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Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989
File 008
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Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989 - File 008. 1989-08-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/163/show/151.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1989-08-18). Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989 - File 008. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/163/show/151

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989 - File 008, 1989-08-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/163/show/151.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 18, 1989
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 1989 / MONTROSE VOICE Activists say crackdown in Argentina intensifies by HEX WOCKNER Harassment of gay men and lesbians in the South American nation of Argentina has worsened to such an extent in recent months that the _!6(. delegates to July's International Lesbian and Gay Association Uth World Conference in Vienna staged a colorful, noisy and multi lingual demonstration outside the Argentine embassy in downtown Vienna. According to activists with the Com tin id ad Homosexual Argentina (CHA) police now routinely back paddy wagons up to the frontm doors of gay bars and discos and haul away the patrons, holding them for up to 72 hours. Gay men face additional harassment in the streets, where authorities charge that they are "poblicly soliciting for the purpose of sex." "All it takes," said CHA's Emmanuel Valido, "is to be standing on the corner with your hands in your pockets. The police will say you were playing with yourself and inviting sex. Or, if you scratch your ear. they say it was a signal chanted pro-gay slogans in Eng- to another man. lish, Spanish and German. The Vienna protest began on a "Gays y lesbianas, unidos, small side street one half block jamas seran vencidos" (Gays and from the central plaza. Activists lesbians united will never be carried signs in their own Ian- beaten") they yelled. The chant guages denouncing the Argentine was a slight alteration of the slo- laws used to harass gays and gan of the Latin American peo ple's revolutions. The protest then moved to Vienna's central square surrounding St. Stephen's Cathedral. Activists linked hanmds and formed a large circle some 35 meters in circumference. Passers-by were perplexed by the multi-lingual protest signs, but realized that gays were upset about something, since "homosexual" looks the same in most Roman-alphabet languages. The police harassment of gays and lesbians in Argentine cities has has only complicated the severe economic and social prolems facing CHA and the country's homosexual movement. CHA in $600 (U.S.) behind on its rent, electricity and taxes; and a dramatically soaring inflation rate has placed condoms out of reach for more than 99 percent of the country's citizens. We would like to keep our correspondence up" said Valido, "but the financial crisis can make us unable to answer because of the high price ot postage. We've discontinued our magazine, Vamos A Andar.' CHA made an emergency plea in Vienna for international assistance and support. Financial donations should be in the form of American Express international money order made out to CHA president Alejandro Zalazar. The address is: Casilla de Correeo 45, Sucursal 37, C.P. 1437, Buenos Aires, Argentina. CHA's name must not be on the address or the envelope. CHA also requested protest letters to Argentine President Carlos Saul Menem at Balcarce 50, C.P. 1064, Buenos Aires; and to local Argentine embassies, with photocopies to CHA. Writers should demand the abolition of the fifth article, first paragraph of Law 333/ 58, the "law on access to personal data" and its amendment concerning "publicly soliciting for the purpose of sex." Our situation is desperate," Valido said. "We're frightened to go in the streets, the bars and discos are being permanently closed and it's not safe for u.n to protest on our own behalf Our classifieds are growing. To advertise your service, garage sale, house for rent or just about anything, call 529-8490. The Montrose Voice eiH.i-_g.M-wS _, $2 f i W%:r. | -5 W_W_\ x' __t__£_$&B -W £■■*_£ ■ ",, * WAVMJE. Models His New steAltm Bomber jacket. George Leland: They called him Mickey Commentary by LEON DANIEL UPI Senior Editor Gary gives himself over to Ihe entertainment aspects of his local news. WASHINGTON-A name like George can take a man all the way to the White House, but it never really fit the Democratic congressman from Houston. George T. Leland was a Mickey if there ever was one. Nobody called him George, although it The Mickeys of the world are fun-loving, hell-raising, boat-rocking types. They're vital, emotional, likeable. All Mickeys aren't Irish. They can be Jewish or, like this one, black Americans. They often are Such a man wasMickey Leland, a charismatic man who once described himself as "an activist for humanity" If that seems grandiose, it also is precisely what he was. Mickey mattered. He spent hie life improving the lives of others. And even his tragic death served as a needed reminder—at a time when the ethics of our leaders are under a Hack—that there still are in Congress men and women of honor. In death, a man is judged one last time on Earth by the quality of those who mourn him. "Mickey was a fighter and a friend of those who've been left out and left behind," said Rep. John Lewis, the Georgia Democrat and authentic American hero. Lewis, a man of singular courage who often shed his blood in the struggle for civil rights, said, "Mickey represented the very best in all of us." That was high praise indeed from a man who was brutally beaten in places like Selma, Ala., as he led marches for the right to Born in Lubbock in 1944, Leland grew up poor, abandoned by his father and raised by his mother, a short-order cook. He became a teacher and then a pharmacist. Elected in 1972 as one ofthe few blacks in the Texas Legislature, he appeared on the floor in a dashiki robe, shocking his colleagues and firmly establishing his political identity. But, as he matured politically, Leland worked successfully within the system for a better world. When he died inaplanecrashin Ethiopia two weeks ago, he was one of the most influential members ofthe Democratic majnriu in Congress. This was a man who persuaded the House leadership to establish the Select Committee on Hunger and let him chair it. As chairman, he traveled often to Africa—before famine became a popular issue and after it had faded from the news. Leland made us care about hungry people. He did that by describing to us how a 14-year-old Sudanese girl died of starvation hefore his eyes. His critics claimed that even after his move toward the political center Iceland was too far to the left. He counted Cuban leader Fidel Castro among his friends. But he had the political courage in 1984 to support Walter Mondale over Jesse Jackson for the Democratic presidential nomination, thus antagonizing many blacks. Leland was a militant who learned that he could make more of a difference by working pragmatically from inside the tent. This kind of adept politicking in the mainstream helped him win $800 million in aid for sub-Sahara Africa in 1985 and major funding for food for homeless Americans the following year. At his death, Leland had moved closer to the center in his struggle against hunger, but nobody was calling him George, He was a Mickey, for sure. 11 I KNOW NOTHING ABOUT ART, BUT I KNOW WHAT I LIKE.' " AIDS doctors develop fund for emergency financial nelp The Chicago-baaed Physicians Association for AIDS Care (PAAC) ia developing a national "superfund" for emergency financial assistance The fund, called Project Lifeline , will be used in part to provide assistance to patients of PAAC physicians. PAAC currently has 460 members nationally, who together have cared for more than 40,000 people with AIDS and ABC. The Project lifeline fund la managed by the AIDS Medical resource Center of Chicago, a non-profit national patient advocacy group. The project has one of the lowest overhead expense factors of any charitable organi__ation In the United States, according to the PAAC. According to Gordon Naiy, PAAC's executive director, PAAC a goal Is to raise 82 million during Its current fiscal year. The organization has asked each of its 28 associate pharmaceutical manufacturer members to contribute to the fund and Is relying on member physicians to help raise funds in their local communities through corporate fund raising programs. —Southeastern Conference Tbe board of directors ofthe Southeastern Conference of Lesbians and Gay Men Inc. will meet In Raleigh, N.C., site of the 1990 conference, Sept. 29, 30 and Oct. 1. The hoard meets twice yearly, Blte *or ft*ure conferences should during the annual conference and approach the board before this in the fell before the next confer- meeting. Further details can be ob- ence. This meeting will be the first talned from 1990 conference time board members have had the headquarters. opportunity to visit a hoat site be- —aids employment fore to the actual conference. For the first time, the California Court of Appeal has National Gay Community Notes ruled that discrimination against employees with AIDS is illegal in California. The court upheld an earlier decision won by National Gay Rights Advocates The region consists of 14 southeastern states, from Maiyland to Florida and Texas to West Virginia. Board members hail from all areas of the region. Meetings will be held at the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina Center. Persons interested in attending meet- a^a _^ Employment Law Center lngs or becoming involved with on __jg g against Raytheon Corpo- She conference are encouraged to ration for discriminating against call or write the 1990 conference an employee with AIDS. Headquarters, PO Box 28863, Ra- Jean0T^,NGRAexecutivedl- lelgh. N.C. 27611.(919) 833-1209. ^^ commellted, ~No one shouId Discussions during the meeting fear losing a job because of their will include election of new board HIV or AIDS status. A healthy members and advisory board economy needs the talents of all its members, as additional planning citizens in the work place and that for the conference and site selec- includes people withAIDS who are Uon for the 1991 conference, as healthy and able to work'' well as regular business. Ignoring the opinions of its own Willie D. PIDdngton and Sharon medical staff, Raytheon refused to Worthtngton, co-chairs for the allow John Chadbourne, a quality .990 conference, will become i year board members at the meeting. Tliery will serve during the conference. Anyone wishing to have their City considered as a potential hoat control analyst, to work after he was diagnosed with AIDS. Chadbourne died In January of 198S. In February of 1987, NGRA won a landmark victory when Califor nia's Fair Employment and Housing Commission ruled that AIDS is a handicap. The ruling made it illegal for employers to discriminate against persons wltli the Illness. After appealing this decision, Raytheon was ordered by the Santa Barbara Superior Court to pay back wages to Chadbourne's estate, all attorney's fees, and to begin an "att... in the work place" training program for all employ- NGRAs legal director Leonard Graff said, "The Appellate Court's decision confirms that Raytheon was out of step with the rest of corporate America and will be held liable for Its discrimination against John Chadbourne. This Is a far reaching ruling that bars all employers in California from discriminating against people with AIDS!' National Gay Rights Advocates and the Employment Uw Center of San Francisco are co-counsel on the case. Peter Laura from the law office of Leroy Walker in las Angeles was the trial lawyer —HRCF interns The Human Rights Campaign Fund Is looking for interns for its office In Washington, D.C. Interns work In all program areas, including legislative, political, fleld, lesbian Issues, administration and public relations. "This is a great opportunity for someone Interested In lesbian and gay Issues, or Just In learning how government and politics work;' said Eric Rosenthal, HRCF political director. Rosenthal coordinates the intern program. "Interns (can) make a contribution to the lesbian and gay movement as they work on important Congressional issues" Interns receive a stipend from HRCF and must work at least 20 hours per week for three months. Interns work under the direction of an HRCF staff member. People who have questions or who are interested in applying for Internships should contact Eric Rosenthal at (202)628-4160 or at the Human Rights Campaign Fund, 1012 14th Street, N.W., 6th Floor, Washington, DC. 20005. The application should include a resume, writing sample and a letter discussing why you want to work at HRCF HRCF is the largest national AIDS and gay and lesbian advocacy organization and political action committee. HRCF lobbies, educates and helps elect members of the U.S. Congress. HRCF also organizes and mobilizes gays and lesbians and their supporters in the field. and influences public opinion through national and local media. We're working to bring you a real newspaper The Montrose Voice. We cover the News of Montrose The Montrose Voice
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