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Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003
File 016
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Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003 - File 016. 2003-04-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/16682/show/16668.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2003-04-18). Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003 - File 016. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/16682/show/16668

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003 - File 016, 2003-04-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/16682/show/16668.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
Publisher Window Media
Date April 18, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript BOOKS: New book set during the Harlem Renaissance tries to shed light on gay life while focusing on A'Lelia Walker. Page 19. FILM: Now on DVD, The Children's Hour' and 'Victim' offer compelling reminders of past cinematic repression. Page 17. 0-_-_- §f§ ■—_—_> ut on the Bayou By STEVE WEINSTEIN THE RUMORS BEGAN CIRCULATING during last month's Winter Party D J David Knapp would not be appearing at the after party; another DJ would be subbing for him. Several hundred miles away from the crowds partying on the makeshift dance floor on the sands of Miami Beach, Knapp and his partner, Scott Bell, were in a hospital room in Ashville, N.C, where they were awaiting the birth of their son. In a few minutes, they would be cradling Ryan Belknap, and David Knapp — one of the most prominent DJs in the club world — would enter the ever-increasing legions of gay parents. Knapp's odyssey began when he first began seeing Bell. "Seeing" is the operative word here, because the two have known each other for seven years but in "When Harry Met Sally" fashion, the two only began a relationship three years ago. Knapp was then living in Miami and not long after, moved to New York. He has since relocated yet again, this time to Atlanta, where Bell lives. Using Atlanta as a base, Knapp travels nearly every weekend for his club gigs. Originally trained as a lawyer (he passed the bar and can practice in Florida), the native Californian Knapp established his reputation in the hothouse club scene of Miami's South Beach. The White Party, which he played annually, helped solidify his standing as one of the hottest DJs on the circuit. More and more gigs in New York's competitive club scene initiated the move there. He now spins around the country and the world, including a 2000 tour of Japan. IN NOVEMBER 2001, KNAPP WAS IDLY LOOKING through Creative Loafing, a local alternative weekly, and saw an ad for a meeting to learn about open adotion. He and Bell intrigued enough to attend an April 2002 mandatory two-day workshop. There, they learned how rigorous the process would be and the difficult choices involved. One of Superstar spinner David Knapp had it all — but he wanted something more. Meet son Ryan. the most difficult would be deciding how much contact to allow the mother or whether to reveal the birth mother to their child. The two decided they were ready to become co- dads and signed a contract. The entire process ends up costing somewhere between $10,000 and $15,000, including lawyers' fees. But, Knapp adds, he is eligible for a $10,000 rolling tax credit. If two people are willing to take a child who is a ward of the state, they can even receive a subsidy worth hundreds of dollars a month until the child is 18 (although the child probably has suffered some emotional or physical abuse along the way). "My mom's a social worker," Knapp says. "I learned some things from her. She counseled us a little bit. And inspired us, too." Ironically, according to Knapp, in Georgia, gay co- parent adoptions have managed to fly under the radar of conservative state legislators. "We can both petition for adoption," he says. "Some states don't allow it. In Georgia, there's no law forbidding or allowing it. So you find a friendly judge, with the help of a good lawyer. Adoptions are sealed, so legislators will never know how many gay adoptions go through. As long as no law is on the books, there are no statistics." Even so, one person is listed as the principal caregiver, the other — Knapp, in this instance — the secondary AFTER PAYING THE CONTRACT FEE, SOCIAL workers came to visit. The couple had to sign a stack of papers. Did they smoke? Was there a gun in Please see DJ DADDY on Page 16
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