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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
File 012
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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 012. 1983-09-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1583.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-09-23). Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1583

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 012, 1983-09-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1583.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 23, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript Sept. 23, 1983 / Montrose Voice Health Muscle-Man Misconceptions By Harvey Thompson, M.D. With so many of us interested in improving our personal appearance, there has been a rapid increase in the number of gyms and athletic programs aimed at people who are more interested in the cosmetic improvements of exercise, instead of the competitive aspects. With that increase has come a good amount of misinformation. Let'B consider some of the more common questions about weight-lifting that crop up for the amateur. Q. Is a special diet needed for weight- lifting? A. Probably not. The body is adept at transforming fats, carbohydrates and proteins from one form into another. Calories are a more important consideration. Body mass is determined by this formula: INTAKE (calories) equals ENERGY EXPENDITURE plus CHANGE (in body weight). The equation may seem simple, but it is frequently misunderstood by the obese, the underweight, the athlete and weigh- tlifter. Any one of the variables influences the other two. For example, if more calories are consumed while energy expenditure remains the same, body weight will increase in anyone with no disease and good health. However, if less food is eaten while energy expenditure remains constant, body weight will drop. Amazing as it is, there are still patients who exclaim, "But Doctor! I don't eat anything, and I still gain weight!" That's obviously impossible. , Q. When you stop lifting weights, does muscle turn to fat' A, No. Fat rells «"■ from endoderm. Muscle cells are from mesoderm Th< not transform themselves from one to another. Probably, the number of fat and muscle cells are "set" at birth and don't change. Obesity is not an increase in the number of fat cells, but a change in their lipid content. Muscle cells hypertrophy, or enlarge, with exercise, but don't increase in number, either. Q. Does weight-lifting increase your life span? A. Maybe not. As unreasonable as it may seem, there is not good proof that exercise protects against heart disease. However, one positive benefit of exercise has been seen in a study of longshoremen; their heavy physical activity Beemed to protect against "Sudden Death Syndrome," a type of heart attack. Q. Will situps reduce the size of my waistline? A. No. Most large bellies are fat. To get the waist size down, one must depend on weight reduction, either through less intake or more energy expenditure through exercise. The exercise will work an allover reducing benefit; spot reduction, aimed at melting away fat in a specific exercise area, won't work. The waist vibrators and wide rubber belt gimmicks were fads of the 50s. Q. Is weight-lifting better for you than jogging or aerobic dancing? A. No. Weight-lifting is mostly cosmetic. It looks healthy, but it's not a real cardiovascular conditioner. Q. Is it better to work out with weights every day or a few times a week? A. Doing workouts can be boring and time-consuming. A daily workout is necessary for the weight-lifting pro, but the amateur who wants a body that's "a cut above the average" will find an altemate- day-of-the-week regime productive enough, as well as a more efficient use of time that's more likely to be followed than daily jrrinds. Q. What are Lats? the Pecs? Biceps? Triceps? Deltoids? Hamstrings? A. All are different parts of the muscular anatomy. Knowing those parts is invaluable in setting up a sensible workout pattern for each muscle group. For example, the biceps in the front of the arms are developed by "curls." Dips or benches develop the triceps in the back of the arms. Bench presses are pretty standard for the chest pectorals. Shrugs build the trapezius* of the shoulder. Arm extensions (front and side) are for the deltoids, situps for the abdomen. Quads and leg curls done on the stomach are for the hamstrings in the back of the thigh. Q. Didn 't you say situps don't reduce the waistline? A. They don't. They help build muscle but will not reduce specific area fat. Q. How many repetitions? How many sets? A. Three sets of the maximum weight that allows you to perform six to ten repetitions for each exercise. If you're looking for definition and not more bulk, use a lighter weight with more repetitions. Q. How about steroids? A. Steroids are NOT approved by the FDA for muscle building because of their numerous Bide effects. Be careful with them if you have high blood pressure, liver disease, fluid retention, diabetes, etc. Professional lifters insist they work, but there are no good studies to compare users against non-users with regard to strength and size. Some steroid users admit they get meaner, more aggressive and hornier on these male steroidB. Q. Aren't gyms intimidating? Will they make fun of me because I'm gay? A. More and more straight and gay men are lifting weights together without hassle. It may require some discretion in small towns; straights don't appreciate being stared at, and you may have to hold back on conversations about gay liberation or AIDS. Stay on the weights and leave other hi'; nr later. Stonewall Features Syndicate.
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