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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
File 006
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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 006. 1983-09-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1577.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-09-23). Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 006. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1577

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 006, 1983-09-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1577.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 23, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript Sept. 23,1983 / Montrose Voice 5 Police View Training Film on Gays International Gay News Agency SAN FRANCISCO—The city's Police Commission here has approved a 23-minute video tape that will be used to inform police recruits about the gay community. The tape, meant to heighten the department's sensitivity to San Francisco's gay community, was also shown to Mayor Dianne Feinstein in her office, accompanied by about 30 members of the mayor's Gay Task Force. "I think it's really very good," said Feinstein. "It got across its points subtly." The nonprofit media company that produced the video for $10,000 said the tape was intended to present recruits with a nonstereotypical view of gays. Among those interviewed are a gay male police officer and a lesbian police officer, who are shown walking their beat in the Castro district of the city. The tape's original title of The Promised Land drew criticism from Police Chief Cornelius Murphy, who said the title's biblical connotation might offend some local residents, but he added that he had "no problem" with the content and the use of the video in his department. The new title is A Look at San Francisco's Lesbian and Gay Community. The video was produced after longstanding complaints from the gay community about police harassment and lack of police concern about attacks against gays. Police recruits will view the video during orientation classes, as well as visit gay and lesbian bars and restaurants. "We have a week during recruit school when they have an opportunity to learn about minorities, including gays," said Deputy Chief James Shannon of the Police Department's administrative office. Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright ©1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg publisher)editor Acel Clark graphics Jeff Bray graphics Sonny Davis accounting Robert Hyde managing editor Chuck Meredith sports editor Jon Cheetwood Joseph Lee contributing writers Lyt Harris advertising director Mark Drago advertising Jon Cheetwood classified advertising Founding Member: Greater Monlrose Business Guild. Gay Press Association News Services: International Gay News Agency, Pacific News Service Austin Bureau: Capitol News Service Syndicated Feature Services 4 Writers: (San Francisco) Chronicle Features. United Feature Syndicate, Jeffrey Wilson, Randy Alfred, Stonewall Features Syndicate, Brian McNaught, Joe Baker POSTMASTER Send address corrections to 3317 Montrose #306. Houston. TX 77006 Subscription rate in US in sealed envelope: $49 per year (52 issues), $29 per six months (26 issues), or II,25 per week (less than 26 issues) Back issues $2.00 each National advertising representative Joe DiSabato. Rivendell Marketing. 666 6th Avenue. New York 10011, (212) 242-6863 Advertising deadline Tuesday, 5:30pm. for if" " "*-' day evening Notice to advertisers: Local advertising ret was effective July 1. 1963. Responsibility: "Montrose Voice1' does nol assume responsi- , bility fo' advertising claims Readers should alert "Montrose Voice" to any deceptive advertising e released Fri- e schedule Si«-A Art Student Wins Westheimer Festival Poster Contest By Robert Hyde Lisbeth Scott, a student at the Houston Art Institute, won first place in the Westheimer Colony Art Festival's best poster design contest this week and was presented with a check for $500. The 23-year-old student was delighted with her prize and was eager to share it with her classmates at the institute. "I think this will buy us all a beer," she said. Scott has been studying art for several years. She spent four years at Texas Tech and will wrap up her studies at the institute in March. "I love every aspect of art," she said. "The institute has really opened my eyes to what's going on in the art world." Scott is unsure of the direction her career will take after graduating. Her primary concern will be to become even more informed about commercial art. "I'd like to be an illustrator for a very large advertising firm just to get my feet wet," she said. Her design, an abstract of purple, turquoise and black, was chosen over 31 other entries submitted by young artists from this area, Michael Groves, president of the Westheimer Colony Association, said. "The contest gives an unknown the chance to make a name for himself," he added. The poster will herald the upcoming art festival, and its design will be extensively reproduced for sale to the public on posters and festival T-shirts. There will also be a limited edition of signed and numbered posters available to the public. The Westheimer Colony Art Festival will be held Oct. 15 and 16 in the 100 to 1100 blocks of Westheimer. Project Launched to Determine Corporate Discrimination International Gay News Agency A group called Lesbian and Gay Associated Engineers and Scientists (LGAES) is launching a project to find out which major corporations discriminate against gays and which do not. The goal is to determine the status of all occupations in such workplaces, not only engineering and scientific ones. The three major objectives of the project are to provide information to gay people so that they can increase their job security "and avoid disaster," to lobby corporations and other employers to adopt sexual orientation nondiscrimination policies and to modify the economic structure for the benefit of gay people. LGAES's plan of action is to conduct a survey via a questionnaire, since no known survey of gays in the workplace so far exists. Despite limited past success in determining corporate attitudes toward gay employees, it is hoped that the new questionnaire will elicit more response, because failure to reply in a substantive manner will be seen as verification of "negative and below average ratingB," they said. A summary report will be sent to companies detailing negative and below average ratings of that company. Eventually, LGAES will publish a list of the 10 worst corporations in an effort to get corporations to reply to the survey and improve their practices. With the information about which companies are good and which are bad for gay employment, an effort will be made to eliminate those companies that pratice discrimination, the group said. When good companies thrive, LGAES feels, "nondiscriminatory job opportunities for gays expand. When bad companies are reduced, economic room is provided for good companies." LGAES believes that corporations "have no vested interest in discrimination. The cost of fair play is virtually nothing." The long-range goal is for more and more companies to see the wisdom of nondiscrimination against gay people. CDC Head Researcher Understands Gay Complaints By S. Christopher Hagin ATLANTA—The director of the AIDS Task Force for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Dr. James Curran, says he understands attacks on the government in relation to AIDS from gays, and he also says the killing disease will "be with us for quite a while." Curran said the "frustration" of gay leaders who complain the government is not doing enough to solve AIDS and stop the deaths is understandable. "I have two reactions" to complaints Curran said. "The first is that it's understandable for all of us who are concerned about this to be frustrated. I, too, am frustrated. I've been working on this problem for two years and two months, and it doesn't seem to be getting any better. "The second part of that is that I get tired of people complaining. I've been working on this problem a lot harder than most of the people who are complaining. "I don't find the numbers terrifying, but I think the problem is a problem that's likely to be with us for quite a while and one that we will have to deal with. I think finding the cause of AIDS is going to greatly increase our capabilities to deal with it, but it's not a problem that's going to go away in the next year or two," said Curran. Plop Plop, Fizz Fizz, Run Run Runners who want to boost their endurance may want to reach for a bottle of Alka Seltzer. Canadian Researchers claim the alkaline content of Alka Seltzer and baking soda counteracts the buildup of acid in muscles being pushed to their limit. With less muscle acid, the theory goes, joggers should be able to run longer, reports American Health. Maybe that's why they call him "Speedy."
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