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Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989
File 003
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Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989 - File 003. 1989-08-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/163/show/146.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1989-08-18). Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989 - File 003. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/163/show/146

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989 - File 003, 1989-08-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/163/show/146.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 18, 1989
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript VOICE / FRIDAY, AUGUST 18, 1989 New York gay group eases stand on AIDS testing By DON MULLEN >EW YORK (UPI)—A major gay health organization relaxed its resistance to AIDS testing Hnri launched an ad campaign urging concerned New Yorkers to "think about" a blood test for signs of the disease. Richard Dunne, execute ediTec tor of the Gay Men's Health Crisis, pointed out there are 180,000 to 360,000 people in the city infected with the human immunodeficiency ivirus, or HIV, which causes AIDS. Dunne explained the new policy on testing follows guarantees of confidentiality and newly developed "Testing is a very personal decision," he said Tuesday. "Our policy has evolved with the times. "Today we have a strong law in New York state which protects people's confidentiality." Dunne told a news conference attended by some critics ofthe campaign. Newspaper ads urging readers, "If you haven't taken Ihe antibody test for the AIDS virus, think about it," appeared Tuesday in The New York Times, New York Newsday and The Daily News. "There are compelling reasons to get tested and to know your HIV status," Dunne said. "When the HlV antibody test was first developed. there was virtually nothing people who were infected could do except wait for the first symptoms of AIDS to appear.' Today, however, there are drugs "which can prolong life by slowing the development of AIDS and preventing some HIV-related illnesses," he said. Gay groups and others have resisted calls for mandatory testing for AIDS for fear the information could be used against them. The test, which involves taking a small blood sample, does not detect whether a person has AIDS. It indi- eate-i only that HIV has entered the body, and the body has produced an tibodies to fight the intrusion. HIV is spread by sexual or blood- to-blood contact, such as drug users sharing needles. It can also be passed on from an infected woman to her baby. Dunne stressed that the call for testing was coupled with the availability of counseling for those suffering from stress before the test and others who found they were infected with the AIDS virus. Some individuals al the news conference argued bitterly with Dunne, questioning the good of testing when many could not afford treat- ■Hov, ; going t have to die?" asked one. Dunne acknowledged that many people suffering from acquired immune deficiency syndrome or HIV- related illnesses could not afford treatment and called for more government help. "The existence of effective drugs is meaningless without access to them," he said. "Access must include not only the drugs themselves but also the primary care necessary to monitor an individual's health. "We call on the city, state and federal governments to work together to ensure that life-saving treatments and care are available to all without regard to ability to pay," Dunne said. It's the season for openings Houston Live by NEIL BADDERS This week's "Houston Live" will give you a little head start on some of ihe coming theatrical openings around the city. Theatre Under the Stars is announcing their season "By Popular Demand." The Comedy Workshop is opening a new revue called "Houtopial' and Main Street Theater is reviving its biggest hit The Trust." Before launching into this preview, however, let me tell you about two outstanding efforts in fundraising on behalf of AIDS or- —Briar Patch Follies Last Sunday, a musical comedy revue was performed at the Briar Patch to benefit McAdory House, Omega House and Stone Soup. The two hour show featured a mix of amateur and professional entertainers, who had rehearsed forthe one night performance since May. The a series of auctions, a raffle and the show. $27,000 had been raised before I left at intermission. Congratulations on the fine work, —Bering's "Beehive" benefit The opening night of "Beehive," now at the Alley Theatre, netted $16,000 for the Bering Foundation, another outstanding effort. —TUTS' season Music Hall season, according to Frank Young, executive director. The musical theater roster announced by Young was selected virtually by audience survey. Expanding the Houston season to seven shows and adding a Saturday matinee (to bring to 14 its subscription performances of each showl, TUTS will also be taking four of its productions on the road following their local staging. The five subscription musicals in TUTS' "By Popular Demand'' season include three Broadway classics—"Mame," Sept. 19-Oct. 1, "The King and I," Dec. 5-17, and "Camelot," Jan. 23-Feb. 4— teamed with two musical favorites of the 1980's—"A Chorus Line" March 6-18 and "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas," May 15-27. TUTS' subscribers also will get first crack at tickets to limited return engagements of "Ballet Folklorico de Mexico" Oct. 14-15 and "Jesus Christ Superstar!' April li-8. Both are revivals from the just completed 1988-89 season. Juliet Prowse will take the title role in "Mame," TUTS' season opener, which will travel to Seattle's 5th Avenue Theatre, then have a limited Northwest tour. Prowse reprises the role she played in the original London production. "Mame" will be directed and choreographed by Diana Baffa-Brill, choreographer ofthe show's most recent Broadway revival, who also staged many of the production's national tours as well as TUTS' 1984 mounting with Marilyn Maye. "The King and I," Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammersleio's second musical classic based on the novel "Anna and the King of Siam," will be TUTS' holiday attraction at the Music Hall. As usual, TUTS' holiday musical will showcase talented students from the company's official training wing, the Humphreys School of Musica) Theater. "Camelot," the third most popular musical with TUTS' audiences, will make its third appearance on TUTS' stage in January. Set in the splendor of the medieval court of England, "Camelot" was created for Broadway in 1960 by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe. Winner of four Tony Awards, the original production starred Richard Burton as King Arthur, Julie Andrews as Guenevere and Robert Goulet as Lancelot. The midwinter production will be shared with the Sacramento Civic Light Opera in that west coast summer company's premiere winter sea- "A Chorus Line," celebratingita 15th year on Broadway, has been scheduled by Theatre Under the Stars for a special 15th anniversary production, replacing its previously announced Southwest premiere of "Grover's Corners" starring Mary Martin. The longest running musical on Broad way and the winner of nine Tony Awards, a New York Drama Critics Circle Award and a Pulitzer Prize for drama, "A Chorus Line" was conceived, choreographed and directed by Michael Bennett, with book by James Kirkwood and Nicholas Dante, music by Marvin Hamlisch and lyrics by Edward Kleban. "The best Little Whorehouse in Texas," which made its debut here at the Tower Theatre in 1979 after opening on Broadway in 1978, will conclude the "By Popular Demand" season. Houston favorite June Terry will star as the musical madam., Mona Stangley. a role she performed at the Tower, on national tour and for over a year in the Las Vegas company at the Sahara and Desert Inn showrooms. Director Roger Allan Raby and choreographer Angie Wheeler, both veterans ofthe original Tower Theatre and touring companies, will stage the all new production for TUTS. — The Comedy Workshop "Houtopia: a Hitchhiker's Guide to Houston" opens at The Come- 'Houtopia" opens Aug. 17 at The Comedy Workshop dy Workshop Aug. 17. Chris Berue directs this original comedy revue that lets you know how to be a mover and a shaker in the Bayou City on 79 cents a day or less (if you don't get on the freeways|. Leam how to deal with the new Houston "pay zoo" ... you know, the with the same old animals, and walk a mile in the shoes of a Houston movie cop (the guy that keeps you from sneaking into a second movie in a multi-cinema). If you lived through the Houston "boom," then the bust and if things aren't quite "back" for you yet, then you'll love this show. "Houtopia" plays Thursday through Saturday at 8:30 p.m., with an additional shows at 11:00 p.m. on Saturdays. Improvisation sessions follow on single show nights. —The Trust Murder, money and a special mission are the elements that come together in Douglas Killgore's "The Trust," being staged for its third run at Main Street Theater in the Village, Aug. 17 through Sept. 17 We're working to bring you a real newspaper. Given its world premiere i tion here in 1987 and revived in 1988, this fact-based drama about the mysterious death of William Marsch Rice has become the biggest box office success in Main Street Theater's 14 years of operation. This success has led author Killgore and director Neil 'Sandy' Havens to develop plans for a film The story concerns early Houston millionaire Rice's plans to create a great school, a "Cooper Union of the South" and how his dream was nearly thwarted by an unscrupulous New York lawyer and Rice's trusted valet. Thecritne and the sensational trial that followed garnered headlines both in New York and Texas for many months at the turn of the century. The title also refers to the mission Rice entrusted to his friend and attorney, Capt. James A. Baker, to bring Rice Institute (now University) into being, Houston actor Harold Suggs, a member of Actor's Equity, will once again portray Rice. Tbe Montrose Voice HOUSTON, TEXAS ISSUE "60 FRIDAY. AUGUST IS. ,988 Published Fridays (Commit nitg ^Hibliahing Compun]; 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copy-igni 1989 Office hours: 9am-6pm All Bills Paid Owner Managed Access Gates Being Installed! Convenient to: Bus line Shopping Hospitals Efficiency, 1,2,3 bedrooms Come See The New... QREENWAY PLACE 3333 Cummins 623-2034 BETTER LAirms & QARDETIS Total Lawn Maintenance Commercial Residential —Landscape —Lawn Care —Tree Service Free Estimates best Prices 523-LAUm Jurors recommend death for serial killer Kraft SANTA ANA, Calif. (UPH—Jurors Aug. 11 recommended the death penalty for serial killer Randy Steven Kraft, convicted of the sex and torture slayings of 16 young men during a decade of murder. In recommending that Kraft be put to death in the California gas chamber at San Quentin prison, a Superior Court jury rejected the only other punishment he faced: life in prison without the possibility of parole. The jury reached its recommendation after deliberating portions of four days at the penalty phase of Kraft's 10-month trial. Superior Court Judge Donald McCartin set a tentative sentencing date of Oct. 27. Kraft, 44, a former computer consultant from Long Beach, was convicted May 12 of 16 counts of first-degree murder and one count each of sodomy and mayhem. The penalty phase began June 5. Deputy District Attorney Bryan Brown, urging jurors to recommend the death sentence, introduced evidence linking Kraft to eight additional murders outside California. Investigators believe Kraft may be responsible for as many as 65 slayings in all. Defense lawyers, meanwhile, pleaded with jurors to spare Kraft's life. "Killing Randy is not going to restore life to anyone," defense attorney C. Thomas McDonald said in his closing argument. "The only thing that would be accomplished (by execution) is more violence, another family would lose a loved one, another mother would bury her son." The defense called as witnesses dozens of Kraft's relatives, friends and co-workers to praise his character and intellect. In addition, a neuroscientist testified that Kraft may suffer from brain damage. Prosecutors said that from 1.172 until 1983, Kraft prowled Orange County roadways, inviting young male hitch hikers into his car, then plying them with alcohol and sedatives until they were rendered helpless. Kraft then tortured, mutilated and sexually abused his victims- many of them young Marines— before strangling them and dumping their bodies along freeway ramps or in remote areas. Kraft was arrested in May 1983 after California Highway Patrol officers who stopped his car for weaving on the San Diego Freeway in Mission Viejo found the body of Terry Gambrel, a 25-year- old Marine from El Toro, in the Prosecutors contended Gambrel had consumed a combination of drugs and alcohol and was strangled with his own belt after his wrists were bound with his shoe Investigators also found in Kraft's car a handwritten list of 61 entries that prosecutors contend was a coded "death list" of Kraft's But another defense attorney, James Merwin, contended the list was simply Kraft's way of coding the names of guests heintended to invite to a surprise party. The defense said there was no "concrete evidence" linking Kraft to any killing. But prosecutors said Kraft had a fetish for keeping souvenirs of his victims. Photos of several victims were found in his car and more photos, along with items belonging to several victims, were found in the house he shared with a companion. His fingerprints were found on pieces of glass recovered near one victim. Kraft's 10-month trial is the longest and costliest criminal trial in Orange County history. Prosecutors estimated the case had coat more than $2 million for attorneys fees, investigators, experts and other court costs before the actual trial even began. The judge has since ordered the cost of Kraft's defense kept secret. Sundeck Indoor Swimminc Pool Sauna Steam room Whirlpool Eurotan Tanning Bed Wide Screen Television Private Video Rooms 4 Video Channel. Weight Area 30 Day Workout Pass $25.00 Saturday, August 19, 9pm Safe Sex Seminar Snacks at 8pm in the TV room Half Price Rooms & Lockers 8am-ll:45pm TUESDAY—LOCKERS WEDNESDAY—SINGLE ROOMS THURSDAY—1/2 PRICE LOCKERS VISIT OUR NEWLY REMODELED VIDEO ROOM New Prices Open 24 Hours a Day! A Safe Place (o Met." 3100 FANNIN HOUSTON, TX (713) 522-2379
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