Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990
File 005
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 005. 1990-02-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1540.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-02-02). Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 005. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1540

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 005, 1990-02-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1540.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 2, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript MONTROSE VOICE / FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2.1990 Committee formed to investigate Randall's charges Representatives of several minority groups, legal and health professionals and an observer from the state Equal Opportunity Employment Commission attended a meeting called by gay rights activist Lee Harrington Jan. 24 to investigate allegations of discrimination by Randall's Food Markets against gays and people with AIDS. The meeting resulted in the appoint ment of a five-member "fact rinding and negotiating committee" to look into the charges and current Randall's policies, and to negotiate with the grocer if a problem is cun- Steven Little, a former Randall's employee who allegedly was forced to resign because of an AIDS rumor in 1985 and on whose case AIDS and gay rights activists are basing [heir request lor a policy change. spoke at the meeting, fie told the group lhat he was fired, even though he took an HIV antibody test to prove that he did nol have Al US ami presented the negative result to bis superiors. Little said he could not comment on specific details of the H3 Iscllll'll itbe- Imrrcd both sides Irom publicly di; cussing the case. Randall's opened its Montros "Flagship" supermarket at Sher. herd Square shopping < .1 Wes on Jar Eugene Harrington I no relation to Lee), who teaches a course in AIDS discrimination at Texas Southero University's Thurgood Marshall School of Law. explained to the group that while AIDS is not included in EEOC guidelines for employers, it is covered under national and state laws protecting handicapped persoos from discrimination. I .ee Harrington said other grocery chains also have written policies re garding AIDS and olher life-threatening or contagious diseases, He distributed a copy of the Kroger Company's policy as an example. The protesters want Randall's to adopt a written polity that prohibits both AIDS and gay. lesbian dis- Attending the meeting were representatives from the Houston Won. en's Political Caucus. Over the Hill, the National Association of Social Workers and several gay and lesbian organizations. Barbara Brown, who works with the EEOC in en furcement, was also present. Serving on the tact finding committee are Dennis Spencer, president ofthe Hoaston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus, Eugene Harrington, Annise Parker and Brad Veloz. Together, they will select a fifth member. The meeting was held at the Houston Area Women's Center, The group decided to take no ofii- ( ml position im the ongoing picket of Randall's being led by ACT UP/ Huustoo until ihe committee has had a chance to complete its investigation and meet with representatives of the store. Members of ACT UP said they would continue the sponsoring the picket regardless of any action or non action by the coalition, and added thai any "t oncerned citizens" should join the Saturday afternoon picket lines. They said the action would continue until the company changes its policy. Dui Ihe Mclinmel, manager of the Stone Soup Food Paotry, stated that although the pantry recently received a letter from Randalls indicating Stone Soup would participate in the Shepherd Square store's Red Barrel o.D il day old bread programs, no food bad yet been donated to ihe pantry, Mel laniel said 1 lie barrels were nol pick up food recently, and that she has not been contacted to pick up food from the bread program. She said she did not know if the store had been in contact with the central offices of AIDS Foundation Houston Rebecca Linkous, director of public relations, said on Jan. 2h that the barrels have been in the store since Jan. 13 but have been in the back ol the store. She said she thought that both Stone Soup and North Main Coalition of Churches, the other recipient of the programs, had been picking up loud She also said lhat she would contact McDaniel that day tocheck on the problem and that the barrels would be moved to the front of the store. Meanwhile. Larry Garrett, one of the organizers of "That's What Friends Arc For," a community-wide benefit held Monday at the Tower Theater, confirmed lhat Randall's had donated $100 worth of food trays for ihe event. "For what it's worth. 1 found (Randall's) very cooperative" said Garrett. Group calls for resignations Group plans 'world AIDS rally to coincide with summit By SHK.HI COHEN DAKBONNF. The irufii Miami-based AIDS nounced plans for ai demonstration in Hi ing with the ii- Summit here in July, to call attention lo AIDS and demand "sensible" action and solutions in the areas ol research and patient care. Boh Kunst. who heads "Cure AIDS Now" in Miami, said the summit, scheduled to take place on the grounds of Rice University Jaly 9- II, is one ol lour world events his group has targeted in its 1990 agenda, which concentrates on establish. , ing a network of what he calls the "screamers and doers"—grass roots activists committed to promoting research and care in the AIDS crisis. The DtheT three events are the Vish-Gorbachev summit meeting in I Vshington, DC. in June; the Sixth ernalional Conference un AIDS, .-■ic-i\ in San Franciaco. and an ' fe conference the group hopes lo pgether through its newly es- ",ed network in October in Mi- 1 V said President George Bu»li I tlsix other world leaders at I aihe conlerence will be invit- I flit with the activists to dis jETL to save the lives ol peo- '■ is from a global perspec- •■j'on.eV- n.«gr-ui believes re- a t IDS must ae re-Incused. A][\^,T'■"'■A conflicts among , ■ KroL _.(( i,.,,.,, iii-Djin-ss "-'»;„ and providing ade- Also invited is Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, who is not among the se\ en participants in the summit. Kunst admitted lhat it is unlikely the heads of state will heed the invitation, lun said the liming of the rally will allow AIDS activists to take advantage of the presence of the thousands of media personnel expected in Houslon that week, to gel their message out. Kunst said he was in Houston to begin laying groundwork for the rally plans, as well as to present bis ide a to about 7.ri Metropolitan Community Church officials who were meet ing here, lie will return to Houston in March for a preliminary planning meeting for the rally, which he hopes will be m Hermann Park the s ■ oft! t. he While here. Kunst said he met wilh several local activists to enlist support Ibr the demons! ration. With the rally, Kuost said he wants in display a billboard bearing ■'cure AIDS" slogans aimed at vari ous segments of the population to show thai ihe disease affects every proceeds of which will go to local AIDS groups in return tor the Houston community's support. The other hall "ill support the networking effort and C.A.N.'s nutritional programs. Kunst said. Kuns- and "Cure AIDS Now" have iiet with controversy in Finn da [yeause ol Ihe group's non-tradi- Ijoiol approaches to several AIDS rclaled issues. Kunst has been criticized by AIDS organizations for rejecting the epidemiological stance of focusing on education in prevent the spread of HIV (he calls the cdu cation efforts ignorant and ineffective). He has also come under fire from some gay and lesbian groups because of bis promotion ofthe separation of gay righls issues from the AIDS activist agenda. Despite these problems. Kunst said he believes he can pull the Houston rally off. "We are talking about lives. ...the focus needs to be on saving lives." said Kunst. "Reducing fighting AIDS to a debate about Ithe incriis oli condoms versus abstinence is ridiculous...since AIDS is everybody's problem, which everybody will have to deal wilh, apparently Urn- debaters') own philosophy indicates that their children will not be able to have children." "This administration's approach in t education) is to tell people to say 'no' to sex, just as they say to say 'no' to drags. (The government! is willing lo regulate persooal behavior instead of trying tu deal wilh the problem.'' Kunsi continued. The groue,. Which KunsL utliullti has had more- difficulty getting funding than other Miami bused AIDS service providers, operates a "meals un wheels" program for HIV posit ive people i II t he city. According to Kunst. the program has served over 1000 clients since it was established in 1987. The group also does testing for HIV and specialized nutrition testing, and it recently re- mit in Houston ceived funding through the Human Resources Services Administration lor a staffed case management sys tern. (Kunst described C.A.N, as the "radicals who became establish- gAIDSralb darinkei Kunst. a long-time Miami activist. was heavily involved to pass a hu- oian rights ordinance ml lade County, Fla. in 1977. Anita Bryant's vocal opposition to that ordinance is said AIDS is a manageable disease and to have resulted in the first organized national response to an issue by gays, who boycotted the Florida orange juice products commercially eodiirseii hy Bryant. follows an integrated t Itisophy. concent rating primarily on a combioatiun of nutritional therapy and early HiV testing and inter Poetry workshop to host aimiversary reading The first Fridays: Poetry aeadig the unique dietary problems asso- sense is celebrating its lOhgn- elated with HIV infection. The top- UrWious year as an open TOU/or ics will' differ on a monthly basis BPets m Houston. Tb honor th* °e- and "n11 te conducted by MT •lesion, a special reading feirfruig DlFerrante. MPH, chief of nutri- 9»o of Houston's most i^eco/ilzed tion services for the Houston ilteraiyOgXtfgB will behdldi8:30 HealtnDepextment.andPatJonBs, pJn.Frlday.Fsb 2.attheFlsTiouae, with tile health department's W1C 1413 We^tnsirner program The reading, called "OldFriends, Participants can ask DlFerrante New Work" will bring together and Jones questions about their ™i-known local writers Vassar own eating habits. Some areas that ^Joanle Whltebird, who will be covered include: making Miller a will read from tJielr ,.-.. uuoas. Muler will read from her "Collected Poej™, to be released in the summer fipom SMU Press. Whltebird Will be reading prose from her new collection "Heat and Other Stories;' due out In May from Arbiter Press. TJie books are Miller's tenth Montrose Neighborhood Events Ensure taste better, removing sodium from canned foods, keeping meal planning simple, and making nutritious meals on a low ln- te workshops — be held at the and Whltebird s ninth A reception PWA coalition offices and kitchen will follow the reading. facilities at 14TB West Gray from ; First Fridays is the longest run- 7:00-8:30 p.m. on the following ring literary reading series In Wednesday evenings: Feb. 3. March Houston. An offshoot of the South- ''.April 11. May ie and June 13. eitn Seed Poets Guild begun in 1972 There will be no charge for attend- hy Whltebird and playwright Chris- ance HJld ^ workshops are open topher Woods, it is sponsored by "^ regardless of health status Robert Clark and the Poets Work- A booklet of nutritional guide- shop/Houston It has showcased llnes for Persons with HIV will be trie work of many local writers. 6lven to attendees .Miller's work is international ly —BPAH party a^laimed and she has twice been The Executive and Professional As- nDminated for the Pulitzer Prize, sociation of Houston (EPAH) will Whltebird has been widely pub- host the annual "Leather and Lace lifhed throughout the country; she Party" at 9:00 p.m. Saturday, Feb was curator of poetry and perform- 17, at 2700 Albany. The event will ing arts at Houston's Contempo- benefit The Assistance Fund and rary Arts Museum and co-founder the Montrose Counseling Center of Wings press. Miller and During the evening, a raffle will Whltebird, along with other mem- be held for prizes Including airline bers of the Poets Workshop/Hous- tickets, gift certificates from local ton. have been close friends for businesses and dinners at Houston many years. restaurants. —Mutritlon WOrklhODS Advance tickets for the party are ™, ., ._ „ , * „ available at Appearances, 1340 ™^TT.<C"UnB6l^e,Ce™r westheimer: Drarnatika, 3224 HTV/AIDS Project, with the PWa Yoakum; Acadian Bakers 604 W. Coalition, is proud to announce an Alabama; and House of Coleman upcoming monthly workshop se- 901 W. Alabama wes, "HIV and Nutrition" This pro- The Montrose Counseling Center gram will be designed to address is a non-profit organization that is well as provides mental health, counsel- baelc nutritional needs, e Ing and support group The center provides research and education to the gay and lesbian community and to other mental health professionals. The Assistance Fund Is a nonprofit organization that pays Insurance premiums, and sometimes prescription costs, for people with AIDS who are having financial difficulties. —Hon abused as children The Family Service Center, which offers the largest childabuse treatment and prevention program In the Houston area, also holds weekly meetings for men abused as children. According to Bill Comstock. the group's volunteer facilitator, gay men make up about 26 percent of the group. The Men Abused as Children (MAC) Group is a self-help group of adult men, abused or neglected as children, who meet to share mutual concerns, support and friendship. Abuse" is defined by the group as any harmful behavior Imposed on a child or young person by an older person. Men who recognize that, as an adult, they are affected by past sexual, physical or emotional abuse are invited to join the group for the strength ari hope the members share, Comstock said. The group provides an environment of safety, where members can move from the retelling of abuse histories to raising specific life issues, he said. 'As members bring more details of their current life struggles into the group and enlist support in dealing with them, (they) can make some sense of their experience and use their Insight to bring real changes In their lives!' he said Comstock said he believes many adult males In the gay community could benefit from the group, if they were aware of its existence. Young gay males, he said, are often coerced into believing that abuse, particularly sexual abuse, as a child by adults is a natural part of their homosexuality. In truth, there Is a "definite distinction" between gay sex and abuse, and the latter actually hinders one's development as a healthy homosexual, he said Meetings are held each Wednesday evening 7:00—8:30 p.m at 4626 Lillian. For more information on the group, call Bill Comstock, 863-9853 or the Family Service Center. 661-4849. —BAJLE pageant Ben Santlllan and Tony Mendez have been named as co-chairs of the 1990 "Mr. andMs. BAILE" committee, announced Brad Veloz, president of Gay and Lesbian Hispanics Unidos. Veloz added that the pair "bring a wealth of expertise and charismatic energy" to the event. The pageant is GLHUs second largest fund raiser. "This will be the fourth year that we select our ambassadors for the organization',' said Mendez and Santlllan. "The individuals (who are named Mr. and Ms. BAILE) will also serve as positive Hispanic role models in the gay and lesbian community" The event, returning to Rich's this year, is scheduled to be held May 18. Anyone interested in participating, either as i volunteer. Is encouraged to attend the next GLHU general assembly meeting on Monday, Feb. l2.atDig- nlty Center, located at 3217 Fannin at Elgin. The meeting will start promptly at 7:30 p.m. For more Information on Mr and Ms. BAILE, call the GLHU information line, 880-GLHU. —Women's spirituality Merlin Stone, author of "When God Was a Woman" and 'Ancient Mirrors of Womanhood;' will be the keynote speaker for Celebration of Sisterhood, the 1990 Southwest Unitarian Universalist Women's Conference, Feb. 9-11 in Houston. Btone, a feminist historian, will present a talk on "The Women's Spirituality Movement Today.' at 11:15 a.m. Sunday. Feb. 11. at First Unitarian Church. 8210 Fannin. In the church sanctuary The conference, which explores the theme "The Ritual Path to Empowerment for Making Changes in Our Lives. In the World:' will also feature workshops and entertainment. Including concerts by Heart Song, the Houston Women's Community Chorus, and folk singer Cindy Freedman. For more information, contact Anita Davidson, conference chair, at 526-1571. ficials suspended funding to several AIDS service groups and sought an opinion on the law from Texas Attorney General Jim Mattox, Mattox said the Health Department could not withhold the But ACT UP members said the original move by health officials shows a bias against gay people. "We believe that some kind of adjustment in the public interest must be made because it's insanity to have people in office who are not doing everything that they can to stem the tide of AIDS." Dennis Paddy, an ACT UP spokesperson said. ACT UP demanded the resignations of Health Commissioner Robert Bernslein and Deputy Commissioner Robert MacLean. Neither could be reached for comment by The Associated Press. Sunbelt conference is next week on as attempts are made lo ileal th AIDS in minority communi- ^s. Refusal of "al risk" minority wiihm the gay homophobia within the black community make ooireach difficult, the organizers said. .Speakers on this subject will be Norman Nickcns, coordinator of the AIDS discrimination unit (if the San Francisco Human Rights Commission and a board member ol the Minority AIDS Council; Mary Bowers ofthe NAACP AIDS education program, and Dr. Joseph Gathe, M.D.. a clinical instructor who specializes in immunological disorders in the department of internal medicine at Baylor College oi'Medicine, (lathe is also a principal investigator in a study ofthe [oacarnet treatment of CMV retinitis in AIDS patients. Drug use statistics among AIDS patients are also different in the Sunbelt. Unlike Northeastern urban areas, where the relatively large number of minorities who esponsi- drugs is a factor in the vast number of minority AIDS cases in Texas. The development and implementation of effective prevention and education programs for drug users in the Sunbelt therefore rest upon different factors Speaking on this topic will be Harlon Dal- ton. Professor of Law. Yale University and a member of the National AIDS Advisory Commission; Dr. Beny Primm, M.D., associate administrator lor treatment and development of the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration, Washington. D.C. executive director of the Addiction Research and Treatment Corporation. Brooklyn. N.Y. and member of tbe Presidential Commission on the Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic; and Edward ¥_. Mayo, Ph.D., associated with Affiliated Systems and Post Oak Psychiatric Associates, who has served on the Office of Minority Health's National Task Force on Strategies for AIDS in the Black Community. Mayo also served on the State of Texas Strategies Conference on AIDS in the Black Com- Epidemiologists predict that the number ol children with AIDS in the USA will greatly ii the next decade. This im... particularly affect the blac munity in the Sunbelt. Because the vast majority of these children will be born into economically disadvantaged households that lack basic health insurance, they will have to be cared for by their extended families. And, because of the socioeconomic culture of the Sunbelt, it is also likely that these children will face discrimination while in school, both from their peers and school officials. Speakers on this topic are Betty Toney, M.S.W., LBJ Hospital Houston and former vice president of the Association of Black Social Workers; Mark Partin, senior staff attorney, Advocacy Inc.. Austin. Tx.. and Dr. Janet Mitchell, M.D., chief of perinatology, Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Harlem Hospital, N.Y., an assistant professor of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University and specialist in pregnant addicted women, adolescent pregnancy and AIDS in women and children.
File Name uhlib_22329406_n485_004.jpg