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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
File 004
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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 004. 1983-09-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1575.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-09-23). Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 004. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1575

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 004, 1983-09-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1575.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 23, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript Sept. 23,1983 / Montrose Voice 3 GPC Celebrates its Eighth Birthday By Robert Hyde Houston's Gay Political Caucus convened Wednesday evening to commemorate its eighth anniversary as an important representative of gay rights. In an evening that had an emotional impact on many caucus members, past presidents of the organization addressed the assembly and recapped what current president Larry Bagneris termed their "long history in the center of the most diverse community in America." Former president Donald Hrachovy recalled when the organization was in its embryo phase with only 15 members who were "all wanting to kill each other for our different points of view." He then mentioned the pride the caucus felt when they mustered over 4000 people from the community to march from the Depository nightclub on Bagby to City Hall in a protest against Anita Bryant. "That was our first march," Hrachovy said. "We have indeed come a long way." Steve Shifflet addressed the caucus and referred to his 1978-79 term as president as being notable for its political inroads. "We brought the GPC into the mainstream of the political arena," he said. Shifflet also referenced efforts made during his years in initiating the early machinations which led to the eventual repeal of state statute 21.06. He also mentioned that during his term, John Hill became the first Texas candidate for governor to respond to the caucus. "Police issues kept us really busy from' '78 to '79," Shifflet added, referring to the discrimination factors of the period. "We could not get in to see (police chief) Caldwell." Shifflet concluded his remarks by mentioning that it was during his years as president that Houston's first Gay Pride Week parade took place. Former two-term president Lee Harrington began his remarks on a more personal note. He stated that when he became president of the organization, he lost his job. But he recalled those years as a "period of growth." "You learn a lot when you're under fire," he said. Harrington then mentioned the death of former GPC secretary Fred Paez which occurred during his term. In an emotional moment, Harrington said that Paez' death and the subsequent events "touched the conscious of the city of Houston," through the candlelight march, the hearing, the indictment of officers, the trial and the eventual acquittal. Proudly, Harrington mentioned his association with former President Jimmy Carter when Harrington was asked to be a gay representative for a national media blitz. He also mentioned the fight the GPC had on its hands when it elected to back Mayor Kathy Whitmire in her '81 campaign against the Houston Policemen and Patrolmen's Union who were "desperate to defame her." Harrington said that after having avoided the press throughout Whitmire's bid, he did call one conference with the Union which lasted 30 seconds. He told them, "There are 40 to 45 gays actively working on the Houston police force now." "HPD has been our motivator for years," he added. "We wouldn't be where we are today without them." Harrington then alluded to the complaints the organization has had over the years—many of which have been deserved, he said. "But the primary purpose of the president of the GPC is keeping the community together for the power that results from that," he said, in addition to acting as a gay representative to the city of Houston. He then stated that future complaints against the GPC should be addressed to the individual directly responsible, and not against the organization. "Anyone who defames the organization and its rich history is going to have me to fight first," he said. In other business, Jim Hayman of the Harris County Tax Office deputized several GPC members to allow them to register voters for the upcoming election. The caucuB then chose to endorse Herbert Melton, who oversees all schools in Montrose, for the Position 4 school board race since he was the only candidate to screen with the GPC. "Of course, I want their endorsement," Melton was reported to have said. Support was also encouraged for the Anne Wheeler fundraiser to be held at the Four Seasons Hotel, 901 Austin, October 13 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. All constitutional amendments were endorsed, except No. 4, which would permit the governor to Buspend habeas cor pus in the event of a nuclear attack. GPC member Ray Hill called the amendment "dangerous." President Bagneris mentioned that Mayor Whitmire needs more volunteers. "Look, folks, we've got no choice," Bagneris said. "I'm not going to sell you on the candidacy of Kathy Whitmire. Just look at the MONTROSE VOICE and THToverthe past years to see the changes we have already acquired in this city." Bagneris went on to read a letter from Mayor Whitmire in which she proclaimed September as GPC Month. You Read About the Fighter Planes, Now Buy the Vodka In an incredible piece of bad timing, the importers of Stolichnaya vodka have just announced plans to boost their advertising. In the aftermath of the Korean jetliner incident, bottles of the Russian liquor are being smashed in bars across the country, and some states are even banning the stuff. Nevertheless, the president of Monsieur Henri Wines, which imports Stolichnaya, says new billboards will be added in some areas and go up for the first time in others, reports the Los Angeles Times. The decision, says the company president, "reflects the brand's solid growth throughout 1983." Our Pets Eat Better Than We Do Pacific News Service The next time Tabby turns up her nose at her kitty crunehies, just tell her she's eating better than most people. Scientists at Cornell University say the food we give our pets may be boring, but it's a more balanced diet than the junk food we eat. Professor Larry Chase says even cows and chickenB eat more nutritious food than humans. But, he notes, both two-and four-legged animals share a tendency to overeat. Montrose Mouth Cops in the Bars Houston's finest spent everybody's tax dollars last weekend touring the city's gay bars. And a few of the individual officers weren't the friendliest things you've ever met either. The VOICE answers your most obvious questions: Does an officer have the right to approach you in a bar? Of course. And especially if he sincerely might think you are under-age or intoxicated. Is he required to be polite? Absolutely. The officer should just as cordial to peaceful, law abiding customers at the Midnite Sun, JR's, Rascals or the River Oaks Country Club. It should not make any difference. Some of the officers last weekend though throught differently. Customers who were obviously of age and quite sober were rudely demanded, "I.D.! (growl, grunt)." So what do we do? You could "growl" back. Show your ID as requested and at the same time return the favor by noting his nametag and badge number. If you're unable to see the tag or badge, ask him to shine his light on it. Officers are required to identify themselves if requested. You do not have to put up with rudeness from a law enforcement official. If you would like to file a complaint against any officer who has been rude to you, Internal Affairs at HPD is first place to start. No lets move on to lighter subjects: The Texas Fiesta will be held this Sunday at the University of St. Thomas in the Jera- beck Activity and Athletic Center, 3900 Mt. Vernon, 1-4pm. This annual scholarship benefit will feature foods representing the peoples and history of Texas, beer and wine and the Potomac Street Band. Admission is $10. For more information, call the university's alumni office at 521-7911, ext. 427. — D — The Houston Chapter of American Atheists will hold a meeting open to the public on Sept. 28. 8pm. at the Texas Medical Center Holiday Inn, 6701 S. Main. Stefan Presser, staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union, will be speaking about recent state-church separation decisions. — D — The University of St. Thomas' autumn theatrical season opens Sept. 29 at 8pm with Grand's Finale, a Southwest premiere of a new comedy by New York playwright Casey Kelly about a Louisiana family of eccentric characters trying to deal with their memories and instructions of their late grandmother. For reservations and additional information, call 522-7911 or 522-7915. — D — Black and White Men Together, an organization advocating the social integration of all races, will have a garage sale Sept. 24 at 409 W. Polk and their general meeting at 7:30 pm at MCCR, 1919 Decatur. BWMT would like to invite members of other gay organizations to join in their celebration as a community. For more information, call the Gay Switchboard at 529-3211. UUmSM-
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