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Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989
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Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989 - File 002. 1989-08-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/163/show/145.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1989-08-18). Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989 - File 002. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/163/show/145

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989 - File 002, 1989-08-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/163/show/145.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 460, August 18, 1989
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 18, 1989
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript Drinking down among pri^e fn the '90's: Don't drop the 'ball' Texans x austin(UPD-Texan,.reflecting COMMENTARY BY SHFRI COHEN DARBONNE. INSIDE AUSTIN (UPI)-Texans, reflecting a national trend attributed to the aging of baby boomers and heightened health concerns, are cutting back on the consumption of alcoholic beverages, a new study says. A survey done for New York- based Impact magazine showed a significant decline in hard liquor sales in the United States during the past decade and a slight drop in beer and wine sales during the past several years. "There have been a lot of social changes," said Richard Spence, a researcher for the Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse. '"You have the aging ofthe baby boomers. "There's more health consciousness among people. Bubba is getting overweight. Perhaps Bubba wants to get rid of his beer gut when he gets to his 30s'' The Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse, which uses tax figures from liquor sales to determines a per capita consumption figure for those 14 and older, said Texans have drinking less beer than they did 10 years ago. During 1979, an average Texas beer drinker consumed more than 41 gallonswhilein 1988 the amount declined to 33 gallons, the commis- Distilled spirits, which includes whiskey, vodka, bourbon and tequila, saw a drop from 2.3 gallons per person to 1.3 gallons. Wine consumption rose from 1.2 gallons per person in 1979 to slightly more than 2 gallons per person in 1988. But wine consumption has dropped since peaking in 1986. The category of ale and malt liquors has shown steady consumption in Texas of about 1.3 gallons per person per year during the 1979- The Impact survey found that shipments of hard liquor nationally dropped from 166 million cases in 1987 to 159 million cases in 1988, a decline of 4.2 percent. Liquor sales were 2,5 percent less in 1970, the first year surveyed by Impact. "It's no secret that consumption is down," said Reuben Kogut, a member of the board of directors of the Texas Package Sfc tion. "People are definitely using our product in a different way than they used to. They are planning to buy less, but a better brand." Kogut said the economic slump in Texas, the negative image liquor has gotten by being linked with drugs, the raising of the state's legal drinking age and the liquor industry's campaign for responsible consumption have contributed lo declining sales. Court order sought for Metro drivers' MONTROSE VOICE THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE D Con unit) i-Lib _[.. fl (Con,,,,,, D FRIDAY ^» 1989D SSUE 460 MONTROSE WEATHER THBOUGH MONDAY Partly ho' Day ,qh_ .»< ut 92, night lows about 72, 20% chance ot a ternoon thundershowers. Caucus suspends rule: Hill can stay president names The attorney for a handicapped lesbian who is suing Metropolitan TYansit Authority for alleged discrimination and harassment by drivers in its MetroLift program will seek a court order today, Aug. 18, to force Metro to supply the names of the drivers involved. Phyllis Frye, attorney for Michelle Tellison, said the hearing a 1:30 p.m. is part of a long battle over discovery (the release to counsel of necessary and pertinent information! in the case. Tellison has charged Metro with "blatant discrimination" against her because of her lesbian lifestyle. Frye said that Metro's pleadings, rejected early on by the court, insist that its contractor for the lift program. Eagle Paratransit, is the responsible entity and has refused to release the drivers' names. Tellison, who has cerebral palsy, has difficulty reading information off a name tag and in many insta-.ces the drivers do not even wear their identification tags, Frye said. Tellison has charged that MetroLift drivers have harrassed her with questions about her sexual practices and have refused to help her get into her house, one of the services required of the drivers. In one instance, the driver refused to help when Tellison fell out of her wheelchair, Frye said. Frye said she hopes to get the court to order Metro to pro vide some means of identifying the drivers. As for the company's pleadings that Metro is not responsible, Frye responded, "the (MetroLiftl vans have Metro written on them." The company also frequently touts "its" van program in promotional material, she said. By SHERI COHEN DARBONNE The Montrose Voice The Houston Gay Political Caucus voted at its meeting Wednesday night, Aug. 16, to suspend an article in its bylaws prohibiting officers ofthe caucus liinn holding or seeking public office to allow Ray Hill, current president, to finish his term. Hill has announced he intends to run for Justice ofthe Peace, Precinct 1. With 49 voting members present, the 29-13 vote just squeaked by the two thirds majority required to make the change. Hill argued on his own behalf that no black, women's or other minority group has such a rule. He also noted that the current president of the Dallas Lesbian and Gay Political Coalition has run for City Council there. Hill also asked the caucus to consider that he is asking for "only three weeks" after his formal announcement in the J.P. race to complete his one year term. He said he does not intend to seek reelection as president of thecaucus. But Pat Gandy told the mem bere that if they were to suspend the rule in one case, they may as well "not have it at all." "The law is there for ureason.lt we change it for this, then whs even have it? We might as well just take it out (of the bylawsl." The bylaw provision was adopted in 1987 because members felt that it would be a conflict of interest for officers of the caucus, which screens candidates and makes endorsements, to run for office. Though the vote suspends the rule for the remainder of Hill's term, ihe bylaw remains on the books. In other action Wednesday, the caucus adopted n list of general questions to be used in screening all candidates for office lliis elec tion year. Other questions, to , used in screening candidates for specific offices, will he presented later. Hill said. Members of the caucus share!; of the late CoogresB- Mickey Leland, and dis the loss. The caucus voted lo focus its previously announced donation drive for Stone Soup nn one day. Sept. Hi was selected as the date for the pointed drive, with details of the event to be discussed in more detail at the next meeting. Gandy, who heads up HGLPC's 1 leminTEitic < 'ommitlee, reacted to Hill's suggested political strategy in Ihe expected special election for 1 ,cliind's Congressional seat. Hill had asked the caucus to consider running an extra HGLPC-sup- ported candidate to "hold our votes together as a barjtainin;; chip," A runoff in the election i? likely because of the number of candidates expected to run. Gandy called the strategy "very questionable" undermost t■ircum- "It would only work if there were so many candidates...and we could wind up taking votes away and the best one might not win," she said. "We better not jump into getting behind any candidates right now...the situation is going to remain very fluid." Gandy said. "We need to keep all our eggs in one basket and get behind (the candidate) who best represents our in- Gandy and Brian Keever also urged caucus members to participate in the memorial services scheduled for the Congressman, The not) HGLPC meeting will be at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 6, at the Metropolitan Multi Service center, 1475 West Gray. Aug. 21 is the deadline for joining thecaucus to vote at the City Council/mayoral endorsement meeting on Sept. 20. It's the Season for Openings Neil Badders 'Houston lave,' inside The Legacy of Mickey Lelana News and Commentaries inside by Sheri Cohen Darbonne and Leon Daniel Computer game teaches adolescents about AIDS Developers of a new computer game about AIDS say they hope their work will serve as a adolescents. The game was created by two professors in the University of Texas School of Allied Health Sciences at Houston's Program in Biomedical Communications and developed with the help of graduate students in the program. The team worked largely on their own time. Dr. Craig Johnson, associate professor in Biomedical Communications who conceived the educational tool, said he came up with the idea after reading the Surgeon General's Report on AIDS. "I realized there was a real absence of information, especially in the adolescent population," Johnson said. He met with Bill Fetter, assistant professor in the program, and the two decided to tackle the challenge of creating BlockAIDS, a video arcade type game with colorful graphics and original characters. The game is •eptiv John; ■aid. "How nrs of Ihe BlockAIDS name, shows how i\ intended to teach adolescents about the acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and Johnson and Fetter say they must continually update the information as new reports on the disease are released. BlockAIDS is currently on display in the Museum of Natural Science's Hall of Health Sciences Fetter calls the game concept "an interesting evolution." "Neither (Johnson) or myself are big on game playing," he admitted. "We decided on a game as opposed to other, more traditional methods of teaching, because we feh adolescents would be more re- lany teenagers are actually going to read the Surgeon General's report on AIDS?" The two considered different approaches, and Fetter came up with the idea of a variant of tic- fere with teaching^ Fetter said. "My initial thinking was that a game that was fairly intuitive would be much easier for the learner to play. If we had created an entirely new design, wew'ould spend more time teaching them how to play the game than teaching them about AIDS," he said, BlockAIDS players complete rows of blocks by correctly answering questions about AIDS. Novice players can get a "hint" that reduces the point value of their block. When aquestion is answered incorrectly, the "virus" takes over the block, preventing completion of the row. As rows are completed, players advance to various levels, each with more squares to block to corn- Mary Anne Faye and Olu Koleoshu. both biomedical communications graduates, were brought on hoard to assist in the game's development. The team of four met weekly, spending many late nights designing questions, graphics and computer screens. "We did this on our own time, because whether it was funded or not, we wanted to make a contribution,'' Johnson said. The final touches were added when Pat Grover, another graduate, created the game's "hero" and "villain" that occupy the blocks. Johnson, whose background is in educational psychology, and Fetter, whose field is instructional technology, say the success of the game has inspired the group to consider creating other health ed- Fetter also hopes the game can be used in the school districts as a health education aid.
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