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Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003
File 013
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Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003 - File 013. 2003-04-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/16682/show/16665.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2003-04-18). Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003 - File 013. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/16682/show/16665

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003 - File 013, 2003-04-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/16682/show/16665.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
Publisher Window Media
Date April 18, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript 1,1 HUH,I voice STAFF EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION Executive Editor CHRIS CRAIN Editor PENNY WEAVER editor@_ioustonvoice.com Production BONNIE NAUGLE, JOEY CAROtINO Correspondents: LOU CHIBBARO JR., LAURA DOUGLAS-BROWN, MIKE FLEMING, MATTHEW HENNIE, BRIAN MOYLAN, KEVIN NAFF, JENNIFER SMITH, RHONDA SMITH, STEVE WEINSTEIN Contributors J.A. CHAPMAN, MATTHEW FORKE, ARJAN T1MMERMANS, TAMARA ADRINE-DAVIS Photographers DALTON DEHART KIMBERLY THOMPSON Webmaster JED DEMPSEY SALES & ADMINISTRATION General Manager DANIEL EMERICH demerich@houstonvoictcom Account Executives BRETT CULLUM - bcullnmi__houstonvoice.com DONNA HULL - dhullfolhoustonvoice.com BRIAN MARTIN - bmartinio)houstonvoice.com National Advertising Representative Rivendell Marketing Company, Inc. 212-242-6863 A WindflnflHKcation Publisher- WINDOW MEDIA LLC Preadent- WILLIAM WAYBOURN Editorial Director-CHRIS CRAIN Corporate Controller- BARNETTE HOLSTON Art Director- ROB BOEGER General Manager- MICHAEL KITCHENS Marketing Manager- DAN GARRIOTT [_ Cay Guild theChamber the greater houston git. chamber of < CHARTER MEMBER Established 1974 as the Montrose Star. 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 {713)529-8490 Fax:(713)529-9531 www.houstonvoice.com Contents copyright 2003 Office hours: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. weekdays To submit a letter Letters should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the right to edit for content and length. We will withhold names upon request, but you must include your name and phone number for verification. Please send mail to Houston Voice, 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200, Houston, Texas 77006; fax (713) 529-9531 or e-mail to editorfShouston- voice.com. Opinions expressed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Voice. All material in Houston Voice is protected by federal copyright law and may not be reproduced without the written consent of Houston Voice. The sexual orientation of advertisers, photographers, writers and cartoonists published herein is neither inferred or implied. The appearance of names or pictorial representation does not necessarily indicate the sexual orientation of that person or persons. Houston Voice accepts unsolicited editorial material but cannot take responsibility for its return. The editor reserves the right to accept, reject or edit any submission. Ali rights revert to authors upon publication. Guidelines for freelance contributors are available upon request. Forum HOUSTON VOICE APRIL 18, 2003 PAGE 12 ■ ■ • _L viewpoint Toppling Saddam won't free gays Gay hawks like to claim that regime change in Iraq will mean greater freedom for gays, but that's not the case even within our own military. By MUBARAK DAHIR H Issue 1173 GAY MEN AND LESBIANS who endorse the war in and occupation of Iraq — and possible future military action against other countries like Syria — need to stop using the guise of caring about the plight of gay Arabs to rationalize their support. It's an argument fraught with emotional manipulation, hypocrisy, intellectual dishonesty and factual error. Even the most dovish opponents of military intervention in Iraq rightly concede that there were plenty of reasons to topple Saddam Hussein and his govern ment. He was a harsh and brutal dictator, and it is near impossible to find anyone who is sorry to see the rogue gone. Gay and lesbian proponents of the war and the occupation should stick to this core truth when arguing their case. Invoking the supposed freeing of gay Iraqis actually weakens their position. THE TRUTH IS THAT THE PLIGHT OF gay and lesbian Iraqis — just like that of gay and lesbian Afghanis — will change little under whatever new government is installed. There is no denying that gays in Iraq and other Arab countries are persecuted. But the forces of oppression that keep them down in the Arab world are complex, and cannot be altered by simple "regime change." Religion, tradition, culture, family pressures, ignorance of the contemporary understandings of modern psychology and other factors make life extremely difficult for gay Iraqis and those in other Arab nations. To believe that life for gay Iraqis will be better — or different in any real way — than it was under Saddam Hussein is willfully naive. The social, religious and cultural forces that oppress gay Iraqis will not have changed one iota under a new government. Furthermore, the line that invading Iraq, and now possibly Syria, will "free" gay people there is heaped in hypocrisy. The forces that are supposedly emancipating our downtrodden gay Iraqi brethren are themselves hyper-homophobic. How can anyone seriously argue that the United States military is an instrument for gay liberation? From there, the layers of hypocrisy only deepen. But the most infuriating hypocrisy to the claim that we are invading foreign countries in the interest of freeing gay people is the way we treat gay Arabs and gay Muslims here in the United States. Gay hawks mouth the mantra of gay liberation in Iraq and Syria, and go to lengths to point out how oppressive those regimes are to homosexuals. Yet what about other neighboring countries that border Iraq? Saudi Arabia is probably the most socially backward nation in the world. run by unsavory dictators who are infamous for their suppression of freedoms. Saudi Arabia even allegedly executes openly gay people. If ever there was an argument for overthrowing a country, Saudi Arabia should take the prize. But the Saudi leaders — who are sitting on what is by far the world's largest oil reserve — are our political allies. Hush, then, any talk of invading them. And what about Egypt? Right now, the Egyptian government is carrying out a choreographed crackdown on gay men in that country, arresting and jailing dozens through entrapment, Internet stings, informants and possibly even telephone wire-tappings. International human rights groups have documented torture, threats and beatings against gay Egyptians. Even our own government has spoken up against the outrageous persecution. But are gay hawks urging that we send the Marines to Cairo to "liberate" the gay men suffering there? Hardly BUT THE MOST INFURIATING HYP- ocrisy to the claim that we are invading foreign countries in the interest of free- in. gay people Is the way we treat gay Arabs and gay Muslims here in the United States. Most gay Arabs and gay Muslims in this country come here specifically seeking the incredible social freedom to be gay that they would never have at home. But particularly since the Sept. 11,2001 terrorist attacks, gay Arabs and gay Muslims have felt under attack here, even from other gays. I have been personally spared most of that prejudice. Though I was born in Jerusalem to a Palestinian father, I had, an American mother, and I was primarily raised in this country. I don't have dark skin or an accent or any of the other telltale signs of my Arab heritage, other than my name. But in the past two years, and particularly as the propaganda on the Iraq war went into overdrive, I know from friends and colleagues and dozens of sources I've interviewed that gay Americans have often been prejudiced and unwelcoming to Arabs and Muslims living here. To talk about "liberating" gay Iraqis in Baghdad while we mistreat gay Arabs and Muslims in our own midst is just too much to stomach. ^2) Mubarak Dahir A is a syndicate. m columnist living in New York Citv and wl m% <&•' i can be reached at MubarakDah@aol.com. 4 ___ ♦
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