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Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989
File 007
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Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989 - File 007. 1989-08-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/163/show/150.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1989-08-18). Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989 - File 007. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/163/show/150

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989 - File 007, 1989-08-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/163/show/150.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 18, 1989
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript MONTROSE VOICE I FRIDAY. AUGUST 18. 1989 Human Rights Foundation gets grant share Free zsa zsa The Texas Human Rights Foundation will receive $52,500 ofthe $2 million federal grant being administered by the Houston Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA) HIV Advisory Council. The Harris County Hospital District has acted as lead agency for the council in working to obtain the Health Resources Services Administration grant. The funds are part of a total $80,000 in new grant funding the THRF will get to continue its statewide AIDS legal Resource Project. THRF, a non profit foundation involved in civil rights litigation and education since 1976, has provided legal services to Texans affected by AIDS since 1986. THRF operates a toll-free telephone line through which callers can receive free legal counselling and attorney referrals for AIDS-related legal problems (1-800-828-6417). The 52,500 will fund the position of an AIDS legal coordinator for the next two years to insure that legal: the Houston SMSA who have been exposed to AIDS. Since 1986, AIDS has been the leading cause of death for men between the ages of 25 and 44 in the Houston area. Gene Harrington, vice president of THRF's board of trustees and one of 19 members of the Texas Legislative Task Force on AIDS, underscored the need to protect the civil rights of people with AIDS. Asked to explain how the epidemic has affected the state and individuals economically, he referred to the Task Force's find ings on legal issues. Harrington stressed, however, that the more critical question presented by the AIDS crisis is one of basic human dignity. "How our state and we as individuals respond to the Al DS crisis will e a measure of how just and compassionate our society is judged to be," he said, David Bryan, THRF's legal director and grant wnter, will meet in Houston on Aug. 29 with R. King Hailer, director of govern ment relations for the Harris County Hospital District and chairman of the advisory council. The terms of the funded program will be finalized at that meeting. In addition to the federal funding, THRF was awarded grants from two private foundations. The Texas Equal Access to Justice Foundation awarded $17,500 to the legal group from its Interest on Lawyers Trust Accounts (IOTA) program, and the Chicago Resource Center gave THRF $10,000. New Orleans 'Southern Decadence' is Labor Day weekend The New Orleans Gay/Lesbian Business and Professional Association has announced that this year's celebration of the city's "well kept secret holiday;' Southern Decadence Day, is scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 2. In 1972. several friends sharing a house they had nicknamed "Belle Reve" decided te host a theme party on Labor Day weekend. Because ofthe name they had given their large home in New Orleans' Faubourg St. John, they decided the theme should be "Southern Decadence," and everyone should costume accordingly. The party was such a success that the original group decided to repeat it the next year, but with a change. They thought it would be fun te meet at a bar friendly to both gays and non-gays in the French Quarter and march back to the house. As things go, the marchers kept going into other bars to escape the heat as the parade tried t to Belle Reve. Suddenly _ realized that the entire group was going the wrong way. They then decided it was time to return to the party that was already in progress at Belle Reve, In 1974 it was decided that a Grand Marshal should be selected to lead the parade on its way back i.i Belle Reve. Il was also decided that 1974 would be the last year the party would return to the house, and the subsequent partying would be held on the streets ofthe French Quarter and the Faubourg Marigny. That tradition has not been broken. Grand Marshals have been chosen each year, each trying to surpass their predecessors in making the parade routes as bizarre and urn xyi-:i led as possible. When the crowd of costumed revelers begins to gather around noon for the parade, traffic on Royal Street becomes stalled ;is drivers and passengers alike rubberneck al the strangely attired (or unattired) parade participants. Costumes, irom the simple to the very elaborate, typically mock famous historical and fictional characters, as well as local celebrities. At 3:00 p.m. on Southern Decadence Day, the Grand Marshal and personal entourage arrive. With the shrill of a police whistle, the procession begins. There are always surprises in the parade route and few, if any, downtown gay bars are excluded along the way. The parade has also been known to visit prestigious downtown shopping complexes. The Riverwalk, Canal Place and the Jax Brewery have been visited in the past, along with major hotel lobbies. Jackson Square, the Moon Walk andnhe French Market are never spared. Kickoff parties, concerts and special events are featured in all ofthe city's gay and lesbian bars throughout the weekend. This year, the New Orleans AIDS Task Force is participating for the first time. The organization will sponsor "Summer Sizzle" on Saturday, Sept. 1. The event, which will be held in the French Market, will feature live NewOrle- ans-style entertainment and unlimited food and drink. You would think that Paul Spreadbury, the man who started the Society for Ihe Prevention of Anything Ajj.iinsl Zsa Zsa, is a longtime fan of Zsa ZsaGaborand became outraged when he learned she had been arrested lor harass- ibis ren paid her any "Nah, I i Spreadbury says. He started the organization— SPAZZ for short- just for fun. "The poinl of this isn't lo make money. We're losing money," said Spreadbury says. "The point is, my God, America, you don'l have to take everything s.j seriously." He also has noticed a great inequity in the Zsa Zsa case. "We've got people who murder and rape and walk away from the courtroom and here we are making a case like this against Zsa Zsa?" Spreadbury says. "Something's It costs $19.96 to join SPAZZ and members get a T-shirt with puffy pink letters, custom placard and a bumper sticker—all proclaiming "Free Zsa Zsa." As of" about two weeks ago, Spreadbury only had 47 orders. "LCOK-THEAYATOLLAH'S DEAD-'.-.THE CONTRAS DI5tfANPED.'-.WHAT PO YVU SAY WE PARP0N OLLIE NORTH AND CALL IT A PECAPE ?! " "I DON'T WANNA BE THE HOSTAGE ....I WANNA BE THE TERRORIST.'... JOHNNY ALWAY5 GETS TO BETHE TERRORIST.'" Every weekend, our advertisers come face to face with our 22,000 Montrose Voice readers. Maybe you should consider advertising in the Montrose Voice? —92.5% of the readers of the Voice are "somewhat likely" or "very likely" to use a product or service because they saw it advertised in the Montrose Voice. —The average household income of the Montrose Voice reader is $45,370 a year. Impressed? So are we. Ready to advertise now? Call us. 529-8490. Who says these are the real figures? Simmons Market Research Bureau in a readership survey of the Montrose Voice concluded December 1988. And who is Simmons? The major surveyor of newspaper and magazine readers in the U.S. The same company used by the Houston Post and the Houston Chronicle (whose average readership figures, by the way, were not nearly as impressive as ours). We're working to bring you a real newspaper. The Montrose Voice.
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