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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
File 013
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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 013. 1983-09-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1584.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-09-23). Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 013. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1584

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 013, 1983-09-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1584.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 23, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript 12 MONTROSE VOICE / SEPT. 23, 1983 AIDS Prevention Through Hypnosis ? From Randall C. Stein, Therapeutic and Forensic Hypnosis Institute I feel compelled to answer the libelous and unjust attack made indirectly on my work by Rick Grossman in last week's VOICE (Sept. 9, "Beware of Quacks")-1 can't comment on others to whom Mr. Grossman referred; I try not to talk about things I don't know enough about. I'm not saying he is wrong in some of what he wrote, but he is grossly misinformed about my work in the community. I heartily agree about "being on the lookout for unscrupulous individuals and services" and needing "to know how to check their reputations and efficacy" (and hope Mr. Grossman and all others interested will check out my credentials and services for our mutual benefit). My friends and clients can readily verify that when it comes to my work, my reputation is quite clear, and that I definitely "know my stuff." It was Sigmund Freud who stated that if emotional support were ever to be delivered to the masses, it would in all likelihood be through some form of hypnosis or self-hypnosis. And via a program myself and my associate, J. Michael Boulch, have put together, I am attempting to implement that in our community, gay and straight alike. The success of hypnotherapy in conjunction with cancer therapy has been widely reported in many professional journals and books. The use of hypnosis, mental imagery and stress reduction has been well covered by nationally-known O. Carl Simon ton, M.D., and Stephanie Matthews-Simonton (Directors of the Dallas-based Cancer Counseling and Research Center) in their bestsellers Getting Well Again and Stress, Psychological Factors and Cancer. A large part of their programs and books are about the theory and use of hypnosis, stress reduction and imagery to promote therapeutic change. I welcome the opportunity to work with victims of AIDS and other such diseases, in conjunction with their regular medical therapy. But I'm especially interested in the preventative uses of hypnosis. As I've stated in our ads, reduction of stress, imagery and self-hypnosis can greatly strengthen the immune system. The underlying causes of many illnesses is a deficient immune system wherein the body is unable to sufficiently defend itself (thus the name of our program: Acquired Immune Sufficiency Therapy). To ignore the many beneficial aspects of hypnosis (in preventative work, as well as in dealing with fears, weight, sleep disorders, memory and so many others!) is to keep the truly beneficial therapeutic aspects of hypnotherapy in the proverbial closet. This, and the desire to use my abilities for my gay brothers and sisters, is why my chosen lifework is hypnotherapy, and why I have chosen to pursue extensive training and credentials in therapeutic, as well as investigative and forensic, hypnosis. For your information and benefit. 'Van Hightower Best Candidate' From Gregg Russell I find it ironic that my position with regards to the Van Hightower/Hall race is shared by many whom I consider to be my most ardent rivals, while the opposition— those who support Hall—is comprised of many who have been my supporters and friends. Several of these "friends" have discontinued contact with me over my decision to support Nikki Van Hightower. Some have questioned my position. One friend suggested that I had "jumped in bed with the opposition." Anyone who knows me well, knows that I make decisions based on fact and reasoning, not upon personalities. My position to support Nikki was based on conversation and correspondence with the candidates, Letters as well as hours of personal research. Several weeks before the GPC endorsement, I wrote both candidates a form letter asking their position with regards to support for the Domestic Privacy in Employment ordinance. To this date, I have received no response from Anthony Hall. I received a letter from Nikki Van Hightower affirming her support for the ordinance. In personal conversation with Ms. Van Hightower, I sensed a genuine committment to further such programs after her election. In recent conversation with Mr. Hall, I asked Anthony what his position was with regard to the particular ordinance. In the course of conversation. Hall referred to the ordinance as a "housing ordinance." When I reminded him that it was a public employment ordinance, in a politically suave fashion. Hall proceeded to address the ordinance in a very vague and nebulous manner. Although he said he would support the ordinance, he would not dis- Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX 77006 cuss the particulars of it and exhibited little knowledge of its content. Considering the fact that I personally gave Mr. Hall a copy of the ordinance several months ago, I felt that he exhibited a poor knowledge of its content. In addition to my personal correspondence and conversation with the candidates, I have spent many hours this summer researching the Houston Post and Chronicle microfilm available on both candidates to trace their political history. While I found considerable information available on each candidate, I discovered that while Anthony Hall frequently took a nebulous position on controversial matters, Ms. Van Hightower exhibited a history of taking advocacy positions on several controversial issues, including gay rights, a position she was eventually fired for at one point in her career as a television commentator at the University of Houston. My conclusions led me to believe that Nikki will always be an outspoken supporter of the community. She is intelligent, caring and genuine. I believe she is the best candidate for the position. New World of Deeper Values name withheld I came home alone again. As usual, the club I went to was very smokey and full of men, mostly in small groups. This club usually caters to the upper crust of the gay world here, many of whom seem very jaded and not terribly interesting. Why is it that when I go to a place like this by myself, I usually come home alone? In fact, I always come home alone. Sometimes I wonder if there isn't something wrong with me because I never meet anyone in the bars. I've been told that I put up a facade when I'm in bars that I look so impregnable, and that nobody in their right mind would approach someone who looks as aloof as me. Why do I look that way? Why does everyone else in the bar look that way? I suppose that I could always blame it on the AIDS scare, but if I really want to be honest, I have to admit that the situation was the same long before I had ever heard of AIDS. Indeed, AIDS may just be a physical outlet for the whole psychosis of the gay scene the isolation and the loneliness and the constant drive to succeed and overdo. I never did get terribly involved in all the gay scene. The thought of going out and meeting strange men and going home with them first filled me with terror, then it became something that happened rarely, but still happened. Now, it is something that rarely happens again, and it is not necessarily because I'm afraid, or at least not afraid like I used to be. Mom was right. I'm a big boy now, and I can take care of myself, but I'm also very sensitive, and my feelings are easily hurt, and they have been hurt many times in the last few years since I've "come out." There have been a dozen men in the last few years, and none of them have amounted to anything lasting. In fact, only about four of them do I even see anymore. I am told that those are actually good odds, and that I haven't even really come out yet because most gay men have sex with someone at least once a week. Can that really be true? Am I really that far removed from the "normal" gay scene? Compared to most men I know, it seems that I qualify for the Monk-of-the-Month Club, but I have the feeling that I'm not the only one. I have been guilty of painting a pretty lurid picture of my nights out for the benefit of those who were not with me, and I can only assume that many of them are guilty of the same offense. So I go out and see the show and feel rather alone, and enjoy the music and have a drink and not see anyone I know and then come home. How many others in that smokey crowded bar did that same thing? Then again, I realize that this club is the type of bar where "married" couples usually go with friends, or just friends go so they don't have to deal with lone cruising; and I guess that is what I usually do. Really, if I want to pick up a trick, I should be hanging out at one of the so-called "cruise" bars. But those places don't attract me anymore. God. You know, I think I'm jaded! I'm jaded and I haven't even been out for three years yet! I'm jaded and I haven't even had a lover yet! I'm jaded and I haven't even DONE anything yet, at least compared to my older friends. They say that our relationships will begin to change now that the AIDS scare is so intense. They say that we will start forming deeper and more long lasting relationships, and that we'll start seeing each other more for who we are instead of for the big buldge under the 501's. I guess that is just fine. But what about me? I never wanted anything else but a relationship. I also tried as much as possible to see the person instead of the sex symbol, and now I wonder where I'll be in this new world of "deeper values." Will the bars become totally closed? Will people start being afraid to see each other completely, like in Europe during the Black Death? I really doubt it; but then, for someone who never really did understand the workings of the cruise bar, I guess that will make thingB all the more difficult. So, I came home alone again tonight. I'm not sure I really wanted to come home with anyone else, but then, I'll never know now, will I. We all meet at the parades and at the bars and at parties, then we all go our separate ways in the maze of the city, and we'll be together again some day quite soon. We all go home alone, really. We take off our smokey clothes and brush our teeth and wash our faces and lie down in our dark bedrooms and some of us sleep very soundly, while others of us lie there and stare at the electronic numbers on our clocks or the shadow3 of the trees on our walls and ceilings from the lights outside our windows; and we wonder why we came home alone again.
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