Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
File 010
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 010. 1983-09-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1581.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-09-23). Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 010. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1581

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 010, 1983-09-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1581.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 23, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript Sept. 23,1983 / Montrose Voice 9 Gay Life In Haiti By Ernie Potvin Via Gay Press Association Wire Service Despite denials by some Haitian Americans during the early outbreak of AIDS among fellow Haitians, gay life has been alive and well in Haiti for many years. Even during the oppressive regime of dictator Dr. Francois Duvalier (1957-1971), a gay bar run by a corporal in the feared "Tonton Macoutes" (secret police) catered to visiting tourists and available boys. It was called Frida's, the drag name the corporal took for his occasional theatrical exhibitions. The bar moved several times but always consisted of a delapidated wooden structure and a fenced-in dirt patio. When the dictator "Pappa Doc" died, his 18-year-old son Jean-Claude became "President for Life," just like his father before him. The climate changed, however, as the younger Duvalier lessened police pressures and revived foreign investment, tourism and what there was of gay life. Frida's no longer had the only game in town, and several small shacklike bars started catering to the gay tourist trade and their tricks. In 1975 I filed a report which appeared in the Puerto Rican gay paper Pa'fuera describing the gay carryings-on in Port- au-Prince during the winter carnival. In addition to Frida's, there was the American bar near the pier behind the Venezuelan embassy, a dimly-lit park filled with local and visiting gays, plus dozens of nongay partners anxious to earn whatever they could. Three small hotels catered almost exclusively to gay clientele. Available boys and family men were always around the edge of the pool areas awaiting an invitation. Haitian flags and portraits of President "Baby Doc" were present in nearly every room. The assessment of Haitian gay life doesn't seem much changed in the 1983 Spartacus gay guide, with the notable exception of the Carrefour section where the American television crews zeroed in on for their report of AIDS in Haiti. In 1975 it was a pleasant and safe place for gay people to meet locals. Spartacus now Bays, "Above all, avoid any establishment in the crowded slum area known as Carre- four. Theft, sometimes accompanied by violence, is rampant, and the 'managements' of these premises are cynical and totally disinterested in your fate." It even included a warning of the possibility of becoming infected with AIDS. All but one of the listings have changed: The Tropical Guest House overlooking the ocean in Fontamara. The big spot these days is Chez Denise where 150 people crowd in to disco on weekends. This is the same club the American TV crews photographed from visiting Video Fitness Jogging and video games, the two great obsessions of the 80s, could not stay separated long, reports the Chicago Tribune. So get ready for the Aerobics Joystick, a gadget that connects exercise bicycles to home video gameB. The faster you pedal, the faster the game goes. Inventor Stephen Kiesling says spending a half-hour on a regular exercise bike may be great for the body, but it's not so stimulating to your brain. A half-hour of Pac-Man, on the other hand, may be exciting as all get-out, but it also can cause high blood pressure. Kiesling, who had been scheduled to compete as an oarsman in the 1980 Moscow Olympics, says combining the two is a natural. "Video games," he says, "are a whole lot closer to sports than most people imagine. They give you the same adrenalin rush as you get at the starting line of a race." ■BaMaflMBBBl behind a clump of trees. "They should have gone inside," a visiting Haitian remarked in Los Angeles. "They would have been welcome." President Jean-Claude Duvalier married at 30 and last October was reported in Newsweek to be hospitalized' in Miami with a potentially fatal disease of the auto immune system. He was reported at the time to be lethargic and confused in his speeches. The government palace refused comment. Since that time, nothing further has been heard about his illness or recovery. In the meantime, a popular new song about AIDS is getting a lot of air time on Haitian radio. Its lyrics have been described as being playful yet morose, while the disease itself is referred to as the "four H," Haitian, Hemophiliac, Heroine and Homosexual. LOOK HOW YOU'RE HELPING XXX Peop+e He*p»ng People The United Way CLUB HOUSTON IS CLUB HOUSTON 2205 FANNIN 659-4998 MEMBER CLUB BATH CHJUI 'M'.lf.'.ilt'Hirii Huia:.lt!'ttUlilH.
File Name uhlib_22329406_n152_009.jpg