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Montrose Voice, No. 151, September 16, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 151, September 16, 1983 - File 001. 1983-09-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/15740/show/15715.

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(1983-09-16). Montrose Voice, No. 151, September 16, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/15740/show/15715

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 151, September 16, 1983 - File 001, 1983-09-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/15740/show/15715.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 151, September 16, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 16, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Reagan Administration ‘Dances’ with AIDS Issue By Larry Bush WASHINGTON —When Congress returned from its summer recess, it began completing its action on the fiscal 1984 budget, which covers government opera­tions beginning October 1. It now appears that, for the first time since 1977, deceased Rep. Larry McDonald (D-Ga.) will be unable to attach a restriction to the Legal Services Corporation budget banning ser­vices to lesbians and gay men. Prior to McDonald’s death, a committee action had already adopted language which leaders out the McDonald restric­tion, and it is expected that House action will have to move so quickly that a McDonald-type rider will be swept aside by the simple need to beat the calendar. At the same time, it appears likely that Congress will not pass a complete budget, but will—as in years past—turn to a con­tinuing resolution that funds government programs in lieu of regular appropriations measures. Since such measures almost always adopt the language and funding levels set in committees, it also appears unlikely McDonald sympathizers would succeed in an alternative on that measure. The major focus for gay groups, of course, will be the final proposal for the AIDS programs. The House subcommittee already has acted but is closely guarding the information on what budget is adopted until the full Appropriations Committee meets in September. It is believed, how­ever, that the subcommittee set the figure at around $35 million, up from the $17 million the Reagan Administration had asked at the time the subcommittee met in July. Tlie AIDS budget for the coming year has see-sawed back and forth for a number of reasons, and provides some insight into how the Administration has responded generally to the AIDS situation. A brief recap of the current and future year looks like this: The Administration asked for $14 mil­lion for AIDS programs in fiscal 1983. When pressed whether that was sufficient at an April 1983 hearing held by Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.), Administra­tion officials said it would do the job. Two weeks after that hearing, on May 12, the Reagan Administration changed its mind, and said it could use another $12 million for AIDS programs before fiscal year 1983 ran out this month (September—It asked for that amount to be transferred into AIDS programs from other government efforts, but Congress refused and instead passed a supplemen­tal appropriation giving them new money. That made the total fiscal 1983 budget $16 million. For fiscal 1984, the Administration pro­posed $17 million—a drop from the pre­vious total, even though it reported no real progress in finding the cause or cure of AIDS and even though no leveling in new cases was being reported to federal health officials. The House appropriations sub­committee is believed to have looked at that proposal and found it inadequate. Among other considerations, the panel is believed to have looked at projects launched under the supplemental $12 mil­lion budget and decided that more money was needed to keep the programs funded that had just been started under the wire. When Rep. Ted Weiss (D-N.Y.) held hearings on the federal AIDS response, however, he asked Reagan officials again whether they had sufficient resources to handle the AIDS crisis; he was once again assured that all that was needed was available. About two weeks later, how-continued page 6 MONTROSE K O / C E The Newspaper of Montrose Sept. 16, 1983 Issue **151 Published Every Friday ‘AIDS Play Safe Week’: Conquering the Killer A researcher at Houston’s M.D. Anderson Hospital PHOTO COURTESY MD ANDERSON HOSPITAL By Robert Hyde “AIDS is not going away,” Dr. Peter Man­sell of UT, M.D. Anderson said this week. “At one Houston hospital alone, there have been 35 cases of Kaposi’s sarcoma and over 50 serious AIDS-rciated infec­tions; there have been 30 Houston deaths, including two reported last week.” In the wake of this dark blanket that is currently smothering our gay community, Houston’s KS/AIDS Foundation is launching a massive educational program involving a multitude of the area’s bars, businesses, organizations and clubs. Over 12,000 flyers have been dropped through­out Montrose, and it is difficult to visit any of the popular establishments in the area without confronting evidence of what is probably the biggest campaign yet to get members of the community to do one thing: get educated and face the facts about a dreaded killer that is crippling our once devil-may-care lifestyle. The Foundation has deemed this giant effort as “AIDS Play Safe Week” in an attempt to brighten a very morbid issue. The organization is calling the commun­ity to school for some serious lectures and at the same time is promising several recess periods so the boys can go out and play. Just for a minute, they’re asking us to stop and listen. Many community bars have scheduled some entertaining event that will raise money for AIDS research, from the Gal­leon outside Montrose to the Mining Com­pany deep in its heart. On Tuesday evening at 8:00 p.m., Rich’s Disco, usually booming with the latest rock blasting amid its carnival lightshow, will stage an entertaining multi-media show and then invite attendees still celebrating life to respond to a team of educators, medical experts, epidemiologists and psycholo­gists concerning precautions against AIDS. “AIDS Play Safe Week” (September 18- 25) will officially begin Sunday at 2:00 p.m. in the middle of the Montrose Jam, an inner-city street fair in the 1000 block of California (one block north of the intersec­tion of Montrose and Westheimer). For members of the community wishing to get a closer look at the problem, Housto­nians with AIDS will hold a question and answer session and talk about their fight for survival at 8:00 p.m. Monday at Bering Memorial Church. The psychosocial impact of the disease on our lifestyle and on our mental atti­tudes toward it will be discussed exten­sively at 8:00 p.m. Wednesday at the church. Local and state politicians will address the politics of the issue at the Tropicana Swim Club on Thursday at 8:00 p.m. A prayer vigil will be held at 7:00 p.m. Sunday, September 25, at St. Stephen’s Episcopal for the religious. “Our philosophy and rationale for doing this is based upon a study of the Houston gay male population which showed they were not aware of safe sexual activities as a disease preventive measure,” said Michael Wilson, president of the Founda­tion. The study was based on a survey of men who came to M.D. Anderson for screening “simply because they were frightened and worried,” Wilson said. “They did not know what safe sex was,” Wilson added. “And I don’t think the aver­age person walking around does.” At the moment, a good education and safe sexual practices are our best defenses against the killer, rather than walking around seemingly apathetic when what most of us really feel is confusion and frus­tration. On a more personal level, Kent Sumrail, Foundation board member and public relations expert, magnifies what may be prevalent within our community when he says that many people are “afraid of trust­ing other gays” in determining whether a potentially intimate partner will be honest concerning his sexual behavior. “I want to touch on a few sensitive ques­tions diplomatically without offending a person,” said Sumrall, who refuses to shut himself off from the gay world. “But it’s very difficult to do that in an effective manner unless people are attuned to the problem. It’s almost as if you scare them away when you ask if they’re practicing safe sex.” Making people less afraid is what this giant effort is all about. The Foundation is even suggesting that our typical keys and handkerchiefs be replaced with their “I Play Safe” buttons which will be distrib­uted throughout the week. The Foundation’s campaign is also an attack against what many people see as a growing apathy in the community toward the disease. “People don’t realize the problem exists until someone they know is infected,” Sumrail stated, “and there are too many people who have not been personally touched by the disease. Unfortunately, these people don’t care.” But others do care. They’re scared. And whether we like to admit it or not, there’s a very subtle air in the bars these days, a hint of caution among the cocktails and the haze of smoke. There’s talk of needing to get out of town and head for the baths in New Orleans. There’s talk of playing Rus­sian Roulette. But more phone numbers are being exchanged and less sharing of one-night stands. There’s Mother Nature standing in the corner telling us we have to get responsible. Our responsibility now is to know as much as possible about this deadly syn­drome. The KS/AIDS Foundation of Hous­ton is making this possible. We will be fools if we look the other way. ho Peaches Memorial Drag Show & Auction Benefiting AIDS Safe week 10pm, Tuesday, Sept. 20 Wednesday, Sept. 21 Taco Night-7:50pm Maria's own special Recipe! THURSDAY, Sept. 22 FULL MOON MADNESS BIKE CHRISTENING, 9PM & Maria's Special Tacos Tuesday & Wednesday Special 25C KEG BEER BUST ON THE PATIO Everyday Special 1/2 price drinks to all arriving at Mary's on a motorcycle! All Day Wednesday & Thursday Special Happy Hour prices to ail in Mary’s T-shirtz UNGEREE & PAJAMA PARTY Every Friday 7am-noon. First drink free to all in proper attire LEATHER NIGHT Every Friday. 8pm-2am 75C can beer to all in Leather MRKING IN SIDE LOT 5PM-8AM WEEKENDS, ALL DAY WEEKENDS (TOW AWAY ZONE OTHER TIMES) AFTER-HOURS NIGHTLY 1022 WESTHEIMER j Home of Houston Motorcycle Club & Texas Riders 528-8851 MUSIC BY LARRY FOUGHT HAPPY BIRTHDAY SEPT 18 TO ADRIAN & RON HAPPY EIGHTH ANNIVERSARY TO G.RC. B Wednesday & Thursday Double Feature R "Born Losers" starring Jane Russell ■ "C.C. & Company"starring Ann Margaret Montrose Voice / Sept. 16,1983 51144454 Sept. 16,1983 / Montrose Voice 3 AIDS Statistics From CDC Being Questioned By S. Christopher Hagin ATLANTA—At least 75 percent of AIDS cases are not being reported for one state by the Centers for Disease Control here. Dr. Richard Lelg, of CDC, has said, “The number of reported AIDS cases might be only half the number of cases.” A source within CDC’s AIDS Project said, “These figures (speaking of CDC’s official AIDS statistics) are incorrect because Dr. (Edward) Brandt (Assistant Secretary of Health) wants it that way. Less money will be appropriated for AIDS research if the numbers are smaller.” Brandt could not be reached for com­ment. In July, Tennessee reported having eight confirmed cases of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, but CDC in its monthly report states the Volunteer State only has two AIDS cases. In late June, CDC issued the same report, but the Tennessee Department of Public Health was reporting five cases then. Dr. Gary Swinger, Assistant State Epidemologist for Tennessee’s Public Health Department, has written in a letter to this reporter, “As of July 19, we have eight confirmed cases of AIDS with four deaths in Tennessee.” In the August 5 issue of CDC’s Morbid­ity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), it was stated as of August 1, Tennessee had two reported cases. The five total cases as of July still had not shown up on the August report. In explanation, Chuck Fallis, a spokes­person for CDC, said in response to why the Tennessee cases were not being prop­erly reported, “I don’t know, but my best guess is that there is a lag time in report­ing from the state health departments to CDC. The most accurate information on the number of cases, at any particular time, can best be obtained from the state health departments, not CDC.” Fallis also explained, “There’s a lag time after their reports are received. The cases have to be logged in and numerous forms must be filled out; this has to happen before they (the number of cases) appear on our computer printout.” When asked if the lag time was two months or more, as in the case of Tennes­see, Fallis retorted, “I don’t know how long it takes. The five cases probably haven’t shown up yet, but they will show up eventually. As of August 18, Tennessee was still listed as having reported only two cases.” Fallis said that he would have the head statistician on AIDS, Tom Starcher, return this reporter’s call to explain the possible shaving of statistics; however, in six hours, Starcher never called. The Texas Public Health Department of August 18, reported 62 cases, but the August 15 MMWR indicated only 47 AIDS victims in that state. Representatives of the National Gay Task Force and a United States House of Representatives subcommittee indicated they might poll the states to see how many actual AIDS victims and deaths there are. After being appraised of the situation, Rep. Ted Weiss, D-Manhattan, chairman of the House subcommittee investigating the AIDS epidemic and the government’s handling of it said, “I have serious con­cern about the scope and accuracy of our national surveillance system for AIDS. My subcommittee is currently conducting an investigation at CDC to ascertain the adequacy of the agency’s surveillance in the AIDS crisis.” By Larry Bush WASHINGTON—Former congressman Robert Bauman, who surprised his conser­vative allies by announcing he was gay and would be working for passage of gay civil rights protections in Congress, now faces a move to oust him from the group he co-founded, the American Conservative Union. Bauman was a key figure in the conser­vative movement until he appeared in court in 1980 to agree to undergo a counsel-ing program rather than face a trial over charges that he had solicited sex from a 16-year-old go-go boy who danced at a strip joint near the FBI Headquarters in Washington, D.C. The publicity cost Bau­man his congressionaol seat, and he told reporters this year that his decision to come to terms with being gay and end dependence on alcohol had cost him his Susan Steinmetz, Weiss’ subcommittee staff director, said, “These are the kind of discrepancies we are looking for at CDC. We can’t get them to admit it to us.” Lance Ringel of NGTF remarked about the comparison of the CDC and state fig­ures. “It’s outrageous! There has been problems from the beginning with CDC’s reporting.” He continued, “To have the correct number of cases would help us in our lob­bying to get the proper amount of funding for AIDS research and victims. These incorrect numbers hurt our lobbying effort.” A gay congressional aide, who did not want to be identified, said, “Bob Bauman, our new brother, says Reagan is good on gay issues. If he is, why is his administra­tion lying about the number of AIDS vic­tims? “I’ll tell you why. Because Reagan does not care about gay lives and he does not want to spend the money.” Inaccurate reporting of statistics is just one additional gay organizational com­plaint against the Reagan administra­tion’s competency and dedication to the AIDS crisis. conservative entree. Among the people who are seeking to force Bauman’s removal as a director of the American Conservative Union is David Keene, erstwhile campaign man­ager for current vice president George Bush; among the Board members who will consider the issue is Terry Dolan, the leader of the ultraconservative National Conservative Political Action Committee who startled people with his frank inter­view on gay civil rights (anti-bias, but anti-legislation). Dolan, himself a confirmed bachelor, reportedly has taken up Bauman’s defense among Board members, express­ing outrage that they might moralize over Bauman’s homosexuality or support of gay civil rights legislation, and claiming that at least three Board members have been convicted of adultery in divorce courts. American Conservative Union Seeks to Oust Gay Founder > WWW HAVE IN COMMON? -(W3S1WN39 SJ-HIO. WX >101 WINHfU JflN SVlOlHI SlKkN KW1HL) Montrose Mouth Play Safe Week This week, and through next weekend, has been designated “AIDS Play Safe Week” by Houston’s KS/AIDS Founda­tion. Events are planned around the city— from entertainment to educational. They’re all outlined in the group’s ads and in the VOICE’S famous “Seven Day Calendar” at the start of our classified section. — — The Art League of Houston is currently presenting “Contemporary Views of Houston” at the Art League’s Gallery at 1953 Montrose. The exhibition is display­ing award-winning works by 37 area artists and is the result of a local competi­tion that involved 163 entries. The art will be shown through October 7. —□— The Houston Area Gay and Lesbian Engi­neers and Scientists have changed their meeting day each month from the fourth Wednesday to the fourth Tuesday. For more information, contact James H. Baker, 21 Pine Dale, No. 8, Houston 77006. Famous atheist leader and founder of American Atheists, Dr. Madalyn Murray O’Hair, has recognized the Houston­based American Gay Atheists. This is the first time Dr. O’Hair has officialy recog­nized any gay organization, said the local group. — — Now over to the other side of coin. The Church of Pentecostal Unity is having its dedication services for its spiffy new facilities all next weekend, Sept. 23-25. They’re at 1217 Richmond and invite everybody by for some old time religion—gay style. It was a festive time last Wednesday night at the tenth anniversary celebration of Just Marion & Lynn’s club on Fairview. Joining in for the food and entertainment by the Rio Frio Trio were VOICE staffers Lyt Harris, Mark Drago and Sonny Davis. Yep, Just Marion’s & Lynn’s has been in business for 10 years. Baja’s Summer Splash continues, even through the official start of autumn is one week away. (Yep, one week.) Baja’s has a drawing during happy hour Monday through Thursday for a free dinner. — — The Top of the Hole is open again, under the ownership of Linda “Lulu” Simpson. Stop by and visit some evening with John Hurley and Larry, the bartender. —□— Several bartenders at some of your “butcher” clubs last weekend were “scantily attired.” The Mouth will leave it to you to do your own bar-hopping and find out which ones they were. Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX 77006 4 Montrose Voice / Sept. 16,1983 MADNESS EPTEMBER 18 UPPSJNC. NO.1 RECOR NG ARTIST ‘CHOIR PRACTICE’ I ‘ ‘ADDICTED\to THE NIGHT’. $5 COVER FRIDAY'SEPTEIi/IBER'23 KS AIDS 'PLA Y ^afe week' WITH SPECIA GUEST STAR SARAH DASH FREE COVER-IN CONCERT. I A SPECIAL THANK YOU FROM THE OWNERS, MANAGEMENT,AND STAFF OF NUMBERS TO THE HOSTS OF BLACK PARTY 83 Sept. 16,1983 / Montrose Voice 5 Gay Catholic Group, Dignity, Converges on Seattle By Steve Warren SEATTLE—Dignity, Inc., moved toward a more prophetic role in dealing with the Roman Catholic Church on behalf of lesbi­ans and gay men at its sixth biennial internationahconvention held here Labor Day weekend. Feminism, social justice, sexual ethics and racial minorities were issues signaling the shift from a concilia­tory stance to a more aggressive vanguard position. A new commitment to feminism issues and a supportive stand toward the San Francisco task force which developed the report “Homosexuality and Social Jus­tice” were accomplishments of which this convention could boast. The road to the future was marked by the creation of a task force on sexual ethics and the unoffi­cial formation of Dignity/Third World, a committee to increase the effectiveness of the organization’s ministry to racial minorities. It was evident that change was in the air from the warm welcome given the roughly 700 registrants by Raymond G. Hun­thausen, archbishop of Seattle. He autho­rized the use of St. James Cathedral for a Saturday night eucharistic liturgy and prepared welcoming remarks which had to be delivered via videotape when the archbishop was—by a suspicious coincidence—called to Rome with 22 other U.S. bishops to hear the pope’s latest mes­sage condemning homosexuality, ordina­tion of women, birth control, etc. (This was contrasted with the 1981 con­vention in Philadelphia where not only was Dignity forbidden to use church facili­ties, but clergy were warned to have nothing to do with the convention— although many did anyway.) Archbishop Hunthausen spoke in his address of some Seattle Catholics for whom “... your (the conventioneers’) pres­ence here is a source of wonderment and Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright ©1983 STEVE WARREN PHOTO Mike Kaney and George Wetzel of Houston at the Dignity convention in Seattle confusion, even anger and resentment. They find it difficult, if not impossible, to understand why the church should engage in a special ministry to persons of homosexual orientation....” Sure enough, about a hundred of those people (500 had been expected) held a prayer vigil across the street from St. James during the Dignity mass, carring signs, singing hymns and saying a rosary. The peaceful protest was wel­comed by the 1,260 lesbian and gay Catholics and their supporters—including about .100 vested priests and other religious—inside the cathedral, who thanked the demonstrators for their pray­ers and prayed for their enlightenment. A full-page ad in that morning’s Seattle Times, headlined “Don’t Be Misled,” was a source of excellent publicity that the con­vention could hardly have afforded to buy. While refuting them with official church teachings and the worst translations and paraphrases of the standard Bible verses, it presented excellent statements of Digni­ty’s point of view from its newsletters and the published words of major convention speakers. The ad also said, in part, “We are ... saddened that ‘Dignity’ will be allowed to use our St. James Cathedral (NOTE: The Christians who give you trouble are those who think churches belong to them rather than God) for it’s ‘major liturgy.’ ... We believe this convention to be not only an occasion of confusion, but also of scandal. ... We join ... in the prayer that all those homosexually oriented may lead chaste lives in accordance with the church’s teaching....” Sponsoring the ad (and requesting donations) was a group of “Roman Catholic Laity of the Archdiocese of Seat­tle” calling themselves “National Parents League, Inc.” All that is known of Chair­man (sic) Mary Royer is that she is neither the Mary Royer who was registered for the convention nor the wife of Seattle mayor Charles Royer, who extended a welcome at the opening general assembly which was both warm and funny. (“The last religious convention we had here came with a $10 bill in one hand and the Ten Command­ments in the other and never broke either one of them!”) Press coverage was generally good with both daily papers reporting on the conven­tion and two TV stations sending film crews to the cathedral Saturday night. Even if they were hoping to shoot a con­frontation which never happened, their stories were balanced, one station leading off the 11 o’clock news with the event. Elected to succeed Atlanta activist Frank Scheuren as president of the inter­national (U.S. and Canada, with affiliated groups in England — Quest—and Australia—Acceptance) organization was John Hagar of Washington D.C. The most important thing about the convention for him, he told us, was “the kind of sharing experience that renews and gives new life to everyohe in the organization ... a cele­bration of love....” While the idea of Dignity/Third World was not officially presented to the conven­tion, Hagar was aware of it. “It’s about time,” he commented. “We’ve been fight­ing being a ‘male organization.’ (Now that we’ve addressed women’s concerns this year,) that’s the next step.... The number of minorities here is incredibly small.” Dignity/Third World is the project of Clyde Sams of Philadelphia, who intends to formulate a plan to present to the 1985 convention in New York. In an exclusive interview, he told us he has the unofficial support of seven chapters in his effort “to be recognized that we (of the Third World) are a people, very much a part of Dignity as a whole.” Being black, Sams seems more concerned about ministry toward blacks than the much greater potential in the large gay Hispanic population; but he promised that Dignity/Third World would include Hispanics, Asians, Native Ameri­cans and other minorities as well as his own race. The question of women was dealt with through the addition of a fifth “area of concern” to Dignity’s Statement of Posi­tion and Purpose: Feminist Issues. We shall dedicate our­selves to develop the potential to become more fully human; and to work toward the eradication of all constraints on our per­sonhood based on the ascribed social roles of women as well as men. The Task Force on Sexual Ethics will develop a report based on “Fifteen Princi­ples for a Renewed Sexual Theology” which relate to heterosexuals as well as homosexuals. A statement in relatively final—though not inflexible—form is to be presented to the 1989 convention, incorpo­rating feedback evoked by a preliminary version in 1987. Dignity’s present policy, in line with the teachings of Vatican II, according to Frank Scheuren, is that “Sexuahty is a personal thing. Your conscience should be your final guide.” Some have accused him, he says, of giving out the wrong informa-continued page 8 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg publisher/editor Acel Clark graphics Jeff Bray graphics Sonny Davis accounting Robert Hyde managing editor Chuck Meredith sports editor Jon Cheetwood Joseph Lee contributing writers Lyt Harris advertising director Mark Drago advertising Jon Cheetwood classified advertising Founding Member: Greater Montrose Business Guild, Gay Press Association News Services: International Gay News Agency, Pacific News Service Austin Bureau: Capitol News Service Syndicated Feature Services & Writers: (San Francisco) Chronicle Features, United Feature Syndicate, Jeffrey Wilson. Randy Alfred, Stonewall Features Syndicate, Brian McNaught, Joe Baker POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 Subscription rate in US in sealed envelope. $49 per year (52 issues), $29 per six months (26 issues), or $1.25 per week (less than 26 issues). Back issues $2.00 each. National advertising representative: Joe^DiSabato Rivendell Marketing. 666 6th Avenue, New York 10011. (212) 242-6863 Advertising deadline: Tuesday. 5:30pm, for issue release r day evening . , . Notice to advertisers: Local advertising rate schedule Six-A was effective July 1, 1983. Responsibility: "Montrose Voice" does not bility for advertising claims. Readers should alert Montrose Voice" to any deceptive advertising. ^ ^ 110102010002000903070102010204020802010000910200010102019000 ^ 6 Montrose Voice / Sept. 16,1983 Reagan ‘Dances’ on AIDS Issue COUNCILMAN deduced ^blisdz Pliz&L All Sumtn&i qJiX 402 looett 527'9866 level likely will be adopted and become the new AIDS program. Interestingly, among those not heard from following the’ latest Reagan Admin­istration admission that it does not have enough AIDS money are the three Republi­can congressmen on Weiss’ subcommitee who sought to ridicule National Gay Task Force director Virginia Apuzzo when she said that the funding was inadequate and that people were going to suffer as a result. Shortly after that congressional testim­ony, Apuzzo and other AIDS groups repre­sentatives met with Assistant Secretary for Health Edward Brandt to again make the case that more funds were needed, and Apuzzo told reporters afterwards that she would be disappoitned if they had not per­suaded the Administration to at least dou­ble its request. That is exactly what happened. Paid for by the Anthony Hall for City Council Committee, 2713 Main, Houston, Texas 77002, J.E. Middleton, Sr., Treasurer. ANTHONY HALL CITY WIDE POS. 4 from page 1 ever, Health and Human Services Secre­tary Margaret Heckler appeared at the bedside of a New York man with AIDS and told reporters her department now believed it needed an additional $22 mil­lion to handle AIDS for fiscal 84. Following along, this now means that the Administration is asking for a total of $40 million for fiscal ’83, but has brought up the new figure after Congress got started on its own process. It turns out that Reagan health officials have decided about $14 million is needed to continue programs begun under the supplemental (bringing the original $17 million and the continued program budget of $14 million to $31 million—about what the subcom­mittee is believed to have already con­cluded on its own). Reagan health officials say that about $8.3 million is needed for new programs in fiscal ’84 that it had not foreseen. That figure interests Congress enormously, because it will show what the latest think­ing is on AIDS research directions and support programs, and may indeed move them to fatten their own proposals. What emerges from this Reagan Admin­istration dance is a pattern of underesti­mating funding needs, seeking to borrow the money from other programs at the last minute and apparently overestimating their ability to solve the crisis. This has not been lost on Congress, and congressional sources now say they expect the House to balk at the latest Rea­gan proposal to shift money away from programs into AIDS efforts. Instead they are more likely to simply add new appro­priations to take care of both the AIDS efforts and continuing valuable existing prgrams. As in other appropriations issues, it is expected that Congress ultimately will not pass a budget bill for these programs, but will instead again pass a continuing reso­lution to fund the efforts. And, as before, that means the funding level and program directions spelled out at the committee Volunteers Needed for ‘Zap Clap Revue Two, Too’ Plans are being finalized for the Zap Clap Revue Two, Too, a big fundraiser for the Montrose Clinic and the KS/AIDS Foun­dation of Houston, and anyone in the com­munity interested in working on the show in any capacity (sets, costumes, stage hands) should contact Danny Villa at 528- 3139. The show, scheduled for Numbers II on October 24 and 25, should have at least one performer from every bar in town and will also spotlight major performers from Houston’s gay community. The show’s director, Villa, said that the Montrose Clinic, which has recently reverted to a completely volunteer basis, is in dire need of funds. The KS/AIDS Foun­dation should be everyone’s concern, he said. “The original Zap Clap Revue was one of the clinic’s major fundraisers,” said Villa, “and we hope to make this year’s show even bigger and better. We really need the support of the entire community. The money we raise could ... save some­one’s life. And we’ll guarantee that the audience will get one hell of a show.” For the Well Who are Worried The Committee for Public Health Aware­ness is sponsoring a “Sharing Group” for the “worried well.” The group provides information for those who are concerned about their health and lifestyle during the AIDS crisis. It meets each Friday, 7:00 to 8:00 p.m., at the Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett St., Suite 203. For information, call 522-5084. The Sharing Group is a free ser­vice. 5 /III /tiXfld JlafLfuf Sept. 16,1983 / Montrose Voice 7 2 PRIVATE 2 SELECTION A SPECIAL SERVICE FOR SPECIAL PEOPLE OPENING IN SEPTEMBER New Phone Number (713) 961-9876 8 Montrose Voice / Sept. 16,1983 Gay Catholic Group, Dignity, Converges on Seattle from page 5 tion from which a conscience choice is to be made. “We do not endorse celibacy,” he adds; “we do not endorse promiscuity; we do not endorse any particular lifestyle.” Rev. Troy Perry, founder and moderator of the Universal Fellowship of Metropoli­tan Community Churches, addressed Dig­nity’s House of Delegates on behalf of the idea that their organizations should hold simultaneous conventions in the same city in 1987, including a day of joint activi­ties. The concept was approved, and Dig­nity’s Board of Directors authorized to work with MCC’s Board of Elders on site selection (St. Louis has been mentioned most often) and planning. Other gay reli­gious groups will be invited to join the largest ones. Though carefully worded in a positive manner, the San Francisco resolution is probably the strongest stand Dignity has yet taken against the church: “... Dignity Inc. applauds and endorses ‘Homosexuality and Social Justice’ as an historic and prophetic accomplishment of lesbian and gay theological reflection ... (and) commends the gay and lesbian groups that have returned ‘Ministry and Homosexuality in the Archdiocese of San Francisco’ as theologically inadequate and therefore unacceptable....” The former report was prepared by the Task Force on Gay and Lesbian Issues of the Commission on Social Justice, Archdi­ocese of San Francisco, Kevin Gordon chairman; the latter was the priest senate report written as a negative response to it. The archdiocese disbanded the task force, but Gordon is reorganizing it independ­ently on a national basis as the Consulta­tion on Homosexuality, Social Justice and Roman Catholic Theology. Among the points of the resolution passed here, it was noted that the action was being taken “with a love for the church which honors its teachings but also exercises the right and duty of respon­sible, respectful and informed dissent in the pursuit of dialogue and possible change.” Besides President Hagar, new officers elected at the convention were Judy Car­ton of San Diego, secretary; and Elinor Crocker of Washington D.C., treasurer. Crocker had formerly served as secretary. Dignity Inc. claims 4500-5000 members in 106 chapters in the United States and Canada. Each has the autonomy to oper­ate in a manner appropriate to conditions in the area it serves. More than half of the chapters have permission to meet on church property. The principal speakers at the conven­tion were Ginny Apuzzo, Executive Direc­tor of the National Gay Task Force, and authors Matthew Fox, O.P. and Mary S. Calderone, M.D./M.P.H. Calderone, who enjoys being derscribed as “a 79-year-old sex lady,” discussed ever­ything from fetal erections and how to £• GENERAL REPAIR • AUTO 3oZo c-I _________ _______ ? Sumrrrer Specials 2 • ir Oil Change & Lube s $1995 I g ★ Tune Up from $3995 g o ★ Air Conditioning o d Check & Charge $2180 z 1411 TAFT § I 522-2190 5 • AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION • < TAFT AUTOMOTIVE explain sex to very young children to the sources of our oppression: “People who hate homosexuality and homosexuals are people who love to hate.... It’s difficult to be homosexual. I know. I’ve shared your pain with you. It’difficult to be heterosex­ual, too. It’s difficult to be sexual in this society.” Her biggest ovation came when she told about answering the questions of schoolboys who were especially concerned over masturbation. “ITiere isn’t such a thing as too much,” she finally told them. “When you get tired, just stop.” Fr. Fox summarized his concept of “creation centered spirituality,” calling it the “oldest Western tradition,” starting from the original blessing rather than'the original sin. “The homosexual has had to create his or her own lifestyle,” he said at one point. “It was not given in a package.” Apuzzo, introduced as “just another dyke from the Bronx,” described the pro­cess through which lesbians and gays achieved representation in the August 27 march on Washington. “If we ask minor­ity groups and women to address homo­phobia in their ranks,” she cautioned,“are we prepared to seriously address the issue of racism in our own?” Concerning the convention theme,“Let Us Build a City of God,” Apuzzo pondered other “cities of God,” saying that James­town perished because the people wouldn’t dirty their hands to dig sewer systems and thus died of dysentery, but “Plymouth grew in grace until today they are repres­ented by Gerry Studds!” She praised the gay community for its response to AIDS, which she called “the second step in com­ing out—reaching out.... If our objective is simply to make it okay to be gay, then I ask you how much faith we have in our potential.... Our agenda must be to make it a better world ... (or) be relegated to a nostalgic footnote in history.” Seattle withheld its famous rain from the conventioneers as they went through a weekend of worship, business, social activities and professionally-run semin­ars. They returned to their local chapters with a new agenda—to initiate dialogue within the church, rather than maintain­ing a defensive responsive posture. The degree to which this can be implemented will vary from one area to another, but I would hate to get in the way of the city­builders who left Seattle on Labor Day. CLUB HOUSTON IS: I 1 CLUB HOUSTON MEMBER CLUB BATH CHAIN SUNDECK OUTDOOR SWIMMING POOL DRY SAUNA WHIRLPOOL SPA SHOWERS VIDEO ARENA LOCKERS FRIENDLY STAFF 6 MONTH MEMBERSHIP $10 1 YEAR MEMBERSHIP $15 2205 FANNIN 659-4998 FREE LOCKERPASS WITH EACH NEW MEMBERSHIP PURCHASED BETWEEN 9/9/83—9/30/83 STEAM ROOM DRESSING ROOMS MINI LOCKERS 1 Sept. 16,1983 / Montrose Voice 9 presented by the KS/AIDS FOUNDATION OF HOUSTON, INC. i aids play safe week events sun., sept., 18 the montrose jam California Street (between Montrose and Grant) 2:00pm - 8:30pm z honoring the AIDS WORKING GROUP mon., sept. 19 “people with aids” day Bering Memorial Methodist Church, Activities Building, 1440 Harold - 8:00pm - 10.00pm. honoring the Montrose Counseling Center tues., sept. 20 “can we talk?” an educational/entertainment extravaganza Rich’s Disco, 240I San Jacinto ($3.00 donation requested) 8:00 pm -10:00 pm. honoring the people of l^T M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute wed., sept. 21 “sex - the times, they are achangin” Bering Memorial Methodist Church, Activities Building, 1440 Harold 8:00 pm -10:00 pm. honoring the Montrose Clinic thurs., sept. 22 the politics of aids 8:00pm - 10:00pm. —Tropicana Swim Club honoring GPC, CHE, and CPHA fri., sept. 23 #’s 2 special event sarah Dash (formerly of LaBeiie) star entertainment/laser education 2 D'sco’ 300 Westheimer (no cover, donations accepted) 10:00pm til whenever honoring the Gay Switchboard of Houston and the office volunteers of the KS/AIDS Foundation of Houston, Inc. - DINNERS ABOUT TOWN sat., sept. 24 -DINNERS ABOUT TOWN - PRIVATE SOCIAL FOR PERSONS WITH AIDS (invitation only, 792-8268 or 527-9090) honoring the Diana Foundation of Houston sun., sept. 25 “the big finale” Officer’s Club, 2700 Albany 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm. honoring the bars, businesses, organizations, and clubs that have supported and helped the KS/AIDS Foundation of Houston, Inc. - PRAYER VIGIL/FORUM St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 1805 W. Alabama at Woodhead 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm. (non-demoninational candlelight service) September 18-25,1983 10 Montrose Voice / Sept. 16,1983 Local Group Forms AIDS Educational Committees Feeling that a large percentage of the non­gay community is harboring fears and near-hysteria regarding the AIDS crisis, a local group has established a nonprofit educational corporation to ease tensions outside the gay community regarding the disease, they announced. Known as The Committee for Public Health Awareness, its purpose will be to increase the public’s knowledge of the health issue through media programs, lec­tures, forums and outreach groups to busi­nesses, professional organizations and private institutions, they said. The organi­zation will also organize support for other health related groups by promoting fund­ing of research and other necessary health services for people in need, they announced. To make important in-roads on the polit­ical front, the group’s sister organization, The Committee for Public Health Aware­ness Lobby Fund, Inc., will focus on edu­cating political leaders and government organizations concerning the needs created by AIDS, especially in terms of funding, they said. Anyone wishing to assist either of these committees may contact The Committee for Public Awareness, Inc., at 528-6333 or 522-5084. Tebedo New Regional AIDS Organization Rep As of August 29, Michael G. Lonergan, director of the Committee for Public Health Awareness, Lobby Fund, Inc. relinquished his seat on the national steer­ing committee of the Federation of AIDS Related Organizations to Terry Tebedo of the Dallas AIDS Action Project. Lonergan explained, “This will give bet­ter regional representation as both Dallas and Houston would be on the national board.” He will retain his seat on the steer­ing committee of the national AIDS Lobby Project, because “our corporation’s only purpose is to lobby government for funds for research and patient services.” Fund Awards Grant to Parents & Friends Group The Board of Directors of the NGTF Fund for Human Dignity, Inc., has unanim­ously approved a grant of $500 to the National Federation of Parents and Friends of Gays to help that organization respond to a deluge of mail generated by two Ann Landers columns. This is the first award in a small pilot program which allows the Fund to grant to organizations other than the National Gay Task Force. “The Fund for Human Dignity is the public education affiliate of the National Gay Task Force,” Executive Director Vir­ginia Apuzzo noted. “Keeping communi­cations open with lesbians, gay men and their friends and relatives across the coun­try is consistent with our goal of educating the American public about the lives of gay men and lesbians.” Remington in Space Brings Peace on Earth NASA has avoided a messy legal battle by a whisker. This issue: Norelco’s claim last June that its razor had been endorsed by the space shuttle astronauts. But, in a last-minute switch, the latest shuttle crew was issued Remington shav­ers instead, reports the company. Result: Peace, at least temporarily, on earth. or Don’t be Left Out in the Cold! Make Your Holiday Reserva­tions NOW to Obtain the Lowest Fares Come by or call to regis­ter for a FREE TRIP TO MEXICO • 6 •» O ' 0 ‘’.G 0 °O o o Call Bruce Woolley at (713) 529-8464 Toll Free at 1-800-392-5193 2029 Southwest Freeway, Houston o’ o D o o © o 0 o..- o- • -.o ' ■o. • ■ < O 0 o • °\ o 1 . 0 6 •.6 o 0 0 0 ’ 0 • a = c: O LU 2 TUESDAY Leather Night, 9pm- 2am—Leathermen drink for happy hour prices on well drinks & beer WEDNESDAY C&W Night, 10pm-2am, Happy Hour Prices on Well Drinks & Beer Happy Hour Prices 10am-7pm Mon.-Sat. 750 Well Drinks, $1 Beer SUNDAY Happy Hour Prices Noon-4pm, SI Beer, 750 Well Drinks SI Beer Bust 4-8pm, all you can drink MONDAY Bare Chest Night 9pm-2am in our Leather Loft with Happy Hour prices on well drinks and beer TEXAS _ RENEGADES THURSDAY $1 Beer Bust, all you can drink, Spm-llpm FRIDAY Club Colors Night: Club Members in Colors Drink for Happy Hour Prices T-IOpm DJ Lary Thompson 1318 Westheimer—521-3475 Open daily 10am-2am Two Levels of Hot Men—Two Bars—Twice the Fun Seminar for “Worried Well” Being Conducted A seminar is currently underway at the Bering Memorial United Methodist Church, 1440 Harold, to address the cur­rent AIDS crisis for members of the com­munity who would like to become “better able to deal more intelligently with the seriousness of the AIDS-related issues that may impact their lives and health,” reports the Rev. Ms. Annette Jones, asso­ciate pastor of the church. To be lead by professional psychothera­pists, the “group experiences” will address such issues as individual concerns, medi­cal information, high-risk sexual behavior and lifestyle adaptation, as well as related social, emotional and health issues. There is one four-hour Saturday after­noon session remaining in the seminar and three two-hour sessions on Thursday evenings. There is a fee of $20 for each session, and insurance is welcome. For required reservations, call 527-9051 or the church office at 526-1017. Vietnam Vet Facing Court-Martial for Gay Sexual Affair A Navy Vietnam veteran who was awarded the Bronze Star will face a court-martial for allegedly having an affair with a hospital corpsman who has a his­tory of drug and alcohol abuse, reports United Press International. Commander Gerald Vanderwier was relieved in June of his command of the frigate Edward McDonnell after Vice Admiral Edward Briggs, commander of the Navy’s Atlantic Surface Force, heard the testimony of Petty Officer John Rain­ville that he had had sexual relations with Vanderwier several times. Vanderwier could receive 15 years’ con­finement, be dismissed from the Navy and forfeit all pay if he is convicted. No date was immediately set for the trial. Do Not Attempt This in Your Own Vehicle Ford has a better idea for getting you to watch its television ads. This year, rather than dropping pickup trucks from air­planes, they’re driving them off cliffs. In both cases, it’s a trusty parachute that comes to the rescue, but the para­chutes aren’t always that trusty. Last year, the airplane gimmick cost the com­pany 12 trucks but no skydivers. This year, reports the Los Angeles Times, the cliff stunt cost only one truck. Killer of Gays Said to be Stalking Indiana, Illinois A two-state probe by Indiana and Illinois authorities has been launched to solve a series of gay murders which authorities believe began in October 1982, reports Associated Press. Eight victims, ranging in age from 17 to 28, were repeatedly stabbed, and their bodies were dumped “a short distance from the Interstate,” Lake County, Indi­ana, Sheriff Robert Babcox told AP. “All eight of these (men) are of similar type deaths, being victims of stab wounds, and all have ties with the gay commun­ity,” the sheriff said. The news service reported that six of the victims worked or lived within two miles of each other in an area of Chicago known for its gay community. The two other vic­tims had ties to the gay community in Indianapolis. 12 Montrose Voice / Sept. 16,1983 Despite Internal Tension, Black Leaders Endorsed Gay Rights By Larry Bush WASHINGTON—National Black civil rights leaders, at the urging of the National Coalition of Black Gays and the National Gay Task Force, held a Washington press conference on the eve of the March on Washington late last month to endorse civil rights legislation for gays. The press conference, which included such figures as Coretta Scott King, widow of Martin Luther King, Jr., Dr. Joseph Lowery, head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Rev. Cecil Willi­ams, pastor of San Francisco’s Glide Memorial Baptist Church, and Benjamin Hooks, head of the NAACP, was the first ever called by Black civil rights leaders to endorse the gay civil rights movement’s goals and marked the first time many had gone on record personally. Only Atlanta mayor and former Martin Luther King aide Andrew Young and former CORE leader James Farmer had publicly endorsed gay civil rights legislation before. “When we marched in 1963, the result was the 1964 civil rights act,” Lowery told a gathering of reporters at the District of Columbia’s mayor’s conference room. “Now, in 1983, it should lead to an amend­ment to the 1964 act protecting the rights of lesbians and gays.” Also making the endorsement was D.C. congressional delegate Walter Faun troy, who earlier in the week had announced at a press conference that gay rights was too “divisive” among Black leaders to be included in the March on Washington goals. Appearing, but not speaking, was D.C. Mayor Marion Barry, a longstanding gay civil rights supporter. The endorsements were called “his­toric” by New York gay activist Virginia Apuzzo, who had participated in a late-night telephone conference call with the Black civil rights leaders to iron out diffi­culties that emerged following a press con­ference by D.C. delegate Fauntroy, chairman of the March and the “Coalition of Conscience.” Fauntroy had been quoted by the Washington Blade as having told an ear­lier planning committee meeting that gay civil rights was “extraneous” to the March agenda and reportedly had compared gay civil rights to “penguin’s rights.” Although Faun troy denied having made that remark at his public press conference, the charge continued to hover as several marchers carried stuffed penguin toys or carried signs reading “When They Came For The Penguins, I Didn’t Speak Because I Was Not A Penguin.” Fauntroy did state publicly, however, that the Coalition of Conscience had barred a gay civil rights speaker at the March and that his umbrella group found the issue, along with abortion rights, too “divisive” to be included. That posture outraged gay rights acti­vists who had planned to participate in the March and led four Washington-area activists to stage a sit-in protest in Faun­troy’s congressional office that resulted in Ik Ii cc Io I Ko mI LmJU Ji Ik Ii (3RPRSE GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 their arrest. Adding to the local Washington tension among activists is the fact that Fauntroy, a Baptist minister, is a co-sponsor of fed­eral gay civil rights legislation himself and participated in the House debate to protect a D.C. city council reform of sex laws in 1981 that had been opposed by the Moral Majority. Fauntroy also was endorsed by the local Gertrude Stein Gay Democratic Club in his last election. Notwithstanding such outward signals of support, however, Black gays and many other Washington gay activists have felt that Fauntroy was a particularly weak ally, noting he has never attended any gay rights function and did not return candi­date questionnaires or meet with gay lead­ers during his campaign. Fauntroy himself sought at the March press confer­ence to distinguish between supporting gay civil rights and “advocating” a gay lifestyle, suggesting that an openly gay speaker would be seen as an endorsement of lifestyle. That distinction, however, only puzzled his critics. Nearly all the focus on a gay response fell early to the National Coalition of Black Gays and the National Gay Task Force. The Gay Rights National Lobby’s Steve Endean was in his home state of Minnesota throughout the week on what his office termed a “working vacation” and could not be reached by either Black or gay civil rights leaders. GRNL Deputy Director Jerry Weller said that GRNL’s role would be “to be supportive of the National Black Coalition and Ginny (Apuzzo).” Apuzzo pressed the Black movement leaders to add a gay speaker, finally set­tling on Audre Lorde’s participation as one of the “litany” readers shortly before Mrs. King spoke; to appear at a joint press conference to endorse the federal gay civil rights bill; and to establish an open dia­logue with gay civil rights organizations to educate each other about their agendas and priorities. Most of the negotiations took place after Black leaders held a two-and-one-half hour conference call with each other from midnight onwards on the night of August 23, when National Organization for Women president Judy Goldsmith report­edly led the pressure to discuss issues with gay leaders, and a follow-up call with Apuzzo joining the Black leaders the night of August 24, again for about two-and-one-half hours. Open September 20 for 2 Weeks P€NNY HAMILTON Lost 2 Nights—This Friday & Saturday—Leota Galloway concert hall, her tontilizing "Penny Hamilton is that rare singer who can belt out a tune with a magnificent voice and a wonderful range." —Rian Gansberg, Hollywood Review "UUith red hair as flaming as her torch songs, Penny can transform a cabaret into a voice invites attention, it captivates & enchants." —Rmerican Productions RESTAURANT and CABARET 2702 Kirby-524-6272 Houston Dinner Mon-Thur 6-11 Fri & Sat 6-12 Reservations Requested Shows 9:30, 11, 12:30 2702 Kirby 524-6272 Hoppy Hour Mon-Fri 4-8pm, Hors d'Oeuvres Love Train Sept. 16,1983/Montrose Vo ce 13 Commentary By Tom Dolan Dear Tom: I’ve been reading your column ever since I woke one morning on somebody’s kitchen floor and saw it under the cat dish. (I can’t resist reading newspaper spread out on the floor.) You might say I’ve been a fan ever since. Lately, though, my life resem­bles one of your columns and that unset­tles me. You see, I never fall in love, but other guys are always falling for me. So when Charlie said he was falling in love with me, my first thought was, “Oh, no!” “You know what that is?” I told him. “That’s just a bunch of endorphins being secreted into your brain. It’s something like a ‘runner’s high.’ It’ll wear off.” I told Charlie I wasn’t in love with him, which he pretty much accepted. “That’s okay. Love takes time,” he said, and added redundantly, “You can’t hurry love,” which for some reason made me think of Diana Ross. I didn’t think we had much in common, but the sex was fantastic. We’re both ver­satile, and when two versatile people get together the variations and permutations are almost infinite. We went through the Kama Sutra the first night and added a new chapter every time we got together. It was the best sex I ever had. Maybe that’s why I put up with his obsessive-compulsive behavior. Like phone calls that seemed to come every 15 minutes, even at 3:00 a.m. when he lay awake thinking of me. (Occasion­ally his calls interrupted my lovemaking with somebody else.) I was even able to handle the fact that he was sometimes inspired to toss pebbles at my bedroom window. If he called and the line was busy, he wanted to know who I’d been talking to, how long I’d known them, and if we’d ever been to bed together. When we met a friend on the street, he wanted to know if I’d ever had sex with him. “Were you lovers?” he would ask. “Did you ever sleep with him?” When he took an apartment in the build­ing across from mine, though, I began to feel really uncomfortable. I knew he was watching to make sure I wasn’t seeing someone else. A number of times I asked him to “give me a chance to fall in love, give me the time and space I need.” But, no, Charlie was like an express train rushing to its destination. He was obsessed by thoughts of living together and joint bank accounts. One of the reasons I saw him as often as I did, apart from the sex, was that after we made love, he did my housework. That’s right, he cleaned the house, attacked the pile of dirty dishes that had been sitting in my sink since his last visit. So, in a sense, Charlie was a real find. A treasure. Friends asked me to pass him along when I was finished. No dust balls under my bed, I wondered if I would eventually fall in love with what Charlie was able to do for me. Housework was just the beginning. There’s a lot of stress in my life, and Char­lie smoothed the wrinkles and untangled the knots in my forehead when I got home from work. He helped undo the effects of the eight hours and 18 cups of coffee at Amalgamated Office Supply. Of course, Charlie is gone now. He finally got the message that I was never going to fall in love with him. And, you guessed it, somebody else fell for Charlie. At last he’s getting the love he’s always deserved. The dust balls are back in full force and dirty dishes are reaching new heights. I can’t say he didn’t warn me. A few weeks before he left, Charlie spoke of “temptations” he was wrestling with. At the time I was glad to know he had some­thing else to think about besides me. He told me his birthday was coming, but somehow I missed it. That was the day he met Boyd. It was a mistake to visit Charlie and his new lover in Charleston. But I looked on it as a cheap vacation and didn’t expect to have feelings, as I observed Charlie inte­racting with somebody who truly appre­ciated him. I noticed they did things for each other. They took turns cooking and cleaning. Charlie seemed to like that. They even clipped each other’s toenails. It was very touching. Some of my friends say Charlie and I were an impossible combination, that Charlie was ready for a relationship and I wasn’t. That we were doomed from the start. They say Charlie was never what you’d call a hunk. They don’t understand why I still need to talk about him. All I know is that he loved me as nobody else ever has. For Chrissake, I didn’t even know I had a relationship with Charlie ‘til he left town with Boyd. It’s funny the way I miss his late-night phone calls. Six months later I wake at 3:00 a.m., my trick sleeping beside me. I wish the phone would ring. I wish it would be Charlie. Yesterday I lost the ring Charlie gave me on our second date. I think I left it in the soap dish at the “Y.” (I only go there for the showers.) Of course, when I went back to look for it, it was gone. Nobody had seen it. Nobody had turned it in. Why did I have to lose Charlie like that ring in order to appreciate him? There’s so much I never told him. Like “Somebody with a butt as nice as yours doesn’t need to wear drum tight clothes in order to be noticed.” Maybe falling in love would have forced me to deal with stuff like that, would have forced me to com­municate with Charlie. If only I had. Ma&be others will profit from my expe­rience if you sign me “Bereft in Bonita.” Dear Bereft: Communication is everything. And here’s a little communication from me: Get on the next plane for Charleston. You can use your Master Charge. Call Charlie every 15 minutes. Toss midnight pebbles at his bed­room window. Scrub his floors and wash his dishes. Chase his dust balls. If neces­sary, even make a fool of yourself. If Charlie is still in love with you, it won’t take long to find out. Sometimes we have to lose things in order to find them. Dolan is a syndicated gay columnist who lives in San Diego. His articles appear here and in other gay newspapers. ** DON’T MISS OUT ON THE FUN!! CALL NOW!! ** HOUSTON’S PREMIERE VIDEO INTRODUCTION SERVICE Make new Mends, form satisfying relationships. k Take the gameplaying and anxiety out of meeting new people. irir PICTURED BELOW ARE SOME OF OUR CURRENT MEMBERS ** k Join them. Become part of Houston's finest, fastest-growing video introduction service. *3,6 and 12-month memberships available. ft MasterCard and VISA accepted. FriendSearch Inc. (A subsidiary of FnendFinders Inc.) 3400 Montrose, suite 310 (corner Hawthorne) Mon.-Fri. 11am-7pm Sat. 12noon-5pm Phone 523-2925 14 Montrose Voice / Sept. 16,1983 Film: ‘Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence’ By Steve Warren In simpler days, films about cross-cultural differences took simplistic approaches to increase our understanding of other peo­ples. Epics such as The Sand Pebbles and The Bridge on the River Kwai left Wes­terners feeling we comprehended East­erners just a little bit more. Wolfgang Petersen’s Das Boot showed that the Germans were just like us when you squeezed them into a submarine, more concerned with survival than political ideology. None of this prepares you for Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence, Nagisa Oshi-ma’s prisoner of war camp drama which, instead of helping us understand the Jap­anese captors, makes their British charges almost equally inscrutable. One of the many unusual aspects of this compelling but unsatisfying film is the abundance of gay content expressed and implied, especially when Oshima and co­writer Paul Mayersberg were working from a novel, The Seed and the Sower by Sir Laurens Van der Post, which report­edly has no gay elements at all. Indeed the closest thing to a plot in this episodic mul­tiple study of individual and national characters is the attraction of camp com­mandant Captain Yonoi (Ryuichi Saka­moto) to enigmatic Major Celliers (David Bowie). This begins with a hokey love-at-first-sight sequence when Yonoi sits in on Celli­ers’ trial. The camera moves in toward the captain as he stares, and the music swells. He becomes flustered when Celliers takes his shirt off to reveal a scarred back, and intercedes to save the major’s life, getting him sent to his own detention camp in the process. Yonoi inquires about Celliers—“What kind of man is he? ... What kind of soldier Confrontation between David Bowie, as Major Straffer Jack Celliers, and a captain in ‘‘Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence” is he?” ... ignorning questions of why he is interested. Celliers also questions the cap­tain’s interest—“If he’s got something on his mind, why doesn’t he come out with it?”—although he may return it but keeps his feelings more deeply buried. “I’ve not had many romantic interludes of great importance” is all we learn of the major’s sexual history. When Celliers is in solitary confine­ment, Yonoi visits him every night until Yonoi’s aide tries to kill the “evil spirit” who would destroy the captian. The pre­sumably nonphysical affair climaxes when Celliers defuses a tense situation by publicly kissing Yonoi, who swoons in a dead faint. Most of the above, like virtually every­thing in Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence, is subject to alternative interpretation. The title character, actually Lieutenant Colonel Lawrence, is played by Tom Conti in the film’s best performance. A student of Japanese language and culture, he tries to understand both sides and, while serv­ing as referee, is frequently caught between them. It is of Lawrence that Sergeant Hara (Japanese television comedian Takeshi) asks, “Is is true that Englishmen are all homosexual?” In the opening sequence, Hara is goading a Korean prisoner into harakiri for being caught buggering an attractive young Dutchman; but later Hara tells Lawrence, “You (English) all fear homosexuality. A samurai doesn’t fear it.” If Hara’s not afraid, he’s certainly damned curious. Films Far more time is devoted to pointing out cultural oddities than explaining them, but Hara sheds some light on the apparent low value the Japanese put on their lives when he explains that he dedicated his life to the emperor at the age of 17 and has considered himself dead since. Perhaps the Japanese sense a kindred spirit in Celliers, not knowing that his death wish stems from a sense of guilt at having betrayed his hunchbacked younger brother in a school initiation. Oshima puts too much faith in the power of visuals to communicate complex ideas. While his film is visually impres­sive, it leaves us understanding only how little we understand. It’s curious that this Japanese director should make his Japanese characters more stereotypical than the English, and that he should emphasize the sadistic streak in his own people, showing them as given to frequent outbursts of unmoti­vated violence. Ryuichi Sakamoto, who plays Yonoi, is a Japanese pop star who also composed the score that enhances the puzzling nature of several scenes. Both he and Bowie are competent actors, but neither gives us more information about his char­acter than the script provides. Celliers’ survival instinct clashes with his desire for death; Lawrence tries to make peace between two sides who want only war; Yonoi is upholding his country’s traditions; Hara is a soldier just doing a job. As much as Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence tries to attribute their differen­ces to cultrual heritage, it only ends up proving that no two people are alike, affirming Lawrence’s resolve, “I don’t want to hate any individual Japanese.” Perhaps the year’s most ambitious film, Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence achieves more in its failure than most do in success. 3201 Louisiana at Elgin (Westheimer) Houston (713) 527-0782 Sunday thru Thursday 11am to 1am Friday & Saturday 11am to 3am TEXAS’ BEST ALL-MALE CINEMA presented by the KS/AIDS FOUNDATION OF HOUSTON, INC. aids play safe week September 18-25,1983 BAR EVENTS Contributions are being accepted at the following bars: Sept. 18, Sunday—Montrose Mining Company Sept. 20, Tuesday—Barn Steak Night, 7pm Rich’s Disco, 8-10pm JR’s Jockey Shorts Contest, 10pm Mary’s Peaches Memorial Drag Show, 10pm Sept. 21, Wednesday—Galleon, Happy Hour Daddy’s Drag Show 7:30pm Sept. 22, Thursday—Dirty Sally’s Beer Bust E/J’s Variety Show, 10pm Westplayland's Boston Tea Party, 10pm Sept. 23, Friday—Numbers #2 presents Sarah Dash (formerly of “Labelle”) Sept. 23, 24, Friday & Saturday—DINNERS ABOUT TOWN!!! Sept. 25, Sunday—Venture-N, Yea ... Party! Officer’s Club, 2-4pm, Bartenders Swim Relay, Box Lunch Auction by Eagle Leathers, & Miss Camp America’s Water Ballet Sept. 16,1983 / Montrose v ice 15 C3AVeL 522-8227 5719 Kirby / Suite 20 Houston, TX 77005 NEW LOW AIR FARE $170 ROUND TRIP* to Los Angeles, San Francisco, Las Vegas & San Diego ★Tickets must be purchased by Tuesday, Sept. 20 Serving the Gay Community Coming to “Vienna Deco” Le Garage—Old Imported Furniture and Accents at Giveaway Prices Open 7 Days Tues-Thurs 10-7 Fri & Sat 10-9 Sunday 12-9 (viewing) 5426 W. Bellfort (near Chimney Rock) 721-0000 NITE LIFE Grand Opening Friday, Sept. 23 Located next to Texas Renegades 1322 WESTHEIMER, HOUSTON SEE NEXT WEEK’S VOICE FOR SPECIALS CanCrusher Corporation We Pay Cash for Your Trash*! *Trash by Can Crusher’s definition is aluminum cans only. Can Crusher Corporation is a full-service recycling company paying market prices for aluminum cans. Our hours are Sam to 7pm Monday thru Friday and 9am to 2pm on Saturday Help America Recycle and Make Money Too! The Can Crusher Corp, also offers a full­service pickup recycling program for bars restaurants & industry. Call 864-2223 for details. Studemont | 2011 Silver eBT Spring 1 Montrose Washington 2011 Silver St. QU1B FRIDAY 50<t Happy Happy Hour AH Well Drinks 500 5pm-8pm SATURDAY Upper Deck Disco No Door Charge to Men in Leather 11pm to 4am SUNDAY AH the Draft Beer you can drink, $1 5pm till midnight MONDAY 150 Beer Bust 9pm to 2am, No Door Charge THURSDAY Leather Long Neck Night 500 Long Neck Beer to Men in Leather 9pm to 2am \Ne squeeze our own fresh orange juice daily Open daily 10am, Sunday noon 16 Montrose Voice / Sept. 16,1983 Commentary This, That and a Lot of Other Things By Joe Baker Time to clean off the top of my desk again. Sometimes I think I could write a daily column considering all the notes, letters, suggestions and newspaper clippings I gather over the months. But, please, don’t anybody ask me to. On the subject of AIDS and the Not-Very- Rev. Jerry Falwell, leader of the Moral Majority: He is roaming the country rant­ing about what he calls the “gay plague.” Since the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta reports that all the homosexual AIDS victims are male, this raises a ques­tion for Falwell. Is God being selective in imposing his “plague” because he hates male homosexuals more than gay women? I didn’t realize that God was a sexist. foundation. 4. In families where gay children try to become heterosexual, all attempts fail. — Cl­in the world of business, news reports inform me that Anita Bryant—you remember her—has designed and is mar­keting a new line of “Christian eye glasses.” I guess they will have little halos and crucifixes on the rims. What some people won’t do to make a buck! The trouble is, though, that Bryant will probably make a million from her ven­ture. You wouldn’t believe how fast statues of the Virgin Mary standing on a tacky seashell sold in Florida. —□— Ed Hurst of Dallas writes that he has been cured of his homosexuality by a “compas­sionate church other than the gay church.” He didn’t like the Dallas Times Herald's recent article on the Metropoli­tan Community Church. Hurst failed to mention how he was cured, however. Also, he didn’t say if he is just not practicing homosexuality any­more, but still has the desire. I’ve talked to a lot of “former” gays over the years, and everyone of them has said the same thing: They have never been able to kill the desire for members of their same sex, but they consider themselves “cured” because they no longer have sexual rela­tions. Some “cured!” SPIRITUAL RENEWAL September 16,17&18 Friday & Saturday at 7:15pm Sunday at 10:45am & 7:15pm with Rev. Elder Jeri Ann Harvey MCCR 1919 Decatur, Houston 713-861-9149 Then there’s also the question why God hasn’t cursed homosexuals with equal vengeance in all of the world. Does Falwell think God hates American gays more than those in England, Italy, the Soviet Union, China, Japan and Mexico? Just as homosexuals are the special vic­tims of AIDS, blacks are the primary vic­tims of sickle cell anemia and Jews of Tay-Sachs disease. Does Falwell believe that blacks and Jews have been singled out by God for these special curses? —□— I read the following on the placemat while having lunch at TGI Friday’s: “Monday’s Child is fair of face, Tuesday’s Child is full of grace; Wednesday’s Child is in the know, Thursday’s Child has far to go; Fri­day’s Child is loving and giving, Satur­day’s Child works hard for a living; And a Child that’s bom on the Sabbath Day, is fair and wise and good and GAY.” So that’s what causes homosexuality! —□— A Los Angeles group called Parents and Friends of Gays says after seven years and thousands of case histories they know absolutely that: 1. The gay child is often aware of his or her sexual orientation at a very early age. 2. None of the children were influenced or taught to be gay by any person. 3. Family fears of “catching” homosexu­ality or of being “recruited” at school or elsewhere are utterly without scientific Love Among the Reruns Some couples prefer a background of soft music, but a new survey shows many Brit­ishers make love with the TV set on. The British magazine TV Choice found 12 percent of those polled leave the TV on during lovemaking, and that, on the aver­age, people pay attention to what’s on the tube only about 30 percent of the time, reports the magazine. • AnneO’Kane Pa,riCMo^a(U* •nne O’Kane iflne O’Kane Pa‘rlCtfa,Law Anne O’Kane 3212 Smith, Suite 102 526-7911 Lunclr^ll'30-3 Mon-Fri. l Suqday Brunel^ noon-3 Dinner 7-llSun.-Thjr. 7-12 Fri.&Sat. 402 Lovett morir^hufs. Fri. Daily Lunch Special Soup & Sandwich $5.25 C©I!JPOIM Taquerias LA JALICIENSE World’s Best Burritos Mariachis weekends, 7pm till We serve Breakfast too 1308 Montrose 524-8676 SPANISH FLOWER, RESTA URANT 8 FREE NACHOS | with your choice © 3921 N. Main 869-1706 Lunch Dinner FELIZE FIESTAS PATRIAS A TASTE OF MEXICO-24 HOURS DAILY THIS COUPON GOOD THROUGH 10-14-83 closed Tuesday 10pm; re-open V\fed. 10am Sept. 16,1983 / Montrose Voice 17 RISKY BUSISIfSS g 2700 Albany-Open 7pm til 2am—528-3611 ADJACENT TO OFFICERS CLUB WEEKLY SHOW TIMES Thursday, 8:30pm Friday 8:30pm & 11pm Saturday 8:30pm & 11pm Sunday 8:30pm Happy Hour till 8:30 The Cabaret that Specializes in Live - Musical Revues insanely presents^ “A camp tribute to Hollywood... shocking... brings the whole house down—TWT Magazine “Hysterical stuff ...a nothing sacred attitude.... Best entertainment buy in town!”—Montrose Voice s sI FAIRVIEW ONE FREE DRINK WITH THIS AD (Present at the door limit one per customen (the way it wasn't) WELCH 18 Montrose Voice / Sept. 16,1983 Women’s Fall Season Opens with a ‘Rage’ Sports By Chuck Meredith The MSA Women’s Softball League opened its fall season under overcast skies last Sunday with a full schedule of games featuring both divisions. Opening day saw a surprising Rage team take two games from a pair of power­ful opponents, Kindred Spirits and the Briar Patch Renegades. Only time will tell if the Rage team is the rage of the fall season or if last Sunday was just a fluke. This Sunday’s games will be held at Levy Field (Richmond at Eastside) from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. but will return to Memorial No. 1 the following weekend. Following are the results of last Sun­day’s games. Rage 5, Kindred Spirits 4 MCCR 7, T-Shirts Plus 2 Rage 5, Briar Patch Renegades 0 T-Shirts Plus 5, Marion & Lynn’s 4 Briar Patch Renegades 3, Cyanide 1 Special Blend 8, Marion & Lynn’s 0 Cyanide 2, Montrose Voice 0 Special Blend 13, Double R Saloon 1 Montrose Voice 4, SCU 4 (time expired) Double R Saloon, River Cats (rained out) □ Thursday Night Bowling Involved in 'Three-Way' The Briar Patch Rabbits have led the MSA Thursday Night Bowling League’s summer season since the early weeks of play. This past week, however, they were joined at the top by the Thursday Night Trick and Flirtation heading into the final night of competition. Marilyn and the Fabulous Four were only one game back as the season came to a climatic conclu­sion on the 15th. Steve McConaughy celebrated his elec­tion as MSA president by bowling a 666 series only hours after being elected to the position during a MSA board meeting. His game scores were 232, 231 and 203. Con­gratulations, Steve! Following an awards ceremony Sunday at Kindred Spirits, the League will begin work on its winter season, with play start­ing September 29. There is still space available for individual members or entire teams. Interested persons should call Richard Dauchy at 644-5479. □ McConaughy New MSA President The MSA Board of Directors elected Steve McConaughy to fill the unexpired term of MSA president last Thursday evening. The election became necessary when term President Jim Reagan stepped down, and Vice President Gene Russo indicated he would be unable to assume the spot because of his involvement with the Gay World Series VIII committee. McConaughy is currently the president of Monday Night Bowling and has been active in supporting all of the MSA sub­groups. He has been particularly visible at the Women’s Softball League functions, as well as supporting the Briar Patch of the MSA Softball League. Although his term expires December 31, all those who know Steve believe he will give MSA the kind of responsible, steady leadership it needs as another busy year comes to a close. □ Montrose Tennis Club Members Vie for Championships In the final weekend before play begins for the 1983 Singles Championships, the club members were really active in trying to improve their play and ladder rankings— hence their Championship seeding posi­tions. The only change in the Top Ten Ladder was Victor Chapman (from Wharton) who overcame Mike Green 7-5, 7-6 (13-11) in the first really extended tie-breaker we have witnessed. Jon Colbert defended his No. 7 ranking against new player Richard Pregeant 6-2, 6-0. So the Top Ten are Rich Ryan, Tim Calhoun, Jan Mauldin, Don Kessler, Ron Landrum, Jim Kitch, Jon Colbert, Lester Vela, Victor Chapman and Mike Green. B Ladder activity saw D.C. defend his ranking against Armi Alabanza 6-1 and 6-4. The big move was made by Randy Dickerson as he jumped three spots by defeating Rich Corder 6-2 and 6-2. (Might add that Randy was returning to form after being lazy and dropping five notches. He is a former Top Ten member well on his way back up!) Then Randy played another challenge match and beat Tom Cardinale 7-6 (7-2) and 6-0. Tom had already defended his rank against Terry Rich 6-3 and 6-3. Robert Arriaga pulled a clever trick after being beaten soundly by Don Smith (another Top Ten player hav­ing to play his way back up the ladder) 6-3, 6-7 (6-8), 6-3. He got Corder to play him the same day and again beat him 6-3, 6-4, jumping three notches above Smith who had just beaten him. Good work, Robert. So the B Ladder lists Donny Kelley, D.C., David Garza, Armi Alabanza, Ron Bell, Randy Dickerson, Tom Cardinale, Robert Arriaga, Rich Corder and Terry Rich.' The C Ladder was the busiest as new members played their way into conten­tion. Mark Dingman got on the ladder for the first time, beating Thomas Cortez 6-2, 4-6, 6-2. Then Cortez defended against Richard Pregeant 6-2, 6-2. The club will begin its five-week Singles Championship September 18. A field of 32 members is scheduled to compete, result­ing in championships in four levels of play. Last summer Rich Ryan won the top Level I, Jon Colbert won Level II and Terry Rich won Level III. The format has been modified this year to provide better competition. Pending late seeding changes, Tim Cal­houn is seeded to win the Championship Level. Donny Kelley is seeded to win Level I, Danny Casillas is expected to win Level II, and Eddie Chavez is seeded for the bot­tom Level III. Play is Sunday at Homer Ford Tennis Center (MacGregor Park) from 9 a.m. ‘til noon. Come on out for some really good tennis. There’s no admission fee. Members not participating in the Cham­pionships will also be hitting regularly, so guests are welcome for a $3 guest fee. Call Rich Corder at 524-2151 for more informa­tion. Take off with Eastern and land on lively New York City for less than Broadway. Introducing Eastern’s , - I Love New York at Night Show Tours. (Includes Advance Theatre Ticket Purchase) From the cozy off-Broadway theaters to the shining lights on the Great White Way, the stars come out every night on stage in New York City. And now you can experience all the excitement of live theater and you can imagine. Call your Travel Agent, or Eastern Airlines at 738-8615 in Houston for complete details. Then take off for Broadway. eastern Sept. 16,1983 / Montrose Voice 19 North Loop Shepherd Legal Clinic This Sunday, Noon to 4pm, Under the Trees Free Beer, Pihatas & Mariachi Band You Are Inivited 2505 N. Shepherd at 25th Phone 880-3663 RAY HILL, MANAGER HIGH RISE LIVIHG IS AFFORDABLE! The EXECUTIVE HOUSE at 230 WestXAlabama is having its Fail Move-In Special. For this month our prices have dropped: Unfurnished Efficiency Apartments ............................................. $375 Unfurnished One Bedroom Apartments..........................................$475 EXECUTIVE HOUSE offers: • Paid Utilities • Security Building • Dry Sauna • Covered Parking Garage • Sun Deck • Gymnasium • Swimming Pool • Free Cable Television • Laundry Facilities EXECUTIVE HOUSE is 2 blocks from Main Street, 3 blocks from West-heimer and 4 blocks from Montrose. We are close to everything in the Montrose area. Call 529-8707 for appointment Stanford Square TOWNHOMES The twenty-four townhomes at Stanford Square afford the convenience of a near town location coupled with the serenity of a carefully-planned, secure environment. Hu'se one and two-bedroom traditional brick studio homes are within minutes of the downtown business and cultural district, Greenway Plaza, the medical center and the speciality shops, galleries and fine restaurants of the Montrose, museum and River Oaks areas. Careful attention has been given to security requirements. An automatic entry gate permits controlled access to the townhome community, while automatic garage doors and well-lighted parking areas extend security within the perimeter of the property. As an additional feature, each home has been pre-wired for its own security system. Stanford Square Townhomes offer a variety of amenities, including: • Woodburning fireplaces, • Private patios, • Kitchen appliances (refrigerator & microwave oven), • Washers & dryers, • Smoke detectors, • Pre-wiring for cable TV & Security Systems. SPECIAL BUILDERS BONUS* for purchasers acting prior to Sept. 30, 1983 1) A weekend for 2 in either of the sunny Carribean islands of Jamaica or Aruba (only air fare & hotel accomodations included) —OR— 2) A year’s full membership for two at the popular Downtown YMCA —OR— 3) A $1500 gift certificate at the furniture store of your choice to help you outfit your new home. *Sale must be closed prior to the awarding of any builders bonus. Builders bonuses may be changed or withdrawn by builder at any time. OFFERED EXCLUSIVELY BY KITTRELL REALTY 529-5981 The Tower Theatre &The UofH Cougar Present The rip-roaring comedy show that will knock you out of your seat! ‘ Subtly & Superbly funny! TOWER THEATRE MON, SEPT 26 7:30PM & 10 PM Tickets available at all Ticketron and Ticketmaster outlets. $2.00 STUDENT DISCOUNT With Student I.D. CHARGE BY PHONE, TELETRON (713) 526-1709 THE TOWER THEATRE, 1201 Westheimer 69343917 0100010100010101010001010105040202010001 20 Montrose Voice / Sept. 16,1983 AVAILABLE NOW IN SELECTED HOUSTON LOCATIONS. THE VERY FINEST NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENT A MAN CAN BUY. NATURAL VITAMINS MINERALS AND HERBS FOR THE ACTIVE MALE HIM MASS APPEA The men & women of DIGNITY/HOUSTON celebrate mass on Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. at Rice Catholic Student Center, 1703 Bolsover, with a social hour afterward. One visit to the Rice Catholic Student Center on a Saturday night at 7:30 is all it takes to realize why DIGNITY/HOUSTON has... —Frenchmen-------------- —Orleans WCATI0^ HIM • 3020 Bridgeway, #108, Sausalito, CA 94965 • (415) 331-5097 If you want to swing in New Orleans’ French Quarter, call Linda Light for our $79 Weekend Special: Two days’ stay in a luxury French Quar­ter Inn, Dinner for two at the Imperial Regency Restaurant, Cruise tickets on a Mississippi River­boat, a bottle of champagne, and round trip air fare from Houston to New Orleans and return. Frenchmen Orleans Travel Club For reservations, call Linda collect at (504) 943-3100 between 10am and 5pm For more info, call 523-7644 or 528-7644. Sept. 16,1983 / Montrose Voice 21 For additional information or phone numbers for events listed below, look for the sponsoring organi­zation under “Organizations" in the Montrose Classified. Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat SEPT. SEPT. 16 17 SEPT. SEPT. SEPT. SEPT. SEPT. 18 19 20 21 22 Selected Events through 7 Days UFRIDA Y: Yom Kippur, Jew­ish day of Atonement UFRIDA Y: Greater Houston MSA Softball League awards, Treebeard’s Restaurant, 315 Travis, 7-10pm UFRIDA Y: Committee for Pub­lic Health Awareness’s “Shar­ing Group for the Worried Well,” 7-8pm, Montrose Coun­seling Center, 900 Lovett USATURDAY: Lambda Bicy­cle Club meets, then tours, from 3pm, unless raining, at 210 Fairview, apt. I USATURDA Y: Choice’s Les­bian Mothers’ Group meets 6:30pm, 210 Fairview, apt. 1 tiSUNDA Y: Montrose Tennis Club plays 9am-noon, MacGre­gor Park USUNDA Y: Montrose Tennis Club’s 1983 Singles Champion­ships begin, MacGregor Park, 9am USUNDA Y: Choices meets 12:30pm, YWCA, 3615 Willia •SUNDAY: AIDS Play Safe Week: Montrose Jam, 2-8:30pm, 900 California, honoring AIDS Working Group •SUNDA Y: Unitarian/ Universalist Gay Caucus meets 1st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannind— •SUNDA Y: Families & Friends of Gays meets 2pm, Presbyterian Center behind 1st Presbyterian Church, 5300 Main •MONDA Y: AIDS victim sup­port group meets 6:30pm, Mont­rose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 •MONDAY: AIDS Play Safe Week: “People with AIDS Day,” Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 8-10pm, honoring Montrose Counseling Center •TUESDA Y: Montrose Sym­phonic Band meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm •TUESDA Y: AIDS Play Safe Week: “Can We Talk?” at Rich’s, 2401 San Jacinto, 8- 10pm, honoring UT M.D. And­erson Hospital & Tumor Institute ■ WEDNESDA Y: Montrose Chorale rehearsal at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30-10pm •WEDNESDA Y: Gay Political Caucus meets 4600 Main #217, 7:30pm •WEDNESDA Y: AIDS Play Safe Week: “Sex—'Die Times, They Are a’Changin’,” 8-10pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold, honoring Montrose Clinic •THURSDA Y: Wilde ’n Stein gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFT Radio, FM-90 •THURSDAY: AIDS Play Safe Week: “Politics of AIDS 8-10pm, Tropicana Swimm Club, 2114 Peckham, honoring GPC, CHE and CPHA •THURSDA Y: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN 1 WEEK: Autumn begins at 9:43am Sept. 23 •IN 1 WEEK: AIDS Play Safe Week: Sarah Dash concert, Numbers, 300 Westheimer, 10pm Sept. 23, honoring Gay Switchboard and KS/AIDS Foundation •IN 1 WEEK: AIDS Play Safe Week: private social Sept. 24 for AIDS victims honoring Diana Foundation •IN 1 WEEK: AIDS Play Safe Week: “The Big Finale,” 2-4pm Sept. 25, Officers Club, 2700 Albany •IN 1 WEEK: AIDS Play Safe Week: prayer vigil & forum 7-8pm, Sept. 25, St. Stephen’s Church, 1805 W. Alabama •IN 3 WEEKS'. Columbus Day, Oct. 10 NOTICE BUSINESS OWNERS: The Montrose Voice lists free each week in the Montrose Classified busi­ness establishments serving as distribution points for the Voice and community organiza-tions.______________________________ • Indicates this listing Is a Montrose Voice distri­bution point DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES HOUSE NEAR HEIGHTS Brick, 2 bedroom, living and dining rooms. Sunroom. Hardwood floors. 699-8249. 523-0427. MONTROSE TOWNHOUSE Contemporary 3-2’/2 covered park­ing, pool, fireplace, 2 patios, large common area, well-kept grounds, all electric, zoned air and heat, cable, lease/purchase option, $750+ utili­ties. 527-8635. 529-4026. ONE BEDROOM 1 bedroom apt. in small quiet Mont­rose complex. Pool. No pets, no children. $150 deposit, $290 mo. + utilities. 529-8178. ROOMS FOR RENT 2 very large rooms available in pri­vate home just 3 blocks west of Main St., near Richmond. Completely fur­nished (bed, dresser, stuffed velvet sofa, table, etc., in each room). A/C. All bills paid. Kitchen not available but a refrig, is provided. Couple will rent to select singles, couples or roommates. No children please. Call 524-9092. GALLERIA/MEMORIAL BARGAIN 1/1 condo, conviently locataed, landscaped courtyards, pools, covered parking, security, decorator touches, cable, HBO, all utilities paid. $425/month. Call Lucille 781- 5509 or Bonnie 840-7207. DUPLEX FOR SALE Large 3-1 & 1-1, 4315 Roseland. Purser Realty, 526-9954, 434-2553. SUPER NICE BRICK In Eastwood. Large 2-1-2 with big den & very nice garage apartment. Mid 90s. Purser Realty, 526-9954, 434-2553. HOUSE FOR SALE Near SW Fwy. & St. Thomas Univer­sity. 2 story. Mid 90s. Purser Realty, 526-9954, 434-2553. GRAND CENTRAL PIPELINE (A gay roommate service.) The best business deal you will make this year. 523-3223. GOOD SURBURBAN LOCATION Willobend area. Convenient to Medi­cal Center & downtown. 3-2-2, den, has Mexican tile. Large updated kit­chen. CA/H WBFP. Purser Realty, 526-9954, 434-2553. EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED ACTORS/STUDENTS/MUSICIANS Telemarketing Houston Opera Sea­son. Enthusiasm essential. Excellent pay. Contact Jacqueline, 223-2243. MAINTENANCE WORKERS NEEDED 5 day work week with some overtime possible. J. Franklin, 526-6551 TELEPHONE SALES PEOPLE Earn $6-$10 per hour. We desper­ately need many ambitious people for telephone sales work. No expe­rience necessary. We train men, women and students are welcome if qualified. Full-part time. Days and evenings. For immediate work, call Mr. Towers, 953-0201. TELEPHONE FUNDRAISER Need 4-6 folks with good telephone voices. Excellent job for people in the arts. Raise funds for nonprofit civil oreganization. P.T. $80 to $150 per week. Call Mr. Logan, 527-9447. BUS BOYS WANTED Apply Baja Sam’s, 402 Lovett. PAINTERS & HELPERS Immediate openings. Experience preferred. American Make Ready, 529-9985. GAY BARS HOUSTON-____________________________ • Bacchus—523 Lovett—523-3396: live en­tertainment Montrose Classified • Baja's—402 Lovett—527-9866: dining, live music____________________________________ • Barn—710 Pacific—528-9427: country_______ • Brazos River Bottom—2400 Brazos—528- 9192: country •Briar Patch—2294 W. Holcombe—665-9678 •Catch-1 Disco—4965 Martin Luther King—' 641-2521____________________________________ •Chicken Coop—535 Westheimer—526-2240 •Copa—2631 Richmond—528-2259: disco with shows • Dirty Sally’s—220 Avondale—529-7525 • Double R Saloon—5731 Kirby—521-1444 • E/J's—1213 Richmond—527-9071 •Exile-1011 Bell-659-0453: country The Voice has more news, more Houston readers, more Houston advertising • Galleon—2303 Richmond—522-7616 • Hole—109 Tuam—528-9128________________ •J.R. s—808 Pacific—521-2519_______________ • Just Marion & Lynn's—817 Fairview—528- 9110: lesbian________________________________ • Kindred Spirits—5245 Buffalo Speedway— 665-9756: predominantly lesbian______________ • Lazy J—312 Tuam—528-9343_______________ •Lola's Depot-2327 Grant-528-8342________ • Mary’s—1022 Westheimer—528-8851________ •Memorial Park Motel Bar—50 Waugh Dr.— 861-1311____________________________________ • Midnite Sun—534 Westheimer—526-7519: disco, shows________________________ • Miss Charlotte’s—911 W. Drew—528-8840: country_____________________________________ •Montrose Mining Co.—805 Pacific—529-7488 • Numbers 2—300 Westheimer—526-6551: disco______ •Officer's Club—2700 Albany—523-4084 •One on One—1016 W. Gray—528-8503 •The Outlaws—1419 Richmond—528-8903 •Pink Elephant—1218 Leeland—659-0040: with shows______________________________________ • Ranch—6620^ Main—528-8730_____________ •Rascals—2702 Kirby—524-6272: dining, live music_______________________ _______________ • Rich's—2401 San Jacinto_______________ •Ripcord—715 Fairview—521-2792___________ • Risky Business—2700 Albany—528-3611 •Texas Renegades—1318 Westheimer—521- 3475 •Tropicana Swim Club—2114 Peckham • Twins—535 Westheimer—520-0244: lesbian disco • Venture-N—2923 Main—522-0000 •West Playland-3012 Milam—528-6988 ALEXANDRIA- • Silly Sally's—924 Jackson-448-9164 BEAUMONT— • Copa—304 Orleans—832-4206______ • Sundowner—497 Crockett—833-3989 GALVESTON-_____________________________ • Blue Room—214 23rd—763-9031 • Fly—2101 0’^-763-9842___________ • Mary's II—2502 0’^—763-9435 • Robert's Lafitte—213 Kempner—765-6896 • Trammps—627 Winnie—763-1247 LAFAYETTE- • Fantasy I—408 Maurice (Windwood Shopping Ctr.)—232-0336 LAKE CHARLES— • Paragon—1501 Broad—433-9389 ORGANIZATIONS SELECTED NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS— Gay Press Association—POB 33605. Washington, DC 20033—(202) 387-2430 Gay Rights National Lobby—POB 1892, Washington. DC 20013—(202) 546-1801 Human Rights Campaign Fund—POB 1396. Wash­ington, DC 20013—(202) 546-2025 Lambda Legal Defense—132 W 43rd, New York, NY 10039—(212) 944-9488 Media Fund for Human Rights (Gay Press Association)—POB 33605. Washington, DC 20033—(202) 387-2430 National Association of Business Councils—Box 15145, San Francisco, CA 94115—(415) 885-6363 National Association of Gay & Lesbian Democratic Clubs—1742 Mass Av SE. Washington, DC 20003—(202) 547-3104 National Gay Rights Advocates—540 Castro, San Francisco, CA 94114—(415) 863-3624 National Gay Task Force—80 Sth Av, New York, NY 10011—(212) 741-5800 NGTF's Crisisline—(800) 221-7044 (outside New York State) Texas Gay/Lesbian Task Force—POB AK. Denton 76201—(817) 387-8216________________________ A Capel la Chorus—(Montrose) Church of Christ—777-9286 _______________________ A Place in the Sun—c/o Gracilynn Books, 704 Fairview—522-7695: subgroup of l/H Inc; con­certs 7 pm Tues relationship, but they don’t have to rub my nose in it! 22 Montrose Voice / Sept. 16,1983 "Andrew! Fix Edgar's head! . . . It's not facing the camera!" "Dang! This can't be right ... I can HEAR the stage, but I can't see a blamed thing!" "I don't like this . . . The carnivores have been boozing it up at the punchbowl all night — drinking, looking around, drinking, looking around . . ." The Far Side by Gary Larson "There! Quick, Larry! Look! . . . Was I kidding? . . . That sucker's longer than the boat!" *1983 SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE ACLU-1236 W Gray-524-5925______________ AIDS Hotline—c/o Gay Switchboard—529-3211 American Gay Atheists—457-6660 American Leathermen (social club)—meets at Different Drum, 1732 Westheimer—528-8528: club night Wed______________________________ Astro Rainbow Alliance—520-9451 (voice), 520- 0552 (TTY)__________________________________ Bayou B’lu: see Montrose Chorale____________ Bering Memorial United Methodist Church- 1440 Harold—526-1017: service 10:50am Sun Black & White Men Together (BWMT)-cZo Gay Switchboard. 529-3211 Choices—c/o Gay Switchboard or Carol at 529- 4975: meets YWCA. 3615 Willia, 12:30pm 3rd Sun; also see Lesbian Mothers Christian Church of the Good Shepherd—1707 Montrose: services 1pm Sun, Bible study 7:30pm Thurs (Montrose) Church of Christ—1700 Montrose— 777-9286: services 11am Sun_____________ Church of Christian Faith—217 Fairview—529- 8005: services 10:45am Sun &7:15pm Wed; Bible study 7:15pm Tues & Sun; choir practice Wed after services Church of Pentecostal Unity—1217 Richmond— 850-7286, 520-5699: Services 7:30pm Fri, 11am Sun Citizens for Human Equality (CHE)—609 Fannin #1301-236-8666: board meet 2nd Tues Colt 45’s (social club)—meets at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos—528-9192______________ Committee for Public Health Awareness—POB 3045, 77253-528-6333, 522-5084: "Sharing Group for the Worried Well" meet Fri, 7-8pm, Montrose Counseling Center Community Gospel Center—1700 Montrose— 523-6018____________________________________ Cong Aytz Chayim—meets at CCF, 217 Fairview—688-8997: service & social 8pm 2nd & 4th Fri_____________ ________________________ Crisis Hotline—228-1505_____________________ Dial-a-Gay-Atheist—457-6660: American Gay Atheists_____________________________________ Diana Foundation—2700 Mason—524-5791 Dignity—Catholic Student Center, 1703 Bolsover—523-7644, 528-7644: mass & social 7:30pm Sat Families & Friends of Gays—464-6663: meet 2pm 3rd Sun at Presbyterian Center, 41 Oakdale, behind First Presbyterian Church, 5300 Main 1st Unitarian Church—5210 Fannin—526-1571: service 11:15am Sun ________________ Frontrunners—529-1288 Gay & Alive Sharing Experience (GASE)—528- 1311, 528-0891 Gay & Lesbian Archives of Texas: affiliate of l/H Inc Gay Asian Club-2615 Waugh #124 77006 Gay Hispanic Caucus—2722 Newman #12-521- 0037: meet 3rd Thurs Gay Italian Group—526-9844_________________ Gay Nurses Alliance—880-9486 Gay Political Caucus (GPC)—POB 66664, 77266-521-1000: meet 4600 Main #217 7:30pm 1st & 3rd Wed_______________________________ Gay Pride Week '83 Committee—c/o Marion Coleman, House of Coleman. 901 W Alabama— 523-2521____________________ _______________ Gay Switchboard—POB 3624-529-3211: infor­mation, counseling, referrals, TTY, AIDS Hotline Greater Montrose Business Guild—contact through Montrose Voice: meets 7:30pm. 1st Tues, community room, Liberty Bank. 1001 Wes­theimer____________________________ ________ Greenspoint/FM1960 Area Far-Away Friends— 821-9681 __________________________________ Homophile Interfaith Alliance—729 Manor— 523- 6969 _______________________________ Houston Area Gay & Lesbian Engineers & Scientists—526-7386: meets 7pm 4th Tues Houston Community Clowns—862-8314 Houston Data Professionals—meets in East Room, Holiday Inn Central, 4640 S Main—523- 6922: meet 7:30pm 2nd Tues_________________ Houston Motorcycle Club (social club)—c/o Mary's, 1022 Westheimer—528-8851___________ Houston North Professionals—POB 3840, Hum­ble 77338—Bill at 821-7126 l/H Inc-POB 16041, 77222-694-1732, 529- 7014: affiliated groups are Interact, Gracielynn Gallery's A Place in the Sun, Montrose Art Alliance, Gay & Lesbian Archives of Texas, Gay Switchboard, Montrose Symphonic Band, Mont­rose Cloggers; board meet 7:30pm 1st Thurs (varied locations); educational forum 7:30pm 3rd Thurs __________________________________ Ingersoll Speakers' Bureau—POB 391, Bellaire 77401-669-4064____________________________ Integrity/Houston (Episcopalian)—POB 66008, 77266-526-0555: meets 7:30pm 2nd Tues at Autry House, 6265 Main, & 4th Tues at varied locations____________ ___________ ____________ Interact, educational subgroup of l/H Inc—POB 16041, 77222-529-7014, 694-1732 • KPFT Radio, FM-90—419 Lovett Blvd—526- 4000: "Wilde 'n Stein” gay radio show Thurs. 7:30-9:00pm___________________________ KS/AIDS Foundation—1001 Westheimer #193— 524- AIDS: AIDS Play Safe Week: Montrose Jam, 2-8:30pm Sept 18,900 California, honoring AIDS Working Group; “People with AIDS Day," Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 8-10pm Sept 19, honoring Montrose Counseling Center; "Can We Talk?," Rich’s, 2401 San Jacinto, 8-10pm Sept 20, honor­ing UT M.D. Anderson Hospital & Tumor Insti­tute; "Sex—The Times, They Are a’Changin'." 8-10pm Sept 21, Bering Church, 1440 Harold, honoring Montrose Clinic; “Politics of AIDS" 8- 10pm Sept 22, Tropicana Swimm Club, 2114 Peckham, honoring GPC. CHE and CPHA; Sarah Dash concert, Numbers, 300 Westheimer, 10pm Sept 23, honoring Gay Switchboard and KS/AIDS Foundation; private social Sept 24 for AIDS victims honoring Diana Foundation; "The Big Finale," 2-4pm Sept 25, Officers Club, 2700 Albany; prayer vigil & forum 7-8pm Sept 25, St. Stephen’s Church, 1805 W. Alabama; "Zap Clap Revue Two, Too” benefit Oct 24-25, Numbers, 300 Westheimer____________ Lambda Bicycle Club—David 682-0456, Carol 529-4975___________________________________ Lambda Center Gay Alcoholics & Alanon—1214 Jo Annie—521-9772 Lesbian/Gay Resource Service—University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, box 309, 77004—749- 1253 ____________________ Lesbians A Gay People in Medicine—880-9486: meet 7:30pm 1st Sat Lesbian Mothers: subgroup of Choices; meets 1st and 3rd Sat, 6:30pm, 210 Fairview, apt 1 Lutherans Concerned—meets at Grace Luthe­ran Church, 2515 Waugh—521-0863, 453-1143: meet 2nd & 4th Tues evenings • Metropolitan Community Church of the Resur- rection (MCCR)—1919 Decatur—861-9149: pot­luck dinner 7:30pm 1st Sat monthly: services 10:45am & 7:15pm Sun & 7:15pm Wed; member­ship inquirers class 7:30pm Tues; education classes Tues & Wed eves Montrose Art Alliance—521-2461: affiliate l/H Inc; meet 2nd Thurs Montrose Chorale and Bayou B’lu—Robert Moon, dir, 521-2006: rehearsal 7:30-10pm Wed at Bering Church, 1440 Harold__________________ Montrose Cloggers: affiliate of l/H Inc; meet Fri eve. Bering Church Activities Bldg, 3405 Mul­berry Montrose Civic Club: see Neartown Association • Montrose Clinic—104 Westheimer—528-5531: open weekdays 10am-5pm (except Wed) and weekday eves 6:30-9:30pm; women’s emphasis program 1-5pm Sun; "Zap Clap Revue Two, Too" benefit Oct 24-25, Numbers. 300 Westheimer Montrose Counseling Center—900 Lovett #203—529-0037: AIDS victim support group meets 6:30pm Mon_________________________ Montrose Singers—Carl Lawrence 774-3591 after 6pm: rehearsal Mon eves. Bering Church, 1440 Harold Montrose Tennis Club—Rich at 524-2151: play Sun, 9am, MacGregor Park; 1983 Singles Cham- pionships begin 9am, Sept 18_______ MSA/Mon Night Bowling—play Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain—528-4576 or 499-9036 MSA/Thurs Night (Mixed League) Bowling— play Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain—961-1523 MSA/Greater Houston (Men's ) Softball—523- 8802 day, 523-0413 eve ________ MSA/Women’s Softball League—728-9371 MSA/Volleyball—880-2930: games 7:30pm Tues, Gregory-Lincoln school, 1101 Taft Montrose Symphonic Band—meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold—527-9669: meet 7:30pm Tues; affiliate l/H Inc Montrose Watch: subgroup Neartown Assoc Mustangs (social club)—meets at the Barn, 710 Pacific—528-9427: club night Thurs__________ Neartown Association (Montrose Civic Club)— meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold—522- 1000: meet 7pm 4th Tues____________________ New Freedom Christian Church—912 W 11th— 591-1342: services 10am Sun, 7:30pm Wed Park People—c/o Neartown Community Firehouse—741-2524________________________ Paz y_Liberacion—POB 600063, 77260-523- 9061________________________________________ Recreational Land Fund Committee—Mustang Club project________________________________ Rice Univ Gay/Lesbian Support Group—524- 0724 _____________________________ Texas Bay Area Gays—332-3737: meet Thurs evening _________________________________ Texas Bay Area Gay Youth—332-3737: meet bi­weekly Texas Gay/Lesbian Task Force—869-7231, 868- 6901______________________ Texas Human Rights Foundation —1915 Commonwealth—522-2824 Texas Riders—c/o Mary's, 1022 Westheimer— 528-8851____________________________________ Unitarian/Universalist Gay Caucus—c/o 1st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin—520-9767, 528- 5842: meet 3rd Sun afternoons Weslayan Fellowship—864-8899_____________ Westheimer Colony Arts Association—1001 Westheimer #187: Festival, T00-1100 blocks Westheimer, Oct 15-16 ____________________ Women's Lobby Alliance—4 Chelsea—521-0439 CONROE— Conroe Area Lambda Society—Jan at (409) 756- 0354 or Ray at (409) 756-4097________________ Conroe Area Lesbians—Kathy at (409) 756-9069: meet 8pm 2nd & 4th Fri LAKE CHARLES— Dignity—Rt 1, Box 216C, Longville, LA 70652 PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS DESIRES SERIOUS RELATIONSHIP G/W/M, 49, self-employed. Rela­tionship where there is equal responsibility, honesty, conscien­tiousness and support. Ad 151-D, c/o Montrose Voice. EROTIC HANDS Videocasette, $35, other titles $25 or less. Both formats. Daniel, 526-9112. $1 GAY BOOK SALE Up to $12 values. Magazines and hardcore paperbacks 50<t. XXX- rated video casettes $25. Collectors’ records $1. 2711 Yupon (near 1400 Westheimer). Sat. & Sun. 3-7pm. COMPATIBLESIGNS Masc. 55-yr. Cancerian looking for sincere relationship with straight­appearing Taurus, Scorpio or Pis­ces. Write ad 151-A c/o Montrose Voice. CHUBBY WANTED Businessman, white male, attractive, 35, 5’10”, 170 lbs., black hair, brown eyes. Would like to meet white, chubby straight-looking male. 250 lbs. or more. For friendship and fun. Please no fems, beards or long hair. Visit Houston occasionally. Inter­ests include open variety. I'm open- minded, sincere and give a lot of myself. You won’t regret you met me. My home is your home in New Orleans. Write ad 151-C, c/o Mont­rose Voice. Will answer all. RIDERS FOR LIPPIZZANERS My four stallions need riders. No salary. 255-6349. "Blackie” HAPPINESS IS... a handsome, healthy, humorous, happy hunk as your escort or model from ... TexEscort. 524-9511. Major credit cards honored. Security and discretion assured. Want to talk? Cali the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 TENSION EASING MASSAGE Relax tension & stress, relax & enjoy full body massage. Call for appoint­ment. In or out. Tom, 524-7163. GAY WOMEN Write/meet with dignity through “The Wishing Well” Magazine Pro­gram. Integrity since 1974. Confi­dential, supportive, prompt. Tender, loving, alternative. Introductory copy $5, postpaid (mailed discreetly 1st class). Information: Box 117, Navato, CA 94948. MONTROSE VOICE CLASSIFIED RATES Advertising rate: □ $2 for up to three bold capital words and □ 30C for each remaining regular type word. Total minimum charge per ad $3. There are no other rates. Advertisers who wish something different should consider run­ning a display advertisement. □ Deadline for all advertising is 5:30pm Tues­day for newspaper released mid-day Friday. □ Blind box numbers can be assigned for $3 each week the ad is run and all responses will be forwarded to you by mail or picked up at our office. □ Deduct 15% if you run the same ad 4 weeks or more and pay for the full run in advance. □ Bring or mail your Montrose Voice Classified to: 3317 Montrose #204, Houston, TX 77006 Use this form or blank sheet of paper (up to 3 normal-size bold capital words, total cost $2) (additional regular, lower case words, 30c each) Name _____-— ------------------------------ Address-------------------------—-------------------------------------------------------------------—--------------------------------------- Number of weeks ad is to run-------------------- Amount enclosed--------------- -------------------------------------- Check Money Order Cash (not by mail) O VISA charge MasterCard charge credit card »-------------------------------------------------------------------------------exP- da,e---------- OPERA SEASON TICKETS 12th row center. $250 or AX charge. Robert, daytime, 524-7800. BODY MASSAGE In or out, Bruce, 521-2009. DEEP THROAT SPECIALIST Seeks healthy males with large problem in need of good regular ser­vice. Satisfaction guaranteed. Serious only contact Specialist, POB 3645, Houston 77001. PRIVATE GAY CLUBS •Club Houston Baths—2205 Fannin—659-4998 • French Quarter Theater—3201 Louisiana— 527-0782____________________________________ • Midtowne Spa—3100 Fannin—522-2379 • 2306 Club—2306 Genessee—528-6235 RESTAURANTS • Baja’s—402 Lovett—527-9866 •Chapultapec—813 R ichmond—522-2365 • Frankie's—Montrose at Westheimer—529- 7896________________________________________ • Gyro Gyros Sandwich Shop—1536 Westheimer—528-4655_______________________ • House of Pies—3112 Kirby—528-3816_______ • House of Shish Kabob—2042 Marshall—521- 9516 • 9’ers—1303 Westheimer—528-8823 • Old Houston Diner—914 W. Alabama—524- 2318________________________________________ • Perky's—Richmond at Kirby—524-0075 • Rascals—2702 Kirby-524-6272_____________ • Spud-U-Like—416 Westheimer—520-0554 • Star Pizza-2111 Norfolk-523-0800 • Steak ‘n’ Egg—4231 Montrose—528-8135 •Tim’s Coffee Shop—1525 Westheimer—529- 2289________________________________________ •Tropicana Swim Club—2114 Peckham SERVICES, ETC. DENTIST Ronald A. Peters, DDS. Open even­ings and Saturday. Reasonable rates. 523-2211. TEXESCORT-524-9511 Models, escorts & masseurs. “We do care enough to send the very best.” Major credit cards honored. Monthly medical certificate. Have a real fun time with the right guy for you. SALON CHRIS 3913 Kirby. Men’s & women’s hair. Also wigs. 524-0352. FREE FREE FREE All of the services of River Oaks Air­line Ticket Center. Bargain fares to "most” everywhere. NYC/OW $69; DEN/OW $115; Cozumel, Nassau, Jamaica $199; Las Vegas $214 including air and hotel. Automobile & hotel reservations worldwide. All gay travel services are available. 3939 Richmond at Weslayan. 629- 1100. PROTECT YOUR HOMEI Wireless alarm system under $600. TV’s, stereos, VCR’s. Laundry & cleaning products. Commercial accounts welecome. 675-8835. HYPNOTIST Habit modification, sexual dysfunc­tion, end fears, personal. Jay Carlsy Ph.D., 440-4667. RUBDOWN, YOUR HOME^ $20. Van, 493-4850. RELAX & ENJOY the Bodyworks massge. Evenings and weekends. Call Bill, 526-2470. Gift certificates available. MOVEMASTERS Hauling, packing, supplies, too. 1925 Westheiner, 521-3155. LICENSED MASSAGE THERAPIST Therapeutic/relaxation masssage. Randolph Alan, 528-3147. TRAVEL CONSULTANTS Complete travel arrangements. All services are free. 2029 Southwest Fwy. 529-8464. LICENSED MASTER MASSEUR Full body massage. In or out. Chase. 527-0876. • Fitness Exchange—3307 Richmond—524- 9932 • Francisco’s Hair Design—901 Richmond— 523-0438 Sept. 16,1983 / Montrose voice 23 • Houston Guest House lodging—106 Avon­dale-520-9767 • Icenhower Beauty School—327 Westheimer— 520-7972 • Legends Hair Design—906 Westheimer—527- 0188 • Lionel Hair Design—3220 Yoakum—526-4494 • Montrose Hair Design—1004 California—522- 2822 • Montrose Voice newspaper—3317 Montrose' #306-529-8490_____________________________ •Neartown Garage—1901 Taft—523-2794 • Private Postal Systems mail boxes—1713 Westheimer—529-3020_______________________ •Tommy’s Barber Shop—2154 Portsmouth— 528-8216 •Travel Consultants—2029 SW Fwy—529-8464 • Travel Innovations—1506 W. Alabama- Montrose Travel Club 523-3051, commercial accounts 523-6835 SHOPS & STORES ADULT MOVIE ARCADES Mags, films, novelties, video. 4330 Richmond, 877-0244. 5200 Tele­phone, 649-9322. 7637% Longpoint, 957-9148. 9927 Irvington, 691-8232. All locations open 24 hours. •All-Star Adult News—1407 Richmond—528- 8405 •Antique Corner—1921 Westheimer—522-6087 •Asylum Adult Bookstore—1201 Richmond • Ball Park Adult IBookstore—1830 W. Alabama • Cobweb Liquors—2036 Westheimer—526- 2989 • Cut Flowers—5015 Montrose—522-1775 • Diner's Adult News—240 Westheimer—528- 8950 • Doubrava-Jones, the Manhole clothing—1983 W. Gray—522-1089_______________________ • Downbeat Records—2117 Richmond—523- 8348 • Dramatika gifts—3224 Yoakum—528-5457 • Google’s—1004 California—524-5555 • Gracielynn Books—704 Fairview—522-7695 • Greetings Plus—1411 Westheimer—630-0188 • Kirby Newstand—3115 Kirby—520-0246 • Oh Boy! Leather Goods—912 Westheimer— 524-7859 • Old English Furniture—1138 W Gray—521- 9145 • Record Rack music—3109 S. Shepherd—524- 3602________________________________________ • Studz Adult News—1132 W. Alabama • TLC—602 W. Alabama—524-5860 •Taft Automotive—1441 Taft—522-2190 • The Tire Place—1307 Fairview—529-1414 • Union Jack clothing—1212 Westheimer—528- 9600_______________________________________ • Up One Western/Leather—BRB. 2400 Brazos-524-5737__________________________ • Westheimer Flea Market—1733 Westheimer • Westheimer Interiors—1727 Westheimer— 520-1357 • Wilde & Stein book store—802 Westheimer— 529-7014 TRAVEL CHEAP AIR FARES A free service for gay travelers. We guarantee to locate the cheapest fare between any 2 cities. Hous- ton/LA 1 way $95. Houston/Denver $115. Gay tours, cruises and hotel packages. Grand Central Pipeline, 523-3223. TRAVEL KEY WEST Free brochure and map included. Accomodations, restaurants, shops, bars. Write Key West Business Guild, POB 1208-M, Key West, FL 33040. (305) 296-7535. By Tycho Fortunes For Friday evening, September 16. 1983, through Friday evening. September 23, 1983: ARIES—The Moon enters Aries next Thursday, the 22nd. A shared dream could become a reality. By staying flexible and open to all possi­bilities, you and your lover could find the answer that you’ve been looking for. A special closeness fills this special time. Memories of childhood could enhance and reflect this feeling of sharing. TAURUS—Eager, ready, anxious to go. Sound right? The usual has­sles and problems are out of the way. Theiaroet is in sioht. and you’re moving. With this kind of purposefulness, your only problem is yourself. Trust all your hunches, inspiration and seemingly wild, crazy ideas. GEMINI—An argument that you’ve been having with yourself is the main event right now. This problem could even become something of an obsession if you’re not careful. Being careful should involve turning your attention elsewhere — like towards your lover, who’s ready to help. CANCER—With a lot of will and determination, you could do a good bit of self-improvement now; with the rest of your life in good order, you can turn your attention to a part of yourself that needs taking care of. Take care! Be your own therapist and friend. LEO—In your sign this week: Venus and Mars. All of that positive energy you’ve been putting out comes back to you in the form of advancement, promotion, a raise. Things in your work and career are taking an upward turn. Relationships with co-workers will be excellent. Involvements with superiors could be intense. VIRGO—Mercury will remain in Virgo while the Sun will leave next Friday morning, the 23rd. Something that looks absolutely perfect could be just the opposite. So, don’t be fooled by beautiful surfaces. Your mind is working overtime, and you’re likely to be fooled if you don’t do some serious listening to your heart. Who’s fooling who, huh? LIBRA— In your sign this week: Pluto. Enjoy playing matchmaker? This could turn into serious business when friends with serious prob­lems turn to you for help. Your ability to bring people together has to be used wisely now. Listen to both sides of the question before you decide what’s right. SCORPIO—In your sign this week: Saturn. At work, you’re the perfect picture of organizational knowhow. All details are taken care of and your career lights shine. But in your love life, things are not so clear. You and your lover are both up for an argument that could turn into something too big to handle. Push comes to shove. SAGITTARIUS—In your sign this week: Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune. Things are getting pretty confusing. It’s time to clear the air and get out of town for a couple of weeks, days, hours. Take your loved one, and go somewhere you’ve never been before. Distance doe&n't matter, neither does charm. Just get away. CAPRICORN—The Moon is in your sign as the weekend opens, leav­ing Saturday morning. Stay on track. You’re getting healthier and acting wisely. You’re doing a lot of learning about a lot of things that you can apply directly to your life. No pie in the sky stuff for you. Just the facts, and the facts are fine for now. AQUARIUS—The Moon passes through Aquarius from Saturday morning to Monday afternoon. Now that you’ve gotten the help you’ve needed, it’s time to make a decision. You can’t be everyone’s lover. Trying to please everybody around you doesn’t leave you very much. A Taurus or a Virgo could be very helpful to you now. PISCES—The Moon passes through Pisces from Monday afternoon to next Thursday, the 22nd. Truth and illusion continue to be the overrid­ing concerns. An older woman may be helpful. Younger men may not be so good. Lots of people fill your life these days, but the merry-go-round is slowing down, so don’t jump off before the music is over. C1983 STONEWALL FEATURES SYNDICATE24 Montrose Voice / Sept, i6,1983 HE TOOK THE CHANCE OF GETTING HEPATITIS B AND LOST NOW THE CONSEQUENCES ARE JUST BEGINNING. CHRONIC ACTIVE HEPATITIS, CIRRHOSIS... OR DEATH. You undoubtedly know someone who’s had it. The "bad hepatitis” that can keep you in bed for weeks and out of a job for months— that can cause lifelong disability and even death from cirrhosis or cancer of the liver. Where do you get it? From people who have become carriers of the virus. Tbday, it is estimated that at least 100,000 gay men are carriers of the hepatitis B virus and spread the infection through intimate contact. That’s the main reason why more than half of all gay men will sooner or later become infected. How can you tell who’s a carrier? You probably can’t. Most carriers seem to be perfectly healthy, and many are themselves unaware that they harbor the virus. Once you get hepatitis B, there’s no specific treatment for it. But now there’s something you can do to help protect yourself. DON'T TAKE A CHANCE­CONTACT YOUR DOCTOR OR CLINIC AND ASK ABOUT THE HEPATITIS B VACCINE. It is highly effective in those who receive all three shots. Do it If you’d like more information about hepatitis B and the today because you never know where or when you’ll make contact vaccine, call The American Liver Foundation at (201) 857-2626. with a carrier. This message is brought to you as a public service by The American Liver Foundation. Studies showed that the vaccine protected against infection caused by hepatitis B virus in 85% to 96% of those who received the required three shots. Hepatitis B virus is an important cause of viral hepatitis, a disease mainly of the liver. Even mild forms of this disease may lead to serious complications and aftereffects, including liver cancer. There is no specific treatment for viral hepatitis. Vaccination is recommended for persons who have a higher risk of becoming infected with hepatitis B virus because of frequent, close contact with infected people or exposure to body fluids from such people. It will not protect against hepatitis caused by viruses other than hepatitis B virus. Because of the long incubation period for hepatitis B, it is possible for unrecognized infection to be present at the time the vaccine is given. The vaccine may not prevent hepatitis B in such patients. In three studies involving 3,350 persons, the overall rate of adverse reactions did not differ significantly in those given vaccine and those given placebo (an inactive substance). As with any vaccine, broad use often reveals rare adverse reactions not observed during clinical trials. Over 200,000 people are estimated to have received the vaccine since its release, and the vaccine continues to be generally well tolerated. Hepatitis B has a long incubation period, and unrecognized infection may already be present at the time the vaccine is given. Thus, reported cases of hepatitis are to be expected and do not appear to be caused by the vaccine. Reactions such as fever, nausea, vomiting, headache, and local pain have occurred. Joint pain has been reported; rash has been reported rarely. Serious illnesses affecting the nervous system— including Guillain-Barre syndrome—have been reported rarely, but no cause and effect relationship has been established. 01983 The American Liver Foundation ALF 5(001)
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