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Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990
File 007
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Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 007. 1990-02-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1542.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-02-02). Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 007. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1542

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 007, 1990-02-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1542.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 2, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript MONTROSE VOICE .- FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 2. 1990 'Life after AIDS' improving, researchers find in 2 studies ^n petttors n{ By BRENDA C. COLEMAN CHICAGO (AP)—AIDS patients with the type of pneumonia that most often strikes them are living longer than they once did, according to two studies that confirm "life after AIDS is improving," researchers say. The studies, published in the Jan. 19 Journal ofthe American Medical Association, found adults with the type of pneumonia known as PCP are surviving significantly longer than they did in thcearly 1980s. PCP, or Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, is the most common AIDS-related infection and had been regarded as one of the most quickly fatal diseases that can overwhelm the damaged systems of people with AIDS. "The data in these reports pear to confirm what cli investigators, and patients have known for several years: Life after AIDS is improving and death is no longer as swilt and ascertain as in the early years of the epidemic" said an editorial accompanying the studies. The dramatic improvement in the two-year survival rate after AIDS diagnoses hasn't been matched by a similar improvement in five-year survival, which remains low, said the editorial by Dr. Richard E. Chaisson of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. New antibiotics to prevent PCP in AIDS patients, and the highly- successful anti-AIDS drug zidovudine, have produced hope that "what was once a uniformly fatal illness has become a chron- Chaisson wrote. One of the studies examined adults diagnosed with AIDS in 1984 or 1985, among whom PCP was an early sign of the disease. Just 42.7 percent of those patients survived a year, the researchers By 1986 and 1987. the one-year survival rate had risen to 54.fi per- "The gain in survival was ob served in gay men and intravenous drug users of both sexes, in all age and racial groups, in all geographic regions, and in patients with or without" other diseases at the time, said the author. Dr. Jeffrey E. Harris of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "Better diagnosis and treatment, particularly the introduction of zidovudine (formerly called AZT). may have contributed to the decline in mortality." he wrote. Similar trends weredocumented in a second study in the journal, this one of 4323 San Francisco patients diagnosed with AIDS between July 1981 and Dec, 31,1987. In 1982, patients diagnosed initially only with PCP survived a median of 10.3 months. Five years later, that figure had risen to 17.9 months, researchers said. Survival worsened over the same period among AIDS patients diagnosed with a type of skin cancer called Kaposi's sarcoma, another hallmark of AIDS. Survival for them declined from a median of A:..:-, months to a median of 18 onths, the researchers said. Among patients diagnosed with other opportunistic infections or malignancies, survival remained the same, the researchers said. Median survival for all patients was 12.5 months, with a five-year survival of 3.4 percent, authors of the study said. One possible explanation forthe increasing death rate among Kaposi's sarcoma patients was that healthier AID patients, as Kaposi's patients tend to be, may increasingly begetting care at outpatient clinics, leaving the sicker patients in hospitals, from which study statistics were drawn, the researchers said. Or, "the declining proportion of patients with KS reflects a shift toward more aggressive forms ofthe disease (AIDS)," they said. For 644 patients treated with zidovudine in the San Francisco study, the drug was a "significant predictor of survival! said the researchers, led by George H. Lemp of the city's Department of Public Health. -JAMES N. BRICKEY ames N. Brickey died Sept 18 ■m ■Dearest Jimmy please understand thai our not getting this in the paper until three months after youi death doesn't mean we don't cate Even though you would understanc id-d ii always u ?)w were the stability lor us, the security. the proof that someone, one person, could make us teel magically safe. "You spent your whole lite giving— not just your lime or your support or your little gifts, but devotion. Sometimes you gave so much to your own detriment; bui in the last year or so ol your That securily. that we conditionally, may ney enced again by some oi us we can't (hank you enough (ot being part of our lives and allowing us to experience that once We pray that you felt ymcli rjbyu: "Texas Art Celebration' seeks role of art in culture isc Art bj LISETTA LAW p betwi culture is explored in the painting, photography and sculpture collected in "Texas Art Celebration '90," now oo display in the [600 Smith Lobby gallery The show is the 22nd annaal statewide exhibit organized by the Assistance League of Houston. The 54 works were chosen from over 1000 slides by juror Neil Print/, adjunct curator of 2Ulh century art at the Menil Collection in Houston and lee turer in art history at Caldwell Col lege in New .Jersey. According to Printz. the show is not intended to be a cross-sec tion of local art styles. Instead, Printz has selected works which express "a concern for the role I \ of art as an instrument of cultural I analysis and criticism." Printz' narrow focus resulted in a show that is provocative as a whole and which includes many significant individual works by both known and un- nnwn Texas artists. The Assistance League, a volun- ■r organization with a variety of iritable projects, offers monetary I-.i-s im- first, second and third es and five honorable mentions. winners this vear arc Marilyn ■»ar first place, forthe sculpture 1 "Marilyn With No Middle MShe'l! Have One When She S(.d which consists of two lead (i„„es of a girl's dress and a n '.U with the former under- ,|,.nstand,md the latter ,„l".P me stand. Second pit ls <">„.? work Third place winner is Mary Ann Papa neck-Miller for her piece titled "Room Temperature'' Lanlear is from San Antonio, while Bettiaon and I'apancck Miller are from Houston. The five honorable mention winners, also from Houslon. are Alistair Milne. William Farr. Romana Fabregas, John Peters and Kathleen Packlick. In fact, more than half of the artists featured are currently working in Houston. The exhibit is a good mix of paint togs, sculpture, photography and mixed media pieces and the gallery at Cullen Center offers an almost ideal setting, though a lew pieces do not gel the space or lighting (bey deserve. One of these pieces is Jim Poag's painting. "Transmitter He ceiver and lied Fog'' which com bines natural images (the sea, fog) with geometric shapes lo form a strange bui compelling work. Two other hidden gems are Diane Arnold's oil on copper painting. Patriarch's Demise" aud Jeff Roddy's mixed media piece. "Trials of Ernest Shakleton" Somewhat reminiscent of Mexican I lay of the 1 lead paintings. Arnold's piece depicts a female figure i-iinimiuiiiwid l.y ihe earth in th .,.'■' leli corner with skulls occupy i lie i lu- other ci mo par! ments (as if on a shelf). The copper shines through the brush strokes to give the painting depth. Roddy's sculpture consists of lour upside down mason jars in which simple narratives are enacted: a figure with a dea' horse, pushing a snow sled, L,l sei in a boat. Qher notable works and good ex- lUiplt'S ofthe show 's an and culture (feme include a large painting hy you We miss you. but God were glad we had you We love you—Kay. Tom, Sara. Wall. Val, Angle. Tom. Pam. Louise and all those you loved" —FRED ANTHONY LUNA July 26.1961 —Dec 20. 1969 panion at his side on Dec. 20.1989. af- n San Anionic Fred blessed a lives of all he grew to corned all his friends inlo his loving heart Visitation was held in the private chapel of Southwest Funeral Di- llibll is Derek Bushier. "Theater of Lies Dedicated to Reagan." The painting combines ihe images af a figure at a podium, the American Hag, a television, a hammer and sickle and a flag onto which is painted sailboats at sea. Also included is an effective work by the cooperative MANUAL tilled "I'topia." which juxtaposes two images of a triangular shaped dwelling. In the right hand image. Iwo children emerge Ironi ihe dwell ing and the sky has heconic clouded. A painting by Becky Hendrick. who currently has a one-woman show at the Firehouse Gallery, is called "Living Room Painting nli." It uses flowery fabric which fades into a black and while image of crowd--. This painting is an interesting progression from the works seen at theFire- With "Texas Art Celebration '90," the Assistance League has taken a big step toward making ibis annual show one ofthe major shows lo feature Texas artists. For both those familiar with art in Houston and those interested in art in general, this show is definitely worth a visit. Exhibit hours are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday through Friday !i:IHl p.m. Saturday and noon to ."i:tiu p.m. Sunday Parking is available in the adjacent 16011 Smith garage. Tin- exhibit enntinues through May 17. City a worker, previously employed by Ihe Missouri Division ot Family Services and laler by Texas Department ot Human Services. Mike worked for Children's Protective Services of Harris County. Uik . spin- friends to join the Houslon Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus, get politically involved and vole, tloss your teeih, and to raise a glass at Our Lady of the Venture-N orSt Mary s (Super- Baritone -Leo Nucci stars in HGO's 'Rigoletto' Leo Nucci has returned loHous- Ion in ,ht. title role of Huston Grand Opera's "Rigoiettl,' now Playing ai the Wonham' Brown ■ heater. Considered by boat to be the supreme Verdi barit.ne of our time, he is the current successor te a post-war dynasty cf Italians which includes Gobbi.Bastiacin and Cappucilli. Mr. Nucci has the ability to thrill with a vibrant mil sizable voice, engaged in the service of a long-lined legato, as well as lo inhahit a character portrayal with total dramatic conviction. So complete is his vocal palette that he can afford even to throw lines away for the sakeof dramatic verisimilitude, or to compromise the sound for theatrical effect when appropriate. Although moderate of stature, he produces a full voice that is bright and manly, clear and perfectly understood, with ringing high notes that constitute a veritable fusillade of projectiles thrown at the house on a nearly palpable column of air. His high A-flat at the end of Act Two was stultifying in its size and effect. Nearly all of his arias and duets are performed from a sitting or kneeling position as he creates the ever entreating, and increasingly- desperate and vengeful, world of the devoted father and deformed court jester. He remains throughout totally focused on the character, and his veteran stage experi ence affords sufficiently detailed movement and theatrical savvy to flesh out a memorably human and moving portrayal. There is great technique and great artistry at work here. Opera buffs favoring larger-than-life performances (of which there are vanishingly few) should hasten to the Wortham if only for this one performer. line. Attempts for larger volume force the voice to turn hard and w ity. (In the plus side, the colora- i passages br.llia CALDWELL Leo Nucci lleftj and Maureen O'Flym ing through Feb. 9 at Ihe Wortham High anticipation greeted the debut of the fabulously named 27 year old Marcel lo Giordani as the licentious Duke of Mantua. Having embarked on a singing (not to mention operatic) career only recently, he has aroused enthusiasm in some quarters as a possible successor to the mantle of leading romantic tenor. Since Kraus and Gedda are in their sixties. Pavarotti is Bfty-five, Carreras is battling leukemia and Domingo (not yet fifty) seems increasingly interested in a career on the podium, the field would appear soon to be alarmingly vacant. Based on last Sunday': performance, Mr Giordani's natural i potential, in need of assiduous coaching and discipline. The sound is mostly handsome md Opera's production of Giuseppe Verdi's "Rigoletto," play- and sonorous, coupled with a studious, often successful, reproduction of the stereotypic■-.! Italian tenor's battery of skills which an- nounce a willingness to abjure sheer vocal bravado for a musically correct line. Capable of a messa di voce as well as scaling down to pianissimo levels, Mr. Giordano appears to have all the right intentions. He also dares a brilliant high D-flat to conclude the "Addio ... speranza ed anima" duet with Gilda in Act Two—a naked and bravura undertaking essayed in recent times only on recordings. That said, one fears for the future development of this young performer. Difficulties abound in the passaggio. Vowels emerge haphazardly whether ascending or descending through the break, and every note resonates different ly, with occasional lapses of pitch. There is no sound at all below F and an occasional graininess ob- Learning on the fly seems a risky endeavor, but his calendar of engagements already is full, with no time for extended study. He'll be back in the Spring for a series of Pmkertons in Madam Butterfly (likely a more congenial role). Appearing as the hapless Gilda is Maureen O'Klynn, also in a debut. The admittedly minority report here is that hers is a small lyric soprano produced with accentuated care and instrumental precision, but with no real thrust or personality. The technique is so conspicuous that every note emerges as a single detached entity, absent the requisite legato to propel the surges of Verdi's compelling vocal that pinged like BBs off a wall. Caro nome, in particular, was limpid and absolutely crystalline in its purity. Moreover, one could have taken dictation from her performance and secured an exact reproduction of the score. The assassin Sparafucile was portrayed and sung wilh menacing virility by Jeffrey Wells. whose physical stalure and reverberant basso seem perfect for the role. A very busy lb II Adria Firestone, was exactly right as ihe duplicitous and sultry Maddalena, negotiating the cramped ladder and dock setting of Act Three with cat-like aplomb. Conductor Vjekoslav Sutej (de but) leads a meticulously detailed performance, crafted towards control and precision. His intention seems to extend to the larger architectural design as well, in that he builds slowly from climax to climax, with the orchestral accompaniment taking a decidedly ancillary role until Kigoletto'sraging Coriigiani aria of Act Two. Admirable as this may he (from a post-doctoral point of view), the overall effect was to diminish the earlier scenes of the requisite underpinning relevant for the heart- on-t he-sleeve emotionalism emblematic of this earliest score from Verdi's middle period. It should be mentioned that some of the positive comments above are partially vitiated, albeit easily disregarded, by the conservative and old-fashioned look and feel of the dimly lighted overall production. Though unimportant in a singer's vehicle such as Rigoletto, this land fat ladies) is what gives opera a bad name in the opinion of the uninitiated. —RICHARD DALE" ADAMS Sept 14. 1949-Jan. 31. 1990 Dale Adams passed Irom Ihis lile to Ihe nexl afler a long and courageous 11 DS He 3 by h parents and younger brothers of Norman. his art work, the many friends My love eternally--J R. -JOHN D. GAUNTT April 15. 1930—Jan. 9, 1990 John Gauntt was born in Hubbard, Texas, and moved to age of lour He grew ights and attended Reagan High School During the c! 70s prietor of Oak Forest Floral shop, and later worked for Texas Commerce Bank For much of his adult life. John was affiliated wilh Holland Lodge No. 1 AF & AM. Donations in John's memory may be made to Omega House. 2615 Waugh #286. Houston, TX 77006.
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