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Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990
File 009
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Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 009. 1990-02-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1544.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-02-02). Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1544

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 009, 1990-02-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1544.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 2, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript MONTROSE VOICE / FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 2, 1990 Limousines 2141 Plant Care 2181 Psychics 2188 TAROT READING ADVERTISE FREE NEXT ISSUE - ■ al NO CHARGE lor tne ADVERTISE FHEE NEXT ISSUE Place a 25-worrj SERVICES PLANT CARE aO H al NO CHAR ne.i 4 weak! *ork. family Guidances Locksmith CES LOCKSMITH aa at NO CHARGE tor i 529-8490 Security 2191 Plumbing 2182 MASTER PLUMBER Mayers 2160 mroM MOVEMASTERS POrt/aitS 2183 Self Mealing 2111.1 >OCUS ONHEALT H_ RICAN MOVERS Nutrition 2161 - ■;.!■; NuiP '.on ..,-. -i al MO CM.*.-- nexl 4 wi-., 8091) MONOAV ONLY Optometrists 2162 ADVERTISE FREE Boxes Pag|ng 2m 2184 Gyms. Health Gyms. Health Cfrs. 2131 Cfrs. 2131 INVITATION TO FITNESS Painting 2163 CLUB BODY CENTEB Parties 2166 Pest Control 2167 ADVERTISE FHEE Photo Finishing 2170 Hair Loss Hair Loss Treatment Treatment 2133 2133 BALDING.' Have Your Head Examined! RH Proctor Ph.D. M.D. 960-1616 Insurance Insurance 2138 2138 First Metropolitan Piano Tuning IL™ Ticket Sales Ticket Sales 2193.5 2193.6 Travel 2194 Travel 2194 Travel 2194 DESTINA TIONS UNLIMITED SAM RYAN DAV|D R. GARLICK Owner - Travel Consonant Travel Consultant (713)529-2218 e Poik. Suite 3 N.Y. mayor appoints Woodrow Myers By JOHN SHANAHAN NEW YORK (AP)-Calling Dr. Woodrow A. Myers "one of the rising stars in the field of public health in this country" Mayor David Dinkins went against strong opposition and named him the city's health commissioner. Dinkins said Jan. 19he appointed Myers. Indiana state Health Commissioner, for his overall qualifications and not because of his AIDS policies vehemently opposed by gay rights activists and AIDS researcher Dr. Mathilde Dinkins announced the appointment of Myers, 35, as city health commissioner just one day after several supporters on a search committee—including Krim, who cofounded the American Foundation on AIDS Research—withdrew their hacking of Myers. Myers supports Indiana laws to keep government lists of those infected with the AIDS virus and to quarantine people who knowingly infect others. The Indiana official has said he would not impose such policies in New York and would support the policies of Dinkins, who does not favor quarantines or government "I'm not the insensitive. Iirutish fiend that some people have tried to make me out to be," Myers said. Myers underscored that, saying "quarantine is not an effective health strategy." He added: "1 don't remember ever saying quarantine was an effective strategy" while he was in In- Dinkins said he was appointing Myers because, "I am satisfied that his philosophy is mine." Despite the controversial AIDS policies in Indiana. Myers has a national reputation as an AIDS expert. He is credited with encouraging Indiana doctors to treat AIDS patients. Myers also made headlines by resigning from his post as vice chairperson of the President's Commission on HIV under Ronald Reagan to protest inadequacies with the agency. On Jan. 18, Krim and several other members of the search committee withdrew support from him. Krim cited "profound differences" between Myers' views and "desirable public health policies." Dinkins had previously said he wouldn't appoint anyone over Krim's wishes. But shortly before he announced Myers' appointment, Krim issued a statement stressing her "full support" for his decision. There have been 23.000 AIDS eases in New York and 12,000 have died. At least 200.000 New Yorkers, and perhaps nearly twice that many, have been infected with the By comparison, the number of AIDS cases in Indiana was 656. Protests continued Jan. 19, with about 75 members ofthe AIDS Co alition to Unleash Power picketing in front of City Hall, chanting, '"No testing. No quarantine. No Myers. No way." There were no ar- "We're here to fight for the lives of all New Yorkers, most especially those with HIV and those with AIDS, those who Dr. Myers wishes to lock up and those on whom Mr. Dinkins appears to be on the verge of turning his back," said a demonstrator. Mark Harrington. After the appointment was made, ACT UP issued a statement saying Dinkins had "betrayed" New Yorkers. Indiana law requires the reporting by name of any person who tests positive for the human immunodeficiency virus. The names of infected people are collected and stored in confidential files at the state Board of Health. The information is used to contact sex partners determined at risk and to target slate prevention efforts. Telephone & Regulators approve drug that could help fight AIDS, cancer GROTON, Conn. (AP)—Federal regulators have approved a new anti-fungal agent that medical experts say has applications for patients with AIDS, cancer and other disorders and will also help with heart transplants. Fluconazole, or Diflucan, was developed by Pfizer Inc. in Groton and will be manufactured there. Doctors say it is different from oth er anti-fungal drugs because it can be taken orally, is non-toxic and has few side effects. "The experience of people who have failed in ail other forms of therapy has been quite good" with Diflucan, said Dr. Frank Bia. an infectious disease specialist at Yale-New Haven Hospital who has been conducting clinical trials. '"Several of our patients have been turned around by this drug." Acquired immune deficiency syndrome suppresses the immune system, making those who have it vulnerable to infections, including fungal infections. Many cancer therapies also compromise the im- mune system, and after an organ transplant, the immune system is suppressed wilh drugs so the body does not reject the organ. Amphoteracin-B, one of the main anti-fungal drugs now in use. has gained a nickname among those who must use it as "amphoterrible" because of its toxic effects. It also makes many patients sick, doctors said. Dr. Patrick A. Robinson, senior associate director at Pfizer Central Research, said Amphoteracin has been in use nearly two decades, but a substitute has long been sought. "When I was doing my training in infectious diseases I was administering Amphoteracin-B, and I said. There's got to be something bettei;'" Robinson said. "Now, 15 years later. I'm involved with bringing it along. It's a pretty good feeling." Amphoteracin must be taken intravenously, but Diflucan can be taken either intravenously or orally. One of the characteristics of the rlruB is that it can puss the blood- brain barrier and act even on cen- system infections. Brian McC.l.v on. a spokesperson for Pfizer, said the company will not release cost data on the drug for at least a week, but Dr. Craig Saxton, senior vice president of Pfizer Central Research, said the drug will not be expensive. McGlynn said the company will announce later details of a program to help get the drug to people who cannot afford it. McGlynn said wholesalers should be stocked with the drug by Feb. 16. Under the terms of its approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the drug can be used to treat cryptoeoccal meningitis, which affects 10 percent to 15 percent of people with AIDS, and systemic candidiasis, which affects almost all people with AIDS. Saxton said Pfizer has had an anti-fungal research effort under way for more than 10 years. The drug was discovered in 1981 by a Pfizer scientist at the company's research facility in Sandwich, England. The drug was introduced overseas, hut three years ago the FDA asked Pfizer to look at it for use in this country against life-threatening fungal infections that affect immuno-suppressed patients. An estimated 4000 people took Diflucan for seven days or more during the most recent clinical trials, and another 24(10 received free doses under the "compassionate use" doctrine of the FDA, which allows use of an unapproved drug when other therapies have failed. Bia said his tests at Yale produced none ofthe side effects tile company warned him to watch for, and he believes in most cases Diflucan will replace Amphoteracin. '"Amphoteracin is not a pleasant drug to take, nor is it convenient, and it doesn't always work," Bia Pfizer, which last year Procardia XL. a drug used to hypertension and angina proved, had sales of $5.7 billi. 1989. bod 'University system should not kick ROTC off campuses1 By MICHAEL C. BUELOW MADISON, Wis. (AP)-The head of the University of Wisconsin System said Monday the Reserve Officers' Training Corps should not be kicked off campus to pressure the military to drop its ban against gay people, UW System President Kenneth Shaw told a news conference he'll recommend the policy-setting Board of Regents reaffirm its 1987 resolution that urges the university to lobby Congress to drop the ban through national legislation. The regents were scheduled lo consider a proposal backed by faculty and student groups to expel ROTC from the campus in 1993 if the military does not change its policy to deny gay people from enlisting. "I have to believe that change is more likely to occur this way, than if we were to opt out," Shaw said. "This is a tactical question," Shaw said the university should oppose the military's policy on homosexual but should not hurt its efforts by kicking ROTC off campus without working "within the He said threatening to drop the programs would reduce the UW's effectiveness in educating the public about why such a policy is wrong and weaken ils ability U, advocate fair treatment of gays and lesbians. Shaw said he would not rule out the option of kicking the ROTC off campus if lobbying efforts to change the ban failed. "I have an open mind about which is the best way to influence public policy. I think this is an is sue the board will be interested in hearing about quite often. Shaw The announcement came about six weeks after the faculty at UW- Madison voted in a rare advisory election to recommend that ROTC be expelled from campus if the military did not end ils ban on gays and lesbians. In making his decision, Shaw said considered a state law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and a new UW policy that sanctions students and faculty for discriminatory remarks or acts against wom- Karlier Monday, Shaw received a letter from UW-Madison Chancellor Donna Shalala, who has talked to UW faculty, students, state and national legislators and other universities about the issue Ms. Shalala said the discussion raised a question of '"whether or not to sever this campus' ROTC contracts would, in the end, hinder our effectiveness in working with Congress and the military on this Ms. Shalala began looking at the issue after the UW Faculty Senate, an advisory group, and the student government approved resolutions in December that urged the regents to sever ROTC program contracts with the federal government if the ban was not dropped by May 199!i. Joseph Elder, a UW sociology and Southeast Asian studies professor who has led faculty opposition to the ban, said he would have favored retaining a timetable to get rid of ROTC programs if lobbying against the ban is not effective "One always wants discrimination to end as quickly as possible. I would prefer to see this tactic and a deadline," Elder said. "We (the faculty! certainly won't let them (UW administration) forget about Elder also said he believed the military's discrimination has not been resolved quickly because many people do not consider homosexuals legitimate minorities whose rights deserve to be protected. Doctor: Normal life expectancy for patients in '90s NEW YORK (AP|-People with AIDS should reach normal life expectancy during the 1990s as treatments become avaihible to make AIDS a manageable disease, a leading government researcher "I have a good deal of confidence ... lhat we can look forward to the 1990s as the kind of a decade where that goal can be realized," said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the national program to test and evaluate new- anti-AIDS drugs. He spoke at the New York-Italy Medical Symposium in New York. Fauci is the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Md„ one ofthe National Institutes of Health. The institute operates a national AIDS drug-testing program in which some 10,000 people are subjects in experimental tests at 46 medical centers across the countrj. Learning to manage and control AIDS is not the same as curing it, Fauci said. The treatments of the 1990s probably will have to be continued for life in people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV. that causes AIDS, he said. Fauci spid he based his optimis tic prediction for the 1990s on the growing understanding of the workings of the AIDS virus, the success in AIDS treatment achieved so far, and a philosophical shift in the way government makes new drugs available. Until now, AIDS drugs have been developed largely by screening available substances for possible anti-viral activity, he said. The increasing understanding of how the virus infects cells, kills them and reproduces is leading to new drugs aimed directly at each of those steps in the virus' growth, Fauci said. "Already there are several drugs ready to go into (human) clinical trials that have been specifically tailored to HIV;' Fauci said. Fauci said researchers scored several soccesses against AIDS during the 1980s. First, they improved care of the sick. In 1985, less than 40 percent of people diagnosed with AIDS survived 18 months. By 1987, 60 percent lived at least that long after diagnosis. Fauci said. Second, researchers discovered that treatment could be helpful in people who are infected with HIV but have not yet become sick. For example, drugs to protect against Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, an often fatal AIDS complication, can now sharply reduce its frequency. AZT, the current mainstay of treatment in people sick with AIDS, has been shown to delay significantly the progression or onset of symptoms in people infected with HIV but not yet sick, Fauci 6aid. There are now "hundreds of thousands who can benefit from early intervention," he said. Third, the government has decided to relax its grip on experimental drugs when the drugs offer hope to people whose lives are threatened and who have few oth- referringto the so-called "parallel track" program, in which promising experimental drugs are made available to patients who need them before experiments have conclusively determined their effectiveness, "This is a philosophical change that needs to be integrated into our way of thinking," he said. It means that the government will not be able to guarantee theef- fectiveness—or the safety—of those drugs, Fauci said. The responsibility for accepting the increased risks associated with such drugs "is going to shift to the individuals taking the drugs." he said.
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