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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
File 002
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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 002. 1983-09-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1573.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-09-23). Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 002. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1573

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 002, 1983-09-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1573.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 23, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript Southern Methodist University Torn Over Gay Rights Issue By Don Ritz The Gay and Lesbian Student Support Organization (GLSSO) at Southern Methodist University has filed for formal recognition of the group by the Student Senate. This will be the second time the group has attempted recognition by the senate. The first attempt was made late in the spring semester earlier this year; recognition was denied. The organization then made two attempts to have the denial overturned. Both appeals failed. The senate will make its decision on whether or not to recognize the GLSSO on October 4. On that same day the senate will formally "re-recognize" organizations less than two years old and any other organizations new to the campus. According to The Daily Campus, SMU's student newspaper, there will be individuals who will attempt to prevent the GLSSO from being recognized. Saad Chehabi, president of Young Americans for Freedom, said, "I am still very strongly opposed to the group. We don't think they should exist. Alumni who give money for scholarships will stop donating. I don't want them using SMU's name because we're a very religous—very conservative school." Ted Brabham, a student senator last year and probably the most outspoken opponent of the GLSSO, said that he would seek a schoolwide referendum on the subject if the senate recognized the organization. Brabham said, "The founders of SMU worked too hard to let a handful of radicals try to bring down the integrity of SMU in the nation." Robert Rios, co-chair of the GLSSO, said that there is no organized opposition at this time. However, Rios stated that it did not become public knowledge that the group would seek recognition until this past Tuesday, Sept. 20. Rios said that there have been cases of individual harassment. Rios and co-chair Leslie Cooper sent a letter to the SMU administration protesting harassment of GLSSO members. The letter stated, "In the early morning hours of Saturday, Sept. 17,1983 (approximately 2:30 a.m.), after being awakened by noise at his door in Smith Hall, a student went to his door and found written on the door with indelible ink in large lettering: "FAGGOTT," "FAG, EAT AND DIE," as well as "FAG, GO TO HELL, EAT AND DIE," written on the name tag of the door. The proper dorm and campus authorities were notified. "The GLSSO is determined to pursue every incident of such harassment. We believe that the present rules regarding this type of harassment are patently unenforceable and also believe that this continued page 6 Do You Have Muscle-Man Misconceptions? Health, page 11 MONTROSE o The Newspaper of Montrose Sept. 23, 1983 Issue ..152 Published Every Friday HPD Displays 'After Sundown' Clout; Nine Gay Bars Hit By Robert Hyde Last weekend saw a resurrection of fears that have been waning since the days of police chiefs Johnson and Caldwell as the community reacted to the actions of six members of the Houston Police Department, unleashed by a new District 17 sergeant, who entered nine popular gay bars and harassed the bars' managers and patrons. Throughout the week, there had been rumors of arrests and late night rides acrosB town in patrol cars, most of which are now substantiated. Over a two-night period, officers entered The Montrose Mining Company, JR's, The Bam, The Chicken Coop, The Midnite Sun, Mary's, Dirty Sally's, Lola's Depot and Kindred Spirits, reports Kent Spear, aide to District C Councilman George Greanias. "There were six officers involved, one a woman, and three patrol cars," Spear said. "And these were HPD patrolmen, not the vice." There were varying degrees of harassment. Some bars managers were reluctant to discuss the matter until more information regarding an official community response was gathered. Other bar managers told of ID checks, rudeness and arrests. Randolph Parks, general manager of The Montrose Mining Company, said that the officers only asked to see his liquor license and that the customers were not questioned. At Mary's, the police went a little further, said their night manager, who asked not to be identified. "Between 9:00 and 9:30 Saturday evening, two vans and a cop car pulled up outside, and six officers entered the bar," the manager said. "They were very rude at first, checking everyone's ID's and shining flashlights in everyone's faces. Three underaged kids had just walked in off the street and were standing by the pool table. When the cops found out they were minors, they were taken downtown. As yet, though, we hadn't served them anything." "Two guys were picked up for public intoxication," he continued. "I know I Berved one of them only two beers. The other definitely was not drunk." Then the manager was confronted with what appears to be the officers' primary demand throughout the two evenings as they hit one bar right after the other. They asked to see his license for selling beer and wine. Since he was only able to show them his mixed beverage permit from the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission, the officers threatened to arrest him, and the manager called in a replacement. Upon checking with police headquarters, however, the officers at Mary's were informed that they could not arrest the bar manager and that the mixed beverage permit covered the selling of beer and wine. "The officers were very nice when they left," the manager said. A few blocks away at The Barn, a statewide party commemorating the Third Anniversary of the Sundance Cattle Company was in progress. Upon their arrival at the bar, four policemen, apparently unfamiliar with the Texas RiderB' uniform, accused a member of the club with impersonating an officer, reports bar owner Walter Strickler. "The Texas Rider came upstairs to where the party was going on to see me, and an officer followed him up," Strickler said. "I thought it was an isolated incident until I went downstairs and saw the flashlights." What Strickler did see was an officer cornering his bartender and demanding his beer and wine license. '"Would you tell him that a mixed beverage permit includes the selling of beer without a license,' he told me," Strickler said. There were no arrests made at the bar, but Strickler is noticeably upset over what he deems is needless behavior on the part of the police department. "If they're going to enforce the law, they should know what the law is," Strickler said. "The TABC checks licenses periodically. There's no need for this." A more bizarre incident occurred when a man was arrested at Dirty Sally's, a few blocks away. Rather than being taken to the Reisner Street police headquaters, the man was given a ride to Buffalo Speedway and dropped off at the Kindred Spirits. "We have witnesses to the fact that he was dropped off there," Spear said. Spear said that this election time walkthrough coincided with last Saturday's opening of the campaign headquarters of Mayor Kathy Whitmire, an incumbent whose tenure has seen many confrontations with the city's men in blue. "When the sun goes down, we have the power," Spears said, referring to what he suspects is a popular concept among many officers, particularly those in the Houston Police and Patrolmen's Union, an organization some feel has a philosophy similar to that of the Ku Klux Klan. But regardless of who was responsible for the actions, many members of the community feel that the two progressive years with Police Chief Lee Brown—years that show a marked decline in police harassment in the area—have gone down the drain. And now no one is taking the blame. Spears feels that the harassment might be laid on the back of a "Sgt, Richardson," newly installed in District 17, who could have brought in officers from other areas of the city to display the HPD's "after sundown" clout. He stated that he did not think any Montrose officers were involved. A Houston Gay Pobtical Caucus representative called a meeting with the Police Advisory Committee on Thursday, and the report of last weekend's activities seemingly caught the committee by surprise. "When I brought up the subject," Spears said, "it caused a tremendous upheaval in the group." A task force to look into the matter was formed immediately. Spears will chair the group which will consist of a mayoral appointee, an officer of the HPD and representatives from the Community Relations Committee of the Jewish Federation of Greater Houston, the Progressive Action League and the Mexican /American Bar Association. "We're going to look into this matter in hopes of coming up with a recommendation to be presented before the Police Advisory Committee, and if the committee endorses it, it will pass from there to Chief Brown," Spears said. "The task force will also delve into the general harassment of the gay community over the past two years," he added, "and will be documented by Greanias' office. At the moment, word from the top is nil. There is an ongoing conversation between Councilman Greanias and Police Chief Brown, but nothing firm has been resolved. Phymeon Jackson, spokesperson for the HPD, told the VOICE, "This matter has been brought to his (Brown's) attention, and he's looking into it." "I hope they don't think this is political," Greanias was reported to have said, and he hopes that the community will give him enough time to get feedback from the police.
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