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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
File 018
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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 018. 1983-09-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1589.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-09-23). Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1589

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 018, 1983-09-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1589.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 23, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript Oz 'n' Ends By Randy Alfred QUOTE OF THE WEEK: The New York Times went to Daniel J. Boorstin, Librarian of Congress, for reaction to reports that book sales and library use have increased steadily in recent years, despite competition from the electronic media. "New technologies transform the use of old ones," he commented. "They don't replace them." Boorstin, a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian, continued: "Reading is a lot like sex. It is a private and often secret activity. It is often undertaken in bed, and people are not inclined to underestimate either the extent or the effectiveness of their activity." THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT: From the daily schedule of the 130th California State Fair, Saturday, August 27: "12:00- 8:00, FFA Demos/Junior Exhibits; 1:00, FFA Beef Judging; 1:00, 3:45, 4:45, Sensory Evaluation." THAT'S ART: The State of California commissions an official portrait of each governor upon his (no women yet) retirement. Bachelor Governor (sounds like a sitcom, eh?) Jerry Brown left office in January after two four-year terms. The unconventional Brown has chosen an unconventional portraitist, Don Bachardy, 49, whose work is often described as "somewhat abstract." Bachardy lives in Santa Monica with his lover of 30 years, author Christopher Isherwood, 79. THAT'S NOT SPORTING: In a key sequence of the new flic Star Chamber, Michael Douglas tries to engage Hal Hol- brook in a sensitive conversation admidst thousands of cheering baseball fans at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. The stadium P.A. announces Dusty Baker and Steve Sax as they come to the plate. When I saw the film here in San Francisco, Giants fans in the theater booed the Dodger duo. THAT'S POLITICALLY CORRECT: At a conference on lesbian and gay aging held here this summer, Randy Stallings of the Unitarian-Universalist Service Committee told a panel on spirituality and religion of an 80-year-old black lesbian from a mid western congregation. Her "multiple layers of oppression" made her a popular speaker at gatherings of the liberal religion, Stallings explained. She confided to him: "I'm terrified of going blind. If I go blind, I'll have to speak to a different Unitarian-Universalist group every night." A PARABLE: Imagine you were black and lived in a small town in the southern United States in 1954. The town had two lakes for swimming: a large, clear one with deep spots for diving, sandy shaded shores, and a picnic area for whites; and a small, shallow, muddy, mosquito-infested slough for blacks. For years, you held marches, wrote letters and gathered signatures on petitions, all without success, to desegregate the desirable lake. Finally, you went to federal court, and you won. This year, the lake is open to all. But this year, there is a polio epidemic in the county. The lake looks clean but, in Affairs of State The U.S. Senate has added its voice to the crucial public debate over the official U.S. Olympic uniform. The senators had to choose between three outfits designed by Levi Strauss: the "Classic"—a red blazer with white skirt or trousers; the "Western"—denim jacket, jeans, cowboy hat and boots; and the "Active"—a red, white and blue warm-up suit. The "Classic" was the big winner, reports Forbes Magazine. About half the Democrats favored it, as did two out of three Republicans. Regional pride definitely had something to do with the vote. Senators Lexalt of Nevada and Tower of Texas both voted for the "Western" look. Sept. 23, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 17 Dateline S.F. actuality, harbors the crippling poliomyelitis virus. You've fought for years for your freedom, but would you go swimming now or wait until the epidemic had passsed? Imagine you were gay and lived in a large urban center in the United States in 1983.... LONG CAMPAIGN: Bill Kraus, aide to U.S. Representative Sala Burton and a veteran of many political campaigns, had his own insightful analogy when he addressed a group of physicians at an AIDS conference this summer. In political campaigns, Kraus said, "You devise all kinds of ways of getting information" out, including TV ads, radio ads, billboards, bus signs and special brochures targetted at specific groups and neighborhoods. "You barrage a person repeatedly with messages in order to make an impact on the decision that that person is going to make," Kraus continued. It's "all part of a carefully coordinated, well-thought-out progressing program designed to influence what that person does with his or her vote "Now if all that is necessary to try to make some Democrats in San Francisco decide which Democrat they're going to vote for in a primary election, imagine what is necessary to try to make the point to people that they need to consider that one of their most basic behaviors, around which they have in many ways identified themselves, and the fulfillment of which has been to many of us a mark of our freedom as gay people, which we have fought for all of our adult lives—imagine the difficulty of making the point to people that certain types of sexual conduct might be related to the transmission of this disease, and that by changing or eliminating some types of sexual conduct, re-emphasizing others, that they will be safer. "That is a very fundamental aspect of human behavior and of one's self-concept, and that would take a campaign which is much more thought-out, much more significant, much longer-ranged, and much more ongoing that the kind we do in a political campaign.... "It's going to be a long time ... until we have a cure for this disease. The way we can save our people's Uvea in the meantime is to educate each other as to the best ways to engage in sex positively and safely during the 10 years or five years or six months or however long it takes to end this disease." Alfred's column originates at the "Sentinel," a San Francisco gay newspaper. ©1983 Randy Alfred, all rights reserved.
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