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Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990
File 003
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Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 003. 1990-02-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1538.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-02-02). Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 003. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1538

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 003, 1990-02-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1538.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 2, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript 2 MONTROSE VOICE , FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2. 1990 Montrose Activity Center sets goals for 1990 BySHERl COHEN DARBONNK Montrose Voice Editor Montrose Activity Center (MAC), the umbrella organization whose member groups include the lesbian Gay Pride Week planning committee, the Hoaston Names Project. Gay and Lesbian Hispanics Unidos and mosl recently. Team Houston and the local chapter of the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, set three primary goals at theonset of 1989. Of these, said newly re-elected board president Jim Owens, two were accomplished and one Reflecting on the MAC board's recent Galveston retreat and the goals that were set for 1990 in discussions then, Owens said thai last year's progress gives an optimistic start to this year's objectives. They are logical and somewhat cautious objectives, however; experience has taught the board to take one step at a time. In regards to establishing a gay and leshian community center—the corporation's slated ultimate goal for the past len years—the step planned for 1990 is crucial. Ifmel. this step will put a physical anchor on MAC's "center" concept for the first time in several years. ] No, it isn't likely that the center itself will be huilt this year. In fact, Owens said, the process of locat- 111 ti a permanent space for the center will probably not begin until 1991. But a central phone number, post office boxes for participating organizations and modest office apace and meeting rooms will probably bemade available, board members are shooting for Lesbian and Gay Pride Week to have these things in place. The hoard retreat is an annual MAI' tradition, when board members analyze "where they've been" and compare the organization's standing to the goals set the previous year, Owens explained. Objectives for the coming year are also set at that time, he said. Present MAC board members spent the weekend of Dec. 16-17 in Galveston for these purposes. To put the new goals in perspective. Owens said it was necessary to look at the 1989 developments. Last year, MAC set out to create a "center without walls," Owens said. Board members throughout the year used these words to describe MAC's umbrella concept. During the year, the organization added three new affiliate groups and began negotiations with several others. "I think for a large part we accomplished that goal;' said Owens. "We have operated in terms of MAI "s goals in WHtl include setting up a temporary of fires, pos! offiei hines and n cent nil phone number for member groups; expanding fund raising techniques, getting wider participation in board elect inns mid recruiting mem hers and volunteers Hour,I members pictured are John Hill. Jack Wiii ii ski -rice president,, ,'tim th, ens 'president,. Dehorah Hell /secretary ... Ray Hill and I. ruin keever Xut available for the picture: Annise Par her i treasurer/, doe Watts. Honme Dial, Seal Massey. t.' Williams and Felix Garcia creating a people base. We've created an awareness of the need to network...this is the first step in a process that is ongoing with all community centers," he said. The outreach is continuing, and other groups have expressed an interest in joining with MAC in the past few months, Owens said. I'art of MAC's appeal to community groups lies in its experience. particularly in dealing with areas where new organizations traditionally have some weak spots: legal, accounting, technical, temporary space requirements. MAC also has 5Q1-3C status as a non-profit, tax exempt organization under IRS requirements. Owens, however, said the tax standing is probably less important as a benefit to MAC member groups than the umbrella organization's expert- "We have i attorney who sometimes do pro bono work for (member groups). Some groups have trouble with tax filing, and we help them with that—we help them set up their books, or find space for a meeting. (Members) are also able to use MAC's 10 year history (in paperwork!," Owens said. "Sometimes an inexperienced group will hit a stone wall where actually a simple meeting or phone call will take care of the problem;' he added. There are other member benefits, including calendar listings and an editorial forum in MAC's widely read monthly newsletter. Member groups have access to the newsletters bulk mailing rate lo publicize their events. The groups, in turn, are helping MAC. The member organizations are responsible in large pari for MAC's being able to realize its second 1989 goal: a steady income. For the first time this year, MAC has succeeded in establishing a dependable "income stream" from sources including a "give back to MAC" fee, two percent ol gross receipts, now assessed to each member group. Board members said the percentage was chosen because it was felt the amount would not place an undue burden on the members and that it was a fair pay back for the services MAC pro- Other income sources include underwriters, community fund raisers and individual contributions. The MAC newsletter, supported by individual and business underwriters rather than advertising, is "almost" but not yet paying for itself, which is also helping the overall financial picture for the group, which one bore the publication's full production costs. (Owens explained that the board decided to use a funding method other than advertising sales so the newsletter would not be in competition with other community publications). Last year, board members decided to begin focusing on raising money specifically for the building fund, which is intended even tually to pay for a home for the center. Although the first major fund raiser ("The Event") for the building fund, which netted about $."i.400. actually didn't take place until this year, planning for it began in August of 19H9. "The opportunity presented it- selL.with the January (11190) date. It was just too good an offer." said Owens. About $600 was raised for the fund last year through a donation from Printex Plus. Jim Crary. Printex owner and a MAC board member, contributed proceeds of his annual Christmas card sales. The building fund currently has a balance of just over $6,000, Owens In 1990, the main focus will shift to the goal of a physical community center. Owens said. The interim center will be established by the end of this year—hopefully, by Lesbian/Gay Pride Week 1990. he MAC will be undertaking a "feasibility study" of community center needs, surveying groups and individuals on what ia needed, OwenB said. The survey will be conducted by a board committee and wil) probably "piggyback" a survey being conducted by the Pride Awards 1990 committee to determine award recipients, he said. The board hopes to have the survey completed by April, and will use the results to determine immediate needs that will be considered in setting up the interim Another 1990 goal i the retreat is building an expanded core of members, supporters and volunteers. The volunteers are especially important because MAC's latest demands are "exceeding the capabilities of the board," Owens said. The organization also plans to open up its election process this year to give MAC "a broader base" of community input. Owens said. MAC has been criticized in the past for having a "self-perpetuating" board of directors, which some feel puts to much control in the hands of too few people. "We are self-perpetuating..but we are keenly aware of the need for a broader base. That is what we want." said Owens. This year, he added, the elections, usually held in November, will be moved up to coincide with National Coming Out Day in October and the election process will be "opened up" for community wide participation. Also, the board members hope this year to do something about the "failed'' goal of 1989: obtaining funding through grants. "We really wanted to do something with grams last year. This is the one goal 1 have to say really failed," said Owens. The difficulty, he said, is that so few foundations are willing to grant money to groups that are openly identified with the lesbian.gay community. and those that arc already are heavily burdened with requests. "In other cities there is funding available from non traditional or n-gay s _ for v found at a (gay and lesbian i community center...but that's just not happening (in Houston)," lamented Owens. "It has never happened here." He added, however, that he believes it is easier for gay and lesbian organizations to be accepted for such funding if they are associated with a center. "I think it's easier being part of a community center because of the networking and cross-pollination in that setting," he said. "Also, the foundations tend to be very bureaucratic...it's easier to deal with the bureaucracy with the (center) association." MAC will be approaching other non-traditional funding sources, specifically, corporations, in the coming year, said Owens. "1 think we have a good chance of getting some corporate money this year. We're getting the process started," MAC will propose granting organizations and corporate underwriters this spring, Owens said. Montrose printmaker assembles graphic pieces By SHERI COHEN DARBONNK Monlruse Voice Editor If you're looking lor "Peaceable Assembly" the multi-media display that protests government censorship of the arts, it may be a little hard to find. The exhibit is not in a gallery, but a tine arl print making i publishing studio on Welch Stre vitha le that st think; belly dancers. The exhibit, peaceably asserr. bled with no federal funding what soever (Jesse Helms, take note) will continue through Feb. 9 at Little Egypl enterprises, 1511 Welch, across from the Girl Scout headquarters. It features the work of 34 visual, performance and literary artists, including several ofthe top names in Houston's art seem Many of the participants created the featured works specifically lor this display. (liber pieces were chosen because of their content. David F'olkman, a graduate of the prestigious Tamarind Work shop for musiei art printers, baa been Houston's only master p, maker for a number Folkman,wboisalsoLittleEgy| ■ . owner, is one of ihe show s curators along with Kevin Cunnigham Benito Huerta and MarilvnZeillin all Hoaston artists. Folkman said he organizes exhibitions, usually for shows that cannot be placed elsewhere, about once a month through his professional contacts with local artists. Because Lit tie Egypt is a printing business and not a gallery space, the shows are not eligible for any type of government grant funding. This aspect is entirely appropriate for the current exhibit, a reaction by the artists to 1990 guidelines for National Endowment ofthe Arts appli Cations. The guidelines, pushed through by Sen. Helms (R-N.C.) de ny funding to art which "...may be considered obscene, including, but not limited to. depictions of sadomasochism, homoeroticism. tbe sex ual exploitation of children, or individuals engaged in sex acts, which, when taken as a whole, do not have serious literary, artistic, political or Must of the works included in the show make direct political statements regarding censorship: some iire created specifically to offend. Others, such as an extremely realistic sculpture of a banana split bearing the caption, "Everything offends somebody sometime," carry the message in a more indirect way. One of the more interesting entries is the darkly salirieal "American Flag Burning Kit" from "Freedom of Expression Products" by Erika Rothenberg, which jabs at consumerism, censorship, silly and offeiiKii i' leu isl al ion and current political trends in one hlow. The kit's message was laken a little too literally by one viewer, however, who "flicked" the attached Bic Lighter and burned a corner ofthe label. The piece created by the artist was nol burned, according in Folkman. Folkman's own entry, the Constitution's first amendment etched very faintly in a plate of glass, sums up the message succinctly Perform ances by theater artists and writers can he viewed on video tape. The show, for anyone interested in art. censorship, or current political A catalogue with two-dimensional representations of each featured piece is also available at Litlle Egypt. Participating visual artists are Eric Avery. Michael Harry. Terry Berlkowitz. Marilyn Zeitlin. Derek Boshier, Bob Camblin, Sue Coe, Kevin Cunningham. Ben DeSoto, James Drake, F'rank Fajardo, Folkman. John Hernandez. Wes Hicks. Ron Hoover. Benito Huerla, Emily Jennings, MANUAL, Larry Miller, Deborah Moore, Celia Munoz, Erika Rothenberg. .Nestor Topchy and Frances* Torres. Performance artists and wnters who participated are Rosellen Brown. David Harvey, Richard Howard. Lauren Johnson. Cynthia McDonald. Thomas Melancon, Tom Nordgren, Joel Orr, Randy Cole. Lee Sokol, Kenny Joe Spivey and Randy Watson. Little Egypt opened in 1973 as Houston's only line art prim workshop. Originally located on Peden Street, the shop has moved but stayed in Montrose. F'ine art print making, an art that almost died in Ihis country in the 195G"s, was rescued by ihe Ford Foundation, which supported the Los Angeles based Tamarind Institute, established to train master printers. The institute has since been reworked into the Tamarind Workshop ot the University of New Mexico. Folkman was the second master printer produced at the Tamarind. The Montrose Voice is the First Choice! We cover the News of Montrose The Montrose Voice Tbe Montrose Voice HOUSTON. TEXAS ISSUE 4S4 Published Fridays (Community jiubiierjtrig Ciimpauri 408 Avondale Houston. TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-S490 Office hours: 9am-6pm ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT David Hinki.E. M.D. Gary Treese. M.S.W., Ph.D. Psychiatry Psychotherapy -:no MONTK0SE BLVD. SUITE 480 HOUSTON. TEXAS 77006 BETTER LAlDtlS & QARDEUS Total Lawn Maintenance Commercial Residential —Landscape —Lawn Care —Tree Service Free Estimates best Prices 523-LAHm
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