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The New Voice, No. 632, December 4 - 10, 1992
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The New Voice, No. 632, December 4 - 10, 1992 - File 001. 1992-12-04/1992-12-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 11, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1643/show/1602.

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(1992-12-04/1992-12-10). The New Voice, No. 632, December 4 - 10, 1992 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1643/show/1602

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The New Voice, No. 632, December 4 - 10, 1992 - File 001, 1992-12-04/1992-12-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 11, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1643/show/1602.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The New Voice, No. 632, December 4 - 10, 1992
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Price, Christopher
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 4, 1992-December 10, 1992
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 24648896
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Over 100 of Our Very Own Personals GAY NEWS F()R SOUTH TEXAS ANO LOUISIANA g_ ''T'2e_Montrose Voice"D D~CEMBER 4-1_9. "!!192.E!_ISSUE 6~2 AUSTIN (512) 476-4245 0 BATON ROUGE (504) 346-6617 0 BEAUMONT/GALVESTON (600) 300-6271 HOUSTON (713) 529-6490 0 NEW ORLEANS (504) 524-3279 0 SAN ANTONIO (210) 226-1633 T T T DATELINE: NEW ORLEANS New Orleans' AIDS Clinical Trials Unit closing at y ear's end By t.•:ONARD •;ARI, JOHNSON Th~ Nt-w VoH't" New Orleans Come the end of December, no new peo­ple will be admitted to the AIOSClimcal Trials Unit. 1be unit, operating since 1987 out of facilities shared by Charity Hospital, is admini•tered by the medi­cal schools of Louisiana State and Tul­ane urhvel"8ities. It is unclear ifthe 141 adults involved m the New Orleans experimental drug trials studies will continue to receive prci;cribed drugs. In any case, no track­ing of the drugs effectiveness wjll be maintain('<!. Tlw nearest operating AC'l'U'e will be in Galveston, Texas and Birmingham, Alabama. A related children's drug trial unit will continue operation in New Orleans. HIV infected mothers and children receiving tainted blood product.' are the primary sources of children becoming HIV infected. However, mothers of infecU'<l children will not be eligible for treatment. The adult unit was threatened with closure at about the same time la,tyeai: Then, tbe National Institute of Health, which funds New Orleans' and other such units throughout the United States, announced it was closing some units to free-up funding so as to open others. That announced closing was halted by outcry from the public and political savvy from Congressmen Bob Livingston, R·La., and Bill Jefferson, D­I. a. At that time, Livingston said, "It makes no sense to expend funds to close one unit in New Orleans and opt>n anothn some wht•n• else:' This year, Liv­ingston and Jefferson have renewed efforts to keep the New Orleans unit open. John LaPlacc, spokesperson for Jefferson said, " Don't consider ita dead issue:· New Orlean• City Councilmember, District-C, Jackie Clarkson said that an attempt was mad .. to juggle some fund· ing from the ••ha n kru pt d ty budget:• JnHt yl'ai: No money was found. A similar situation exists this year, according to Clarkson. "I'm very upset, we now have a $:10 million deficit, and I don't know h ow t.o help. The c ity is 1n line to rocc 1ve t.>Jlnctly that amount ... a one-time payment from Christopher Hemmeter and Daniel Robmowitz, the partners winning the Mayor's nod to build and/or opera It~ the coming River­front ( ::tll-lino. Act-Up. Nola Holds J azz T T T DATELINE HOUSTON Funeral The St>w VoiceJ New Orl•ans ACT-UP New Orleans, the atten· tion mustering, pro-patient AIDS group, held a 3:00 p.m., Sun­day, Nov. 29, pro­test- march from in front of St. Loms Cathedral, to the gray hulk of what is now called the Medical Cen· ter of Louisiana at New Or lean 8 AC1'l/P NULA's banner at the Jazz funeral (MCLNOJ. The MCLNO i• bettor known in New Orle­ans as "Big Charity:• The march was organir.ed by ACT· UP/ NOLA, acL'Ordmgtomember Frank Aqueno, to draw attention to the dosing of the AIDS Trial unit which operates through several hospitals in the ar<'a of Tulane Ave., including MCLNO, l..ouisi· Charmame Nei•ilk, grand marshal of the Jazz funeral for the All>S 1'rail Unit ana State Medical Center, and Tulane Medical Center. Marchers gathered outside the Cathe­dral on a cool, bright Sunday aflt'moon Ma.-s had let out hours earlier but Jack· son Square was crowdt'C! with tourist and TV cnmt'.rnmen Parade grond-marshal and celebrity· apparent wns singer Charmaine Nev­ille, who said she rushed from her Ja,t performance to be m the pnrude A group of middle-aged tourists recogniw Neville and move m close one woman asks what th<' paradt• 1s for: Sht• nods. and 'peaks to her group, they aL nod and agree AIDS 1s awful. Speakers at the march, which ended at Big Charity without any disruptive inc1dcnt.s, wert• Patrick Ht•mming, and MeJissa Thompson. both mt~mlwrs of ACT UP N OL.A They asJc:Ni tha t 1nd1 viduals phone or FAX the Cltnton Trnn­s1tion Teams in Little Rock at(501)399· 7000, voice or 399-7096, FAX. Io Wash· ington the Clinton Tran,ition Team ts (202) 973-2600 and 973-1000, both \'Otte; and 973-1169 and 973-1971, both FAX. Councilmember Eleanor Tinsley helps improve the view from Milam House I louston n ty c'Ouncil member 1-:Ieanor 'J'mslt·y will t·ome out swinging at Milam llousl' ut 10:00 on Thursday morning, Dt·c. 3. Tht· wt•ll-know crusader against bill· boards will join the facility's staff m the demolition of a billboard on the property. RollH, <·offot• ond a quCHtion and anBW<'r period will round uut the t•vent. Milam llouse, l0<·atl'<l at4100Milam isa new r(•sidmtial facility for men with HIV. It is exPt'Ctl'<l to operatwnal early next year. The n1•w residence is to meant to fill a T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA void in HIV rare It will provide a rest· dence for people without dehilitatmi: ill· neRt;es, but who are in need of a caring. nurturing, home-lik~environmenl in their time of cris1•. The home ha• bet·n dt>Sil(lled to aocommodate <.·ight ra-id<•nt.8. The facility iH a st.u.t...·ly old homt» and promises to be a showplace upon complc~ lion Several local mlerior designers have cho>-1·n particular rooms m the house, which they are renovatinK and decorat mg Toun; and special ownts are plannc>d t.o give the public an opportunity to en)oy the home. Candlelight march in San Francisco marks Mille, Moscone killings SAN FRANCISCO, Saturday, Nov. 28 (AP>-Hundreds of people took part in a candlelight procession in memory of Harvey Milk, with many pledging to make ~ reuhty of the as•assinated gay leader 8 dream of a march on Wash mg. ton. The_ march down Market Street Fri­day night ma_rk•·d the 14th anniversary of the assossmatw n• of Mayor George Moscone a,nd !'.;hlk, H c: ty •upervisor who was San Jiranc1lleo e first openly gay official. Th(• man·h startl'<l in the mainly ICU Castro District and ended at City Haif about 10 blot· ks away. Pulice Sgt. Larr; McKenzie 1•stimated 300 people l<>ok part hut org1mizers s1ud the figure was clue(•r to l,<XXl. Taking up one side of.the street, the ed behind a banner marchers follow . to A . reading ' 'March on Washing n, pn1 25, l!l'J3:' Milk had called for such a march on the capitol, telling a Gay Ji'reedom Day Parade in San I•'rancisco on June 25, 1978 that "gay people w;u not win their rights by staying quietly in our closets. We are coming out'.' F1ieni distributed along the line of march said the demands of the 1993 event would include an increase in fund ing for AIDS education and passage of "a lesbian, gay, bi,.,•xual and trans· gender civil rii:hts bill." 'lbi• marchers broke into shouts of "We're here, we'rti qu<.•er, we're not going away" whm they reuchl'<l th(• ~teps of City II all, but the event was mainly sol· l'm n. " I only take part in peaceful marches:' 8~1d 11 participant who would identify him11e1r only as C.T. Zeth McGinnis oaid he marched to .. 8 ta ~d up to homop-hobia and show sup-port or my communil)~· San Mateo County Supervio:or Tom corridor to Milk's office and shot him Nolan said Milk had "opened doors" for five times in the head. He said he had gays. gone to City Hall that day to regain his " I never met him;' said Nolan. "I seat as supervisor, from which he had came here after he was killed. But he resigned 17 days earlier for financial was proud and he was the rea•on I went reasons. into politics:· H e served a 6-year pri ... on term and With drummers taking up the rear then committed suicide in ()cl. 191'5 by and a flute player marching in its ranks, b the procession drew new participant;; as car on monoxide poisonini:. it made its way up Market Street. Some of the worst riotmg in the city's "Many people are here to show sup- history broke out in May 1979followini: port for ending the ban again•t gays in the verdict that White wasl(uiltyonlyof the military;' said Allen White, a spok- manslaughter. The so-called ''\\bite esperson for the organizers. He pointed Night" riot.' resulted in 160 injuri°" and out that Milk had served m the Navy $1 million damages, mcludini: the aboard an aircraft carrier. firebombing of some City Hall officeB On Nov. 27 1978 Milk and Moscone and the destrucbon of police cars. were shot to death by former Supervi.or The strategy at \\bit.e's trial involved a Dan White. so-called "Twinkie defense" that White crept through a City Hall base- claimed he suffered from diminished ment window, shot Moecone four times capacity due in part to eating too much in the head, reloaded, walked down a iunk food. 2 THE NEW VOICE I DECEMBER 4-10, 1992 Interestingly, the issue of gays in the military, raised by Bill Clinton during the recent presidential campaign, is getting more attention since his election. It is as if the entrenched military establishment and its cohorts didn't take Clinton seriously before. Only this week the Houston Post, whose creditability on anything about Clinton is on a par with the National Enquirer, ran an editorial suggesting Clinton may have come to his senses on this issue. The Post repeats the old argument that the leadership of the military is opposed to gays - which to some of us would be a strong argument the other way. The Post also could not pass up the opportunity to point out that Clinton has never worn a uniform --as if this is a valid argument for anything. By one of those coincidences of journalism, the morning after the Post editorial, the New York Times ran, on its front page, a feature article on gays in the military taday and how they exist in a hostile environment (Number One: don't read the Houston Post). The point, however, is that gay men and lesbians have always been in the military - even this writer served during that unquiet period between Korea and Vietnam. If General Colin Powell is so opposed to gays in the military perhaps he should i:ommune with the ghosts of Alexander the Great, General Charles "Chinese• Gordon or Lord Kitchener (who went to his death on a troop ship with his lover at his side). The opponents to gays in the military, be they military or civilian, share a common misconception -- that removing the bar to homosexuals would unleash some queer orgy. It would have the same effect as removing sodomy laws: It shatters a legal barrier but leaves in place sufficient laws against sexual harassment - assuming the military is now able to handle sexual harassment since Tai/hook. The Post, displaying its usual level of ignorance, cites the Uniform Code of Military Justice prohibitions against homosexual behavior. That's just the point - the behavior, if committed on the job, would still be prohibited. There would be no breakdown in the military's high standards of morality. The large number of discharges, the government­documented financial costs of the gay bon, are -- for the most part - not the result of gay solicitation but rather military witch hunts and gestapo tactics to force other names from entrapped indiuiduals. We know it will come as a shock to old-line militarists and their armchair-bound compatriots but the removal of the gay ban from the military will not bring down their house of cards. Military life will go on -- with gay men and lesbians being allowed a more productiue contribution because they won't be constantly looking over their shoulders for the CID (Criminal Investigation Division). And we hope President-elect Clinton will see congressional opposition to h~proposalfor what it is: The goad old b'?ys in Congress re/lecti'ltg the ignorance of their buddies in uniform. As the New York Times article pointed out euen the macho Marines have their share of gays -- it is this inability of some straights to conceive the idea that gay men and lesbians are truly no different than the rest of society. And that we are everywhere, from Marine grunt to an office in the Pentagon. Clinton needs to hear more positive input, say, from those who supported him, and less bigoted commentary from those who opposed him -- like the Houston Post. In the end, we firmly believe Clinton will do the right thing, the just thing, and end a practice rooted in ignorance and stereotypes. WESTHEIHER TH E ~\.~) 0 Y 0 F GAY SEX DR. CHARLES SILVERSTEIN AND FELICE PICANO LOBO'S SPECIAL Regularly $30.00 LOBO Price $19.95 Many other gay best sellers also on sale 1424-CWestheirner (atWindsor) 522-5156 • T-Shirts • Magazines • Cards • Books • Leather • Accessories • Necessities Video Sales & Rentals DECEMBER 4-10, 1992 / THE NEW VOICE 3 'Y 'Y 'Y DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Conference of openly gay politicians meets in Chapel Hill, North Carolina By KEITH HARTMAN FOR THE NEW VOICE I'm still not sure what was more surpris­ing about the conference that many openly gay men and lesbians could win elected office, or that such a diverse lot of people could actually agree on anything at all. On Nov. 21, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, hosted the eighth annual conference of openly gay and lesbian politi· cians. About 75 elected and ous smear campaigns from their opposi­tion, most found that being up front about their sexuality early on tended to defuse the issue. "Youcan'tshock people with what they already know" said Dale McKormick, who had been a highly visi­ble gay and lesbian rights campaigner appointed office hold<n, plus a col­lection of new can­didates hoping to U. S. Representatiue Barney Frank attends conference in Maine before her election lo the state legislature. Some candidates felt their sexuality could even be an· advantage at times. "Hen:· said another state leg­islator, "people fig­ure if you'll tell 'em the truth about something hke that, then you 'II tell them the truth about anything make a successful run, arrived with their lovers to spend thr<>e days charting the course of the gay rights movement and the uses of gay power. Their constituencies ranged from W<·at Hollywood, an area so pro­gressive that gay men and lesbians once held a majority of the city council seats, to a conservative district in Maine so small that 1tcan becanvassedona bicy· cle. And the politicians themaelves were an even more diverse lot from Jack Campbt•ll, candidate for Dade County Board of Commissionel'8 and owner of the Club Body Center chain of gay fit­ness clubs, lo 22 year old Brian McCon­nf'll. who rnn for the C'ity council of Uluckburg City Council straight out of college and came very close to win­ning, The two keynote speeches were both hopeful and sober­ing. Seattle City Council person Sherry Harris, the first black lesbian elected lo public office in the United States, gave a thought-provoking sp1.'ech on the tactics of the religious right. Her home state of Washington ha• been targeted by the same groups which attempted lo pass an anti-gay rights law in Oregon, and which succeeded in doing so in Colo­rado. Harri• analyzed the ways in which the right uses gay "scare" tactics to rait1e money, and how they have suc­cessfully exploit<.'<! fear of homosexuals as a way to push other unrelated issues on their agenda. "The campaign lo keep gays out of our schools is really a cam­paiJln to put religiou11 indoctrination back into our schools." She warned Ule cent after the Clinton victory. "We've got lo be prepared and we have no time lo loose. Our biggest challenge in this next decade, my brothers and sis­ters, will be to develop a proactive strat­egy lo get out in front of the radical right, the religious extremi•ts, and the hate groups who week too ... deny us our civil rights and liberties. Being a member of another minority group who knows what it's like to expe­rience the wrath a majority population can inflict, believe me folkb, we haven't seen anything yet. If we don't stop this movement (fhe Anti-gay rights drive) now, we won't be able to retreat back into the cloi;et and think that if we don•t tell anybody, then it's going to be OK. They will find us. And when they do, they will down our houses, they'll arrest us and our lovers for illegal relation· ships, they will make sure that we lose our iobs, they will blacklist our busi· nesses, they will murder our family members. And they are going to do this all in the name of God. U.S. Representative Barney Frank abo stressed that this was not time for the community to become complacent, particularly as we are bemg pre,;ented with an opportumty lo finally overturn the military's ban on homosexuals. "We have to remmd people that this is not a fight we picked This is overwhelmingly a case of people minding their own busi­ness and being exposed:' He saluted President-elect Clinton for speaking out on the issue, but said that it was time for gays to demand that some of their silent allies in congress finally stand up and be counted. Frank says that Clinton's victory show that it 1s po"sible to take a public stand on gay rights without sac­rificing one's career. " I never urged anyone to commit political suicide. But the level of risk L-. clearly much lower than they thought it was, than even we thought it was . .I think we have a right to point out that this is personal:' Following Frank's spe~'Ch, Allan Spear lead the group in a moment of silence for Ramone Blain, the Montreal City Council member who died this year of complications of AIDS. Once an active member of the conference, Ram­one refused lo attend last year's meeting in Houston, and said that he would not attend any con fer· ence in the V S. until our country lifted it's dracon­ian trawl restnc­tionf' on pt~on~ with HIV. The con fcrence will meet next year on Chicago. (Editor's note: The officials discussed tactics and swapped stories form their own elec­tions. While many had encountered seri-audience that the gay and lesbian com­munity cannot afford to become compla- Dauid Scondras, right, Boston City Council, with friend at oonference Freelance journal­ist K<•ith Hartman is ballf"'d •n Du.-.. ham, North Caro­lina.) 'Y .- 'Y DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Researchers say lab tests show AIDS virus stymied by genetic technique WASHINGTON, Friday, Nov. 27(AP)­Researchers today reported they have found a way of preventing the deadly Al DS virus from reproducing inside its favorite blood cell target-at least in a lest tube. Three scientists writing in the journal Science said AIDS resistance could be inserted into the blood cells using another type of virus thatcarriesalt.ered genes. Work is under way now to lest the tE·chnique in animals. No human trials are planned until the animal experi-ments are completed, the researchers said in a Mtatement. The scientitJts intierted into an infec­tion particle called adeno-associated virus, or AAV, a gene that would stick to a specific part of the genetic pattern con­tained in the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS. Healthy blood cells, called CD4 cells. that are the favorite target of HIV, then were infected with the AAV virus. This caused the new gene to be incorporated into genetic pattern of the CD4 cell. When HIV virus was exposed in a lab- 'Y T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA oratory culture lo the altered CD4 cells only a few of the viruses could grow or reproduce. Jn unaltered CD4 cells, cul­tured for comparison, the HIV was able to replicate, the study says. Untreated CD4 cell• reproduced about 1000 times more HIV virus than the CD4 cells with the altered genetic pat­tern, the study said. The researchPrs •aid the work •howed that the AAV virus was on effKtive way lo carry a new gene into blood cells. The AAV is taken up by the blood cells and the virus then inserts the new gene into the nucleus of the cell. When the HIV virus entA>l'8 the cell and tries to take over the nucleus. it is met by the new gene. The researchers said the new gene acts like a shield that blocks key processes the HIV must per· form in order to reproduce. The study was conducted by Saswati Chatterjee and Dr. K.K. Wong of the City of Hope National Medical Cent.er in Duarte, Calif., and by Dr. Philip R. John­son of Children's Hospital at Ohio State University, Columbus. The research was conductA>d while oil three •cientists were at the National Institutes of Health. Two Milwaukee policemen fired for botching Dahmer investigation By ANTHONY SltAom FOR THE NlW VO!Cl MILWAUKE~;. Saturday, Nov. 28 (Al')-Two patrolm•·n who left a drugged, naked boy '" the care of serial kill!'f Jeffrey L. Dahmer lost their appt•al for rt•instatement with th., Police llt•purtment d~spite apologiz1nK for u bunglt·d investtgation. Spokesmt•n for relati-:es_ of sevora1 of Dnhmt-r's 17 murder vi~ttms said Fri. day's decision by the fire a_nd Polir,, . - bhc tensions stem- (ommill!lton east•s pu h t th ffi ming from allegations t .11 e 0d cers were influent·ed by racism an con­tempt for homOtiexuals. Commissioner Chairperson M. Nicol Padway, reading a statement. said the panel acknowledged the two o.fficers had good rt'Cords but that they violated routine during a chnnct• visit May 27, 1991, with Dahm•·r, two months before his mutilation murder•werediscovered. "The extt-nt of their disregard for basic police proct'<lure constitutes gross n1•gligence:· Padway said. "Their con­du1 ·t t·annot and will not be excused as un ~·rror m judgmenC' J ~rtk,·ro ,Joseph 1: Gabrish, 29, and i~ n I\, Balcerzak 3.5 found Laotian migrant Kon<·rak sinthasomphone, 14, outside Dahmer'• apartment hou.•e. They left him wjth Dahmer despite con­cern expressed by black neighbors. Dah-mer is white. • An unrelated incident led other pohce to the apartment m July where they found portions of bodies and learned Dahmer kill<'<I Sinthasomphone soon after Gabrish and Halcerzak had left. Dahme~ now serving life M'ntenccs in a state prison, al•o admitted killing four other victims following th<· May 27 visit. He said he'd kill<'<! 17 men and boys smce 1978, many of them black and some of whom he met at gay bara and street comers. The officers' lawyer. Ken Murray, said he will appeal the commission'• 4·1 rul­ing lo Circuit Court. He accused the city of reneging on a deal to reinstate t_hc officers in exchange for their apologies and their pleru; of guilty to administra­tive charges. The office" were •·scaJ>('goats,. for a police adm1mstration that doesn'tha\-e the "guts or courage to take the heat:• Murray said. Gabrish and Balcerzak did not attend Friday"s hearing. Victim's relatives and sympathirers uttered a hushed "yes" 8..' Padway finished reading the decision. 4 THE NEW VOICE f DECEMBER 4-10, 1992 'Y 'Y 'Y IN MEMORY OF TO.VY BICOCCHI T any Bicocchi died eerty Monday morning. Noverroer 23, 1992. at Park Plaza Hospital. Tony held a Pho. In EcooomiCS and was a vet­eran al WOlld W. II. He was a beloved tong.ll!ne hanl working member ol OU' comrn<n1y as evidenced within GLPC alono: as a pest head ol the Voler Regis­trabon Convn111oo; serving on saeelW1Q coounil­tces, ond pn>ildlng lnvaUlblo support with his folding machine dlrtig runerous maik>u1S Tony received many GLPC Vckrlteer Awards 1or his e!lo<1S. and his help lo the Gay Ptide Pa­rades culmlnatod In his being elected a Grand Marshal. SeMccs ChurCh. BRUCE ELTO.'V COWAN Born: 0-..bar 1, 1956 In Temple, T­Oied: - 23, 11111211'1 HouA>n, T-Bruaa C:O..an waa - tn Marblo Fals, Tex· BS,wherehe~lroml1i!liscllool. In 1Q78, he mcoilled a Bachelot's 11 lluUlasa M­n* 1istrallon dognle from the un-sity ol Texas at AusUn. In 1985, he gra<lJaEd with a Master's In Business Admlnistraaon dognle from the Uni­versity ol Houslon at ~ Ulke. Bruce was V9f'/ auccoss1\j 1n rw ...-1n retall lnlamal auc111ng Bruco was per!1aps be6t known lor his gener­osity ond ho&pllallty He was a frequent contrib­utor lo a vanety ot clWilable and polUcal causes, both as an lnclvicllll and lhrough O<ga­ruaUons ll<o EPAH He ollen "'"'led his tnends lo large and small parUes and dlmenl. Bruce wanted lo express !hanks for the care and ~ ol Or. Ga<y Brewton, Oncol Cen*. and the nurV1g stall at Twelve Oaks Hoepllal Bruce Is survtved by his pwenls, Russel and Shi1ey Cowan, Marble Fals; Sister, Teresa N,.. gi, Marble Fels; Sisler, Karen s-. Austin; and a host of other ralatives and fnands from HousblandcenlralTaxas. F.....a .....tees went held for Bruce on Fnr:tey, - ZT, In Marble Fals, where he was Wied. In accordance will Bruce's wishes a ,.al<e party wll soon be had In Houslon. F~ more Information, call (713) 528-0035 JEFFERY DALE FISCHER Born: OclDbar 31, 1963 Died: August 16, 111112 Jofl, 28, diod In his SIOep lrom complicallons ol AIDS. Jell fou!11t auageousJy tho cancer that he succmibed lo. Sorvfv0111: Parnnts: Rollnl Sr end VICkle Fisher; SISier; Linda Ramrez, Albu­querque, Now Mexico, Debbie Palllza, Spring, Texas; Cindy Lammons, Nesbit Mississippi. Brother.>, Roland Jr ol Allluquetque, New Mexi­co; James Fisher ol Flo<asvl!e, Texas. Jell left behind 10 rMx:es and ~. numerous aunts, undes and cousns. Grandmother Mary Bartel of San Antonio Jell worlced several ot the nighclubs the last being the Papermoon In San Antonio, formef1y employed at the Hyatt on the Riverwalk In San Antonio Jell is loved and missed by many His friendly smile and llJllPOrl - eJwwys there and ... be dearly missed The famly kinlly lhanl<s San Anlonlo AIDS FOlnlatlon for their generosily and help cbing this- Oonabons, 1eme111bia...., can be ~ In Jell's nane lo the San Anlonlo AIDS Foundation. JAMES LA.MAR LUCAS James l.Jlmas Lucas,«. died Friday. Novem­ber 20, 1992, or AIDS - but no1 without a tight He Is survived by his lie partner, Alan Frazer and a smaD anny of straige and wonderfU frlends. A sloryteller by na!Ure, no delail was too small to lncllx» 1n the tales or 111a -enturea . ..., ~ day he had st least one. HIS capbve audiences would wait lmpalionlly for him to get to the point the point al\Vwys being that he enjoyed life, loved people. and savonld both. No ewtiy clU'ch has 6'1er blessed OU' union No lllalo has .,.,er granlad us ~ No family bord has .,.,. made us two No company - - - commission No debl - paid no dowry lo be giW1ed No naty over - land or power No aerrotance of the wor1d outside remained To stain hi beauty ol ltis rq>1a1 holr The secret mamage VON Is ,_ spoken The secrel marriage can never be broken No "-5 on the altar No wtila vail In yoll' her No~ dress lo atler No bible oath lo ,.._ The seaet .-rlage vCNt is naver spoken The aoaet mamago can never be broken Wrttten by: "STING" RANDIE RONALD REINERTH Rancle Ronald Reinefth, admonostralor of the Tulane Univer.;ily School o1 Medicine's Depart· men! of Psychiatry and Neurology, died Novem­ber 3, 1992, o1 AIDS compllcatiOOS He died at Tulane Medical Cenler, at age 34 Mr Reinarth was born 11 PittsbL<gh and lived In New Ortoans for the past nve years. He !1ad­ualad Iran Bet1>01 Pal1<, Pennsylvania Higi School and ...,...,ed a master's degree 11 SOCial ""'1< from thG urMnily of 8 Paso, Texas. and a master'B dagl98 In hospllal adrniistra!ion from lhe l)niV8rSlty ol North Carolina al Chapel Hit Mr Relnof1h was a former pediatrics social wort< chief In the neonatal division of Willian Beunont NTrrt Modica! Center In El Paso s...vtvors lncble his long lime ~ Al PaUnbo ol Naw Clr1cans, his father, Ronald P,,.. tno<1ll; tis mother. Gayle Owston Relnorth; tis palOmal Pldmocher, Lois Reinerth; tis mater­nal Qrandmother, Eleanor C>wslon; and two sis­ters, ROllln Ct.rlln.1rld Pam Pierce al ol lhe Pittsbt.wgh - ' A rnamonal service was held Moflday, No­Veniler 30 at Holy Tml!y CfUCll on Rue Dat>­p111na Blftl was In Pttl3llUgh PA.TRICK JOHNSON SPRINGER Born: May 23, 1949 Died: o-nbar 1, 111112 Patr1ck died from complcallons from Acqulrad lmnU1e Oendency Syndrome. Patrick has been a resident ol Houslon for eighteen years. He was reared In Lenorah, Texas. He - his BAA from Baylor In 1971. He - ll'alslarred lo Hou&­lon In 1973 and for several years wor1<ed for van­ous ol compenles before leaving hi ol Industry and helping lo open Omega Hause Hospice In 1986. He served as Its Housa Manager for fou' y881S, Survtvors Include his compnon ol six­teen yean; LBtry Bahn; parents Grover and Irena Springer ol Lenorah; twin brother and llsler-b­law Michael and Marteta Sprtnger ol tubboclc, Texas; brolher!I and llsler.HHaw Sieve and Ballera Springer, Ivory Coas~ Wast Mica, Ma-­In and SyMa Springer, Huntsvtle. Alaberna; nephews Scoll and Micl<y Spr1nger. niecas Ma Dean, Malel and Janel Springer, Melanie Jahr>. son and Nancy Springer. Funeral lltlrgy 2:00 p.m., Tiusday December 3, 1992 Clvlsl Oa.n:h Cathedral, Eplscopel, 1117 Texas A-.~ op - E. sw.ig, Dean W8'1er Taylor, Ca>­on JoM A. l.ogan, Jr. olllctating Paltanrs: Jim Riclwdson, Bii Meyerll. PIM Gall, Or. Robert Awe, David Flndler, Susan Pabna, Jar.. Block, S1an Hopkins, Lym Hensel, Mike Gibbs, David Owens, Wade Umplvias, Pia Murray, JoM c;a. lahan, Chris Kelty, Ed Morris, Ja:k Karr, Richard Fry Michael Sellers, Michael Nighh:lgalo, Wea Vanhorn, Rusty Smith, Jody Huckaby, and Stan Ford Further Se!vicas lo be held In Stanlon Texas under the dlnlclion of Gllraeth Funerai Home with burial In Tnni!y Memorial Park, Big Spring, Texas. Patrick has request that 8l'l'f donabons be made lo the Epiaoopal Diocese ot Texas AIDS Commission Emergency Fund for PWA's or lo Omega House, 2615 Wax,11 Drive, 11286. Houston. Texas noos. Arnol.nc-.t The Naw Voice pltlllshas obituarie1 • both news and a oonrntnty service. he ot ct..ge. Very long ~ am Sl.t;ecl lo eclllng Send lnlonnalKln lo The Naw Voice main ollce, 408 Avondale, Houslon, lX 77006 °' fax lo (713) 529-9531. Houaton Mle•lon Church o~" ''$'"~ Bood Or 4,.,m ::·~· _. CO~~ONWEALTH l:z..1225 11 WonhipS.fYk:n 1.. Sunday 10:30am R ... Robert Carter Cat!~~=: --/ Frlendl meet fer M­Sotanla71 at 7-.30 pa 1307 YALE, SUITE B (71Jl sso-w2 TodOI Inoa ..,0 u1oo1 BJl.S. 911-1217 Custom B & W Photo Lab & Photography DiJcre•I 0 Mail Order Available 0 CaD or Writ• for 8rochur• 2602 Waugh Dr. Houston, TX 77006 (713) 520-0789 You're invited to COMMUNITY GOSPEL CHURCH ~t L l8ducc.i..i.. • W-.0., T-Suma: Sun. U.-00 A.M. ' 'l'ialae A Wenhlp Twes. 7:30 P.M. o Bible St11d1 nlll'. 7:30 P.M. o Midweek SerTfce Pastor • Chris Chiles 713) 880-9235 !1IJ-=.~I wA Church Built On Love" 1---1---t METROPOLITAN COllllUNITY CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION Rev. Elder John Oil. Pastor Ms. Carolyn Mobley, Asst. Paator 1919 Decatur 88"H149 OFF WA~Tlij & SL.VER Tuee .• D•c. 8. 8:00pm EMPOWERMENT FOR UVNQ HIV/AIDS &4>port Group Wed., Dec. 9, 7:30pm CHOIR REHEARSAL Worahlp Service• Sunday, 10:46am a. 7:115pm Wedn-day: 8:415pm COME EXPLORE HIS KINGOO" Sunday Worship·Service 11am 614 E 191h 862-7533 Houston 748-62Sl DECEMBER4-10, 1992/THENEWVOICE 5 'T 'T 'T LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Move the March on Washington?; An open plea to the womyn's movement From CHRIS FABBRO, South Pasadena, power and love, as well as show the rest of Ca. the nation that we will not only recreate Many Amencan people and organizations but we will supersede the legal protections have called for a boycott of Colorado, gay Coloradoans once had. including travel to the state as well as a If you want to show your support for refusal to purchase goods and aervicee human righta where it is urgenUy needed, originating there. This action protests the please contact your local chapter of March passage of Amendment Two, which effec- on Washington immediately. (Your local lively voids all non-discrimination laws gay resource or gay community center can and prohibit& legislation protecting gay provide the telephone number.) Urge them people. to move the march. If we do not stop the Who, howevei; is hurt by such a boycoU? extreme right in Colorado, other states The voters who approved the amendment? will follow suiL The gay community and its sympatbiz- I can 888ure you, this April 25 you will era? I believe there is a show of strength not find me in Washington; you will find that far exceeda the power of the gay dol- me in the heart of our country, helping our Iar. newly unprotected gay family promote The gay community showed ita strength visibility and generate acceptance. in Oct. 1987 by congregating for what., according to ita planners, became the larg­est civil righta demonatration in history. Another march is planned there for April 1993. I atand for the po88ibility of relocating the march on Washington to Denver, the only Colorado city large enough to house the swarm of marchers the April event will draw. Gay people and sympathizers are desperately needed by the gay community in Colorado. Boycotting their state will not help regain their legal protections as effec­tively ae being with them in a show of unity. They are now legally discriminated against and have no protection from ant- 1gay forces. Waahington, D.C. hasaeen our strength. Now we mustahow Colorado our Womyn's Movement 1'rom CHARLOTl'E BAHM, New Orle­ana, La. So, how would you feel if you were Aileen Wuomoa? How would you feel if the great american criminal justice system failed you? How would you feel if a man tied you to hie steenng wh~l of hie old Cadillac, raped you, sodomized you, and then poured alcohol into your ori6ces-begin­ning with your nose and ending with your eyes? How would you feel if you were sit­ting on Death Row in Florida awaiting execution for self defense? I truly believe it ie important to tell Ail­een Wuomoa' story. Within the dynamics of her life lie the dynamics of the aystem. First., the facta: (I) ehe ia a lesbian, (2) she 'T 'T 'T DATELINE: HOUSTON ie a sex-workei; (3) she is poor,(•) she was sexually abused as achild,(5)shewas bru­tally attacked by several of her John's, (6) she killed six of her tricks in what Aileen Wuomos calls self defense. It's what the Boy's Club calls murdec What else could it be? First of all, she is a lesbian, therefore, she must hate men enough to kill them. Secondly, she is a sex­workei; therefore, she deserves whatever happens to her in her tricks-she is unwor­thy of respect and rights because she is indecent and immoral. Thirdly, she is poor. This puts her at the mercy of the public defenders office and direcUy into the hands of the system. And, really, Aileen, get over it-we know you made up the part about being sexually abused as a child. That doesn't happen to children in Amer­ica! What happened to Ms. Wuomos could have happened to any ofue. This is a terri­fying thought. The most horrifying thought is that Aileen Wuomos' public defender had the opportunity to make deals with the court, as well as with the prosecutor in her case. Hell, this was a poo~ psycho. man· hating, killer dyke who was killing some of their brothers-white men. She wast is definitely dangerous. So, the Boy's Club strikes a deal-call no wit­nesses to back up her testimony, do no background check on the man she mur­dered (could he have really been danger­ous?), get through the trial godspeed. No one in his1 her right mind would believe her. After all, she is a poor, psycho, man-hat­ing, killer dyke who was killing reputable white men. You know what-111 bet her community support groups won't believe her eithec NOW wouldn't touch the case because those womyn are too afraid of being called dykes. Lambda Legal Defense doesn't have time for this case-­they are too very busy trying to fit same­sex couples into the construct of patriar· chy with legal same-sex marriages. That is much more important than some poor dyke whore's life. If trash journalism like Dateline can unearth evidence sup­porting Aileen Wuomoe' innocence, why couldn't her lawyers? And. why didn't anyone, besides Dateline question thia? It all sounds a bit too fishy to me. I guess I am a htUe angry. Where was tis the womyn 's movement for Aileen Wuor~ nos? Where is the Queer movement for Ail· een Wuomos? Will she die in the electric chair to be forgotten or worse than that to be remembered a. a poor psycho man-hat· ing dyke prostitute? We can easily be pitted against each other; especially in the case of differences. But, why was everyone so easily pitted against Aileen Wuomos? She might not be the girl that we would like to bring home to mother, but she is a human being who deserves to be treated with respect and fairnes.-just as though she was a white man. She also deserves support from her sisters. ae well as her brothers. She deeerves to be believed!!! HIPY celebrates a day of thanksgiving with thirty area young The Houston Institute for the Protection of Youth, Inc. (HIPY) provided two Thanksgiving meals for youth on 11umk..,Pving Day. Over 30 young peo­ple attended the traditional turkey din­ners served in the HIPY offices. Tra~y Brown. Executive Director remarked, "ll is important that H IPY impress on our clientele that we care about all aspects of their lives. The chal­lenges of dealing with iasues associated with youth who have been separated from their families because of their sex­ual orientation or HIV infection can be overwhelming for these young people and the staff and volunteers who pro­vide prOl(rams to help them. This Thanksgiving dinner was an opportu· nity to allow all of us to look atthe poei live differences we're making in so many lives:• Most of those attending were home­less, thrown away youth who partici­pate in HIPY's programs. Mr: Brown continued, "Looking around the table, I am grateful that we have able to help 80 many youth through our programs. Even with the strides we've made, how­r ve r. it'• im poaai. hie to ignore the magnitude of need that remains. Today we're thankful not only for the generous con tri bu tions which have been made to us but are Thanksgwing at H.J.P. Y. hopeful that con­tributions to HIPY continue during the holiday season when youth, without families or means of support are most in need of our pro­grams:' At the beginning of both meals, those attending were encouraged to express what they were thankful for this year: One youth commented, "I'm thankful to be here today because without all of you who have taken time to love me and work with me, I would not have survived until Thanksgiving:' HIPY serves adole.cents and young adults ranging in age from 13-20. The agency's outreach focuses on gay and 'T 'T 'T GUEST COMMENTARY lesbian youth, young people living with HIV disease and runaway, throw away and homeless youth. HIPY currently operate>; a drop-in center which includes clothing distribu­tion, food vouchers, informabon and referral, employment as.,istance, hous­ins/ 9.heJter referral a nd indiv id ual and group counseling. The center alao pro­vides a safe refuge for the young people to socialize. Support grou!Jb for teenag­ers who are "thrown away" or homeless are held every Wednesday and Thurs­day night at 7:00 p.m at the Center: Meals are served to all youth who come and partiopate. HIPY's flagship 'JTansilional Living Program, the HIPY House, offers inde­pendent living skills training for "thrown away" gay male.;, most of whom are coping with HIV disease. A similar housing program for young les­bian women will open in Jan. 1993. For information on Houston Institute for the Protection of Youth, Inc. pro­grams and services call 713-942-9884. Affirmative visualization, where there's hope, there's life By KAY MEHL MILLER, PH.D. Remember when you were a kid and a major holiday stirred feelings in you? In the best of situations, you were excited, alrnoet to the point of glee as you looked forward to the good things coming your way, In the worse of situations, you dared to dream, at least within yoUJ'Belf that good things were coming your way'. The emotion that fueled d ta' ed your energy an sus '° thefull glowofhappiness or the courage. to hang in through another day of d111aster wae hope. Hope is a very powerful force in the human spirit. There are those who want. to lake hope away from the gay· les~1an bisexual community and replace it with fear. !"ear de11troys life. Many of us experi ence conflictl'd feelings when, as in San JOl!e rt'<:enlly. a gay couple i~ murdered and a suspect is not immediately held accountable. Or another senseless bash­ing occurs, and we worry for ourselves or our loved onee. Or we hear careless, condemning words from unexpected sources, and we feel uncomfortably exposed. Some of us want to run back in the closet and hide but if we do, we surren­der ourselves o'ur uniqueness, our right to express o~rselves ns we are. Fear envelops us and Jiei; to cover that ~ear distort our beings and ourrelabonsh1ps. Yet., even in this sorry state, hope is alive. Though suppres•ed beyond recog­nition, hop<> is n~ver beyond recall. It takes listening; it takes belief; nnd it takes action. It we have courage to act despile adversity, we are already allied with hope. There are trite cliches that neverthe- 1- rt'Oect truth. Where there's life, there's hoP<' is absolutely true. So is when life hands you lemons, make lem­onade. There is a surge of research into the effects of positive feelings on illness, and both observation and study show recovery in some cases and improve-­ment in others, even in very serious ill­ness where doctors have predicted death. (Read Head First: The Biology of Hope by Norman Cousins). When the human spirit responds to the hope within, the possibilities for wellbeing are endless. Although the H~V _virus has ravaged the community, this illness has not eradicated hope. In fact quite the opposite has happened. Look how revitalized and active the gay­lesb1an -bisexual community has become since AIDS first emerged in the 80's. The community is both vi•ible and powerful now, and the voice of gay-leb­bian- bisexual America is heard. On a J>Cn<onal level, hope fills us with affirmation of life and brings the good things to us that we expect. My Someone who is serioutily ill io full of hope for recovery, and so am I for his recovery. With that hope come.; movement towards action. a program in visualiza­tion that will revitalize his immune sys­tem and enable him to fight off the infec­tion that threatens his life. Many of you reading this column are filled with similar hope for youn;elves or for your loved ones. Know that there 1s a rational basis for the effectiveneso of hope, and joining with me, don't ever give up on hope. In the best of situa­tions, we'll experience gleeful, giddy cel­ebration. And in the worse of situations, we'll have thesatisfactionofhangingin there with courage, giving fear a good fight and affirming and enjoying the quality of life and love with an apprecia­tion for being the belit of who we are. 6 THE NEW VOICE/ DECEMBER 4-10, 1992 T T T FILM REVIEW Malcolm X is great movie even with historical inaccuracies By JAVIER TAMEZ The :>;ew Voice/HoWilon In the production packet for "Malcolm X" distributed to critic•. the controver­Slal ovil nghts leader is quoted: "We declare our right on this Earth ... to be respected as a human being and we intend to bring this right into exist­ence by any means necessary:' Given Director Spike Lee's intention of showing the civil rights leader to be a non·vtolent man, despite his fiery rheto­ric, 1t', an odd way of introducing him. Odder still because Lee •Ucceeds bril­of film, but it ts the things that Lee omitted or added to the story that harm the value of tl1is movie. For example, rel­atively late in the film, a white w o m a n approaches Mal­colm X outside a public building, and she asks him liantly in showing the lei;ser known side what she as a of Malcolm X. white woman can Malcolm (Denzel Washmgwn) addresses an audience of Harkm do to help his re•uients outsuie of Apollo Theatre He was not a violent man. He never committed an act of violence during his career with the Nation oflslam or after­ward, and the mo•t he could be accw;ed of is adamantly declaring his resolve to defend himself. cause. Malcolm X brusquely answered, "Nothing'.' This is completely accurate, except Lee left out that shortly thereafter, Mal­colm X apologized for his response and admitted that the civil rights movement could use help from all quarters. Includ­ing this would only have shown Mal­colm X in an even more positive light. Conversely, Lee excluded one of the seamier aspects of Malcolm X's early years. Namely his time as a pimp. Lee never even alludes to it, and it makes it seem as if Malcolm X's criminal career was confined to con swindles. Lee chronicles Malcolm X's life from his humble beginnings as a small time criminal in Harlem; to his defiant deter­mination during the early years of his incarceration; to his conversion to Islam, hi.; devotion to Elijah Muham­mad and his sermonizing and conver- 11ion effort.; to the black community; and ultimately to his break with the Nation of Islam and his assassination. Lee also added things, particularly in It is altogether a truly in•piring work covering Malcolm X's childhood. The T T T HOUSTON QUICK NOTE film shows Malcolm X's boyhood home being burned by the KKK, who were mtent on silencing his father, a civil rights preacher in Nebraska. Except this never happened. Yes, his father was at odds with the KKK, and they did attack his family home, but it was never burned. Also padded was his father's death. In the movie, Lee makes it seem as if the father is laid across railroad tracks in such a manner that he would be decapi­tated. His father did die in a train acci-dent (and it was probably murder, though the police report said he fell), but it was his father's legs that were cut off, and then the man bled to death. The most offensive addition though is pure vanity on Lee's part. In keeping with his habit of C88ting himself in all his movies, Lee plays the part of Shorty, a friend from Malcolm X's youth. This is an actual character, but his significance in Malcolm X's life is minuscule, and Malcolm X's story could ju•t a• easily have been told without ever mentioning Shorty. None of this should be construed as a negative review. This is a great movie with superb acting and some incredibly moving scenes. Denzel Washington in the title role is just about perfect. He plays each part of Malcolm's changing character with studied emotion. Atdifferent times, he is indifferent, carefree, street-wise, hum­ble, authoritative and aloof. Al Freeman, J~ as Elijah Muhammad is equally wonderful. He exudes a beauty, gentleness and saintly quality that is ideally matched for the role. Moreover, both Washington and Free­man are headed for Oscar nominations. Spike Lee is one of the bestdirectorsin the industry right now, and this film in noway diminishes his sta~ It does show, however, a Jack of historical objectivity, and when your subject is Malcolm X, ob1ectivity is crucial. •-112 ~Christmas Songfest'; Sing-along event raises money for worthy causes The Grand Ballroom of the Sheraton Astrodome Hotel will be alive with song on Sunday, Dec. 6, when an expected crowd of mor~ than 1000 participates in "A Chrietme.• Songfeet:• the annual yuletide smg-along benefit at 6:00 p.m. The zany but reverent event will fea­ture Jerry Atwood's electronic orches­tra. BoU1terous emcees Marsha Carlton and Jim MacGregor will keep things rolling. The benefit will include a cash bar cocktail hour, with entertainment by Kayce Glasse, Ricky Comeaux, Steve Di.xon a nd Bill Sansom. Th4' hoat. com· mittee has promised a lavish comple­mentary hors d'oeuvre buffet, door pri:zes, a raffle and a silent auction. Proceeds of the event will benefit two local AIDS service organizations, The T T T DATELINE THE WORLD Assistance Fund, and Voices For Life. The Assistance Fund pays insurance premiums for Persons with AIDS, and pays for emergency prescriptions for those waitin g for Mt_-dicaro 11:"li6'1b1hty. Voices for Life is a non-profit founda­tion whose purpose is to raise and dis­tribute funds to local agencies adminis· tering direct care for Persons with AIDS. Its primary source of fund• is the sale of an acclaimed double compact disc by Houston area musicians. The album is available in local record stores, and will be offered for sale at ''A Christ-oltut Suug{e.t.:• Admission to the event is $25atthedoor, Master Card and Visa accepted. Advance reservations for tables seating ten may be purchaoed by calling Ed lnderwish at (713) 956-6969. Foreign laborers to be tested for HIV virus before working in Singapore By KENNETH L. WHITING FOR THE NEW VOICE SINGAPORE, Tue>Kiay, Nov. 24 (AP}­Hundredo of thousands of foreign labor­ers, who play a major role in the econ· omy, will have to pass a test for the AI OS virus before going to work in Singapore. Details of the government ruling, including the date it goes into effect, have not been completed, health offi­cials said Monday. A senior Health Ministry official, Dr. Chen Ai Ju, said 48 foreigners were found to have the HIV infection that caWM!B AIDS in the first 10 months of this ye~ compared to 28 all last year and 26 in 1990. With a population of about three mil-lion, Singapore now has more than 300,000 guest workers from neighboring Asian countries. The labor force totals l.3million. More than 67,000 maids, most from the Philippines, Thai construction laborers, MalaYl!ian factory hands and others help sustain an economy which grew by 6.7 percent last year. Only maids undergo compulsory AIDS testing at present. Six have been returned home since the tests started in 1990. AIDS testing will cover new appli­cants for work permits and current unskilled and semiskilled laborers with permits. Foreign workers earning less than $920 per month must have a work permit. T T 'Y DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Many foreigners are UIU!killed and poorly educated, but they play a key role by filling jobs shunned by prosperous Singaporeans and earn wages substan­tially higher than they would get at home. This small city-state has long main­tained tight control over guest workers, seldom issuing entry permits for more than two years and insisting the for­eigners return home on completion of their contracts. Foreign executives, professionals and others are covered by separate employ­ment passes. The planned AIDS screen· ing does not apply to them The Ministry of Health said in a state­ment that l l full-blown cases of AIDS and 29 of the HIV infection were detected in the first 10 months of this yea~ This brought the total number of peo­ple infected to 143 since 1985, when the first case was reported in Singapore. In a study released in Manila, the Asian Development Bank said that AIDS is spreading so rapidly in Asia that by the end of the century the conti· nent will account for most of the pro­jected 50 million HIV infections and active cases. AIDS, or acquired immune deficiency syndrome, destro~s the body's resist· ance to disease. It is spread by exposure to contaminated blood or other body fluids. commonly by sexual contact or use of infected hYPodermic needles. Singer launches drive to repeal Springfield, Oregon's anti-gay amendment SPRINGFIELD, Ore., Tuesday, Nov. 24 (AP)-A singer in a Springfield rock band has launched a petition drive to repeal the city's anti-gay rights charter amendment. The amendment, known as Measure 20--08, was approved by voters in the pri­mary election last May. It prohibits the city from "promoting, encouraging or facilitating homoeexualitY.' "Basically, I feel Measure ~ dis­criminate.: · said Willie Nicholas who performs with a band called Good bean Fun. "It's totally pointing a finger at a group, saying, 'You're not OK: Ithascre­ated a lot of hostility in the community:' Loretta Neet who was chief petitioner for the amend~ent, predicted the repeal initiative would fail even if Nicholas can gather the 2339 signatures required to place it on the ballot. Neet said Springfield voters sup­ported the statewide anti-gay rights Ballot Measure 9, which failed by a mar­gin of 57 percent to 43 percent in the gen· era! election Nov. 3. Springfield precincts favored Meas-ure 9 by 51 percent to 49 percent. "It would seem that in voting for{such measures} twice, Springfielders would certainly understand the charter amendment by now;• said Neet, o mem· ber of the board of director8 of the con­servative Oregon Citi:zens Alliance. But Nicholas believes the repeal initi. ative will find strang support among Springfield residents. m.~ny of whom he said are "sick and tired of the months­long controversy over the charter amendment. Nicholas said the effort to repeal the initiative ;8 8 backstop to anticipated legal challenges to the amendment. The American Civil Liberties Union has said it will challenge the constitu tionality of the amendm~nt withi? the next few weeks in Lane County Circuit Court. "I consider that 'plsn I\ ~o wipe out Measure 20-0I!;' Nicholas said, "lf'plan Pl doesn't work, then maybe 'plan B' will" To qualify for the March 23 ballot, Nich. olas will have to. collect the required number of voter Signatures by Dec. 22. LIVING ASSURANCE from LIFE INSURANCE Living with AIDS doesn't mean giving up the financial assurances you have always counted on. Take control of your life today by quickly and confidentially convert­ing your life insurance policy to cash, from the people who care ... DEDICATED~1ITTOURCES "Dedicated to a Better Today• 1-800-677-5026 n<=(:!;:~.mER 4-10, 1992 / THE NEW VOICE 7 The New Joy of Gay Sex Meet Co-Author Dr. Charles Silverstein Benefit Reception for H.A. T.C.H. Friday, December 4, 7:00 PM Book Signing Sunday, December 6, 2:00 PM Crossroads Market & BOOKSTORE ·~ _..,,, 610 W. Alabama, Houston, 713-942-0147 r111111~1·••····· My name is Steven Simon. I am the President of American Life Resources. 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Archer Bankruptcy Law 1-800-281-2955 24 Hour Information Line (713) 236-0312 1720 Lyric Centre Bldg., 440 Louisiana (713) 236-0003 405 First City Bank Bldg., 11550 Fuqua (713) 481-2244 BOARD CERTIFIED IN CONSUMER BANKRUPTCY LAW BY TEXAS BOARD OF LEGAL SPECIALIZATION INFORMACION EN ESPANOL BETTER LAWNS & GARDENS Total Lawn Maintenance Commercial Residential -Landscape -Lawn Care -Tree Service FREE ESTIMATES BEST PRICES (713) 523-LAWN Houston 8 THE NEW VOICE I DECEMBER 4-10. 1992 T T T SAN ANTONIO SOAP San Antonio hosts 1993 Miss Tri-State Pageant at Paper Moon By t:SCHOL RICHARD WRIGHT The- :\ew Vo1ce San Antomo Well, hello to all of you San Antoruans. Texas and New OrleanR and all the rest of you Pilgnms. On Nov. 27, San Antoruo held the hghung of its famous River Walk. Beau­tifully decorated for the holidays, it is a must see for Deet>mbe~ ~ark your calendar for Christmas vacation fun in San Antonio, and when you do, be sure to include Ab's Wester­natr. Ab's needs no happy hour with $1.25 well and longnecks all the time. percentage of top class acts. Acts that appear later m some of the ntz­iest clubs in cities such as Las Vegas, New York, Chi­cago, San Fran­cisco, and Los Angeles. From what I have heard from pageant offi cials, San Antoruo could become the staging grounds for the 1993 Miss U.S.A Pageant. Oh, speaking of Ab's. the old Ab's on Roooevelt is re-ope.Ung with new own­ers and new management. Well what about that Thanksgiving! Rene's Birthday brunch at the Bonham Exchange This years con­testants included Sources indicate record breaking attendance at the Bonham Exchange, the Noo Zoo and Wild Club. I had the chance to let my fingers do the walking through the ten digits on the telephone to converse with San Antonio retailers. They agree that sales are up due to the holidays. Remember to "keep our dollars ns pink as possible" by supporting our community merchants. So stay out of those crowded malls and refer to your New Voice advertisers for variety and converuence. Did you have the chance to attend the 1993 Miss Tri-State Pageant? It was held Nov. 20th at the Paper Moon in San Antonio. It is an official preliminary to the next Miss USA Pageant, which will be held in May of '93. Jesse Garza of Garza Produc­tions, Jerry Bur­ges and many other owners of USA pageants turned out for this historic evenl Miu Tri-State 1993 Sb•'fVll• Brooh sbowa witb pazunt pt01Doter le$sc Guu of Gan.a ProductJOIJS Pageantry in Sun Antonio is dif fcrent form any pageantry in the U.S. San Antonio is known for pro­ducing an over­whelmingly large TT T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Si red a Monroe (second runner-up), Taralynne Foxx (first runner-up) and the winner Sha­wna Brooks. I conducted a private inter­view with the winner, before he took off on a cr0<;s-country tou~ The tour is one of the many benefits earned by winning the Miss Tri-State pageant. Shawna Brooks is originally from North Carolina. He is 25 years old and has been performing for six years. He progressed in Atlanta, Georgia, moved to Florida and was then nsked to move to San Antonio to do shows with the Wild Club, and to gear up for the Miss Tri-State pageant. Shawna says she has worked hard for the last three months getting ready for Miss Tri-State, and was honored by her selection. !\ow she's getting ready for the Mi" Gay U.S.A. contest. Jes.<c Garza won the promoter of the year award at the U.S.A. pageant., and Sha wna says she is very proud to be involved with such a man P.S. 1b all of San Antonio, if you hove anything that may need to be men­tioned about your club, restaurant, shops, store or organization, please call Condom Sense opening soon Richard Wright of The New Voice (dead­line is Sunday night) at (512) 737· 2615. The New Voice urges all organizations to get involved and send in any news, prei;s releases, or calendar listings to The New Voice in Houston at408 Avon­dale, Houston, Texas 77006 or Fax it to (713) 529.95:n &th Evan•, em ceca Sundays at Hv11ham Exchange Homosexual W.W. II veteran, minister speaks out about gays in military CO:O-:CORD, :-i.H , Thursday, Nov. 26 (AP)-Bob Wood earned his secret mto the battlefields of Italy, to am uddy. fro­zen foxhole where he was shot and bayo­neted by Germans m the Battle of Cas­sino dunng World War II He sllld nothing through 22 months of painful n>COvery m Army hospital,;. He was awarded the Purple Heart, a Com­bat Infantry Rndgc and a Bronze Star for her01sm, but remamed silent. Wood hadn't forgotten hJS training day, at Camp Walters, Texa;, where he ~w some prisoners in the stockade with a b1g"q"on the backs of their uniforms. "Once you were charged or even sus­pected of being a queer, it was all over for you in the service, even before there was any type of official military hearing;• Wood said in an mtcrview with the Con· cord Monitor. ':At the Ume, there wasn t anything I could do abc.ut 1t, except decide that some day, when I did ha,-e ,ome power, I would sp<•ak out:• And he did Wood become an ordained min1Ster in the United (,"hurch of Christ and an out­spoken advocate of equal rights for homosexuals. He says he was the first minister m the country to come out of the closet in 1952-and wrote the fir•! book addressing C,'hnstianity and homosexuality m 1960. He began a 'l:I· year monogamous relationship with a mnn two years lnte~ when such unions were virtually unheard of. In 1969, he was at the front of the Stonewall riots in Greenwich Village, which brought the gay revolution into the open. Wood is retired from the clergy after ,ervmg in parishes in Manhattan and Spring Valley, N.Y., Newark. N.J., and Maynard, Mass., but he still speaks out on homosexual issues- Wben he hears war veterans and Pen­tagon offioals cnucize l'rnsiden~lect Clinton's mtenuon to lift the ban on T T T SPORTS QUICK NOTES homo""xuul m the military he laughs and •hakes his head. Wood, who is 69 and lives m a retirement home in Con­cord, said gays always have served in the military, many with d1etinct1on. The only differt•ncc is homosexuals now are more likely to challenge the sys­tem, he said. He scoffed at the notion that gay ,oldiers can't be trusted, are easily blackmailed and are bad for morale. "We've served since Valley Forge and the Indian wars and I don't think there's been one case when· gays have become traitors because of their sexual orientation:• Wood said. "In fact. if they let us be oursdves, then we couldn't be blackmailed in the first place:' In the front lines of the Italian cam­paign of 194:1, soldiers were too busy try· ing to 6l8Y alive l<> worry about sexual orientation, Wood said. "~;spcetally rn combat, you're think­ing about 1000otherth1ngs. Wberecan I get my next cup of clean drinkm11 water? Where will I get food'/ !low <·an I stay warm and dry;• Wood Sllld. '"All thes~ generals who say, 'I was in combat and I know how important it is to have the trust of your ml'n in that kind of situation: Well, I can say the same thing:• Wood said. Wood said the military had little to fear from homosexuals, but homosexu­als had good reason to fear the military establi•hment and their fellow soldiers. He remembers straight Boldien1 threatening homosexunlH unless they provided sexual servic<•s. He •md h1• knows of gay Boldien1 who Sl'rved honor­ably, but were dishonorably di•charg1'<1 when their sexual preference wus dis­covered- a move that deni1'<1 thl'm of a military pension and veteran•' benefits. "There's no question that lh•·Y hurt our morale· now they think we'll hurt tht·ir morale' if they a<'knowledll" us;· Wood said. 'Good Sports' hosts Texas A&M watch party; Bowling standings Good Sports and J R.s welcome all college football fona to the!:ianto Fe side this Sa\. urday, Dec. 'i, ot2:00 p.m. Texas A&M foot­ball- undefeated, untied, ranked 1\3 or 1\4 m the polls, and dreaming of a national championship-puts its 12-0 record on hold, and w111ts .. and waits. The outcome of th1S Saturday's first ever Southea•tern Conference title playoff game will go a long way tow·ard determming A&:\! s fate. If !:iEC East champ, Flonda (l!-3) knocks off or lies :-.EC West champ and 112 ranked Alabama (11-0) ID B1rmmgham, the Aggies will move closer to a motchup with ill Mu1mi for the national college football crown. Good Sports will achedule future watch parties around major college football and basketball games. "This will be a super way to spend time ... ithgood sports and to meet other college fans m the community;' declared club organizei; Lee Harrington. "so tell all your sports friends and gym buddies to get on thm team's colors and come 101n ua!" Did Your team send us a banner to display? \\'ho aro the hoW·•t players ever? Come on, there coulcl ev.en bt• mistletoe on the goal poet <·rosBhnr, if hot danet>r, Ron, will get off long rnough ~le~ fans under it. He sure to }t_•t u• known .. ea of time how many nn• m your pa.rty. CALL 623-9000 now Gamblers Bowling League The Ausun Gamblers Howling League announced the following standings as of :-:ov. 24. 1992: Pirst Place-Huns of Steel Stcond Place-Oil Can Harry s Third Place-Habt>s in Boyland Fourth Plar..-Easy !'irk-ups Fifth Plate-Bout time High scratch malt' and femal1• howlt'ra were Michael Bolnndn (l35) ond C'nrla Ives <206). The Bowling Lea11uc wishes to l't'mind readers that th<' seamd half of th1•1r Fall Winter •en•on ~!'.ins 011 Tuesdoy, ,Jan i;. New teams. ind1V1dual bowlers, and sub­stitutes are in Vilt'<! to Jmn in th• fun. LEATHER FOREVER 704 FAIRVIEW • HOUSTON, TX 77006 (713) 526-6940 10% off any belt with this ad during the month of December. 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The fall is 8wift, the pain is not. Neighbors pack my quickly swelling foot in ice, and drive me to the Erner· gency Room at The Medical Center of Louisiana, formerly Charity Hospital. Preliminary check in is half-fast. A computer knows where I work, and how little 1 make. A nurse, behind a glass with a voice hole, marks a blue slip of paper, "AccidenVRush'.' Then, a long, painful wait in a lonely, crowded room. A few whites. including some shackled prisoners in orange jump suil8, me, and a lot of blacks. I know one of the black ladies, she lives in the Fau­bourg Marigny near me. Finally, a doc­tor walks through a steel door marked: "Do not knock, no one will answer this door:' He says toa w1uting.complaining patient they are going to start seeing 'regular cases" now. I take this to mean non.-emergency cases. I am s1tting m a wheel chair. broken foot elevated, tn a kind of stoic stupo '" "What about me;• I ask? Four and a half hours earlier, I pushed my papers, attached to the blue shp marked "ACCI­DENT/ RUSH;' through a blind slot, so indicated, next to the steel door. The doc­tor asks, "What IS your name?" My papers can not be found . I am offered a shot for pain. I tum it down. I think I will need all my consciousness. The doctor asks a second tune if I put my papers through the slot. He goes back inside and closes the steel door: Another twenty minutes pass. A nurse opens a door on the opposite side of the room. Every one looks up, looks past the two cuffed and •hackled prisoners in their orange suits. They are looking at the nurse. She says to me, "You the man with the broken foot? We got your papers now~ A man has come up beside me. He offers a cigarette. I don "tsmoke. He taps an artificial foot with a cane. He says he got it cut off here at Charity because the doctors let it get infected. I wish he would leave. The door opens, my name i• cal hod. and the man with the false foot pushes my wheelchair inside to modem medical treatment. Two hou.•. 1ater, X·rays show what? T T T NEW ORLEANS QUICK NOTE I'm sitting in a wheelchair in the Ortho­pedic Room. My X-rays are in a big brown envelope behind my back. A doc­tor passes and asks if I have my pic­tures. He says I have a "green stick break:' I ask to S(>e, he shows me two sharply bent metatarsal bones. Another hour, another docto& This one young, handsome, caring. "Good news, looks like you don't have a break;' he says. "May I i;ee?" I point to the two metatarsal bones bent left, just above the toes. The first doctor is summoned. He con· firms "my diagn06es:' The younger handsome, caring doctor apologizes and says he is a facial bone doctor. We talk He is a gmduate of my alma mater. I like him because he is honest, admits his mistake, and treats me WI if the broken foot is important to me. It is. Another hour, a man I take to not be a doctor wraps pla•tcr and Ace bandages around my swollen foot. It is "not a cast:• he says. He calls it a "splint'.' There are three skin breaks, nothing is done for them. Somewhere, dunng all this time, I decline another pain shot. I am C<'rtain I need to be a lert. The bandage wrapper talks a bout the harsh truth that to medicine is a buSJ· ness:· If it is not profitable, Americans won't become doctors, he says, and we will be left to the mercies of" foreign doc­tors with foreign ways:· It i• now eight hours smce I arrived in the Emergency Room and was issued a blue slip marked, "ACCIDENT/ RUSH" Alone, in the Ortho Room, waiting for the plaster to dry. A doctor, foreign , with an accent I take to be Chinese, stops. Leaves. He returns with the brace and bandage man. The foreign do(·tor explains the plaster must be removed and the foot recast. He shows the xeno­phobe how to pince me face down, leg bent up, foot held nt an angle by a con· traption of plastic cup and tape while the plaster is applied and left to dry. Again, nothing is done for the skin wounds. Ten hours later, my foot in a plaster splint held on by Ace bandag!.,;, and wobbling on crutches I do not know how to use, I am home. I nm to return 10 six days. I had not been alert enough. Soon, I will have an infection und be hoMpital· ized in a ward at Big Charity. More will follow. New Orleans Lesbian and Gay Community Center to open Dec. 12 The new Lesbian and Gay Community Center of New Orlcsn' has planned a celebration of its opening on Dec. 12. FestivitJe~ wt.II begin at 3:00 p.m. with a special reception for community center founders, and opening ceremony. An O!>"n house, and entertainment begin at 4 :io p.m. The a-nter will serve as a meeting place for many existing community organizations, as well as the site for cul­tural, political, educational and social act.ivilles. "New Orleans now joins the ranks of other major cities with such a commu· nily et·ntcr:• says Ro~rt Brunet, one of T T T BATON ROUGE SOAP the organizt>rs of the cent.f-r. "We Utink it's a !(]gn of the a-real protrress ourcom­mumty has made:• The board of the non·profit center solicits donors to become "Founders" of the center. by their contribution of $250 or more. Founder's names will be perma­nently du;pluy4>d ut lh<· <"t:tnlA'•r, Contrihu tors are invited to call board member Handy Evans st work (504) 11:11.;~'">:ll or at home (504) 897-3212. Dec. 12 was chosen for the official open· ing because it is the a nniveraa ry of the passage of the gay civil rights ord1- nnn('!n hy lhuNew ()irleo11•<'"it.y• ... ~u.-.._ I Houston 'Pretty Boys' at George's; Wedding at Mercavah; 'Ripped' at LSU By MS. JEANNE RE' MONTANDON This reporter went to see Ripped, the lat­est production of the L.S.U. Theater: It was a -'21st century ver•ion of Rip Van Winkle The production seemed to have more money and time put into the stage and set than the previous productions and there were a great des! of special effects. I have been attending all of this seasons productmM and I was very dis­appointed in this performance as com· pared to the previous productions. While many of the actor• carried the perform· ance and made it well worth the cost of the ticket, the over all production lacked the polish that L.S.U. Theater has become known for. It remained a great way to start the evening, yet it did not live up to the expectations that go with the productioni; associated with L.S.U. Theatei: The next performance will be "The Comedy of Errors:• I expect it to be more consistent with the profeKSional· ism surrounding the L.S.U. Theater: Hope I will sec you there. George's Place brought in "Pretty Boys of Houston" on Wedne.;day night I stopped by for a drink and to see some old fn<"nds and. the place was packed. There wa'• hardJv room in thP lar11e parking lot. George's Place has been in the same location for over 22 years. It is one of the most friendly bars in Baton Rouge. It has a large crowd of regulars both girls and guys. Chuck is one of the bartenders at George's Place and he has been working with Richard (the owner of George's Place) for over two years. Chuck seems to be a standard part of the place. The beard looks great Chuck! New on the scene, Buddies is fast becoming a regular stop for the nightly crowd. It has two full size pool tables and 11 pool tournament test is open to men and women. Girls, here is a chance to show the guys we can put on a show as well, See you Friday at Club Scandalous and lets take that prize money. The Church Mercavah held another wedding on Satur­every 1'uesday Laura of Mercauahper{ormed wedding night with a cash c:tremony day afternoon. The bride and bride did not want their picture taken or their names mentioned, but the wtodding was well attended . There was food and drtnks available after the wedding for all the guest. While gay wed­dings in Lou.,.iana are still not legal, the mimsters of prize. Girls and guys get out the pool stick and ioin the fun at Buddies. Club Scandalous is still packing them in every Friday night with the weekly talent contest. Every Friday mg ht Club Scandalous has a tel· ent show with a $50.00 prize. The con- Mercavah are licensed in the state to perform wed· dings and the church has been doing gay weddings forover7 years now in the Baton Rouge and New Orleans area. Laura was the minister who conducted the wedding and she had this to say: "A TT T DATELINE: AUSTIN wedding ceremony in which two JX'Ople express their love and lifelong commit· men ts, be it only to each other, in front of their friends and family, or to the whole world, and the states refusal toacknowl· edge homosexual weddings should not discourage anyone in the gay commu· nity from celebrating the~e occasions or take away from the importance of the event:• The weddings are conducted after the couple has gone through a counselling ses•1on with the minister, and the minister is sattsfil'CI thal the commitment is scriouR. We are still waiting to h!•ur from ,Java Connections on when that open mg dat£ will be scheduled. The plans for Java are cxcitrng, and should bl' a hig addi tion to Baton Rouge. It will offer a n1·-. alternative to the night sc!•n!• in thi> town. On the 28th, thl' bur can catch th! S&M video bar at Church. Church 1• just around the corner from George'f Place and offers a widP variety of music and fun . It was th!• old Art Har. Take 8 trip over thert' and l{lve some variety t< your evenings. If you want you cvenl covered then give a call at 66.'i-7815 anc I will post your up and coming event in this article! Austin's Day Without Art concludes w1.:h somber nighttime observance By St.:ZETTE LOCKE The ."'ew V01ce/ Auatin On World AlDS Day, AWltin joined in Day Without Art and Night Without Light. A Doy Without Art. The Austin Busi· ness community and the visual art.; community shrouded their art work with black cloth and hung "Day With· out Art" po11ters over the shrouds. From 7:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Dec. I the lights of the State Capitol and down· town office buildings dimmed in mem­ory of tho"" who have died from AIDS. Members of the public participated in the "Body Count" performance by lying down in rows on the grounds of the Cap· itoL During the time the lights were dimmed the "bodies" ht their faces with flashlights a• a statement that we must not forget the face of ea<· h person lost ~r to be lost, nor must we forget the tragic societal inatu-ntion to AIDS. The flash· lights lit up a sea of bodies to represm t over 150,000 dead from AIDS. Body Count 1992 WWI funded m part by the city of Austin under the au8 pices of the Austin Arts Commiss10n, and was sponsored by the Founda lion For A Compassionate Society If you are terminally ill, do you know what your most valuable asset may be? DO NOT DROP YOUR LIFE INSURANCE POLICY! $ell It! VIATICAL ASSISTANCE CORPORATION IS A TRULY CARING COMPANY THAT SPECIALIZES IN HELPING PEOPLE LIKE YOU. GIVE US A TRY. VIATICAL ASSISTANCE CORPORATION "a financial alternative ... 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With over 500 merchants under one roof nothing beats the Astrohall's Trading Post for one-stop holiday shopping convenience. And talk about selection! There's everything from antiques, fine collectibles and crafts to unique handmade goods and accessories. Make the smart choice for Christmas and come to Houston's favorite shopping show. Admission is free! December 12 • 13 St.>w hours. Salurday 12/ 12 10 am. HJO pm Sundav 12113 11 am 5:00 p.m. ~ $4 p<r rar. For Information roll 17131 799 9.'iOO. Exhibit space (7131799-9632 • ,. purm.tt ,_,_ry t'.!llrl" all uw... MlnllDunl prur wal&ar $50 and pnMdrd ~ Tndtng Paet ttll'Tdwlb SCOTT K. BOA TES Attorney & eo....e1ar n Law Criminal, Family and Probate Law Including Wila, Powera of Attorney, Partnership Agreements & Real Estate Contracts Telephone: (713) Be&-7577 Volc9 llal/Peger: 708-3805 ... ----"'-- How are you managing? 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MoonDance offers hearty southern cui­• ine, while keeping your health in mind. Featured menu item• include every­thing from grilled tuna or catfish to liver & onions, not to mention the classic chicken fried steak. Start your dining experience with the perfect broccoli-cheese soup followed by a flame broiled shrimp ,;alad, and fro-oms (double dipped mushrooms with honey-mustard or ranch drei;sing). Enjoy the proudly featured exclusive Texas wines or MoonDance specialty beverage•, such as the MoonRita or the Eclipse (amaretto swirled rn peach schnapps with cranberry and grape­fruit juices). Afterwards, if you have any room left under your belt, experience the delight­ful sour cream brownies or pos•ibly the liquor ice cream cakes! Moondance believes wholeheartedly m cholesterol-freecanola oil, fresh fruits and vegetables (nothing canned will do). The chefs have also cut back on the use of salt, sugar and butter in their spe­cial recipes without sacrificing great fla­vor. There is a party room available for birthdays, banquets and special occa· sions and they will prepare a banquet for you in their location or yours. They do catering, too! Monday rughts are "Gay Night" & The Bisexual Network meets upstairs on Thursdays. MoonDance is located near the capitol at 706 Congrei;s. There is full bar service and live music on Thursday, Friday & Saturday. Call for the current schedule. Most major credit cards are accepted. They not only feature Texas wines, but they also use Texas raised beef and pork in their dishes. Chorlie•s Breakfast Special $295 7am-3pm • Mon-RI 2 Pcrcakes - 2 Bacon 2 eggs (any style) OR LlJ'ICh Special $4.95 Everyday • Mon t1nJ Frf 11aTI ti ? See Us For BRlNCH Every Sattrday and SU1day BREAKFAST • UJIJCH • DNlffi • DESSERTS 24 HOLRS A DAY 1100 WestheiTier Houston (713) 522-3332 2 eggs - 2 bacon Hash Browns or G1ts arxl Toast OlOice of 3 Entrees 'Y 'Y 'Y DINING NOTES Early Birds at Blue Water; MoonDanc~ Diner­Austin; Green Leaves Cafe-New Orleans By THE !"EW VOICE STAH' The Blue Water Grill at 21 1 Richmond at Greenbnar has "Early Bird Specials" for diners from 5:00 to 7 00 p.m. The Paul Eng!;,sh Jazz Quartet, appear Wed.-Sat. l<.30 to midnight. Open for Lunch: 11:00 o.m. Mon-Fri; Dinner served till 10:00 p.m. Sun-Thur. till 11:00 pm. Fri. & Sat. Open days a week Coll (7laJ 526-7977 for re:;ervations or informat10n. Sazarac Celebrity Grille For great dining and hve cabaret try The Sazarac Celebnty Grille. This week· ends act is Swing SeL Coming Attrac· t1ons: Dec. 6 & 7, Maniha Carlton & Clay Howell; Dec 9, 10, 11 & 12. Swing Shift, !}(oc. 30 to Jan 2; Pudgy' Queen of Tease; Wed. Dec. 16 & Wed. Dec. 23, Bubba Mc:-."eely. Showtimes are 9;30 & 11:30. "Open for Lunch: 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Dinner: 6:00 p.m. to 10:00, Mon.­Sat. Hill 11:00 p.m. Fri. & Sat.) Happy Hour: 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. with FREE buffet. Sunday Brunch: 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. with Claudia Burson Call (713) 62().0050 for reservation• or informa· tion. Secured valet parking available. Encha nted Garden/ Karma Cafe For healthful dining try the Karma Cafe at The Enchanted Garden located at 1512 West Alabama. Vegetarian and macrobiotic specialties abound at a moderate price. Also available is a full service "Day Spa" and Esthetique with natuml product,; for your body and home. Open Tues.-Sat. 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Sunday brunch 10:00 a.m to 3:00 p.m. For information or appoint menta call (713) 942-0922. A Moveable Feast ;'I; ot only can you get a great warm or cold lunch or dinner from varying stages of vegetarian dining atAMovea· ble Feast (lacto veg; vegan; macro), but you can also shop for numerous vita· mtnllnineral supplements. health food products, organic produce, dried herbs & potpourri and informative literature. Dine in or take out meals are prepared dally from 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Locau;<l at 2202 West Alabama, you haven t had Health Food till you've tried A Moveable Feast. Phone (713) 628-3585 f'AX (713) 5zs.5089 Charlie's Coffee Shop Charlie's Restaurant has a very large, versatile menu and is open 24 hours a day for your dining pleasure. A fa~orite 1top over of alter houn diners and early bird typee, thU ia one menu that doesn't ·top breakfast at 10:30 a.m. If your date wanL' pancakes but you want roast beef, it's no problem for the cook• at Chnrhe's. Located at 1100 Westheimer near the Tower Theater servJce is friend Iv and there's never a wait. Phone 522.J.1.32. Orders to go available. Jade Dragon Hunan Restaurant For a very res8onnble price and no wait· ing. check out the buffet atJade Dragon. Rcctntly under new owncr1>h1p, the Dragon's menu still has the familiar items you are familiar with; full dinners from various regions (Canton, Sze­chuan, Hunan and more) along with luncheon special and the new steam table buffet. The Jade Dragon is located at 224 Westhe1met Phone (713) 526- 2683. Hour•. 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Mon.-Thurs .. 11:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Fri.; 5:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Sat.; and 5:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Sunday. Orders to go and limited delivery available. Moonda nce Diner- Austin Go to MoonDance Diner for hearty southern "family dining" that keeps your health in mind. The menu features a wide variety of items from a flame broiled shrimp salad to classic chicken fried steak. Texas wines are featured and the desserts are out of this world. MoonDance is located near the state capitol at 706 Congress and offers a full bar and live music Thursday through Saturday <call for scht'tlule). Monday is "Gay Night:' Most major credit cards are acceptt-d. Green Leaves Cafe­New Orleans Green Leaves Cafe offers up a gyeat menu featuring Creole American Foods. Daily specials are served from 3.95 up. Open six days out of the week. Green Leaveb is only closed on Wednesdays. Hours are Lunch: 11:00 a.m. to :J:OO p.m. and Dinner: 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Located in the French Quarter in New Orleans at 5:l9 St. Philip. for informa­tion call (504) 524-4398. If you want your restaurant listed or reviewed, call us at (713) 529-8490 FRENCH AFF.AIR CATERING Quality • Breakf .. st • Lunch • Dinner Coctails • Receptions • Buffets • Deli also eg•t•rl n Cuisine In your oifn "'wonment Serving A~ • San Antonio & w HO~ton (713) 626-3826 • (713) 415-6028 (pager) SAZARACl IMllll-liWi 11111 3 2 1 9 Smith 0 EI gi n - Houst on , Texas 7 7 0 0 6 Did You KNow? You CAN ENjoy OUR f Abulous FREE Buff ET duRiNq HAppy HouR 4:~0 8:00 p.M. MoNdAy fRidAy IT'S THE DEAL! =II -. . .. .. • :;;rii'E~· ; ,;.· ::.. ::- 5 ~5.- ~ - :~ ;:-: --·;_:;w· ,..._ - ..... ~ : II= -------' DECEMBER 4-10. 1992 / THE NEW VOICE 13 3 2 1 9 Smith@ EI gin - Houston, Texas 7 7 0 0 6 TONIGHT, FRIDAY & SATURDAY DECEMBER. }, 4 & 5 SWING SET HousrnN's OWN MANHATTAN TRANsfER MONDAY & TUESDAY DECEMBER 6 & 7 MARSHA CARLTON wiTH ClAy HowEll CoMiNG WEdNEsdAy - SATuRdAy DECEMbER 9, 10, 11, & 12 SWING SHIFT PUDGY! - ''OUEEN OF TEASE'' As SEEN ON SHOWTiME, AN EvrniNq AT Tl-IE IMpRov ANd AT TAj MAHAl's 11CAsbAH RooM" AT BAlly's GRANd iN ATlANTic CiTy ANd SOON AT THE SAZARAC CEIEbRiTy GRillE DECEMbER JOTH - JANUARY 2Nd NEW YEARS EYE DINNER & SHOW $60 PER PERSON SHOW ONLY $JO • MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS NOW 1 BEGiNiNG Tf.tis SuNdAy, DECEMbER 6 SAZARAC SUNDAY BRUNCH 11:00 A.M. TO }:00 p.M. SEE BUBBA McNEELY - LivE diRECT fROM LA • WEd., DEc. 16TH & WEd., DEC. 2~Rd =II I= ... q ~ 1/ie a.czJ-cal i# Zjc;,;A .11 . 1 FOR RESERVATIONS CAL~· 520-5050 /SECUREDVAL:T PARKINGAVAILABLE 14 THE NEW VOICE I DECEMBER 4· 10. 1992 TT T AUSTIN SOAP Nexus girls party; Mame's opening a success; 'Bout Time turkey give-away; By SUZKITE LOCKE The !\ew Voice/ Auatin "I was a Femmy·Tomboy:• Sound inter­esting? A fabulous new comedian. who hwi been featured on H.B.O. will enter­tain Austinite.; in February. Georgia Ragsdale'• message i• high spirited and upbeat! A lesbian up and coming' The guls in Austin know how to party! This month they've planned a few parties' Only two Tuesday• left to show off your talents! Tuesday Dec. 22 i.q the Grand Talent rinale-come on, join m! Friday Dec. 18 the girls of San Antonio's Nexus are sho .. ,ng off their boxers! A Christmas Boxer Short.; Parade. Austin "s Nexus i• joirung m the &p1rit Sunday Dec. 20. This party will be hosted by the beauti­ful and unforgettable: Ms Ricki and Karen Di' Angelo. On the same night have your picture taken with Ms Santa and her "significant other" Dec. 11 ffnday) at 10:00 p.m. help Nexu• gear up for Chnstmas with a simultaneous lighting ceremony to be held at both clubs. (Austin & San Antonio) Hey San Antonio, get ready for your all female extravaganza' It's coming •oon! S1<1y tuned! Also in San Antonio "4x4 Volleyball League:• for more information stay clOBe .I'll inform you when I get the lo-down ... New Fridays at Nexus! $1 well, $1 longnex. $1 Ritas and every night $2 draft beer with .50 cent refills. Austin lad1es ... are you ready for this.:'All Girls Productions" presents an All-female Extravaganza, hosted by Nina Iniquez. Lina Rose and Bianca D'Lorenzo Dec. 6 (Sunday) at 9:30 p.m.! Oohh La La! Mame's opening last weekend was a great success! Special kudos to Bill Tem· pelton's culinary talent•. Donna Men­thol'• trio was a real treat-watch for her return. Work continues on the upstairs bar and patio. Watch for a late December opening. The game room is complete and open. A.' always, parking 1s ample on the comer of Red River and 10th. The ~ew Mame's now has unformed security every Friday, Satur­day and Sunday nights. Austin's only international licensed D..J., Kevin Campbell spins em: All requests-All the time. Kevin's tips go to the Christopher House. The Christo­pher House i• a non-profit organization formed to develop a residential, interme· di ate care center for people with AIDS. They are badly in need of funding. Also helping to raise money-(Dec. 20) The Babtist Women of Austin present a fund rai"ing event and show (8:30 p.m.) at San !"ran Cisco"s. The Babtist Women will also be traveling to San T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Antonio to do fund raising shows at five clubs! As you can see thi• is a very important event. tiO be atCisco's Dec. 20. 8:30 p.m.! Also at Cisco's they still have "No 2106" T-shirts for only $12! Get them while they last. Help fund the Fight...lt Ain"t Over Yet!! Sunday (Dec. 6) The Capital City Rid­ers will host a La•agna Dinner and the following Sunday (Dec. 13) Santa's Twisted Playhouse will take place at Chain Drive. All proceeds from thei;e events will be used to buy groceries for the Food Bank. Hey, Corpus Christi remember Russ? He is no longer at Mame's, but at Chain Drive. Ahio new to Cham Drive bar tending staff is Rick Sigman! Welcome! Okay are you ready for this .•. raid grandma's closet-Crossing i• hosting an "Ugly Sweater Contest" with !stand 2nd place cash priws, Saturday, Dec. 5 at 6:00 p.m. This should be a sight! Stay tuned ... Ch ristmas and New Year's Eve Party plans in the making! Seasons Greetings from Oil Can Ha rry's! Get ready for the Winter Won· derland Christmas Party. Santa and Ms Claus along with cute, scan tily clad helpers will be at Harry's on Dec. 18th along with Austin's Gay Men's Chorus. They will perform a Christmas Carol (Dec. 18) 8:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. After· wards the Christmas blow out contin-ues. A $3 donation is requested at the door, to benefit Project Transition and The Wellness Center. .•. Don't forget Harry's has Hot Dancers Thursdays and Sundays (Showtimes: 10:30 p.m. and Midnight). Charlie's is having a Customers Spe­cial Appreciation Party Dec. 17 (7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.) "We Appreciaw You" says General Manager David. This great event will be sponsored by 25 peo­ple who will present Project Transition over $2.500 that night. 'Bout Time is also sponsoring A Cus­tomers Appreciation Party Dec. 20. Free food and moreU Don'tmissthisone!Dec 12-"Grinch that stole 'Bout Time'.' A year ago the Christmas Grinch forced B.T. to close-a vacation (Bahh, hum bug!). But now they're back-better than ever. So come and help them cele­brate on the 12th day of Christmas my True Club gave to me ... A turkey for Christmas dinner. 'Bout Time will give away 12 turkeys! One each night Dec. 12-Dec. 24! (Dec. 19) Camp Drag Christmas Show. (Dec. 23) Chri.stmBK Pajamas Party .. Show off your P.rs. Happy Birthday Jerry Huey. (Dec. 23) "'The New Joy of Gay Sex" by Charle11 Silverstein. The Dr. will see you .•. and sign your copy at Liberty Books, Tues· day Dec. 8, 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. Firm wanted software returned after anti-gay rights bill passed SPRINGFIEW, Ore., Friday, Nov. 27 (AP)-The city"& recent a nti-gay rights charter amendment prompted a Califor­nia software company to ask for the return of a $7,500 computer program. Orbit Software USA Inc. of Danville. Calif., refunded the money to the Springfield Utility Board in a Septem­ber letter from company vice president David Ment that a>ked for the immed1- ote return of the program, said utility spokesperson Mary Ann Rhode, . "Basically, the letter from Orbit said, ·we don't want to do bumness with a company in a town that passes laws like the o ne you h ave;•• Rhodes &aid . The utility returned the check and tried to convince Orbit to drop the demand for its software, she said. The utility also asked a Springfield computer company owne~ Je8"e Maine, to mtercede with Orbit. "I told Merit the community was divided on the measure, that the bus1· ness community was basically against it, and that he would be punishing the whole community when not everyone T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA was rettpons1ble for pusmg it;' said Main e, the owner o f PICO lnfonnation Systems. Orbit eventually decided to wait until after the Nov. 3 election to see whether a more sweeping anti-gay rights initia­tive on the statewide ballot was defeated, Rhodes said. Measure 9 went down to defeat by a wide margin in the most heavily popu· lated areas of the state but many small towns, including Springfield, supported it. Rhodes said she did not know whether Orb it would renew it.a <lf"mnnd to rtlturn th~ tiOfLwa r e. M er it Wll.8 unavu1lu 1Jlo tor comment. The Springfield city charter amend­ment, passed in the May 19 primary election , remains in force. It lumpfi homosexuality into the same cau•gory as masochism, sadism and pedophilia, and prohibits the city from promoting any of tho.e practices. Maine tried unsuccessfully to overturn the charter amendment last summer. He won a seat on the City Council in the Nov. 3 general election. Denver may or to appear on Arsenio Hall TV show to discuss boycott DENVER. Thursday. f'>i, •v. 26 (AP}-Den· ver Mayor Wellington Webb will appear on Ar8"11io Hall's television talk show Wed­nesday, De<·ember 2. hoping to blunt the groWUlg boycott movement against Colo­rado Ix-cause of passage of Amendment 2. Webband Hall ,.iJl talkaboutthecon•ti­tuuonsl amendment, whirh invalidated gay rights ordinance, 1n three cities and prol::bits any aud1 Jaws from being pa.,.ed in the future. Webb was onginally scheduled to be on the show last Monday, but a blizzard can· celed his flight to Los Angeles. At Webb's •ugge•lion. mayoral aides approached the ahow after Barbara Stre­i• and backed the boycott laat week. Webb is acheduled to join Hall dunng the first fivt- mmutea of his late-night ahow, the usual monologue slot. The T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA mayor will d1scu•s the boycott and hia desire to overcome the divieivenNa Amendment 2 has caused, said Briggs Gamblin, Webb"• pres• secretary. The producer• of the nationally •YndJ· cated •how are paying all of Webb"s expense•. Gamblin said ''The me.sage I want to bring is that there are too many examples where people make the"" snap judgmenta;• Webb aaid. "For example, I oaw a videotape of police beating a man named Rodney King, and I 'aw a jury come back with a (not guilty) verdict. We didn't, therefore, say everybody in California is raetst:' He also will talk about the positiv• &•l>t'<"l.H of Colorado and th• fact that llenvtr, Bou). der and ski resorts oppotlt'd the amend­ment. Ruling says Minneapolis discriminated against employees' same-sex partners :\11:S:S!'..APOLJS, Tuesday, l\ov. 24 (AP)-Three library employee• were awarded more than $.C)().000 in damages after a civil rights panel ruled that the city discnmmated against them by not providing health insurance for their Jes­b1& n partners. Ann DcGroot, executive director of the Gay and Lesbian Community Action Council, called the ruling "a ma)or breakthrough" in recognizing discriminauon based on sexual orienta­tion. Maury Landsman of the Umversityof MinneDnta Law Clinic, one of the law. yers representing the women, said sev era! cities around the country have pro­vided benefits for their employees' same-!Wx partners. "But as far as we know, this is the first time a judicial or administrative body ha,; found the policy off ailing to provide Chea Ith in•urance) to be di11Criminatory;· Landsman said. The ruling goe• beyond a 1991 case mvolving n ll'Sbian city social workerm Dt•nvt•r who took time off work to care for her ailing Jover. Her request for sick leave was denied. She protested and a hearing officer later ruled •he was en ti· tied to three day• of •ick pay. A Minneapolis Civil Rights Comm1s· sion panel voted 2-1 last week to requir~ the city and the Library Bourd to stop refusing to provide health<nre l><•nefita to the women"• partner•. The panel rejec·ted thecity"s arl(umcnt that providinl( the bt'nefite would be too costly. AsSl8lnnt City Attorney James Moore said no decision hes been made about whether to appeal the ruling. Moore said no asscsBment has been made a• t-0 how many city employees would be affected or what the cost to the city would be if the ruling stand•. The panel awarded $:19,599 to Judith Bagan, employed at the library •inre 197!!; $30,525 to Mane Han•on, an employee _smce 1982, and $20,:191 U> Jane Anghn, who worked at the lihrary from 1983 until Nov. 1990. The amounUi include $8/>00 in punitive damages for eac~ woman and attorney fee•. They also mdude tripled actual damages, based on their partners' medi· ~al expense> and the added cost of buy· mg health msurance. DECEMBER 4-10, 1992 / THE NEW VOICE 15 T T T NEW ORLEANS SOAP Breakfast with Bobby; NLA Xmas Beer Bust at Phoenix; The Divas are back By BCNCH BRITTAIN 'lbt• l\t·w Vo1n New Orleans It's difficult to understand how the national media sides on the issue of !'resident Clinton's promise to use an !'xecutive order to end discrimination ugamst gays and lesbians in the mili· tmy fon·e. They seem to spend an unu· sun! and unn<'Cessary amount of time blowing this issue out of proportion to its importunce. This in tum gives the homophobes a platform to launch attacks against this idea who's time has certainly come upon us. This i•sue is going to give all of us an opportunity to see if President-elect Clinton is going to be the decisive man we all believed him to be when we cast our votes this fall. Persons against the executive order are now pushing for a study group in order to postpone what should be inevitable. The GAO study is comprehensive enough to enable any truly responsible person to make a deci· Scarlett OHara Butler at The Mint Gary bartends at \fr Are Family sion based on facts and not emollon. Let's give Bill a chance to show us what kind of President he is going to be. It's my hope that he'll surprise us with his directness and decisiveness. The New Orleans Gay and Lesbian Business Association is being hosted by Larry Potts at his gallery ARIO· DANTE, 535 Julia Street, phone 524· 3233, this coming Tuesday, Dec. 8 from 7 to 9:00 p.m. This quarterly party is being used to gather toys for the kids at McDonogh i\15, their sponsored school in the French Quarter. Bring a toy or two to drop in the barrel. It's also rumored that the n1•w bu•ineBB dired.ories will be pas•ed out at the meeting. Everyone is welcome. New members are especially being encouraged to attend. For those of you who are running out of things to do on Sunday morning get that lazy body out of the sack and make a trip to the Phot'ntX for "Breakfast with Bobby:• Every Sunday from 8 to II :00 a.m. Bobby's serving $1.25 juice drinks to those Mu ls who need sustenance after the night before. In addition to all the usual fun and gnm<"a nt tho Phoenix a nd Men's Room this coming season they'll be having the National Leather Association Christ· mas Beer Bust this coming Friday, Dec. T T T NEW ORLEANS QUICK NOTE 11 from 9 l'M-'ttll. The following Fri· day, the Knights d'Orleans will have Santa on board to let you have your pic­ture taken in hi• lap. This will begin at 9 PM on Dec. 18th and remember t.o wear your Christmas finery. The next night, Saturday, Ike. 19, the Phoenix will once again present Tony Coleman and Paul Vincent playing for your enjoyment at their monthly Hoe Down at the Ho House. It sounds like George and Jamie have some wild and fun filled time;; in store for us at the "Big Red BaT.' The American Aquatic Garden has a special presentation in store for all of you this Christmas time. There are new attractions in the gardens you'll enjoy browsing and a full store of special gifts for your Christmas browsing inside. They ship by UPS as well as offer you a J(]JI> reduction for using the coupon in this week's advertisement. We'd like to give a special return home "welcome" to the Born Divas, perform­ing at The Mint this Sunday for their regular 3:15 PM show, Dec. 6. They'll be per· forming at The Mint through ~·eb­ruary each week­end, except for the New Year's week­end . Welcome back, kids, we all missed you during your visit to Hous­ton. Say hell.a t.o the "Clown Pr1Me" Take the opportunity this Saturday or next Saturday, Dec. 5 and 12, to stop by the NO f AIDS Task ~·orce from !i:OOa.m. to IO PM for free flu shots. If you'd like more information call the Task Force at 945-4000. 26011 Boots has If any of you have some non· eJe<-tncal Christ· 1rlx" Loue bartend• at Sundam-e been having some wild and woolly parties up on Royal this year and Tom Tosh has one of his biggest set for you this week. Thoae of you m New Orleans this Sunday, D,'C. 6th, arc eocour­aired to stop by to see 'l'om and hi• wrangler~ as " Papa Noel Comes to a Winter Won· derland " The Gre-at Gh·c·a·way customer apprrn· ma8 ornaments ation part'.\ starts you'd like to pass on, take them to The Friendly Bar. or Big Daddy's Bar or call Joyce Alberts at 943-89'.!9. She'll be happy to h Avft aotomPOnfl pick them up and deliver them to the 600 ward a t Charity Hospital for their tree. Any· thing will be appreciated. at4:00p.m. WewanttoremindTum that in addition to the 3600 weekly reader>; m New Orleans this newspaper has over 25,000 weekly readers in the rest of the g ul£oa. .. t mHrlu>ot._ 21 more shopping days to Chnstmas. Happy Holidays. New Orleans holiday event uses art show and sale to help fight AIDS The fifth annual New Orleans Art Against AIDS show and sale will be held Dl-c. 2 through 5 on the third level of Canal Place. Hundreds of the metro· politan area's leading artists, galleries, art patrons and philanthropists have •igrwd on as participants in the event. Hohday-theme creations, including wreath• and ornaments wilT be on pub· lie view daily from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 1.-~ii;i!l~ p.m. The •how culminates with a gala 8ale und au1·tion on Dec 5, from 8:30 p.m. to midnight. Fifty grap<.•vine wreaths will he indi· Rapho••/ J)tluzw u·tth rrxktnlt horse for '1rt AJ/am.-1 AIDS' T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA vidually decorated by notable artists, interior de•igners, retailers and other "surprise" creator•. The list of wreath makers already includei; Albert Brown Salon, Chrestia and Staub Interior Deb1gn, artist Chris Maier. Michael McKey of Michael's Hair Salon, the Ralph Lauren Polo Shop and gallery owner Arthur R.oger. Of NJ><-·crnl intt-rt•st thiM year are nine unique woodt•n rocking horses cn.•atro by Kelly and Got!Regen Furniture Design. Each horse will be painted by a different artist. Participating artists include Raphael Oil.uzio, Ronna Har· ris. Bill lies, Richard Johnson, Francia Pavy, John Scott, Arthur Silverman and Joe Zucker. Art Against AIDS was established in 1987. It is spon!IOred by the Conu•mp<~ rary Arts Center, and the New Orlean• Museum of Art. It has raised over $200,000 to benefit NOtAIDS Task Force, and other non-profit HIV I AIDS program8 and agencies in Loui,iana. Tickets to th!' gala auction are ·c;o, and are available by calling the NOr AIDS task force at (504) 945-4000. Coast-to-coast gay, lesbian radio station begins broadcasting By DANA COFFIELD FOR THE NEW VOICE DENVER, Sunday, Nov. 29 (AP}-The manager of a new coast-to-<:oast lesbian and gay radio station said listeners will find plenty of music from homosexual artists and issue-oriented news, but those looking for titillation should tune out. "People will be bored before they will be titillated;' Clay Henderson said Sat· urday night, soon after KGAY went on the air. "There is nothing that will go out on the airwaves that will offend my sweet, little, old Republican mother in Bra· zoria County, Texas:• he said, Broadcasting from a tiny Denver stu· dio crammed on opening night with tele­vision, magazine and radio reporters, Henderson srud investors pumped $1 million into the •talion to bring "main­stream radio for a gay and lesbian audi· encc" to market. The station isn't available without a satellite dish. Though the nation has other radio stations that offer gay and lesbian programming, KGAY is expected lo reach an estimated 7.5 mil­lion homes in the United States, Can­ada, Mexico and the Caribbean. Direct broadcast satellite reception will be an option on some late I 993 and 1994 automobiles. And the station 1s working to encourage cable systems to carry KGAY as background music for their information channels. Specifically lesbian and gay program· ming is scheduled for about 65 hours each week, coupled with 105 hours of progressive rock music. The station's news programming include" reports from the Albuquerque-based Gay Net News Service, Henderson said. The station is not governed by the Federal Communications Commission but Henderson said his staff-I2 peopl~ in Denver and eight correspondents­has been instructed to be "journalists first, gay journalists second. "We have a responsibility to show both sides of the story, and to label opin· ion exactly that;• he said. Henderson said he expects advertis· ing volume on the station to be heavy. "We offer a very brand-<:onscious, loyal consumer,• he said. "Studies have shown that advertisers that will invest m advertising to the gay communit)·, the gay community will respond:' KGAY doebn't give out its station address to the general public, partly because of anti-homosexual sentiment in Colorado. The state's voters approved a measure in November that invah· dated gay rights ordinances in three cit­ies and prohibits any such laws from being enacted in the future. Henderson said KGAY staffers have been trained to respond "in the event of emergencres:· but threats won't keep the station off the air. A 17-year veteran of gay and lesbian media start ups, Henderson said "life is too short to Ii ve under the veil of threats. If people want to threaten me, they'll have to get in line:• 16 THE NEW VOICE DECEMBER 4-10. 1992 T T T CORPUS CHRISTI SOAP Pageants at Choices; Portraits at Dessert Hearts; Sorry BUTR, I mean BUTCH! By SUZETTE LOCKE The Jl."ew VotceJCorpuo Christi WeU. now that we're stuffed from the Turkey Holiday .. .lefs get on with the festivities! Only three weekt; left tiU Christmas! Hope you "ve been good! So much is happening here in the Coastal Bend. Here it is from A to Z. ting a Toys for Tots Drive. Please, get involved. Your toys and gifts may be the only ones received by a spe­cial child of the Coastal Bend! Oooohh ... Dec. 5 Portrait special. Bring your loved one, special two or bunch of friends and save a '"MO"' at Choices ... of course, would like to express his great appreciation to a lot of sclfles.; 60uls that help create a great Thanksgiving Dinner! Charles Green, Lucky, JU8bn (from the Ram· ada), Becky Dally. Kevin Haskell, David, Jerry 0 . (from Hidden Door) and United AmUBement, the backbone of Choices: Ken & Lad and all of the other special people that helped it couldn "t have been done without you. Thanks! Thanks for preparing and serving over 125 people for a first time ever Thanks· givmg. Stay tuned for Christmas Din­ner ond show! moment in time- Men of Monterey-tell Choice• •f you want to stt them again the Board of Directors for the CBAF! What an honor! Okay BALLS ... Happy Birthday on Dec. 7. Merry Christmas everybody! To help, the Rebels have gone wild! For Christmas, you can win one of three hams for yourself and help some one less fortunate to enjoy Christ· mas. Concerned citizens have "adopted" clients from PLA/CBAF and vowed to make their Christmas special by fulfilling some of their needs. Con· tact a Rebel for more information. Get involved ... you can make a difference. Tickets $1 or 6 for $5. Thursdays are Club Night at the Hidden Dooc The Hid· den Door is proud to support local clubs and organizations including CCMC, TGRA and BALLS. forever! Create your own portrait packages. Choose 5 unit. for only $39.95 plus $4.95 service fee for 3proofs. Units are: 16x20(equals) 5 units, 10xl3 (equals)3 units.Bxl0--1, 2 (5x7) (equals) I, I (5x7) plus 4 wallet (equals) I, 4 (4x5)(equals) I or 8 wallets. Thanks Bob and Amador for remem· bering my birthday and making it extra special: I love to shop in the Leatherack! A gift certificate and other gifts Crom the shop is just what I wanted' Thanks' Remembec .. only three wl'eks till Christ· mas._ You've got to check the specials Bob has! (in the Leatherack Chri•tmas Sale!) Rebels Ham Drawing_ J>ec. ~th at 7:00 p.m. Wow, it'g already standing room only at Choices and now they've added another ba~ for extra cuRtomer service. They applt'cia te your business and wonted to show you, so now in edition to great shows, you11 get more service! Just ID llme for the Texas ~ ew Comer USA '93 Pageant! Dec.. &-A prclimi· nary to Ms Goy USA! Many special guests will be there!. .. you'd better not mlSS llus one! Then, on Dec. 5 Raymond Saucedo (Guest DJ) will mixing and blasting- at Choices, of course. A":! wrut! That's not a[ Dream Boys will be back Llcc 10! Mmmmmm_.heard that's o sight to behold! Alan-get ready! They re commg! Hey everyone, remem· her the gorgeous men from Monterey, Mexico o few weeks back' Well, if you need to hove some more tell Lad and Ken or ''"MO let t.nn• hear from you! Lester JenninJ(s and K~n Htmckm­" Choices ownero And last but never least La Vida ... Tht• life! La Vida's has lots of speciuls ... a spectal staff, a special dub,sp<cial scrv ice and always a beer special. La Vida's customers are always special. For extra 'f.l~C. and personalized attention ched out La Vida's. Nick is there to insure your taken care of. La Vida's on the run way between the Hidden Door and Choices. Zundru and l..isa would like to express their npprecta t1on for Thanksgiving, nlso. 'J'lus year was veryspectal to them. for this year many bridges were repaired. Holidays are not only for portymg with your friends and uadopted" family but for reflecllng on your life and appreaating those with whom you put on the back burner all year. Although Iksert Heart. do~ Thanksgivmg, 1.ondra and Lisa want everyone to know they were m their hearts and prayers. This Christmas sea· son remember that there are always thoseleso fortunate. There are the child· r..n that need your very special atten· lion. On )).,.. 4th !Je,,,,,; Hearts is hos· Hob from "\iyne's Uolhera..>1- Thanks for the 8-day gift..' Mmmmmm. _.u·hat a. Dream ... Boy! T T T GALVESTON SOAP Sign up for your appointmmt. Shoot day is Dec. 6 with two weeks delivery. Dena Kaye will be performmg at Desert Hearts' Don't miss it! In the mean time_.all my rowdy friends are coming over Monday Night (to Desert Hearts) for free hot dogs, football and dart tour· ney. Tuesdays; Taco buffet, Wed· nesdays steak nights with nb eye s teaks, real tators with salad and Sunday barbecue Damn near cat out every night with the girls! Ooops .. .I made a Faux Pas! recenUy BALLS had an anniversary party at the Hidden Door and I gave Raymond Sauredo he/JM Tanya And now I'd like to take a moment toexprcssmygrat· itude and apprcci· ation to everyone an Cor1>ua Chn•b and Austin' Tlus wayward travel1·r has spent many hundreds of dol lars and countlC88 days on a burned engine. I love trav· elinl( in between these great com m u n i credit to the Rebels, who were also partymg and hanging colora ... sorry guys! You know I love you. please accept my apologies, now stop teasing Butr._J mean Butch! Ha-Ha' Congratulations Butch Sparks for his appointment to the President of ties_.although my truck has seen better times, you have been patient and understanding in this streo<sful time. Thank you! You have truly shown that "unity" ism our com· munity. Again, Thanks for bearing with me through this .. .J'm back on the road. Grand Drag at Kon Tiki; Muffin sent to New Orleans; Dickens on the Strand By~TEVIEB. The Jl."ew Voice/Galveston The commotion by the ocean this week ID Gal,veston on Thanksgiving Day, Lafitte s, had their Annual Feast. The bur fum1Shed the turkey and ham while April. Lets get to the good stuff. Gos· sip ... go>sip . . gossip. I swear I was Bee· ing double along with ev<"rybody else. Rocky iust movt"d here from Dallas and his friend Tony was down for the holi· day. This guy looked so much like John everyone else B. that everyone kept calling him John. brought pot luck. The food was fan· tastic and every· one seemed to be getting their fill. Some were even going for seconds and thirds. That night a special show was at the Kon Tiki. Unfortu· nately I was una· ble to go due to other engage· ments. Saturday's ~---~-ni'>'!!:~==-=-=--::-::: Henry, I under stand you "ve been knocking on any. one's door at 9:00 a.m. on Saturdays and Sundays 1 a tely Is this because you've been keeping house guests? show featured the Kofi-Ml&S Mid Amer~a 1993 Look out New Orleans, Muffin is headed your way for her "first time:· Muffin, remember your first·time, Island Diva, Misty keep that in mind Valdez, Kofi, !\1.11111 Mid America 1993 Poison Alexander and Miss Gay Gal: veston 1993. This coming Saturday they will have special guest featuring Oprah De Marro and Golveston's favorite female dancer while in New Orleans. You know at your age it's hard to find a first-time for any­thing. Mike hod his best friend in from Chattanooga, Tennessee for the holi· days. You could sure tell hcwam'tin his home town, such a "Bad Girl:' Jerry, be Tony-tM real John B 7 M•ke & Jerry bad girlz! sure to come visit again soon. Well, 1t t was mce while it lasted. Kevin hasn't • been at the Brazos River Bottom in over a week. But, school started again so he and Uncle Walter will get bock to their •liq. wd lunches." Janice, remember to send him on his way at 3:00 p.m. and no blue light ape. cials till he's gone. Uncle Walter, I under· stand you got a lot of Turkey(s) for Thanksgiving, but we know You can't get chicken. Lafitte's is making a change in their daily 11<.·hedule. Since 1970 whi·n Hobert op<·n.-d Lafitte's he o":-'ned at IO:OOa.m., now after ~l years hes going to open at noon. I think he iust wants h1· 8 '-· t I Ul'llU y seep. As w_e go to pre.is I'll be covering Gnl· veston s part m World A(l)S Da _ story next week. Y This is also Galveston's winte i . val "Dickenson the Strand"'!~ kr esti $8.00 at the gate and $6.00 tn. ad~ 1 " 18 are , vanaa.at Hand~ll s for those who wish to he fes­tive 1t s free if Y?U are in Victorian Cos­tume. Well. unlll next week ..,._ t' . folks:' ~ i na 8 It ......... HOUSTON SOAP PART ONE DECEMBER4-10, 1992 / THENEWVOICE 17 Leather News: Lancers is 15 on Friday & Ripcord is 10 Monday--Congrats! By TAD Nf;LSON Hello Houston! Congratulations to the Texas Riders on their Fall Round Up. Gary tells me that there were 122 people registered from acr08e the nation and that they made up 28 clubs and loteofG.D.I.s. The farthest club came from New Orleans from both The Knights d'Orleans and Lords of Leather and the farthest G.D.I. crune from San Francisco. The club par· ticipation award went to The Bad Boye of Austin who had the most member• present. A special award, the Isl Annual Texas Riders Com· munity Service Award went to non other than the very active Lady Victona Lust. Mi: Fall Round Up went to Mr. Brian Eschatpe of the Lords of I.eathe~ New Orleans. And Me ~'all Round Up day night and this week his guest Vanna White is a surprise! Wheel of For· tune iH sponsored by the Pot Pie Restau· rant. Pacific Street invite" you to inspect the hunky Santas and elves throughout the Christmas Season for all you stock· ing stuffin' fantasie" with Caged Heat! Men Behind Bars-every night' And in case you need a present, try the bright red sweaters with the snowy white Pacific Street logOti-a holiday must, if you can't have one of the Men Behind Bars ... The collection boxes are in place for the Annual went to Me Tracy Ryan Idol poses with Heaven mgr Ron ~;gan of the Capi· Paolucci Toys For Children With AIDS that the National Leather Associa· tion are collecting They reque.t that the toys be in their original factory wrapping and boxes, so the kids get the instruc· tions, etc., but stuffed toys will always be accepted. tal City Riders of Austin. Congratulations to everyone who attended and to thee winners and the Riders. By the way, get down to the Venture-N Wednesday December 9 as the Texas Riders bartend for Full Moon Madnesa on the Farside. JR's Bar & Grill is having Karaoke Thursdays on the Santa Fe Stage from 13:00 p.m to I :30 a.m. You are invited to join in the fun; some upecale and some silly as an eve­ning at the Karaoke Bar keeps getting bigger. And a special note to you who More on the leather/levi club scene in Houston: .~. .....-. -..... might be inter· Lancers Motor· cycle Club is 15 years old and will hold and anniver~ sary run on Friday and Saturday, December 4 and 5. It will include cocktail parties, Saturday buffet, poker run, ecav~ eeted, everyone who singRon stage aets a FHEf: audio cassette of their performance. Pacific Street continues the Hot Thursday spe· <"i .. lw You show your Gym l.D. card, and Pacific Street will show you a good time with no cover charge! Flex you enger hunt, and a Dr. Charles Silverstein will be at run pin. Registra Crossroads Mkt muscles and show off you latest construction achievemenl Better still, watch the construction workers show their brawn off. Prepare you Merry Ho Ho Hoing with Pacific Street in mind-where "Real Men Still tion fee is $10.00 and t-shirta will be available for$12.00. Registration begins at the Venture Nat 29'l:l Main Street in Houston, Texas and you may call (713) 520-8902 for more inform it.ion. And: Monday December 7th is the Tenth (10th) Anniversary of The Rip­cord. It should be quite a party to be at from 9:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. ll is also a Hlack Tie/Black J.eather Affaii: (No polos and/or dresses, guys) Congratula· tion• to Gary Batchellar and his fine •taff on ten year• or service to the loother. levi and uniform t-ommunity. Heaven i• having their 1992 Reces­sion Buster/ Autumn HarvCtit with Hi· NHG Dance Music Videos and NO COVER from 9:00 to 11:00 p.m.(exclud· ing Holidayti and Special Event.) with any nonpermhable canned good for Al'H Stone Soup Food Pantry. With no canned good you will still receive Reces· sion Buster price cover of only $2.00 between 9:00 to 11:00 p.m. and after that General Admission applies. Of course Heaven has "fabulous drink specials nightly!" B.J. Williams is hosting the Wheel of 1''ortune at E/J's at 10:30 p.m. on Thurs- Dance". DeeeDrag Show at Heaven on Decem­ber 10th will feature a special guest from Dallas, CoCo joining regular DeeeDrag sta~ Kofi, Miss Mid America 1993. (And CoCo-if you read this, I sure wish you would perform thatshowstoppingnum· ber you did at the benefit for Naomi ear· lier this year. That was some of the best dancin' and om• of the b<·st sound edit's I've ever !;('en and heard!) Heaven ·s spe­cial gue..t for DeeeDrag on December 17th i>I Tasha Kohl, 1992 ~:nt.ertainer of the Year. Tasha does some really fun number• so make your plans early and be there. Tonight, and ~'riday and Saturd~y at The Sazamc Celebrity Grille at Smith & ~;Jgin the local group billed as "Hous· ton's own Manhattan Transfer" Swing Set will be performing two shows for your dining and cabaret pleasure; the first at 9::lO p.m. and the second at 11:30 p.m. Swing Set should not be confused with a group of similar name that will be T T T HOUSTON QUICK NOTE performing at Sazarac the following Wednesday through Saturday Decem· ber 9, 10, 11 & 12th, Swing Shift; an exciting and dynamic trio pla;in11 a range of songs and music from early swing and blues to contemporary origi· nals and much in between. Traditional Saturday night at Pacific Street moves into the big Leather and Flesh event with no cover charge for men in chaps or leather jock straps. A handy clothes check allows you to become as naked as you want to be ... doors open at 9:00 p.m. where real men still dance! This Sunday at Mary's, the Wolf Pack will be celebrating the birthday of Wolf Daddy, Bruce Chambers bel(inning at 4:00 p.m. on the patio. If I am not mis· taken this will be quite a fe.tive gather· ing of the pack and their admire'" and close friends. Be sure to be there for this one and get some good pictures­you know-the kind I can't print! New for winter at Gentry is Lesa· gna Night. Every Sunday from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m for only $4.50 you can enjoy lasagna with meat sauce, salad bar and gar· lie bread. For a Tham. Sunday December 6th, the BRB iH proud to present "The 6th Annual Lady Victoria Lust PWA Chnstmas" with guest emcee,; Mona·A littleMore and Ruby Barbeau. There "'ill belotsoflocal celebrities on hand for the ,;how which begins at 6:00 p.m. There will abo be Steak night at the BRBfrom 5:00p.m. to 9:00 p.m. so go early, have a steak dinner and stay to watch the show and fill •ome lucky cowboys Pony Express "Male Box". Sunday December 6th, at Cro,sroac!B market-authorof"The )'\;ew Joy of Gay Sex .. , Charles Silverstein will be on· hand to sign copiCti of hi• book Charlei; 1s also going to be the •pecial gue>;t at Crossroads on Friday December 4 at 7;00 p.m. to a reception for H.A.T.C.H (Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homo­sexuals). \\'hile you ·re there, check out the hlJl(e selection of books, cards, calendars, tapes & CD" and beautiful gift item• that are available. break from the BruC1!lla D'Valle of Corpw; u·as at Fall steak, try Gentry Round up Lasagna Night. Monday and Tuesday, Decem· ber 6 & 7th Marsh Carlton "ill be performing at The Sazarac Celebrity Grille with Clay Howell. This duo pota on a dyne· mite show and And this Sunday at Gentry don't miss the Miss Gentry I 9'J:I Pageant. Evemn11 gown und talent comμ<·t.ition wlll begin at 8:00 p.m. sharp. The duh will award over $fi00.00 in cash and prizes. Sunday December 13th at Gentry i• the &cond Annual Mister Gentry competition. Call the~ bnr for detaiJ8 on ttntry and nward•. Mystery Man and Pacific Street torso logo-Alan returns to his own Caged Heat Sunday. Don't miss this early holi· day treat. He'll have you decking his halls and more ... Don't forget the special cover charge hours on m08t all of the daily Pacific remember they were there to save the day when the Divas diva'd out. Showt1mes nrc 9:30 and I 1;30 p.m. for both days. Be sure to stop by Gentry for a chance to win up to $100.00 at 10:30, l 1:30 and 12:30 every Monday and Tuc~day. Dyan Michaels spms th<· wheel on Monday night w h1J .. J->a1vi Hoata the 1\maday night festivitie". Mary's has Monday night football with the Sundance Cattle Company from 8:00 p.m. till the game j, over on the patio. And now along with that they have Monday night Steak Night from Street schedules. The Sazarac Celebrity Grille will begin serving Sunday Brunch as of this Sunday December 6. The lavish brunch will be served from JI :00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. each Sunday. If you are looking for a beautifol and exciting place to gather with your friends after church for brunch, they are located at 3219 Smith at Elgin. 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. ~- with a great piece ---·,,. of meat, salad and Sunday be sure to stop by the Even Santa rrads The New Voice Dance Hall and Saloon for the new Drag Shows with Jill Jordan hosting a bevy of beauties this week including Laura Lee Love and Black Velvet. Showtime is at 10:30 p.m. and there is plenty of off street parking. Dance Hall and Saloon is located at 202 veget.able with all the fixing" for only $4.!iO. Mondays keep getting busier at the Mining Com· pany as participa· tion in the pool tournament increases each week Go in and enjo~ the sound~ of the CD Jukebox, and then be on hond at i'\·00 p.m. for the pool tour· ney. If you enJoy the huge select.ion of tunCti available on the juke box, come in on Wed­nesdays to get your fill of Coun· try & Western favorites as played by D.J John Sins for the Bear Club for Men. Successful fThat's what Friends are for. .: benefit announces 1993 plans Larry Garrett, the founder of the "l'hat's what Friends are for .. :· annual AIDS chanty event has announced the date and locauon of next year's func· tion. The fourth annual production will take place on June 19, 1993, in the Grand Ballroom of the Weslln·Gallena Hotel. Dr. William T. Shearer and Dr. Patricia Salvato will be honored. In past years, the event was held at the Tower Theater, Rich's, and most recently at the WMtm·Galleria. Each year, procee<ls have doubled, a trend that the organizers hope will continue. Proceeds from the 1992 event topped $45,000. Marvin Davis !Lady V1ctona Lust) "' this years Community Relations Chair· pers
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