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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 001. 1983-09-23. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1572.

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(1983-09-23). Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1572

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983 - File 001, 1983-09-23, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1601/show/1572.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 152, September 23, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 23, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Southern Methodist University Tom Over Gay Rights Issue By Don Ritz The Gay and Lesbian Student Support Organization (Gl.SSO) at Southern Methodist University has filed for formal recognition of the group by the Student Senate. This will be the second time the group has attempted recognition by the senate. The first attempt was made late in the spring semes· ter earlier this year ~ recognition was denied. The organization then made two attempts to have the denial overturned. Both appeals failed. The senat.e will make ita deci· sion on whether or not to recognize the GLSSO on October 4. On that same day the senate will formally ' re-recognize" organizations less than two yea.rs old and any other organizations new to the campus According to The Daily Cam· pus, SMU's student newspaper, there will be individuals who will attempt to prevent the GI.SSO from being recognized. Saad Chehabi, president of Young Americans for Freedom, said, " ! am still very strongly opposed to the group. We don't think they should exist. Alumni who give money for scholarships will stop donating. I don't want them using SMU's name because we're a veryreligous-very conser­vative school." Ted Brabham, a student senator last year and probably the most outspoken opponent of the Gl.SSO, said that he would seek a school wide referendum on the sub­ject if the senat.e recognized the organization. Brabham said, "The founders of SMU worked too hard to let a handful of radicals try to bring down the integrity of SMU in the nation." Robert Rios, co-chair of the GLSSO, said that there is no organized opposition at this time. However, Rios stated that it did not become publit knowledge that the group would seek recognition until this past Tuesday, Sept. 20. Rios said that there have been cases of individual harassment Rios and co-chair Leslie Cooper sent a letter to the SMU adminis­tration protesting harassment of Gl.SSO members. The letter stated, "In the early morning hours of Saturday, Sept. 17, 1983 ( appro~imately2:30a.m .). after being awakened by noise at his door in Smith Hall, a student went to his door and found written on the door with indelible ink in large lettering: " FAGGOTT," "FAG, EAT-AND DIE," as well as "FAG, GOTO HELL. EAT­A." JU DIE,·• written on the name tag of the door. The proper dorm and campus authorities were noti· fled. 'The Gl.SSO is determined to pursue every incident of such harassment. We believe that the preeent rules regarding this type of haraSBment are patently unen­forceable and ,.also believe that this continued page 6 Do You Have Muscle-Man Misconceptions? MONTROSE Health, page 11 v 0 I c E The Newspaper of Montrose Sept. 23, 1983 Issue .. is2 Published Every Friday HPD Displays 'After Sundown' Clout; Nine Gay Bars Hit By Robert Hyde 1.a&t weekend saw a resurrection of fears that have been waning since the days of police chiefs Johnson and Caldwell as the community reacted to the actions of six members of the Houston Police Depart· ment, unleashed by a new District 17 ser­geant, who entered nine popular gay bars and harassed the bars' managers and patrons. Throughout the week, there had been rumors of arrest.a and late night rides acro88 town in patrol care, most of which are now substantiated. Over a two-night period, officers entered The Montrose Mining Company, JR's, The Barn, The Chicken Coop, The Midnite Sun, Mary's, Dirty Sally's, Lola's Depot and Kindred Spirits, reports Kent Spear, aide to District C Councilman George Greaniaa. "There were six officers involved, one a woman, and three patrol cars," Spear said. ''And these were HPD patrolmen, not the vice." There were varying degrees of haraSB­ment. Some bars managers were reluctant to discuSB the matter until more informa­tion regarding an official community response was gathered. Other bar manag· era told of ID checks, rudeness and arretits. Randolph Parks, general manager of The Montrose Mining Company, said that the officers only asked to see his liquor license and that the customers were not questioned. At Mary's, the police went a little further, said their night manager, who asked not to be identified. "Between 9:00 and 9:30 Saturday even· ing, two vane and a cop car pulled up out· aide and six officers entered the bar." the ma~nger ..aaid. ''The)' were very rudt at tint, checking everynnt.le ID's and shin ing fl aehlighta in everyone's facci; Thrtt underaged kids had just walked in off the str""t and were standing by the pool table. Whrn the cops found out they were minors, they were taken downtown. As yet, though, we hadn't served them any· thing." "Two guys were picked up for public intoxication," he continued . .,I know I served one of them only two beers. The other definitely was not drunk." Then the manager was confronted with what appears to be the officers' primary demand throughout the two evenings as they hit one bar right after the other. They asked to see his license for selling beer and wine. Since he was only able to show them his mixed beverage permit from the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission, the offic· ers threatened to arrest him, and the man­ager called in a replacement. Upon checking with police headquarters, how· ever, the officers at Mary's were informed that they could not arrest the bar manager and that the mixed beverage permit covered the selling of beer and wine. "The officers were very nice when they left," the manager said. A few blocks away at The Barn, a state­wide party commemorating the Third Anniversary of the Sundance Cattle Com­pany was in progress. Upon their arrival at the bar, four policemen, apparently unfamiliar with the Texas Riders' uni­form, accused a member of the club with impersonating an officer, reports bar owner Walter Strickler. "The Texas Rider came upstairs to where the party was going on to see me, and an officer followed him up," Strickler said. "I thought it was an isolated incident urtil I went downstairs and saw the flash­lights." What Rtricklf'I' did eee was an officer cornering his bartender and demanding his bf·rr und wine hcense. "Would you tell him that a mixed bever· age permit includes the selling of hf.er without a licem1e, he told me,'' Strickler t'aid. There were no arrests made at the bar, but Strickler is noticeably upset over what he deems is needless behavior on the part of the police department. "If they're going to enforce the law, they should know what the law is," Strickler said. "The TABC checks licenses periodi· cally. There's no need for this." A more bizarre incident occurred when a man was arrested at Dirty Sally's, a few blocks away. Rather than being taken to the Reisner Street police headquaters, the man was given a ride to Buffalo Speedway and dropped off at the Kindred Spirits. "We have witnesses to the fact that he was dropped off there," Spear said. Spear said that this election time walk­through coincided with laat Saturday's opening of the campaign headquarters of Mayor Kathy Whitmire, an incumbent whose tenure has seen many confront&· bona with the city's men in blue. "When the sun goes down, we have the power," Spears said, referring to what he suspects is a popular concept among many officers, particularly those in the Houaton Police and Patrolmen's Union, an organization some feel has a philo­sophy similar to that of the Ku Klux Klan. But regardless of who was responsible for the actions, many members of the corn· munity feel that the two progressive years with Police Chief Lee Brown-years that show a marked decline in police harass­ment in the area-have gone down the drain . And now no one is taking the blame. Spears feels that the harassment might be laid on the back of a "Sgt. Richardaon," newlv Installed in nlotrict 17, who could have. brought in officers from other areas of the city to display the HPD's "after sun­down" cloul He stated that he did not think any Montrose officers were involved. A Houston Gay Political Caucus repre­sentative called a meeting with the Police Advisory Committee on Thursday, and the report of last weekend's activities s~mingly caught the committee by sur· pnse. "When I brought up the subject," Spears said, "it caused a tremendous upheaval in the group." A task force to look into the matter was formed immediately. Spears will chair the group which will consist of a mayoral appointee, an officer of the HPD and repre­sentatives from the Community Relations Committee of the Jewish Federation of Greater Houston. the Progressive Action League and the Mexican / American Bar Association. "We're going to look into this matter in hopee of coming up with a recommenda­tion to be presented before the Police Ad vi· aory Committee, and if the committee endorses it, it will pass from there to Chief Brown," Spears said. "The task force will also delve into the general harassmentofthegaycommunity over the past two years." he added, "and will be documented by Greanias' office. At the moment, word from the top is nil. There is an ongoing conversation between Councilman Greanias and Police Chief Brown, but nothing firm has been resolved Phymeon Jackaon, spokesper· son for the HPD, told the VOICE, ''This matter has been brought to his (Brown's) attention, and he's looking into it.'' "I hope they don't think this is politi· cal," Greanias was reported to have said. and he hopes thatth•communitywill give him enough time to get feedback from the poi!c ... 2 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 23, 1983 SEPT 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 GPC Celebrates its Eighth Birthday By Robert Hyde Houston's Gay Political Caucus convened Wednesday evening to commemorate its eighth anniversary as an important repre­sentative of gay rights. In an evening that had an emotional impact on many caucus members, past presidents of the organization addressed the assembly and recapped what current president Larry Bagneris termed their "long history in the center of the most diverse community in America." Fonner president Donald Hrachovy recalled when the organization was in its embryo phase with only 15 members who were "all wanting to kill each other for our different points of view." He then menti­oned the pride the caucus felt when they mustered over 4000 people from the com­munity to march from the Depository nightclub on Bagby to City Hall in a pro­test against Anita Bryant. "That was our first march," Hrachovy said. "We have indeed come a long way." Steve Shifflet addressed the caucus and referred to his 1978· 79 term as president as being notable for its political inroads. "We brought the GPC into the main­stream of the political arena," he said. Shifflet also referenced efforts made during his years in initiating the early machinations which led to the eventual repeal of state statute 21.06. He also menti­oned that during his tenn, John Hill became the first Texas candidate for gov­ernor to respond to the caucus. "Police iBBues kept us really busy from '78 to '79," Shifflet added, referring to the discrimination factors of the period. "We could not get in to see (police chief) Cald­well.'' Shifflet concluded his remarks by men­tioning that it was during his years as president that Houston's first Gay Pride Week parade took place. Fonner two-term president Lee Harring­ton began his remarks on a more personal note. He s tated that when he became presi­dent of the organization, he lost his job. But he recalled those years as a "period of growth." "You learn a lot when you're under fire," he said. Harrington then mentioned the death of Conner GPC secretary Fred Paez which occurred during his term. In an emotional moment, Harrington said that Paez' death and the subsequent events "touched the conscious of the city of Houston," through the candlelight march, the hearing, the indictment of officers, the trial and the eventual acquittal. Proudly, Harrington mentioned his association with former President Jimmy Carter when Harrington was asked t.o be a gay representative for a national media blitz. He also mentioned the fight the GPC had on its hands when it elected to back Mayor Kathy Whitmire in her '81 cam­paign against the Houston Policemen and Patrolmen's Union who were "desperate to defame her." Harrington said that after having avoided the press throughout Whitmire'& bid, he did call one conference with the Union which lasted 30 seconds. He told them, "There are 40 to 45 gays actively working on the Houston police force now." ''HPD has been our motivator for years,'' he added. "We wouldn't be where we are today without them." Harrington then alluded to the com­plaints the organization has had over the years-many of which have been deserved, he said. 0 But the primary purpose of the presi­dent of the GPC is keeping the community together for the power that results from that," he said, in addition to acting as a gay representative to the city of Houston. He then stated that future complaints against the GPC should be addressed to the individual directly responsible, and not against the organization. "Anyone who defames the organization and its rich history is going to have me to fight first," he said. In other business, Jim Hayman of the Harris County Tax Office deputized s~v­eral GPC members to allow them to regis· ter voters for the upcoming election. The caucus then chose to endorse Her· bert Melton, who oversees all schools in Montrose for the Position 4 school board race sin~ he was the only candidate to screen with the GPC. "Of course, I want their endorsement," Melton was reported to have said. Support was also encouraged for the Anne Wheeler fundraiser to be held at the Four Seasons Hotel, 901 Austin, October 13 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. All constitutional amendments were endorsed, except No. 4, which would per­mit the governor to suspend habeas cor-pus in the event of a nuclear attack. GPC member Ray Hill called the amendment "dangerous." President Bagneris mentioned that Mayor Whitmire needs more volunteers. "Look, folks, we've got no choice," Bag­neris said. "I'm not going to sell you on the candidacy of Kathy Whitmire. Just look at the MONTROSE VOICE and TWToverthe past years to see the changes we have already acquired in this city." Bagneris went on to read a letter from Mayor Whitmire in which she proclaimed September as GPC Month. You Read About the Fighter Planes, Now Buy the Vodka In an incredible piece of bad timing, the importers of Stolichnaya vodka have just announced plans to boost their advertis­ing. In the aftsrmath of the Korean jetliner incident, bottles of the Russian liquor are being smashed in bars across the country, and some states are even banning the stuff. Nevertheless, the president of Mon­sieur Henri Wines, which imports Stolich­naya, says new billboards will be added in some areas and go up for the first time in others, reporta the Loa Angeles Times . The decision, says the company presi­dent, "reflects the brand's solid growth throughout 1983." Our Pets Eat Better Than We Do Pacific New1 Service The next time Tabby turns up her nose at her kitty crunchies, just tell her she's eat­ing better than most people. Scientists at Cornell University say the food we give our pets may be boring, but it's a more balanced diet than the junk food we eat. Professor Larry Chase says even cows and chickens eat more nutritious food than humans. But, he notes, both two- and four-legged animals share a tendency to overeat. Montrose Mouth Cops in the Bars Houston's finest spent everybody's tax dollars last weekend touring the city's gay bars. And a few of the individual offic­ers weren't the friendliest things you've ever met either. The VOICE answers your most obvious questions· Does an officer have the right to approach you in a bar? Of course. And especially if he sincerely might think you are under-age or intoxicated. Is he required to be polite? Absolutely. The officer should just as cordial to peaceful, law abiding custo­mers at the M1dnite Sun, JR's, Rascals or the River Oaks Country Club. It should not make any difference Some of the officers last weekend though through! differently. Customers who were obviously of age and quite sober were rudely demanded, "l.D.• (growl, grunt)." So what do we do? You could "growl" back. Show your ID as requested and at the same time return the favor by noting hos nametag and badge number. If you're unable to see the tag or badge, ask him to shine his light on it. Officers are required to identify themselves of requested. You do not have to put up wilh rude­ness from a law enforcement official. If you would like to file a complaint against any officer who has been rude to you, Internal Affairs at HPD 1s first place to start. -o- No let's move on to lighter sub1ects: The Texas Fiesta will be held this Sunday at the University of St. Thomas in the Jera­beck Activity and Athletic Center, 3900 Mt. Vernon, 1-4pm. This annual scholar­ship benefit will feature foods represent­ing the peoples and history ofTexas, beer and wine and !he Potomac Street Band. Admission is $10. For more informa­tion, call the university's alumni office at 521-7911, ext. 427. -o- The Houston Chapter of Amencan Athe­ists will hold a meeting open to the public on Sept. 28, 8pm, at the Texas Medical Center Holiday Inn. 6701 S. Main. Stefan Presser, staff attorney for the Amencan Civil Liberties Union, will be speaking about recent state-church separation decisions. -o- The University of St. Thomas' autumn theatrical season opens Sept. 29 at Spm with Grand·s Finale. a Southwest pre­miere of a new comedy by New York playwnght Casey Kelly about a Louisiana family of eccentric characters trying to deal with their memories and instructions of their late grandmother For reservations end additional infor­mation, call 522-7911or522-7915. -o- Black and White Men Together, an organ­ization advocating the social integration of all races, will have a garage sale Sept 24 at 409 W. Polk and their general meet­ing at 7:30 pm at MCCR, 1919 Decatur BWMT would like to invite members of other gay organizations to join in their celebration as a community. For more informetion, call the Gay Switchboard at 529-3211 4 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 23, 1983 How is AIDS diagnosed? How does hepatitis spread? Is there a treat­ment for penicillin-resistant gonorrhea? These are only a few of the questions that a prac­ticing physician answers candidly, concisely, and on the basis of the most up-to-date research in a new book called GAY MEN'S HEALTI-1. Covering all major sexually trans­mitted diseases known to affect the gay com­munity, Jeanne Kassler, M.D., describes the causes, the symptoms, the treatments and the steps you can take to help combat this increasingly serious threat. tfj~eJ.Rcw GAY MEN~ HE,.~TH A GUIDE TO THE AID SYNDROME & OTHER SEXUALLY TRANSMITIED DISEASES JB:\:\E K.\SSLER.UU. 1 8 1 7.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~--' £-- The STRATFORD on Baldwin C ondorninimns as individual and private as you are. )uu ar~ p/tuJtftJnfU< I La1mon • Finger. Inc. Police View Training Film on Gays International Gay New• Asency SAN FRANCISCO-The city's Police Com­mission here has approved a 23-minute video tape that will be used to inform police recruits about the gay community. The tape, meant to heighten the depart­ment's sensitivity t-0 San Francisco's gay community, was also shown to Mayor Dianne Feinstein in her office, accompan­ied by about 30 members of the mayor's Gay Task Force. 0 1 think it's really very good," said Fein­stein. "It got acrosa its points subtly." The nonprofit media company that pro­duced the video for $10,000 said the tape was intended to present recruits with a nonstereotypical view of gays. Among those interviewed are a gay male police officer and a lesbian police officer, who are shown walking their beat in the Castro district of the city. The tape's original title of The Promised Land drew criticism from Police Chief Cornelius Murphy, who said the title's biP­lical connotation might offend some local residents, but he added that he had "no problem" with the content and the use of the video in his department. The new title is A Look at San Francis­co's Lesbian and Gay Community. The video was produced after long­standing complaint.a from the gay com­munity about police harasament and lack of police concern about attacks against gays. Police recruit.a will view the video during orientation classes, as well as visit gay and lesbian bars and restaurant.a. "We have a week during recruit school when they have an opportunity to learn about minorities, including gays," said Deputy Chief James Shannon of the Police Department's administrative office. Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copynghl •1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry MCCiurg publ11hM1echlor Acel Clark f1"phlC$ Jeff Bray greph1c. Sonny Davis ~coontmg Robert Hyde m•negmg ed11or Chuck Meredith 1porfl editor Jon Cheetwood Joseph Lee corttr1bu1mgwmte11 Lyt Harris M/llerf11•ngd1r.cror Mark Drago Mlvellll•flg Jon Cheetwood cl1»1l1ed -~lllrtg Foundir>g Mem~r Gr .. ter Montrose Bus1neu Guilcl. G•y p,., Auoe••t.on IW•t111• Seft111CH lntern•t•Ofl•l Gay Ne""' Ag.-w::y. P•clfic New• S.rw1ce ~utr1n BurHu C•p•tal New• Service Syndte•led FHtur• Sett111Cfl & Writers (San Fr•nc•aco) Chloruc .. F .. tur•. Unttecl Feature Syncl•ctite. Jeffrey W11sofl R•ncly Alfred. Stonew•ll F••luret Syncl1c•te. Brian McNaughl. Joe B•ker POSTMASTER Send .cldrHS corritct1on• 10 3317 MonlroM •308. Houlton. TX 77006 Sub1c11pflon r•I• 1n US m •••led MV91ope ~49 per yHr (52 1•w.t),$2iper1ucmontha(2fi111uet). orS1 Hperweel((letl than 2e 111ue1) B•ck ldl.HMI $2 00 MCh Nahon•I «1,,.,-t11mg ,.,,,e1enflftt11e Joe D•S•balo. R1tll9ndeU Markehog. ee8 61h A~enue. New Yo!1c 10011. (212) 242·&863 Advwt111ng delfdlm• Tuead•Y· 5 30pm. for 1uue relffMd Fri- ::-;.::;;;'!,1'9ff,,.rJ LOClll adverl•SIOQ rete achech,,.1e 5111-A •• ettec:t1..,.Ju1y 1, 1113 Respona1M1ty. MontrOM II~~ Ooea l'IOI .uume rwc>Ofl,.. t11 t.1y for aavert19lng c .. •m• PudeB thoukl ••en MontroM \lotce to •ny o.c.piiv. adtllertalng . ···· .... .. ······· .......... ·-·. SEPT. 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Art Student Wins Westheimer Festival Poster Contest By Robert Hyde Lisbeth Scott, a student at the Houston Art Institute, won first place in the Wes­theimer Colony Art Festival's best poster design contest this week and was pres­ented with a check for $500. The 23-year-old student was delighted with her prize and was eager to share it with her cJassmates at the institute. "I think this will buy us all a beer," she said. Scott has been studying art for several years. She spent four years at Texas Tech and will wrap up her studies at the insti­tute in March. "I love every aspect of art," she said. "The institute has really opened my eyes to what's going on in the art world." Scott is unsure of the direction her career will take after graduating. Her primary concern will be to become even more informed about commercial art. "I'd like to be an illustrator for a very large advertising firm just to get my feet wet," she said. Her design, an abstract of purple, tur­quoise and black, was chosen over 31 other entries submitted by young artist.a from this area, Michael Groves, president of the Westheimer Colony Association, said. "The contest gives an unknown the chance to make a name for himself," he added. The poster will herald the upcoming art festival, and its design will be extensively reproduced for sale to the public on posters and festival T-shirts. There will also be a limited edition of signed and numbered posters available to the public. The Westheimer Colony Art Festival will be held Oct. 15 and 16 in the 100 to 1100 blocks of Westheimer. Project Launched to Determine Corporate Discrimination International Gay Newa A1ency A group called Lesbian and Gay Asso­ciated Engineers and Scientists (LGAES) is launching a project to find out which major corporations discriminate against gays and which do not. The goal is to determine the status of all occupations in such workplaces, not only engineering and scientific ones. The three major objectives of the project are to provide information to gay people so that they can increase their job security "and avoid disaster," to lobby corpora­tions and other employers to adopt sexual orientation nondiscrimination policies and to modify the economic structure for the benefi t of gay people. LGAES's plan of action is to conduct a survey via a questionnaire, since no known survey of gays in the workplace so far exists. Despite limited past success in deter­mining corporate attitudes toward gay employees, it is hoped that the new questi­onnaire will elicit more response, because failure to reply in a substantive manner will be seen as verification of "negative and below average ratings," they said. A summary report will be sent to companies detailing negative and below average rat­ings of that company. Eventually, LGAES will publish a list of the 10 worst corporations in an effort to get corporations to reply to the survey and improve their practices. With the information about which com­panies are good and which are bad for gay employment, an effort will be made to eliminate those companies that pratice discrimination, the group said. When good companies thrive, LGAES feels, "nondis­criminatory job opportunities for gays expand. When bad companies are reduced, economic room is provided for good com­panies." LGAES believes that corporations 0 have no vested interest in discrimina· tion. The cost of fair play is virtually nothing." The long-range goal is for more and more companies to see the wisdom of nondiscrimination against gay people. CDC Head Researcher Understands Gay Complaints By S. Christopher Hagin ATLANTA-The director of the AIDS Task Force for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Dr. James Curran, says he understands attacks on the government in relation to AIDS from gays, and he also says the killing disease will "be with us for quite a while." Curran said the "frustration" of gay leaders who complain the government is not doing enough to solve AIDS and stop the deaths is understandable. "I have two reactions" to complaint.a Cunan said. "The first is that it's under· standable for all of us who are concerned about this to be frustrated. I, too, am frus­trated. I've been working on this problem for two years and two months, and it doesn't seem to be getting any better. "The second part of that is that I get tired of people complaining. I've been working on this problem a lot harder than most of the people who are complaining. "I don't find the numbers terrifying, but I think the problem 1s a problem that's likely to be with us for quite a while and one that we will have to deal with. I think finding the cause of AIDS is going to greatly increase our capabilities to deal with it, but it's not a problem that's going to go a way in the next year or two," said Curran. Plop Plop, Fizz Fizz, Run Run Runners who want to boost their endu­rance may want to reach for a bottle of Alka Seltzer. Canadian Researchers claim the alkaline content of Alka Seltzer and baking soda counteracts the buildup of acid in muscles being pushed to their limit. With less muscle acid, the theory goes, joggers should be able to run longer, reports American Health. Maybe that's why they call him "Speedy." 6 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 23, 1983 Southern Methodist University Torn Over Gay Rights Issue CanCmsher Co~oration We Pay Cash for Your Trash*! continued from page 1 unenforceability is but one of the reasons such incidents occur. uln this case the vandalism OCCUITed in a dormitory newly renovated at a e<msid­erable cost to SMU. Perhaps if the admin­istration were to provide some serious educational programs on homosexuality, such vandalism, displays of open hostility toward homoeexual students, and open defiance of the student code would decrease." Dr. Campbell RA!ad, faculty advisor of the GLSSO, said that early Tuesday morn­ing (Sept. 20) an envelope waa pushed under the door of the same harassed stu­dent in Smith Hall, which read, "Move off the floor, faggot, or else." &ad said that other harassments have occurred as well. Last spring, Robert Rios was verbally assaulted while crossing campus. The incident was taken to the student judi­ciary after school opened this fall. The individual charged with the assault was reprimanded and made to issue a written apology. Threats and derogatory comments about homosexuala have also appeared as graffitti on the bathroom walla in the art echool. According to The Daily Campus article, Rios was uncertain as to whether or not the group would be recognized. Rios said, "I can't predict human nature. All I can do ia try. Whether or not we are accepted, we exist and continue to ex.isl" Rios said that they have not yet openly sought the endorsement of any individu­als or groups. However, Rioa believed that the GLSSO would once again receive very strong support from students in the Per­kins School of Theology. Rios aJao said that the Organizat ion Committee of the Student Senate will have New York Removes Haitians from AIDS High Risk List ~[. ~~:;!~~v!!:iation Wire Service New York City Health Commisaioner Dr. David Sencer has removed Haitians as an AIDS risk factor group in that city, claim­ing the majority of Haitians with AIDS fall into two other risk categories, that of homosexuals or intravenous drug users. He was also responding to many com­plaints from New York's Haitian com­munity that undue discrimination was being directed at them due to the AIDS crisis. Numerous reports of job loss and housing discrimination have been cited. For many months, Haitian AIDS patients denied any homosexual or IV drug use connection, while the rest of the Haitian community streued a national taboo against the gay lifestyle. Last month reports surfaced showing that was not the case. Television crews and news­paper reporterfl visited Hai~ ~d repoi:ted back incidences where Haitian medical clinics were using the same needles for various patients, and that male prostitu­tion was thriving between locals and tour· iata. Many of the men involved with male prostitution were bi~exual a.nd are believed to have transmitted the disease to Haitian women. At a new a conference. a group of Hai ti an physicians contended that most Haitian AIDS patients in the United States had lied when asked about drug or gay connec· tions. They believe most of them are illegal aliens and therefore fear deportation. to review the GLSSO this year. Last year the Organization Committee unanim­ousJy accepted the organization and recommended to the full Student Senate that the GLSSO be recognized. Rios said, .. I can't see how they (the Organization Committee) can come out with anything other than a unanimous decision to accept us." As last year, the editorial staff of The Daily Campus is in favor of recognition of the GLSSO. Dr. RA!ad said that he believes the chan­ces of senate recognition are "marginally better" than last year. RA!ad said', "There's a lot of hostility on campus, but after last spring, we're ready for anything." 0 0 0 0 <> ·Trash by Can Crusher's definition is aluminum cans only. Can Crusher Corporation is a full-service recycling company paying market prices for aluminum cans. Our hours are Sam to 7pm Monday thru Friday and 9am to 2pm on Saturday Help America Recycle and Make Money Too! The Can Crusher Corp. also offers a lull-service pickup _recycling program for bars restaurants & industry. Gall 864-2223 for details. RUTH HASTINGS ~ 201Jr. Silver Spnng ~ ~ ! ;; ~ Washmg1on 8 2011 Silver Sl 2 \ ~(Q)~~(GJ~ presents with Craig Jessup & Barry Lloyd 'Nednesday-Saturday, 10pm & midnight ($3 entertainment charge) "BOY'S NIGHT OUT" with Lee LaForge, Ernie Ritchie, Steve Watson SUNDAY and MONDAY at 9 and 11 u111~00~ 0 0 Tuesday Night Showcase 9-11 0 0 IC 0 Call Sam at 526--0964 0 to reserve your spot o~ ovoooooo 0 0 0 oo Greg Davis Entertains for Cocktails from 6 to 8:30, Mon.-Fri. Tropicana Club wishes an "almost always annual' Sunday, Sept. 25, Happy Birthday and Continued Success to Debra Danburg AIDS Prompting Club Bath Chain President to Diversify By S. Christopher Hagin ATLANTA-Will Jack Campbell, preoi· dent of the Club Bath Chain, and hie Atlanta partner, Ray Zeller, be allowed to diversify and go into the legitimate health spa business here? That question only the Atlanta police, the License Review Board and Mayor Andrew Young can answer. The in·depth investigation has just begun. "There's a definite need to diversify," said Campbell, who is financially con­nected to 43 gay bathhouses around the nation. He and Zeller, who used to own two baths, want to open the "most posh and attractive'' legitimate health club in the city. They want both male and female members using the club at thesametime­with separate bathing facilities. 04AIDS has caused a considerable drop­off in business (at the bathhouses)." says Campbell. Due to the financial olump and because of the trend for baths to come and go from generation to generation, accord· ing to Zeller, is the reason the two well· known bath operators are looking to the health spa business. Campbell says the buoineoe at his bathe in San Francisco and New York have dropped tremendously, while clubs in "Kansas City, Toledo and Chicago have not been affected at all. Where AIDS ie a problem our business is dropping,'' Camp· bell asserts; however, he would not give specific drop-off figures. The reason for the Jocal controversy is because Campbell and Zeller are buyinf out a facility which was going to be a gay bathhouse but were denied a business license for several reasons, including organized crime connections and also and partly due to Campbell's and Zeller'• involvement in gay bathhouse operations. Zeller hao tried to elevate neighborhood and citywide fearo that hie proposed buei· ness will be a bathhouse. In the conflict over the organized crime connected bath, press attention centered on what Atlanta City Council Member Mary Davio called "sex staJls." Ze1ler invited Davis, a pro· gay member of the council, and residents of the area to tour the facility. Many of their fears were quashed when they saw the 46 dressing rooms had been removed. Other residents, including Charles Barden, an AIDS victim, still remain unconvinced that CampbeU and Zeller are not going to operate a gay bath later out of the same location. Barden, who live8 next door to the converted warehouse, lead the successful fight against the proposed bath. He believes he contracted the deadly diseaae in a bathhouse in San Francisco. Zeller hao met all of the conditions that the Virginia·Highlando neighborhood re•· idents and Davia mentioned. He even plans to enter into a contractual agree· ment with residents and the city stipulat· ing concerns. Campbell and Zeller plan to have facili­ties for bodybuilders, aerobics, karate, fencing, indoor jogging, bodytech, nutri· lion piano, a health food store, a green· house swimming pool, exercise area and a nursery for children. There will be a lot of greenery inside, and it is to be beautifully decorated. The neighborhood the spa is located in ia populated by a near majority of gays; however, neither partner would say they are aiming for a primarily gay clientele. Lt. J.T. King of the police bureau's licensing and permits di.visi?n toured t~e spa with Davis and srud h1s office wi~l scrutinize Zeller's and Campbell s apph· cation for a business license because of the earlier controversy. A person in Young's office who did not want to be identified oaid, "Thio health club looks legit to me. It io nothing like the earlier bath and Zeller's background. But, I believe, thia place will receive a license." According to Campbell, the hea!~h dub will be named Club Body Centre. Notice tht initials are CBC," 011id Campbell, who hoMed • oockl.ail. reoept.ion, I.or . .. tock- • \ ........ . .. ...... ......... .... .... .. holders of the Club Bath Chain at the opa on September 2. The CBC stockholders conducted their annual meeting in Atlanta that day. Campbell and Zeller oay they plan to open spas in other cities, but have not yet decided on any particular locations. New AIDS Hotline Swamped International Gay New• Acency A federal hotline, set up in July to provide the pub1ic with information on AIDS, has been answering 8,000 to 10,000 calls per day-a heavy pace that can handle only half the estimated demand. "It'o been incredible," said Shellie Len· gel, who runo the U.S. Public Health Ser· vice operation. "It's evidence of the deep concern that people have about the dis· ease." Lengel eotimatee that 90,000 callo dur· ing the last week of July did not get through. About 30 people are now involved on a rotating basis in fielding the calls, which range from a diagnosed AIDS patient who just wants to talk to someone, to a healthy person who received a blood transfusion five years ago and wants reassurance that he is safe. Usually six persons are on duty between 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.(EST) Monday through Friday. A three-minute tape io available on a 24·hour seven-days-a-week basis. "We generally let our people stay on the phone only three or four hours, because they mostly can't handle more than that," Lengel said. "It's emotionally draining." She added that about half the people they talk to are members of the gay com­munity. Aside from gays and a small number of drug abusers who call, "the others gener· ally are people who are not at risk at all," Lengel said. "They are frightened about the disease and have no reason to be frightened." They are concerned about meeting with homosexual friends, going to public swimming poolo and health clubs. Lengel oayo much of the staffs work is reassuring callers that they are not in danger from AIDS without intimate sexual contact or sharing of intravenous need lee. Protecting privacy has been a major concern. No names are required. no list is compiled. The toll free number io: l-800·342·AIDS. Home Cooking Best Pacific New• Service If you want fancy food, go to a restaurant. If you want nutritious food, stay at home. A Cornell University study found people who dine out more than 30 percent of the time don't get as many vitamins and min­erals as those who eat at home. Researcher Karen Bunch says the pro~ lem is most serious among l:>-t&l4-year­olds, because they prefer fast-food restaurant& where the meals are generally low in nutrition, For example, she says, if you eat a large burger, an order of fries and a soft drink, you're getting about 900 calo­ries but only about 10 percent of your recommended daily allowance of vitamin C and even Jess vitamin A. She suggests drinking juice or milk, and taking advan· tage of the oalad bar. Bunch says the problem with most Americans is not under-consumption, but over-consumption, although most people won't admit it. She says the nearly 4000 people she interviewed for her study claimed they consumed only about 80 per­cent of the recommended daily allowance of C'alories. Bunch says that's hard to believe when an estimattd 20 to 30 percent of the poJtukthon is overweight . . . .. . ........ .................. ~ ....... ! SEPT. 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Stanford Square TOWNHOMES The twenty-four townhomes at Stanford Square afford the convenience of a near town location coupled with the serenity of a carefully-planned, secure emironment. These one and two-bedroom traditional brick studio homes are within minutes of the downtown business and cultural district, Greenway Plaza, the medical center and the speciality shops, galleries and fine restaurants of the Montrose, museum and Ri \'er Oaks areas. Careful attention has been gi\'en to security requirements. An automatic entry gate permits controlled access to the townhome community, while automatic garage doors and W('ll-lighted parking areas extend <;ecurit\ within the p('rimeter of the pro1x·ny. A, an addition:il feature, each home has been pre-wired for its own security system . Stanford Square Townhome~ offer a , ·;;-UJ<:l} of amenitie~. including: • Woodbuming fireplaces, • Private patios, • Kitchen appliances {refrigerator & microwave oven), • Washers & dryers, • Smoke detectors, • Pre·wiring for cable TV & Security Systems. SPECIAL BUILDERS BONUS• for purchasers acting prior to Sept 30, 1983 I} A weekend for 2 in etther of the sunny Carribean islands of Jamaica or Aruba {only air fare & hotel accomodatiom included). -OR- 2) A year's full membership for two at the popular Downtown YMCA -OR- 3) A $1500 gift certificate at the furniture store of your choice to help you outfit your new home. "Sale must be closed prior to the awarding of any builders bonus. Butlders bonuses may be changed or withdrawn by builder at any ume. OFFERED EXCLUSIVELY BY KITTRELL REALTY 529-5981 8 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 23, 1983 British ............ .. Anxiety-Ridden Over AIDS lnternatlonal Gay New• Aaency WNDON-Fear of catching AIDS is caus­ing more harm in Britain than the disease itself. People are literally worrying them­selves aick with little reason and may need psychiatric help, says doctors and volun­tary workers. People are so frightened by newspaper and television reports of the disease that one London hospital alone, SL Mary's of Paddington, has reported hundreds of patient.a 1uffering from AIDS.related anx­iety. some to the point of being suicidal. Three cases of "severe psychiatric illnees with fear of AIDS as the dominate feature" were reported last month in the Britiah Medical Journal by Dr. Jonathan Weber and Dr. David Goldmeier of St. Mary's. All were unable to work because they feared they might p888 on the disease. None had any of the phyaical abnormali­tiea a880ciated with AIDS, of which there are only 14 confirmed cases in Britain, The anxiety casee were the following: A 35-year-old academic was in good health until he watched a Horizon docu­mentary on AIDS. He then developed "an irrational conviction that he was incubat­ing AIDS and complained of night sweats, weight lou and malaise." Although he waa a aexually active homosexual, he had no high-riak factors, such as intravenous drug abuse. (intimate) contact with an AIDS patient or history of sexual contact in the USA. A 4G-year-old gay man "developed an acute agitated depre88ion" after reading a newspaper artide. He still does not com­pletely accept that he is notauffering from AIDS. A heterosexual man, 30, who claimed he was sexually assaulted by a homosexual man six months earlier, watched a video recording of the Horizon program about AIDS more than 30 timea and developed an intense anxiety that he had the diaeaae. Worst hit by thia new streea ayndrome are gay malea, reaponding to reports that they are moat at risk from the diaeue. Tony Whitehead of the Terrence Hig­gins Truat, a London-baaed organization set up to fund AIDS research and support eufferen, said: "Very often people are simply being senaible and checking just what the risu are and what they can do to reduce them. But where you have people who haven't accepted their sexuality, the combination of guilt feeling•, acare­mongering reports and general anxiety can be exploeive." Not all allDety-ridden people are gay men, however. Gay Switchboard haa had frantic calla from grandmothers who fear they may catch the diaease after learning their grandaons are gay. One married woman telephoned a hoapital to ask if there was any chance her husband might be secretly biaexual and pasa AIDS on to her Mexico Publishes New Gay Newspaper International Gay Newe A•ency Despite opposition from authorities and what many say is a homophobic culture, gay people in Mexico City are putting out a regular newspaper called Nuevo Amblente. The 16-page tabloid keeps Mexican gay men and lesbians abreast of international happenings, as well as aware of the gay liberation movement in their own country. The publication is published by Grupo Lambda who hope to receive subscriptions from Spanish-reading people outside Mex- 100. Yearly subecriptions outside Mexico are $8 (U.S.) for seven iuues. Subscription• are available from Nuevo Ambiente, J\i>arq,do P,.,.i ;73.l;lq, ~•pco 12, D.F., Mexico. The Pink Rose of Texas The vines of Texas are upon us .. almost. The Lone Star state now boaats 13 com­mercial wineries and predictions are that 10,000 acrea of grapea will be in production within 10 years, reports the New York Times. The only sour note comes from a market· ing consultant hired by the University of Texas. Carl Blonkvist told them: "Keep the word 'Texas' off the label." The consultant said, "I'm a Texan. I'd like to see a picture of the state on the bottle. But the bitter fact is that if you aak 100 people about it, you'll get (atrange) smiles from 95 of them." ' HIGH RISE LIVING IS AFFORDABLE! The EXECUTIVE HOUSE at 230 West Alabama is having its Fall Move-In Special. For this month our prices have dropped: Unfurnished Efficiency Apartments ... . . . . . .. . ... .. . .. . .. .. . $375 Unfurnished One Bedroom Apartments ............. . ..... . . . $475 EXECUTIVE HOUSE offers: • Paid Utilities• Security Building • Dry Sauna • Covered Parking Garage • Sun Deck • Gymnasium • Swimming Pool • Free Cable Television • Laundry Facilities EXECUTIVE HOUSE is 2 blocks from Main Street, 3 blocks from West­heimer and 4 blocks from Montrose. We are close to everything in the Montrose area. Call 529-8707 for appointment Tuke off with Eastern and land on IlnLotroduNcitWk!?~d~1: Cicy forl= ilian :ve ew xor . . N.gh Sh rr. youcan1magme. at 1 t ow .1.ours. Call your Travel Agent, or (Includes Advance Theatre Ticket Purch88e) Eastern Airlines at 738-8615 in From the cozy off-Broadway theaters to the shining lights on the Great White Way, the stars come out every night on stage in New York City. And now you can experience all the excitement of live theater and Houston for complete details. Then take off for Broadway. e EASTERN America's famrite way to fly SEPT. 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Gay Life In Haiti ~[. ~!;~!~~~:Ciation Wire Service Despite denials by some Haitian Ameri­cans during the early outbreak of AIDS among fellow Haitians, gay life has been alive and well in Haiti for many years. Even during the oppressive regime of dic­tator Dr. Francois Duvalier (1957-1971), a gay bar run by a corporal in the feared "Tonton Macoutes" (secret police) catered to visiting tourists and available boys. It was called Frida's, the drag name the corporal took for his occasional theatrical exhibitions. The bar moved several times but always consisted of a delapidated wooden 1tructure and a fenced-in dirt patio. When the dictator "Pappa Doc" died, his 18-year-old aon Jean-Claude became "Preaident for Ufe," just like hia father before him. The climate changed, how­ever, as the younger Duvalier leasened police presaures and revived foreign investment, tourism and what there was of gay life. Frida's no longer had the only game in town, and several small shack­like bars started catering to the gay tourist trade and their tricks. In 1975 I filed a report which appeared in the Puerto Rican gay paper Pa 'fuera describing the gay carryings-on in Port­au- Prince during the winter carnival. In addition to Frida's, there was the Ameri­can bar near the pier behind the Venezue­lan embassy, a dimly-lit park filled with local and visitini gays, plus dozens of nongay partners anxious to earn wha­tever they could. Three small hotels catered almost exclu­sively to gay clientele. Available boys and family men were always around the edge of the pool areas awaiting an invitation. Haitian flags and portraits of President "Baby Doc" were present in nearly every room. The assessment of Haitian gay life doesn't seem much changed in the 1983 Spartacus gay guide, with the notable exception of the Carrefour aection where the American television crews zeroed in on for their report of AIDS in Haiti. In 1975 it was a pleasant and safe place for gay peo­ple to meet locals. Spartacus now says, "Above all, avoid any establishment in the crowded slum area known as Carre­four. Theft, sometimes accompanied by violence, ia rampant, and the 'manage­ments' of these premises are cynical and totally disinterested in your fate." It even included a warning of the poBSibility of becoming infected with AIDS. All but one of the listings have changed: The Tropical Guest House overlooking the ocean in Fontarnara. The big spot these days is Chez Denise where 150 people crowd in to disco on wee­kends. This is the same club the American TV crews photographed from visiting Video Fitness Jogging and video games, the two great obsessions of the 80s, could not stay separ­ated long, reports the Chicago Triburn!. So get ready for the Aerobics Joystick, a gadget that connects exercise bicycles to home video games. The faster you pedal, the faster the game go;:~entor Stephen Kiesling says spend­ing a half.hour on a regular exercise bike may be great for the body, but it's not so stimulating to your brain. A half-hour of Pac-Man, on the other hand, may be excit­ing as all get-out, but it also can cause high blood pressure. Kiesling who had been scheduled to compete a~ an oarsman ~n .the 1980 ~oa­cow Olympic•, 1aye combmmg the two ts a natural. j'Video games," he aays, 0 are a "!"hol~ lot closer to sports than moat peopl~ imagine. They give you the same adrenalin rush as you get at the etarting line of a race." behind a clump of trees. ''They should have gone inside," a visiting Haitian remarked in Los Angeles. "They would have been welcome." President Jean-Claude Duvalier mar­ried at 30 and last October was reported in Newsweek to be hospitalize<f in Miami with a potentially fatal disease of the auto immune system. He was reported at the time to be lethargic and confused in his speeches. The government palace refused comment. Since that time, nothing further has been heard about his illneBS or recov· ery. In the meantime, a popular new song about AIDS is getting a lot of air time on Haitian radio. !ta lyrica have been des­cribed as being playful yet morose, while the disease itself is referred to as the 0 four H," Haitian, Hemophiliac, Heroine and Homoaexual. LOOK HOW YOU'RE HELPING CLUB HOUSTON IS: CLUB HOUSTON 2205 FANNIN 659-4998 llEJlllEll <:LU'S BATH OlAnr 10 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 23, 1983 Big Brother Balks By Patrick Franklin Thia year marked the 30th anniversary of President Eisenhower's executive order banning homosexuals from all govern­ment poaitiona. In a more freewheeling age, it's easy to forget the hysteria of the 50s when a slip of the lip could sink a career, and gays, lesbians and people who were merely "suspicious" lost their jobs and reputations. Dr. Dan Simoniski, a former political scientist at Texas Tech University in Lulr bock. hasn't forgotten, though. What he also remember& is the surveillance that was undertaken by the FBI on domestic groups that were regarded as .. subver· aive·· (a common denunciation of gay acti­vliits) and which may continue now. Sim.inoski filed a request on October 20, 1982. for all records held by the FBI on 13 •pecific gay movement groups and any others affecting the gay and lesbian move­ment aa well. Using the Freedom of Infor­mation Act as a lever, the search for records included not only the main FBI filea, but those at seven field offices of the agency. Generally, the cost of such request is borne by the applicant. However, a "fee waiver"' is available for applications that result in discloeures which are "in the pub­lic interea~" On January 3 of this year, S1mmoek1 s request was denied by the FBI. claiming that the size of the public to be benefitted was too small and his ability to get the information to the public too limited. Obviously, the FBI is waffling. Millions of gay people are affected by the existence of government prying, and early indica­tions ahow cJearly that most gay activist groups have generated government records. Siminoaki has published exten­aively, writing both for the gay press and for major academic conferences. Dr. Siminoski filed an immediate appeal with the Justice Department and plans to carry the case further should that be denied. His case ia considered a strong one by attorneys and experts in Freedom of Informatin Act isaues. Whatever the re1-1ult, the case promises tangible benefits to the gay community; if successful, at least 2000 pages of documents (the number the FBI admits having) will be turned over for public scrutiny. The case ia valuable as a test of gay civil rights and an oppcirtunity for media cover­age and public education. It opena many doors between gay and nongay euppcirters of pereonal freedom and open govern· ment. Siminaoki'a attorneys estimate that his Kick the Habit: Suck on a Tube A tobacco-flavored pacifier for adults is the latest aid for smokers hoping to kick the habil. It's called "Smokebreak"-a white plastic tube the size of a cigarette, with a tobacco or menthol-flavored cotton wick inside. The manufacturer says "Smokebreak" tastes like the real thing, satisfies your oral fixation and gives you aomething to do with your hands. A kit of two "Smokebreaks" coata S8 and is supposed to last three to six months. For another two bucks, reports the San Fran­ciaco Examiner, you can get a booklet on the dang en of smoking. Majoring in Disaster You can now prepare yourself for disaster and earn a college degree at the same time. Starting this fall , reports the Chronick of HigMr Education, North Texas State Uni· veraity is offering a bachelor's degree in Emergency Management and Adminis· tration . The first of ita kind in the country. the pr""1"am '!\'ill train 1tudents to deal with e\<i!rj'thing from mudslides to nuclear war legal fees will run from $10,000 to $20,000, with associated travel, telephone and pub­lic relations costs. The gay and lesbian community has a great deal at atak:ein his work, and we strongly urge contributions to Siminoski so that he can continue to prepare and pursue a case that affects us all. Any contributions are not tax­deductible, since the government does not regard thi1:1 as in the public interest. You can mark the anniversary ofthePresiden· tial Decree of Shame by sending financial support to Freedom of Information Defense Fund, Dr. Dan Siminoski, 1221 Redondo Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90019. Dan can be called for more information or to arrange speaking engagemrnts at (213) 931-7826. 1983 Stonewall Features Syndical• Health Muscle-Man Misconceptions By Harvey Thompson, M.D. Y'ith so many of us interested in improv­ing our personal appearance, there has been a rapid increase in the number of gyms and athletic programs aimed at peo­ple who are more interested in the cos· metic improvements of exercise, instead of the competitive aspects. With that increase has come a good amount of misin­formation. Let's consider some of the more common questions about weight-lifting that crop up for the amateur. Q. Is a 1pecial diet needed for weight­lifting? A. Probably not. The body is adept at transforming fats, carbohydrates and pro­teins from one form into another. Calories are a more important consideration. Body mass is determined by this formula: INTAKE (calories) equals ENERGY EXPENDITURE plus CHANGE (in body weight). The equation may seem simple, but it is frequently misunderstood by the obese, the underweight, the athlete and weigh­tlifter. Any one of the variables influences the other two. For example, if more calo­ries ere consumed while energy expendi· ture remain• the same, body weight will increase in anyone with no disease and good health. However, if leBB food is eaten while energy expenditure remains con· atant, body weight will drop. Amazing as it is, there are still patients who exclaim, "But Doctor! I don't eat anything, and I still gain weight!" That's obviously impos­sible. Q. When you stop lifting weights, does musrU> turn to fat? A. N0< Fat llo r lr0111 en~oit'l'M. MuM'le ~!I!!.'!!! from. ..~. soderm. They do not transform themselves from one to another. Probably, the number of fat and muscle ceUs are uset" at birth and don't change. Obesity is not an increase in the number of fat cells, but a change in their lipid content. Muscle cells hypertrophy, or enlarge, with exercise, but don't increase in number, either. Q. Does weight-lifting increase your life span? A. Maybe not. As unreasonable as it may seem, there is not good proof that exercise protects against heart disease. However, one positive benefit of exercise ha~ been seen in a study oflongshoremen; their heavy physical activity seemed to protect against "Sudden Death Syn­drome," a type of heart attack. Q. Will situps reduce the size of my wais­tline? A. No. Most large bellies are fat. To get the waist size down, one must depend on ~eight reduction, either through less intake or more energy expenditure through exercise. The exercise will work an allover reducing benefit· spot reduc­tion, aimed at melting away' fat in a ape· cific exercise area, won't work. The waist vibrators and wide rubber belt gimmicks were fads of the 50s . . Q .. Is weight-lifting better for you than Jogging or aerobic dancing? A. No. Weight-lifting is mostly cosmetic. It looks healthy, but it's not a real cardio­vascular conclitioner. Q. Is it better to work out with weights every day or a few times a week? . A. Doing workouts can be boring and time-consuming. A daily workout is neces· sary for the weight-lifting pro, but the amateur who wants a body that's "a cut above the average" will find an altemate­day- of-the·week regime productive enough, as well as a more efficient use of time that's more likely to be followed than daily grinds. ~· What are Lats? the Pees? Biceps? Triceps? Deltoids? Hamstrings? A. All are different parts ot the muscular anatomy. Knowing those parts isinvalua· hie in setting up a sensible workout patt­ern for each muscle group. For example, the biceps in the front of the arms are deve­loped by "curls." Dips or benches develop the triceps in the back of the arms. Bench presses are pretty standard for the chest pectorals. Shrugs build the b'apezins•of the ahoulder. Arm extensions (front and side) are for the deltoids, situps for the abdomen. Quads and leg curls done on the stomach are for the hamstrings in the back of the thigh. Q. Duln't you say situpB don't reduce the waistlin~? A. They don't. They help build muscle but will not reduce specific area fat. Q. How many repetitians? How many sets? A. Three sets of the maximum weight that allows you to perform six to ten repeti­tions for each exercise. IC you're looking for definition and not more bulk, use a lighter weight with more repetitions. Q. How about sterouJs? A. Steroids are NOT approved by the FDA for muscle building because of their numerous aide effects. Be careful with them if you have high blood pressure, liver disease, fluid retention, diabetes, etc. Pro· feasional lifters insist they work, but there are no good studies to compare users against non-users with regard to strength and size. Some steroid users admit they get meaner, more aggressive and homier on these male steroid&. Q. Aren't gyms intimidating? Will they make fun of me because I'm gay? A. More and more straight and gay men are lifting weights together without has­sle. It may require some discretion in small towna; straights don't appreciate being stared at, and you may have to hold back on conversations about gay libera­tion or AlDS. Stay on the weights and leave '1.!!"' hv''7. ~bJ,<;tf.a fur )~~er;. • •• " • 198~ st;;;;;u·a!J Feo..!J,Ace~ SY/l.d<ea.t -=--.. SEPT. 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 12 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT 23, 1983 AIDS Prevention Through Hypnosis? From Randall C. Stein, Therapeutic and Forensic Hypnosis Institute I feel compelled to answer the libelous and unjust attack made indirectly on my work by Rick Grossman in last week's VOICE (Sept. 9, "Beware of Quacks'1. I can't com­ment on others to whom Mr. Grossman referred; I try not to talk about things I don't know enough about. I'm not saying he is wrong in some of what he wrote, but he is grossly misinformed about my work in the community. I heartily agree about "being on the loo­kout for unacrupulous individuals andser· vices .. and needing "to know how to check their reputations and efficacy" (and hope Mr. Gro88Dlan and all others interested will check out my credentials and services for our mutual benefit). My friends and clients can readily verify that when it comes to my work, my reputation is quite clear, and that I definitely "know my stuff." It was Sigmund Freud who stated that if emotional support were ever to be deli· vered to the maBBes, it would in all likeli· hood be through some form of hypnosis or self-hypno•is. And via a program myself and my associate, J. Michael Boulch, have put together. I am attempting to imple­ment that in our community, gay and straight alike. The succesa of hypnotherapy in con· junction with cancer therapy has been widely reported in many professionaljour· nal• and books. The u1:1e of hypnosis, men­tal imagery and stress reduction has been well covered by nationally-known 0. Carl Simonton,. M.D .• and Stephanie Matthews-Simonton (Directors of the Dallas-b&Je<l Cancer Counseling and Research Center) in their bestsellers Get­ting Well Again and Stress, Psychological Factors and Cancer. A large part of their progTam• and books are about the theory and use of hypnosis, stress reduction and imagery to promote therapeutic change. I welcome the opportunity to work with victims of AIDS and other such diseases, in conjunction with their regular medical therapy. But I'm especially interested in the preventative uses of hypnosis. Aa I've stated in our ads, reduction of stress. imag· ery and aelf·hypnoei.a can greatly streng· then the immune system. The underlying causes of many illnesses is a deficient immune ayste-m wherein the body is unable to sufficiently defend itself (thus the name of our program: Acquired Immune Sufficiency Therapy). To ignore the many beneficial aspects of hypnosis (in preventative work, as well as in deal­ing with fears, weight, sleep disorders, memory and so many others!) is to keep the truly beneficial therapeutic aspects of hypnotherapy in the proverbial. closet. This, and the det1ire to use my abihties for my gay brothers and sisters, is why my chosPn lifework is hypnotherapy, and why I have chosen to pursue extei:isive training and credentials in therapeutic, as well aa investigative and forensic, hypno­sis. For your information and benefit. 'Van Hightower Best Candidate' From Grell/( RusB< II I find it ironic that my position with regards to the Van Hightower rHall race is shared by many whom I consider to be my most ardent rivals, while the opposition­tho" e who support Hall-is comprised of many who have ht-en my supporters and friends. Several of the~e "friends" have discontinued contact with me over my decision to support Nikki Van Hightower Some have questioned my position. One friend suggested that I had "jumped in bed with the opposition!• Anyone who knows me well, knows that I make decisions ha~ on fact and reason· ing, not upon perijOnalities. My positioi:t to support ~ikki was baaed on conversation and correspdndence with the candidates, as well as hours of personal research. Several weeks before the GPC endorse­ment, I wrote both candidates a form letter asking their position with regards to sup­port for the Domestic Privacy in Employ­ment ordinance. To this date, I have received no response from Anthony Hall. I received a letter from Nikki Van Hight­ower affirming her support for the ordi· nance. In personal converaation with Ms. Van Hightower, I sensed a genuine commit· trnent to further such programs after her election. In recent conversation with Mr. Hall I asked Anthony what his position was' with regard to the particular ordi­nance. In the course of conversation, Hall referred to the ordinance as a "housing ordinance." When I reminded him that it was a pub· lie employment ordinance, in a politically suave fashion, Hall proceeded to address the ordinance in a Vf!rY vague and nebu­lous manner. Although he said he would support the ordinance, he would not die· Let us hear from you Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston. TX 77006 cuss the particulars of it and exhibited lit· tle knowledge of its content. Considering the fact that I personally gave Mr. Hall a copy of the ordinance several months ago, I felt thatheexhibitedapoor knowledge of its content. In addition to my personal correspon­dence and converBBtion with the candi· dates, I have spent many hours this summer reAearching the Houston Post and Chronicle microfilm available on both candidates to trace their political his­tory. While I found considerable informs· tion available on each candidate, I discovered that while Anthony Hall fre­quently took a nebulous position on con· troversial matters, Ms. Van Hightower exhibited a history of taking advocacy positions on several controversial issues, including gay rights, a position she was eventuaJly fired for at one point in her career as a television commentator at the University of Houston. My conclusions led me to believe that Nikki will always be an outspoken suppor­ter of the community. She is intelligent, caring and genuine. I believe she is the best candidate for the position. New World of Deeper Values name withheld I came home alone again. As usual, the club I went to was very smokey and full of men, m0t1Uy in amall groups. This club usually caters to the upper crust of the gay world here, many of whom seem very jaded and not terribly interesting. Why is it that when I go to a place like this by myeelf, I usually come home alone? In fact, I always come home alone. Soi:ne­times I wonder if there ian 't something wrong with me because I never meet anyone in the bars. I've been told that I put up a facade when I'm in bars that I look so impregnable, and that nobody in their right mind would approach someone who looks as aloof as me. Why do I look that way? Why does everyone else in the bar look that way? I suppose that I could always blame it on the AIDS scare, but if I really want to be honest, I have to admit that the situation was the same long before I had ever heard of AIDS. Indt!ed. AIDS may just be a phys­ical outlet for the whole psychosis of the gay scene the isolation and the loneliness and the constant drive to succeed and overdo. I never did iet terribly involved in all the gay scene. The thought of going out and meeting strange men and going home with them first filled me with terror, then it became something that happened rarely, but still happened. Now, it is some­thing that rarely happens again, and it is not necesaarily because I'm afraid, or at least not afraid like I used to be. Mom was right. I'm a bigboynow,andI can take care of myself, but I'm also very sensitive, and my feelings are easily hurt, and they have been hurt many times in the last few years since I've "come out." There have been a dozen men in the last few years, and none of them have amounted to anything lasting. In fact, only about four of them do I even see anymore. I am told that those are actually good odds, and that I haven't even really come out yet because most gay men have sex with someone at least once a week. Can that really be true? Am I really that far removed from the "normal" gay scene? Compared to most men I know, it seems that I qualify for the Monk-of-the-Month Club but I have the feeling that I'm not the o~ly one. I have been guilty of painting a pretty lurid picture of my nights out for the benefit of those who were not with me, and I can only assume that many of them are guilty of the same offense. So I go out and see the show and feel rather alone, and enjoy the music and have a drink and not see anyone I know and then come home. How many others in that smokey crowded bar did that same thing? Then again, I realize that this club is the type of bar where "married'' couples usually go with friends, or just friends go so they don't have to deal with lone cruis­ing; 8.nd I guess that is what I usually do. Really, if I want to pick up a trick, I should be hanging out at one of the so-called "cruise" bars. But those places don't attract me anymore. Letters God. You know, I think I'm jaded! I'm jaded and I haven 'teven been out for three years yet! I'm jaded and I haven't even had a lover yet! I'm jaded and I haven't even DONE anything yet, at least com­pared to my older friends. They say that our relationships will begin to change now that the AIDS scare is so intense. They say that we will start forming deeper and more long lastingrela· tionships, and that we'll start seeing each other more for who we are instead of for the big buldge under the 501 's. I guess that is just fine. But what about me? I never wanted anything else but a relationship. I also tried as much as po88ible to see the person instead of the sex symbol, and now I wonder where I'll be in this new world of "deeper values." Will the bars become totally closed? Will people start being afraid to see ea~h other completely, like in Europe dunng the Black Death? I really doubt it; but then, for someone who never really did understand the workings of the cruise bar, I guess that will make things all the more difficult. So, I came home alone again tonight. I'm not sure I really wanted to come home with anyone else, but then, I'll never know now, will I. We all meet at the parades and at the bars and at parties, then we all go our separate ways in the maze of the city, and we'Jl be together again someday quite soon. We all go home alone.really. We takeoff our smokey clothes and brush our teeth and wash our faces and lie down in our dark bedrooms and some of us sleep very soundly, while others. of us lie there and stare at the electronic numbers on our clocks or the shadowa of the trees on our walls and ceilings from the lights outside our windows; and we wonder why we came home alone again. Leave the loop night. Tuesdays. Let's Not Lose a Real Friend From Nina Kruschwitz As October is half way here and more and more people become aware of the city elec· lions, I feel the need t<> put pen t<> paper. It is not often that one is given a friend without asking and or seeking. In the City Council At-Large Position 4 campaign, the Montrose community seems to have been offered this gift. The issues of equal rights, human jus­tice for all different lifestyles-not just one segment of Houston-the arts and a strong desire to live in a growing stimulat­ing atmosphere continue to be main goals of our community and issues for which we Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX 77006 pride ourselves for fighting. Anthony Hall has been a state represen­tative from a different area in our city-a city council member from a different area than ours-yet he has consistently shown his commitment to our goals. He has done this when he did not have to or when it might not have been politically savey for him to do so. We now have an opportunity to let his goals and our goals be one. Let's not lose a real friend. Dignity Seeks New Members From Stan Ford, President of Dignity! Houston On behalf of Dignity/ Houston, I would Tommy's Barber Shop 2154 Portsmouth (Greenbriar Shopping Center) 528-8216 NE Romn1 IN I 1' I UWI I GRl2RGE GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 SEPT. 23, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 13 like to express our appreciation for the excellent coverage afforded the Interns· tional Convention of Dignity, Inc. in Seat­tle. ANTHONY HALL Dignity/ Houston is a ministry of Catholic Gay men, women and their friends joined together in working to pro­mote the general acceptance and under­standing of Gay people within the church and society and with Gay people them· selves. By encouraging a spiritual atmos· phere via concerned support and sympathetic understanding, we hope to facilitate positive growth as individuals and as members of the body of Christ. September has been designated by our group for emphasis on inviting new people to experience our weekly liturgies and fel­lowship that follows. Persons wishing to attend will find us at 7:30 p.m. each Satur· day at the Rice Catholic Student Center, 1703 Bolsover. A map t<> help locate the center is printed in the ads we have placed in the VOICE each week in September One of 16 Legislators who voted to repeal 21.06 in 197 3. CITY WIDE POS. 4 2713 Main, Houston, Texas 77002, J E. Middleton, Sr., Treasurer. Paid for by the Anthony Hall for City Council Committee, Luncheon Menu Fried Zucchini Chips 2.95 Snacks Nachos Supreme 2.95 Shrimp Cocktail 4.95 ~ Sandwiches AJ=... "THE HAMBURGER" - '/z lb. of beef, thick and juicy - seroed with appropriate 3.95 garnish. With cheese add .25¢ BAJA BURGER - Ground sirloin, topped with cheese, crisp bacon and sliced onion PA TTY MELT - Cheddar cheese and grilled onion on rye bread THE B.L.T. - bacon, lettuce and tomato; for an added twisttry it with avocado or cheese. CLUB SANDWICH - slices of ham, roast beef, swiss cheese seroed on toasted bread and chips. CHICKEN FILET - topped with canadian bacon, swiss cheese and BBQ sauce REUBEN - Corned beef on rye, sauerkraut and swiss cheese FRENCH DIP - thinly sliced beef on French bread with au jus and chips BBQ BIIBF - served on a bun with French fries. Soup and Sandwich Du Jour - Ask your waiter. Soup and Salad 4.75 5.25 3.75 4.95 5.50 4.95 5.50 4.50 5.25 4.50 14 MONTROSE VOICE / SEPT 23, 1983 DINNER Monday-Thursday 6-11 Friday & Saturday 6-12 JOIN US FOR H' Monday thru Friday 4 to Bpm Complimentary Hors d'Oeuvres in the lounge 2702 KirbY, )R HAPPY HOUR efner at the piano Roast du Sapper rneu SEAFooo n1ere, le Snapper ai .. ... : ..... ~on butter ~napper Pornadrne .. . ·........ 9.so ~ked sturte':Jchatrain ... . ... 10.so F . ressing Shrrrnp · · · · · . 11 so rred shrirn ..... .. .... '. crabrneat . P . .. t ····· 119 Coquilles.si . ·. co~~n~ig1tion~1 9.·9ff . Jacque .... atter 10.so . .... 11.95 Broiled b ck, orang Breast of reast of c~ ·sakuce . . FOWL Chick Ch1cke ic en · · · · ..... en kiev n a/rnand· · • Wrapped ine· ·. · · · · · . · ·..·. ·. · . · . · · · · · · • · · ...... . around . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . •. ... herb buti~ · · · · ....... ." · · · · · · .... ... ."." · · · · 11 .95 r, battered a·n · d· ·d · · · . ······ · · · · · · 8 · 95 eep tried · · · · · 9.so .... 10.95 asca/s Piccata -sautee With Marsa1a:'bernon butt~rabrneat, hea ll'EAL Osca rown r . . vy cream '-crab sauce · · · · · · · .. . • rnushr rneat, as , rnushroo . . . . . . . . . . . oorns and . Pa rag us h rn, rnarsa/ · · .: . . . . . chives ' O//andais a Wrne · · · · · ·.... · · · 12.95 e ... ····· ·· ··· · ········ 9.95 .... . ..... . . 10.so . ... 11 .95 Reservations Requested Shows 9:30, 11, 12:30 16 MONTROSE VOICE I S EPT 23, 1983 The Mayor Who Happens to be Gay On the Job By Arthur S. Lazere, C.P.A. In 1980, the town of Bunceton, Missouri (population: 419). elected an openly-gay mayor. There were no gay issues in the town before, during or after the election. The impression that observers carried away was that of a mayor who just hap­pened to be gay. In April 1983, the City Council of La· guna Beach, California {population: 17,950), elected councilperson Bob Gentry as mayor. A month later, Gentry came out publicly in a story about gays in Orange County which appeared in the Los Angeles Times. When Gentry ran for City Council in 1982, he was closeted, but the closet door ~t<M_XI considerably ajar. The political insiders who approached him to run for City Council knew he was gay, he told me recently, and they came to him for that reason . The time was right for a gay coun· cilperson. The informal local gay network knew that the candidate was gay, but there were no gay issues in the campaign, and nothing was said publicly about Gen­try's sexual orientation. Indeed, the Loa Angeles Times quoted Gentry: "My running for office was separ­ate from being gay. I am not now and never have been the gay mayor of Laguna Beach. I am the mayor, who happens to be gay." Gentry, 44, was raised in comfortable suburban towns, first near Boston, later in the Chicago area. He was the middle child or three in a middle class, professional, Anglo-rooted family. At Hanover College in Indiana, he earned a bachelor's degree in psychology. He was active in student organizations and assumed leadership roles. In his senior year, he managed the freshman res· idence hall, the first direct step in his career in the "student affairs profession." Finding that he liked the work, Gentry went on for a master's degree in higher education administration and counseling at Indiana University. ~e built a successful career starting in Chicago and later relocating to southern California. He has been at the University of California's Irvine campus since 1970 and now holds the position of Associate Dean of Students. Gentry says that he knew be was gay even before puberty. ("Being gay waa very natural for me.") His lover of nine years owns a hairdre88· in~ salon in nearby Newport Beach. ("We are a real team when it comes to politics.") In his academic career, however, his clooet w&1 carefully maintained, his gay and non·gay social networks carefully orchestrated to prevent overt disclosure of The Laser Memory Card Computer technology is about to take another quantum leap, this time into the laser age, says the Boardroom Reports Newsletter California scientist Jerome Drexler has developed a laeer memory card which may ~me day ~ake today's methods of storing mformation obsolete. Though it looks like a regular credit card, the laser memory card can hold as much as 800 pages of data. Information can't be accidentally erased because it can't be erased at all. And, Drexler says, a fully encoded card will cost le88 than six dollars. Experts see a variety of possible uses for the card, which will hit the market in about a year. It would allow you to carry yo':ll' entire medical history in your wallet,. or 1t could be used as an extra·secure ID card •. imprinted with your photograph, phy81cal description or voice print. And Drexler says updating today's computers to make them compatible with laser cards will he relatively inexpensive. hie sexual preference unitl the Los Angeles Times article. (It wasn't until a month after Gentry came out in the Times that the University of California adopted a policy of nondiscrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.) Somewhat ironically, Gentry thinks his gayness led to his choice of career: "If you are going to survive being gay, you have to have real sharp skills of per· ception. You have to be able to work in diversity. You have to be able to think of yourself as a minority group member and how you are going to get what you want, being a minority group member. You have to have a great deal of intuition and a great deal of persuasive ability, building those skills as a human being, functioning in a world that disvalued me. With a great desire to be successsful, I had to learn those skills and hone them. That's why I went into the people business." It is not coincidental that these same skills are key elements in a political career as well. Indeed, those with experience in the contentious politics of academia come to the arena of governmental politics well armed. Gentry's initial political foray con· cemed a real estate development in La· guna which threatened the survival of some old trees. He got involved in the neighborhood association during the bat· tie to save the trees and was elected presi· dent of the association. From there it was a logical next step to the city council. Gentry is a conservation-minded pro­gressive, a proponent of carefully limited development in Laguna Beach. When elected in 1982, he was part of a slate of three candidates of similar mind, all of whom won seats on the council. In that election, the main opposition came from an incumbent Republican, stockbroker Howard Dawson. Dawson claims that he was unfairly branded as "a tool of the developers." He avers that con· servation is not an iBSue in Laguna Beach due to the geographical limits of the area. "The Lord laid it out that way. There's not much you can do," he said to me. Dawson resigned his council seat two weeks before the 1982 election in protest against the "ultra liberals" he saw taking over. Since hia election, Gentry has been instrumental in the establishment of two important gay organizations. Laguna Outreach is a community service, educa· tional and networking group which attracta some 100 attendees from all over the south coast to its monthly meetings. The Election Committee of the County of Orange (ECCO) is a political action com· mittee styled after Los Angeles' pheno­menally auccessful MECLA. Gentry has also led his city council to take supportive positions on the gay employment righta bill in the state legislature and on AIDS issues. I asked counc~man Dawson if Gentry's com.mg out had impacted on his effective­ness as mayor. 11No," he said, "the gays have been here a long time, and it haa never been an issue. It would have been nice," he went on, "if he admitted it when he was running. He got elected and then started working on gay issues. Some peo.. pie think they've been had. I'd prefer if he'd concentrate on issues that affect eve-. ryone, not just gays. Gay i88ues are not of concern to the majority." Dave Bishop is the publisher of the La· guna Beach Tide and Tim.es, a weekly newspaper. He speaks positively of Gen· try and cites a changed tenor at the city council, a shift of focus from strictly local issues to issues that were previously dealt with only at the county, stat.e or even fed· eral levels. Gentry has done ua real good job," according to Bishop on issues such as offshore drilling and the dangers of a local nuclear power station. Dawson, in contrast, characterized this activity of Gentry's as "tilting at windmills." Bishop thinks that the key to Gentry's "remarkable rise to political importance" has been his strong gra88 roots organiza· tion. Will Gentry's upfront stance have any effect? "T do hear a bit of snide com· men ta on hie being gay but not in public. It. is a minor undercurrent; most people don't care." Jim Lyon heads up the Laguna Beach Chamber of Commerce from which one would expect a conservative view. He said that Gentry has "conducted. himself admirably," despite the fact that he "leans toward conservation and is negative on growth." He also expects that being openly gay will have no effect on Gentry's performance or chances for reelection. "It's no big deal down here," said Lyon. Gentry has been approached by some local influential Democrats to seek a Con· gressional seat which comes up next year. But the Congressional district extends well beyond heavily gay Laguna Beach and into conservative, Republican Orange Couty heart.land. Gentry is cautious and thinks the time is not right yet. "You've got to pay your dues, learn the ropes, get to know who's who. You've got to serve out your term," he said. In 1982, the town of Bunceton, Missouri, reelected its mayor who just happened to be gay. There are still no gay issues in Bunceton. Despite his similar claim, Bob Gentry is no longer a mayor who just happens to be gay. He has taken an activist's stand on gay issues, and that is part of the package he will next have to sell to the voters, whether in Laguna Beach or in Orange County. Lazere is on the board of the San Fran· cisco Industrial Development Authority. His column originates at the "Bay Area Reporter." a San Francisco gay TU?WS· paper. WELCOMES The Incomparable PETER ALLEN LIVE! IN CONCERT! THE TOWER THEATRE OCT IO & II 8:00PM TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ALL TICKETRON AND TICKETMASTER OUTLETS INCLUDING SOUND WAREHOUSE AND ALL JOSKE'S STORES/ ORDER BY PHONE I CALL TELETRON f713J 526-1709 CHARGE TO MASTER CARD OR VISA Produced by PACE Concerts and the Tower Theatre THE TOWER THEAmE 1201 Westheimer - Secured Parking Available Oz 'n' Ends By Randy Alfred QUaJ'E OF THE WEEK: The New York Times went to Daniel J. Boorstin, Librar­ian of Congress, for reaction to reports that book sales and library uee have increased steadily in recent years, despite competition from the electronic media. "New technologies transform the use of old ones," he commented. "They don't replace them." Boorstin, a Pulitzer Prize-winning histo­rian, continued: .. Reading is a lot like sex. It is a private and often secret activity. It is often undertaken in bed, and people are not inclined to underestimate either the extent or the effectiveness of their activ­ity." THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT: From the daily echedule of the !30th California State Fair, Saturday, Auguet 27: " 12:00- 8:00, FFA Demoe' Junior Exhibits; 1:00, FFA Beef Judging; 1:00, 3:45, 4:45, Sen­sory Evaluation." THAT'S ART: The State of California com­missions an official portrait of each gover­nor upon his (no women yet) retirement. Bachelor Governor (sounds like a sitcom, eh?) Jerry Brown left office in January after two four-year terms. The unconventional Brown has chosen an unconventional portraitist, Don Bachardy, 49, whose work is often des­cribed as ''somewhat abstract." Bachardy lives in Santa Monica with his lover of 30 yeare, author Chrietopher Ieherwood, 79. THAT'S NOT SPORTING: In a key sequence of the new flic Star Chamber, Michael Douglas tries to engage Hal Hol­brook in a sensitive conversation admidst thousands of cheering baseball fans at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. The sta­dium P.A. announces Dusty Baker and Steve Sax as they come to the plate. When I saw the film here in San Fran­cisco, Giants fans in the theater booed the Dodger duo. THAT'S POLITICALLY CORRECT: At a conference on leebian and gay aging held here this summer, Randy Stallings of the Unitarian-Universalist Service Commit­tee told a panel on spirituality and reJigion of an 80-year-old black lesbian from a mid western congregation . Her "multiple layers of oppression" made her a popular speaker at gatherings of the liberal religion, Stallinge explained. She confided to him: "I'm terrified of going blind. If I go blind, I'll have to epeak to a different Unitarian-Universalist group every night." A PARABLE: Imagine you were black and lived in a small town in the southern Uni­ted States in 1954. The town had twolakee for swimming: a large, clear one with deep spote for diving, sandy shaded shores, and a picnic area for whites; and a small, shal­low, muddy, mosquito-infested slough for blacke. For yeare, you held marches, wrote let­ters and gathered signatures on petitions, all without success, to desegregate the deeirable lake. Finally, you went to federal court, and you won. This year, the lake is open to all. But this year, there is a polio epidemic in the county. The lake looks clean but, in Affairs of State The U.S. Senate hae added its voice to the crucial public debate over the official U.S. Olympic uniform. The senators had to choose between three outfits designed by Levi Strauss: the "Classic" -a red blazer with white skirt or trousers; the "Western"-denim jacket, jeans, cowboy hat and boots; and the 0 Active''-a red, white and blue warm-up suit. The "Classic" was the big winner, reports Forbes Magazine. About half the Democrats favored it, as did two out of three Republicane. Regional pride definitely had some­thing to do with the vote. Senators Lexalt of Nevada and Tower of Texas both voted for the "Western" look . actuality, harbors the crippling poliomye­litis virus. You've fought for years for your freedom , but would you go swimming now or wait until the epidemic had passsed? Imagine you were gay and lived in a large urban center in the United States in 1983 .... LONG CAMPAIGN: Bill Kraue, aide to U.S. Repreeentative Sala Burton and a veteran of many political campaigns, had his own insightful analogy when he addressed a group of physicians at an AJDS conference this summer. In political campaigns, Kraus said, "You devise all kinds of ways of getting information" out, including TV ado, radio ado, billboarde, bus signs and special brochures targetted at specific groups and neighborhoods. "You barrage a person repeatedly with messages in order to make an impact on the decision that that person is going to SEPT. 23, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 17 make," Kraus continued. It's "all part of a carefully coordinated, well-thought-out progressing program designed to influ­ence what that person does with hie or her vote .... "Now if all that ie necessary to try to make some Democrats in San Francisco decide which Democrat they're going to vote for in a primary election, imagine what is necessary to try to make the point to people that they need to coneider that one of their most basic behaviors, around which they have in many ways identified themeelvee, and the fulfillment of which has been to many of us a mark of our free­dom as gay people, which we have fought for all of our adult lives-imagine the diffi­culty of making the point to people that certain types of sexual conduct might be related to the transmission of this disease, and that by changing or eliminating some Dateline S.F. types of sexual conduct, re-i!:mphasizing othere, that they will be eafer. "That is a very fundamental aspect of human behavior and of one's self-concept, and that would take a campaign which is much more thought~ut, much more sig­nificant, much longer-ranged, and much more ongoing that the kind we do in a political campaign .... "It's going to be a long time . .. until we have a cure for this disease. The way we can save our people's lives in the mean­time is t.o educate each other as to the best ways to engage in sex positively and safely during the 10 years or five years or six months or however long it takes to end this disease." Alfred's column originates at the "&n· tin.el," a San Francisco gay newspaper. C 1983 Randy Alfred, all rights reserved. ruesday & wednesday Movie "What's the Matter with Helen" starring Debbie Reynolds and Shelley Winters ruesday & wednesday Special 25C KEO BEER BUST ON THE PATIO Htr<tnesday, sept 28 Taco Night-6pm Maria's own Special Recipe! Everyday Special 112 price drinks to all arriving at Mary's on a motorcycle! All oay Htr<tnesday & Thursday Special Happy Hour prices to all in Mary's T-shirtz LINGEREE & R4.IAMA PARTY Every Friday, lam-noon. Rrst drink free to all in proper attire LEATHER NIGHT Every Friday, Spm-2am 75C can beer to all In Leather PARKING IN SIDE LOT 5PM·BAM WEEKENlS. AU OAY WEEKENOS CTOW /IWAY ZONE OTHER TIMESl AFTE/l·HOU/lS NIGHTLY 1022 WESTHEIME/l HOme of Houston Motorcycle Club & Texas RlderS 528-8851 MUSIC BY LARRY FOUGHT 18 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 23, 1983 How Do You Do at Relationships? By Roz Ashley d · furnit How do you feel about other people? Your- esigner ure. . (a) Preppy. (b) Sleazy. (c) A look oflong- 8elf? Your lifestyle? Your image? How do 8. What would you like to change in your mg. you relate to non-gays? Are you hostile? gay life? 13. What do you do when someone asks, Proud? Secretive? Afraid? ' (a) Stereotypes. (b) Nothing. (c) Lovers- "Just what oo you peopk do with each Can you laugh at yourself? At society's and a8 often a8 possible. other?" ignorance? 9. How would you feel if someorn! said, (a) Throw up-preferably on them. (b) '.he following scientifically-formulated "Agayorksbianrelationshipisap~ceof Walk away. (c) Tell them-in graphic quiz will answer absolutely none of those cake." detail. questions, but it will give you your Gay (a) Very negative. (b)Obviously, they've 14. What do you lack in your life? Image and Relationship Rating. You can never had one. (c) Nauseous. (a) Nothing-I've got it all. (b) My civil skip any item that doesn't apply to you- rights. (c) I'd like a raise. orthatyoufindboring-butyou'llwindup JO. WhotooyouweartoattractMwpeo- 15. How oo you relate to the "closet?" with a lousy ecore iI you do! pk? (a) Still in. (b) Way out. (c) "Shirts on the Circle the answer that most truthfully (a) Shirts with alligators on them. (b) left-pants on the righL" completes each of the numbered para- Chanel. (c) Chaps-and spurs. 16 BO'"US QUEST 0 graphs. Answers and scores follow the 11. What group could furniah th#! best · "'" 'I N. What irritates last question. peraon for a relationship? you most about non-gays? (a) The "A" crowd. (b) The muscle (a) Their ignorance. (b) When they want 1. ~at was you biggest prob/.em in to "cure" me. (c) When they just want to "commg out?" crowd. (c) Any crowd. hug. (a) "They were ALL big! (b) "Holding on 12. What certain look do you try for to my job." (c) "Telling my parent.a." when you dreBB for cruising? To get your Gay Image and Quiz Relationship Rating, add up the points given here for the answers you have chosen: 1. a-0, l>-3, c-5; 2. a-5, l>-5, o-0; 3. a-0, l>-5, c-3; 4. a-5, b-0, c-3; 6. a-0, l>-5, c-3; 7. a-5, b-3, c-0; 8. a-5, l>-5, c-5;9. a-5, b-5,c-5; JO. a-3, l>-5, c-5; 11. a-5, l>-5, o-0; 12. a-3, b-0, c-5; 13. a-0, l>-5, c-3; 14. a-5, b-5, c-5; 15. a-3, l>-5, c-5; 16. a-5, l>-5, c-5. Score 26-41. You seem to be confused. Did that come from taking this quiz? Score 42-58. Your self~image is okay, and you do well with relationships (unless you chose Anita Bryant on Question 2). Score 59-80. You're terrific! You're proud, you've got attitude, and you relate well to yourself and things that matter. I'm surprised you bothered to add up your BCore. Ashley is a personal counselor. 1983 Stonewall Features Syndicate. 2. If you had to be alone on a desert p••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••­island. with only one person, which of the following would you choose? . (a) .Somebody beautiful. (b) Somebody iust hke me. (c) Anita Bryant. 3. What is your main goal as a gay per­son? (a) Acceptance by non-gays. (b) Finding real love. (c) Simple survival. 4. How oo you relate to law officers? (a) Minimally. (b) Timidly. (c) Passion­ately. 5. What relatioruhip currently turns you on? (a) Myself. (b)The hot number next door. (c) Thia month's centerfold. 6. What do you think of jealoU11y in rela· tion&hips? (a) It's sick. (b) It's a gut instinct. (c) It's heterosexual and confining, but keep your hands off my lover, honey! 7. What are you looking for in a relation-ship? (a) I want the earth to move. (b) Just a quickie. (c) A fabulous townhouse with Say, Do You Access Here Often? By day, it's CompuServe, providing For­tune 500 companies with up-to-the-minute business data. But by night, it becomes what aubscribers are calling "Compu­Sex," an electronic cocktail party where singles mingle their microchips. • For $5 an hour, CompuServe's 68,000 subscribers have after-hours access to 32 channels to swap adult information from the privacy of their home computer term.i· nals. Participants choose CB style "han­dles," like "Cutie Pie," "Sexy Hunk" and even "Conan the Librarian." One California programmer-known as "Robot" -aays he's mel some "wonder­fully nice people" through the network, though he admits "it can get pretty raunchy sometimes." The folks at CompuServe say they have no objections, reports the San Jose Mer­cury. They call it "an excellent example of personal and human networking." The Show Must Go On Did you hear the one about the town that arrested a circus? The San Francisco Chronick reports that the folks in Bee­ville. Texas, are still buzzing about how the Hermanos Suarez Circus was hauled in because several of ita drivers didn't have Texas licenses or plates. A judge ordered the circus incarcerated because its owner couldn't come up with the $4000 in fines. There wasn't any room in the jail, however, for 10 lions, three ele-­phants, 10 dogs and 50 circus workers, so the whole 1how agreed to stay at the local fairgrounds~ Thia had to be a voluntary move-as one aheriff'1 deputy explained, "What do you do if an elephant dl!<"ldee itdoeau 't want t.o stay?" MICHAEL CHRISTOPHER in his first starring role There's a thin line between fantasy and reality sometimes it is only ... Sl(IN DEEP co-Feature Hot Truckin' SEPT. 23, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 Daniel: The Story of 'Radicalization' Films By Steve Warren In the 60e they called you a "hippie com· mie pinko fag" if you showed signs of being any one of the four-or sometimes if you were just young. Daniel (Timothy Hutton) ie young, and he has the added burden of being the son of the most notorious scapegoats of the McCarthy era. Sidney Lumet'e Daniel, adapted by E.L. Doctorow from his novel The Book of Dani~l. is a fictionalized projection of what might have happened to the children of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were f"xecuted for passing U.S. atomic secrets to Russia, leading to the present nervous state that's called "the balance of power." Susan (Amanda Plummer) grows up neurotic, grasping at any possible source of the peace she'll never find. Daniel inter­nalizes everything, hiding his emotions behind a wall of cynicism. When he feels his sister slipping away, he becomes deter­mined to get at the truth of their parents' life and death. As he once promised to become a lawyer to save his mother, he tries to save his sister by being a detective. This is really the story of his radicaliza­tion. Golden·hued flashbacks make up about half of Daniel; the rest of it occurs in the electric tones of the late 60s. Lumet has recreated protest rallies of three different eras for background, but it's the intimate scenes that stand out in memory: Daniel's visit.a to Susan in the mental hospital and their trip to prison to see their condemned parents. Timothy Hutton b~comes a _kid of detective of_ hi~ own life as he inves!igatl!s the events kadrng to tus parents• trial and execution for stealing atomic secrets for Russia in Paramount's uDanzel" The politics are sketched in simply but extremely well-a little intellectual Marx­ist ta lk , growing social awarene88, a Paul Robeeon concert. The politico behind the trial are deftly handled in a few telling allusions: "It was a career-making case. Everybody did well." The Communist tend to give too much for the screen. Party, we are told, abandoned the defend- Plummer overacts but it works well in con­ants until after the trial, "when the propa- text, unlike Tovah Feldschuh as the bour­ganda value was too great to be ignored." geois bitch whose father betrayed his Hutton manages to show the camera friends. Her scene is even badly photo. what Daniel's hiding from the world, des~ graphed, as if Lumet took the day off. pite the added disadvantage of working Mandy Patinkin is excellent ae the with several stage-trained performere who father, and Lindsay Crouse is good ae hie "'-ife. Ed Asner gives a huggable-and most un-Lou Grantish- perfonnance as their defense attorney. Fact or fiction-and you can bet there's plenty of both her&-Dani.el is one hell of a etory. It pushed all my buttons and drew more tears from me than any movie since Ordinary Peopk. Happy Hour Prices 10am-7pm Mon.-Sat. 7Se Well Drinks, $1 Beer D~IL"V SPEC:l~LS SUNDAY H•PPY Hour PricH Noon~pm , 81 •••r, 75C: W.11 Drinka S1 Beer Bu•t 4-8pm, •II you c.n drink MONDAY Bare ChHt Night 9pm-2am In our Luther Loft with Happy Hour prices on wall drinks and beer TUESDAY Leather Night, 9pm- 2am- Lutharmen drink tor !:CPJ,.rnoku; lb~:; on WEDNESDAY C5W Night, 10pm-2am, Happy Hour Prices on W.11 Drinks 5 8Hr Levels of Hot Men-Two B THURSDAY S1 Baar Bust, all you can drink. lpm-11pm FRIDAY Club Colo,.. Night:: Club Members In Calera Drink t.r Happy Hour Prices 7-10pm DJ Lary Thompson 1311 W.sthaimar-521-3475 Open daily 10.m-2am One visit to the Rice Catholic Student Center on a Saturday night at 7:30 Is all It takes to r .. llze why DIGNITY/HOUSTON has .•. MASS APP EA j J -- The men & women of DIGNITY/HOUSTON celebr11te mass on Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. at Rice Catholic Student Center, 1703 Bolsover, with • social hour afterward. For more Info, call 523-7644 or 528-7644. Gay Community Spies in the Closet-Part II By Dan Siminoski, Ph. D. In my last column, I summarized some of the evidence indicating that the FBI has infiltrated and surveilled lesbian and gay groups since at least 1950. It appears the FBI acted for a number of reasons: the linkage of homosexuals and "subver­sives" in the early McCarthy era; the implementation of obscure federal laws regulating sexual "misconduct" by fed· eral employees; and outright Bureau prej­udice against aexual and other minorities. In response to a Freedom oflnformation Act oearch I filed a year ago, the FBI admits surveillance of an unspecified number of groupe, including the Matta· chine Society, One Inc., the Daughten of BiliU., the Gay Activiata Alliance and the National Gay Tult Force. Bureau atate­ments to me and to the Justice Depart. ment aclmowledge thousands of pages of record&. However, other FBI-relalA!d law­suits suggest that the Bureau now holds (or bu illegally d .. troyed) tens of thou­unda of pages of pertinent records. This basic discrepancy, and the FBI's improper denial of a "waiver" of coats for providing me documents, have caused me to appeal the FBI'a ruling to the Justice Depart· menl However, after eight months of delays and missed timetables, Justice still has not ruled in my case. Therefore, as this column appears, I am filing suit in the U.S. District Court in Los Angeles to force the FBI release all pertinent records. I will be represenlA!d in court by ACLU of South­ern California; many gay and non·gay groups are aupporting the case in a variety of ways. The coming legal struggle will benefit the national gay rights movement on sev­eral fronts. Of course, I want to review the records we expect to receive from the lit­igation, and I certainly want them to be available to other researchers. Accord­ingly, I have arranged to have all records (including my peraonal notes and diaries) deposilA!d in the National Gay Archive in Loe Angeles. Those records should help to reconstruct a significant portion of our hiatory, unquestionably an important out· come of the case. But my purposes are primarily political, not academic. I am a political organizer, not a scholar or researcher. My first con· cern is for the long-term legal and political goals of the gay community. At least three Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston. TX 77006 of these goals might be affeclA!d by the case: increaaed cohesion of our local com­munities; increased strength of national organizations without depletion of resour· ces; and improvement of connections with non-gay communities who share similar needs and goala. Let's consider each of these issues separately LOCAL COHESION: I read somewhere that leabians and gays are the only truly "Americanized" minority, since we come from all social, political and religious groups, sharing only sexual preference in common. That fact is readily apparent when one travels extensively throughout the country. as l have in recent mo?ths. We are remarkably diverse as a national community. However, one aide effect of that diver­sity is to make union and common purpose difficult to accomplish. The national com­munity tends to unite in times of external threat (Anita Bryant, The Family Protec­tion Act), but even in thoae moments of power, we have found it hard to present a coheeive image of ourselves to potential alli .. , policy maltera and the media. That diversity haa even made communi­cation among ouraelvea difficult. Our irroup1 tend to be organiud by function, • ~Y race, by locality. In many locales. we are still struggling to lower barriers between lesbians and gay men, between social claBBes, between races. Our organi· zationa are similarly fragmented. What we need are issues that touch all of us, that unite us and can be used as a tool to help others understand our problems and goals. This case will demonstrate FBI surveillance of gay organizations of all types. It will demonstrate a pattern ofspy· ing similar to that experienced by black, Hispanic, anti-war and other activist movements. Al the AIDS aisis tragically and ironi­cally 1how1, we can come together when the need is great. I hope that an effective media campaign around this case will help build even more unity. NATIONAL ORGANIZATION: Our national uaociationa, beaet by the effects ofn!CMllion and the urgent but unplanned needs of AIDS reeearcli and information, are 1tru1111ling for fiscal atability. Aa 11ay involvement in American politics broad· ens so does its need for funds. I believe it wo~d be a mistake for me to seek financial help for media and travel support from our national organizations. Legal coats are being borne by the ACLU, and I hope to raise money from businesses, individuals and personal lecture and writing fees. Aa I have travelled around the country, media coverage of this particular issue haa given me an opportunity to generalize from my C88e to the broader issues of the gay rights movement. Indeed, one of my principal purposes in this litigation is to create a forum for the discussion of gay issuea with the 1reneral public. This case will graphically illustrate a scandalous history of interference with the rights of million a of "invisible Ameri­cana" whose only crimes are their sexual identities. It is worth noting that the ACLU sees this acandal not as a sexual, but as a civil liberties issue. Public percep­tion of 0 gay rights" as "civil rights" makes gay/ non·gay dialogue far more possible. THE RAINBOW COALITION: The most important benefit of the case may be the potential it offers for connecting our com· munity with other minorities whose agen· das are similar to ours. Thia "networking" has begun with considerable success: the gay role in the 1982 elections and consider­ation of the MCC for membership in the National Council of Churches, for exam­ple. The moat recent example was gay inclusion in the "Rainbow Coalition,'' a constituent group that planned the "March on Washington for Jobs, Peace and Freedom.'' Connections with non-gay groups are increasing rapidly, another reflection of legitimacy and power. This case, with its overtones of FBI interference with a legitimate cause, offers a chance for us to bring our issues to the attention of all Americans. Working with other causes that have endured similar interference can maximize the success of our move­ment. READER INVOLVEMENT: No movement-oriented struggle is successful through the efforts of one person. This case is supported by a growing number of groups committed to the inclusion of gay people in the mainstream of American life. Individuals and groups can do their part by doing research, instituting press rela· tions, arranging speaking engagements or fundraiaere, or simple financial contri­butions. Dare to struggle! Dare to win! Dr. SimirwaJu ia a palitical acientist who haa been active in the gay rights move· ment for about a decade. He ia currently workilVI on a book, "Spiea in tM Closet," to be publUMd by Alyaon Pru1 next aummu. He may be written at 1221 &dondo Blud., Loi Angele1, CA 90019. e J983 Stonewall F.awn• Syndicau . 20 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 23, 1983 * stooillg * ffie QOllgest CZieddy CBeOll CoQQectiOn m uUontltose Come cr>Qay With CUs 6% 'J:iaw!~OA"e· 'iJ:lous!Oll. gems 77006 529-8299 OP"• .. AA0•day IM• Sat~doy Hani- 7poo. 'Jwlnys 11e 9poo ~~'ii'&~JM~<OOWWJJ~'fi'~~ • SEPT. 23, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 Commentary μJ • GENERAL REPAIR• AUTO There Sure Are a Lot of 'Johns' Out There m () -I Jl 0 By Joe Baker z During the past 12 years that I have been writing professionally, I've probably writ­ten several hundred thousand words and thousands of news and feature stories and columns. Few of those, however, prompted the reader response I received following my column of a few weeks ago entitled, "Dear John, Wherever You Are, This Column Is For You." In case you missed it, the column dealt with a personal experience: My "Mr. Right" turned out to be an inconsiderate, flaming asshole. I wrote the column for several reasons. First of all, I had to get the hurt out of my system. For me, writing does that. I also felt that a lot of gay men and women could easily identify with my expe­rience. In addition, there was a message I wanted to get across to the "Johns" of the world. And, okay I'll admit it, down deep I hoped that my former infatuation would see the column-and realize that if I ever saw his car parked in some parking lot, I was going to let the air out of his tires. Reader response from the column was overwhelming. I never realized there were so many people like my "John" in Texas. Readers who wrote or talked to me in per· son all wanted to tell me their horror stores. Everybody had a similar expe. rience with somebody who broke their hearts. They all agreed with my plea to the "Johns" out there in that big, bad world that "a little honesty can go a long way and eave a lot of hurt." I'd like to share some of the comments I received from readers. It sure makes us realize that we are not alone. We all love and hurt the same way. A sampling: "If you think you got dumped on, let me tell you about my 'John.' We were together for six months, and he was everything I could want in a man. It was pure love. "One day I came home from work-and all my best clothes, my color television, my 1tereo, my records and tapes and some val· uable pieces of art were gone. "He left a note, though. It said, 'So long, sucker!' That was five years ago. I've never seen him since and have no idea where he went." -c- 111I'hank you! Your article made me stop and think,'Have I been Mr. Right for someone and treated him the way John treated you? " ! hope your article toucheA other hear\8 the way it did mine and made them think the way it did me." -c- "My 'John' cruised me for three hours one Saturday night. Every place I went, he showed up. Finally, we got together and later decided to go back to my place. I was sorry I had played hard-to-get for so long, because he really turned out to be a terrific guy. I could hardly wait to get home alone with him. "He followed me all the way to my place, but when we got to my driveway, he didn't follow me in. He just drove on." -c- ''There are also female'Johns.' I gave20 years of my life to this woman and could not have loved her more. When I turned 60-and figuring I would be spending the rest of my old age with her-sh~. walked out on me for a younger woman. -c- "Boy, did your column make me think! I've never taken the dates I've made very seriously. I've stood a lot of people up­never bothering to call and cancel or to call afterwards and explain. I guess I've hurt a lot of people." -c- "Can I ever tell you aome 'John' stories! , I don't lll8ke date• anymon:. I've been otood up too often. If anybody wants to get together with me, we do it right away or not at all. I don't trust gay people." -c- "! met somebody once, and he told me all the things I wanted to hear, too. I thought he was great. He told me one thing I didn't want to hear, though. After we spent the night together, he informed me he had the clap." -c- "I also don't understand why gays treat each other so badly. Sometimes I think is it all a game: Hurt somebody before they hurt you." -c- "I've met dozens of Mr. Rights, and they've all turned out to be like that John you wrote about. Everyone of them had a lover they couldn't bear to leave. Of course, they never brought up the lover until after I had fallen in love with them­or they wanted to dump me." -c- "You might just as well get use to gay men treating you like a piece of meat. That is all they are interested in. You have to become the same way just to survive." "Joe I know what your problem is. You are goi~g after too good·looking gu.ys. The prettier they are and the better bodies th~y have, the bigger assholes they are. Fall m love with an average looking or ugly man, and you will be treated wonderfully." () -I c z z t Specials g ~ * Oil Change & Lube ~ ~ $1995 ~ z ~ * :~~~ ~:n:~:n~~:gs ~ =i Check & Charge $21so ~ 6 z 1411 TAFT ~ ~ 522-2190 ~ •AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION • <t GROOVIN'* CRUISIN'* BOOZIN' COME PLAY WHACKO CITY SPECIALS AND SURPRISES AIDS PLAY SAFE WEEK PARTY Sunda~ Sept. 25th1 4pm ti/ 1st Drink Purchase Goes to KS/AIDS Foundation of Houston~ Inc. HOT MEN, HOT MUSIC, MUNCHIES AND ALL GOOD LOVIN' VIBES ... 2923 MAIN• HOUSTON• 522-0000 22 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 23, 1983 Montrose Live Herschel Bernardi Has Seasoned Love Affair with 'Fiddler' By Robert Hyde "The sun never sets on Fiddkr," lierschel Bernardi said in an interview this week just hours before he dashed over to the !'Juaic Hall for sound testing for the open­ing night of Fiddler on the Roof "Some­where, at any given time, Fiddler in being staged in some part of the world." "In fact, the Japanese have made it a s_tap_le in their repertory," he said, men­tmmng that a touring company trans­verses that nation three months out of every year. "How come it 's such a success in Amer­ica when it's 80 Japanese," Bernardi said he had been asked. "But the Japanese appreciate ita eymholic quality, whereas Americana have to have everything spelled oul And then they appreciate its patriarchal values," he added, "and its ref­erence for tradition. Most of theirs went down the drain after World War II." .. And the play is immortal.'' Bernardi said, and he is grateful for that. After Zero Mastel stepped down from the original Broadway production in 1965, Bernardi has been almost conttantly associated with the play, even though he lost the movie role to Topol. But the play has kept him busy, when many actors on both the east and west coasts are sitting by their phones being "up-fors," as Bernardi calls them. An offspring of Jewish "gypsy" parenta who immigrated to this country in 1902 and began acting forthe Yiddish stage, at 52, Bernardi has all the charm neceasary to make his role as the loveable, exasper· ated Tevye an enjoyable experience. With thinning hair, luxurious Yiddish beard and a prominent nose, his commanding physical presence is due more to the warmth than emanates from the man rather that from his stature. He is easy to talk with , ea1y to smile. It is also easy for him to boast. When asked how he felt about being regarded as the definitive Tevye, he said, "There's no question. My background and talent make me ideally suited for this part." Born in New York City, Bernardi made hie acting debut at three months when he was snatched from a steamer trunk to cry on cue in one of his parents' productions of Yiddish theater that played throughout the country. During the Depression years, he appeared in his parents' plays and landed juvenile roles in two Yiddish movies. After studying at the New York School of Industrial Art, he headed for Hollywood but met with grim success on the road to stardom when °that nose" was an affront to the movie moguls of the era only interested in handsome leading men. "I was a young ugly," Bernardi recalls. "Today, that's a very good thing to be, like Pacino and Hoffman. But not then!" In the early 50s, Bernardi returned to New York and performed in one-man shows for various Jewish organizations while he drove a cab through Manhattan. A break came when he replaced friend Howard DaSilva in The World of Sh-Olom Aleichem at the Barbizon Plaza Hotel in New York and toured with the show for two years. When the show closed in Los Angeles, Bernardi received several televi­sion offers then finally landed the role of U. Jacobi in Peter Gunn and from there appeared in such films as Irma La Douce with Shirley McClaine and Jack Lemmon and Loue With the Proper Stronger with Natalie Wood and Steve McQueen. Then he became disillusioned with Hol­lywood. Frustrated and unfulfilled, he returned to New York where Fiddler was soon his for over two years and for 705 performances. In the years since and despite his star­ring roles in television's Arnie and in Man of La Mancha, Fiddler on the Roof remains foremost in his hea.r.t. '10e part is cloeer to me now that it ever has been.'• Bernardi said almost rever­ently "AJ)er11l~ c l"l'!-P f"4l'•!1¥11'1' th'P\ wh I flt t pfayi>:i ~·~e. and. th rola Herschel Bernardi (right) and Thelma Lee as Golde in "Fidler on the Roof" matchmaker; Motel Kamzoil, a poor tailor, and Lazar Wolf, a wealthy butcher, both wanting to marry Tzeitel, Tevye's oldest daughter; and a host of other endearing characters who bring so much life and beauty to this ageless musical. The universal appeal of Fiddler is due in part to the warm and wonderful book by Joseph Stein, to the smooth and melodic music by Jerry Bock, to the simple yet strong lyrico by Sheldon Harnick and, in this case, to Jerome Robbins' direction and choreography flawlessly reproduced by Ruth Mitchell and Tom Abbott respec-tively. ' There were many musical highs in this production. "Tradition," a wonderful song and the opening number, underscores a major theme of the show, and the entire cast came alive with a strong musical blend of very fine voices. "If I Were a Rich Man" is Tevye's glorious one man musical anthem. "Sunrise, Sunset," sung at the wedding of Motel and Tzeitel, has neither sounded nor been presented more beauti· fully than in this production. "Do You Love Me," a duet with Tevye and Golde, brought one of many tender moments to life. Throughout the play, Tevye watches in agony while three of his daughters marry for love instead of through the traditional process of being paired by the match­maker. But his values of tradition are pushed to the breaking point when daugh­ter Chava marries without his permission a man not of their faith-a delicate subject at best. But then Fiddler is such a very humanistic musical that it taps the gamut of your emotions from loads of laughter to doses of sadneas. Seldom has there been such a totally welli!uited cast. The emo~ •nd live on •Ul!t~a!liftheyhadbffn tran•ported back bec~mes richer over the years," he stated, adding that his own life experiences have helped him better define his character. "I .also have less fear of acting now," he continued. A very close friend of Barbra Streisand, he attributes her influence as a giant step in his overcoming stage fright. "Barbra taught me such a lesson." He smiled, remembering. "She has a direct line from her heart to her throat. There's no fear in that woman! And it's that ele­ment .that I'm getting more and more of," he said. Then he spoke of doing Man of La Man­cha again and possibly Death of a Sales­man, both projects in the back of his mind when he will not be playing the role that taps his soul. o 'Fiddler' Reviewed By Joe L Watts Herschel Bernardi, billed as the world'• greatest living "Fiddler," is in Houston this week enchanting audiences in his starring role aa the indomitable Tevye in Pace Theatrical Group's presentation of the National Touring Company's Fiddler on the Roof. The longest running musical in the history of Broadway is based on stories by the Russian Jewish writer, Sho· lorn Aleichem, and is set in Anatevka, an impoverished vilJage in Czarist Russia just prior to the revolution. Anatevka 's residents are some of the most delightful characters to be seen in the history of musical comedy: Tevye, the complaining but lovable dairyman who has reared five daughters according to scriptural wisdom and sometimes his own; Golde, his stern but caring, supersti­tious wife, who hopea for rich hUBbandit for their daughters; Yen the village in time to the village of Anatevka. Most of the players (including Mr. Bernardi) have performed in the Broadway and touring companies of Fiddler over many years, yet they all remain fresh and spontaneous. Herschel Bernardi has a lived-in quality in his performance. He doesn't just play Tevye, he is Tevye. His portrayal is a clas­sic, and the standing ovation he received was richly deserved. Thelma Lee has some remarkable moments as Golde. Ruth Jaroslow is ideal as the matchmaker -a campy, warm and honest performance. Several additional bright spots in this stellar cast were Charles Bari's stuttering Motel, Paul Lipson's winning Lazar Wolf, James Werner's Perchik, the revolution· ary student who comes to Anatevka with new ideas-an exce11ent young actor­and Robert Yacko's Fyedka (a gentile) who falls in love with Chava (Tina Para­diso). a really fine performer. In a changing age full of divorce and therapy, Fiddler on the Roof bring a renewed celebration to the simple ele­ments of life: tradition, love, marriage and faith. The show plays at the Music Hall through Sunday, Sept. 25. If you can still get tickets, treat yourself to a joyous expe­rience. You deserve it. o The Art of Dining By Joe L. Watts In celebration of the fifth anniversary of the Susan Smith Blackbum Prize, which is awarded annually to a woman who has written an outstanding work for the English·speaking theater, five Houston theaters will produce during the 83184 sea· son the plays which are finalists for the prize. Main Street Theater (2540 Times Boulevard-in the Village) is first in line wilh Tina Howe's The Art of Dining, a comedy about food and eaters. Ellen and Cal (Mr. & Mrs.) have bor­rowed $75,000,andhehasgiven up his law practice to open the Golden Carousel Res­taurant for gourmands. Both have a dif­ferent purpose in mind. EIJen wants to "turn on" people and cause them to "go mad" and "just die" for her wonderful cui­sine. Cal is hoping to make a fortune from his wife's culinary talents, but perhaps even stronger is his insatiable love for her cooking or for any food in general. So guess who's coming to dinner? First there's a married couple who peruse the menu referringtodiffemtitems with sexual innuendos and toasting each other with "to your long, curly eye lashes" and 0 to your lovely white thighs," sug­gesting just how erotic and sensual food and dining can be. Next comes a neurotic young female wri­ter who Jives in a weird world aB her own and meets for the first time a publisher who is considering publishing her short stories. Then a campy tribe of three ladies arrive who come to oink their teeth into the duck, veal and bass. But who ordered which? The fight to claim the best looking dish is a funny one, as they pig-out while discuss· ing their nonexistent diets. Playwright Howe has caught our obses­sion, need and relationship with food and it's effect on our everyday existence and lifestyle-an interesting premise, but she doesn't delve very deeply into that rela­tionship. Puffy potatoes but very little meat. The banquet nine·member cast is mostly cooked to order and served nicely by director Rebbeca Greene Udden. Ruth Getts and Charles Tanner, as Ellen and Cal, are quite good and convincing in their roles, especially Tanner, who brings a fine comic feeling to hie character. Powell and Roy Hollingsworth are enjoyable as the erotic dining couple. Charlotte Stanton, Dorothy Edwards and Terri Branda are triumphant aR the diet· ing ladieJ1111>d ll<la&on the pr6du~lion wil~ aom• of It' better la1tghg. I... •••• ·-······· . ·- ·-··· ...................... ·-··-·-' Unfortunately, Polly Macintyre, as the neurotic writer, plays the awkward young lady rather awkwardly, letting the audience know she is about to make a blunder juat before she makes one. Christopher Boyer, as the young pub­IUiher, is suave and sure, with a dash of charm; a perfect contrast to the awkward writer. Ray Simmons smart gourmet kitchen/ dining room set ia a compliment to the production. Main Street Theater deserves credit with this season opener for being a quality company not afraid to risk new scripts. It's a shame that The Art of Dining is not the epicurean evening one might hope for. o Penny Hamilton at Rascals By Jon Cheetwood Raacals should be commended for their efforts to bring new bJood to Houston's cabaret circuit. Thank you, Raacals, in particular for your latest fresh find. Penny Hamilton is irresistible. The vocalist/actress is an ample-bodied beautiful girl gifted with a "JO" personal­ity, as well as a voice. I've seen audience rapport before, but rarely has it had such a natural cadence and honest ring as it does in Ms. Hamilton's hands. Her act is brim­ming with humor. She described her ensemble at one point as "the WASP version of Mahagony" and her body as "USDA Choice." And it is her custom to take a picture of her audiences for her mother, but when the flash failed opening night and she couldn't take our picture, we were informed that now we couldn't possibly "be girlfriends and
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