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Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990
File 006
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Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 006. 1990-02-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1541.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-02-02). Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 006. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1541

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 006, 1990-02-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1541.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 2, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript .(W:@g \-lQon flUo * l--^ m i mm. , MT~ '•« FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2. 1990/ MONTROSEVOICE Board fires teacher over AIDS talk Another salesman totally overwhelmed by this year's sales theme. AIDS activists protest Ind. Senate bills INDIANAPOLIS (AP)—About 30 permit physicians to conduct Indiana chapter of the AIDS Coa- makers to defeat Senate Bills 260 AIDS activists chanted and sang AIDS tests without the consent of lition to Unleash Power, or ACT- and 302. outside the Indiana Statehouse to 'he patient, UP. gathered on the east steps of "We're going to put forward a opposetwoSenatebillsthatwould Members of the newly formed theStatehouseJan.24tourgelaw- positive viewpoint," said organiz- iric Evans of Indianapolis, re not going to sit back and h bills ge. passed that Uke ■ights away" Gays say bigotry, violence has reached new heights SEATTLE (AP)-Gays and lesbians leaving the closet in hopes of finding a place in an enlightened society have instead run into a wall of hatred, speakers said at a conference on hate-group crime. Bigotry and violence against homosexuals have reached epidemic levels, said Daniel Levitas, executive director of the Atlanta-based Center for Democratic Renewal. The center, which monitors such crimes across the nation, sponsored the program Jan. 27. "Intolerance is so great that it's a fundamental challenge to the fabric of a democratic society." Levitas told the approximately 250 people attending the conference. "'We are moving backwards. Whether we continue to move backwards or will begin to move forward is dependent upon what actions are taken or not taken by- people of good will." Conference speakers said many attacks against gays are committed by members of various "hate" groups across the country or their sympathizers. Levitas said there are 20,000 members of groups such as the Ku Klux Klan, skinheads, and neo- Nafcis and for each actual member of these groups there are 10 sym- Kevin Berrill, director of the Anti-Violence Project ofthe National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, said gays and lesbians are under siege not only from the AIDS disease but from fundamentalist churches and far-right forces. "Despite tremendous social and political obstacles, we have managed to make significant progress!' said Berrill. the keynote speaker at the conference. "Visibility is what allows us to organize, educate and challenge Berrill believes violence against homosexuals will intensify in the His Washington, D.C,-based organization reported there were 7.24H incidents of violence against gays and lesbians in 1988, up from 7,008 in 1987, 4946 in 1986 and 21)42 in 1985. The numbers have risen each year not only because more attacks occur, but because an increasing percentage are reported, Berrill said. A 64-year-old retired Lutheran minister who asked that he not be identified said even gays who are not the targets of violence must endure great difficulties in this "You can't live a normal life, because homosexuality is not normal to the public's image, but it is to me," he said. "That is my life. That is who I am and have always "I'm looking for ways where 1 can begin to address some of the gay-lesbian issues that the church needs to face," he said. SAPULPA, Okla. (AP)-The ; Creek County school board has 4 dismissed a history teacher who .. ' conducted a classroom discussion ; about AIDS. Mike Elledge, an Allen Bowden 5 School teacher, pleaded wilh * board members during a meeting j Jan. 23 to let him remain on the ; "Please don't Eire a very good '; and caring teacher for a five-mi- .'; mite talk on a forbidden subject/ Elledge said. "Maybe my talk with .Tt the kids about AIDS was bad judg- ; Elledge'b voice cracked and he.-'; wept at one point during his," speech to the school board He left '" the meeting surrounded by his stu ^ dents and said he would appeal the decision. (.Inly hours alter the board's de- '- cision, results of county elections : were announced. Ten of the 12 ■■% board members oil her did nut seek-; rceleciiiiii or wore replaced. Elledge Baid he talked about ac--: quired immune deficiency syn- " drome with four of his classes on - He said he told a hypothet: story, using himscll as an example- at one point, in which ■_. higb school girl has sex with a hoy wb had previous sex partners to ill trate "the pyramid effect of c sexual encounter?' Assistant Principal Ra/ Walker said parental per is required to discuss AI D§ classroom. According to the state/ teaching AIDS, "schrx shall make the curric/ materials that will be u/1 le AIDS prevention an/ucatlon available for inspeJ1 by lh*' parents and Juardi/o£ *e stU dents that mill i Katie Ve*. a pai*ot who works [ in a nursealTulsaRetfionalMedi-, dlCentel sivs she complained l». Piacips >ita Rusher after herld- yea,oldson told her about the dis- "I Wee lhal kids need to be. taughbabout AIDS, but only by. somenn. who is certified to do so. ■ Mrs. Veil said. "I'm a profession al, and r wouldn't touch the subnet in a c.assrnom setting." Crowd pushes for rights measure By HAL SPENCER OLYMPIA, Wash. (API-Proponents of a bill to extend civil rights to homosexuals told an overflow, crowd at a legislative hearing about discrimination that has cost them jobs, housing, insurance, coverage and self-respect. Eight people appeared to testify against the measure Jan. 24, some contending homosexuality is a chosen perversion rather than a biological condition and saying the bill would lead to special treatment for pedophiles, alcoholics and others. Rep. Mike Todd, D-Aaburn, chairperson of the House State Government Committee, ran a tight ship, ensuring that testimony on the volatile issue did not stray too far afield. The crowd, which overwhelmingly favored the bill, was restrained. The bill. HB2072, sponsored by Rep. Cal Anderson, D-Seattle, is the 13th such measure to be introduced in as many years. "I think if people see the kind of turnout we have here tonight, we might have a chance of getting this through," Anderson said. Tacoma voters narrowly repealed a gay rights law last fall while Seattle has such a law in force. The legislation would place homo sexuals under the same state law that bars discrimination based on race, religion, national origin, sex, marital status, age or disability. It would ban discrimination on issues ranging from housing to employ- Backers told stories of discrimination that ranged from losing their jobs to assault. Seattle minister David Austin said he has been assaulted twice because of his sexual preference and was struck on the back of a head with a pistol in the last attack. "It was a long time after each incident before I could walk down the street without extreme fear or paranoia," he said. ing job at the Sequim Gazette in October after she told co-workers she is a lesbian. She said she was fired despite good performance reviews before she divulged her sexual preference. No spokesperson for the Sequim Gazette was immediately available for comment. A panel of young men told the committee that homosexuality is especially difficult for teens, who feel they must hide their sexual preferences from their parents, friends and school teachers. Many are harassed and heaten hy classmates, they said. "We had to live a secret life, lying to family and friends." said Eric Hess of Bellevue. Patricia Henderson of Seattle said she is discriminated against because she doesn't like homosexuals. "I should be given the right by the Constitution to discriminate. There is rational discrimination and irrational discrimination.'' she said, declaring lhat discrimination against homosexuals is rational. She and others said homosexuals don't need protections against dis crimination Doug Burman of Lakewood said if the bill should become law, there will be an effort to repeal it through an initiative. "The amount of anti-gay violence is astonishing," said Mark G. Michael, a Seattle psychiatrist who treats many gay men and women. "I wish you could see their pain. To be fired for who you are is a very painful and scarring experience." Seattle minister Bob Fitzgerald said he has three children, one of whom is homosexual, and he considers discrimination a family issue. "They all seem to be protected except my youngest son. and I wantiupro- tectionj now," he said. "I urge you to consider this a family issue-justice for members of a Opponent Judy Perry of Olympia said. "There is a way that seems right unto man. bot that way brings death." Gay people "don't need to be given any different rights than black people," she said, drawing a roar of laughter from the crowd. Enjoy an evening of dazzling entertainment for the healing of AIDS. **■ Saturday, February 3 Jones Hall 8 p.m. >*■ Vor ticket information callTJCKETRON 526-1709 1HLART STRINGS is a project of DIPTA IX'sifin Industries Foundition for AIDS luc.-d in 1 Illusion by Ik-ring Community Service l:o
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