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Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990
File 002
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Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 002. 1990-02-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1537.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-02-02). Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 002. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1537

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990 - File 002, 1990-02-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1557/show/1537.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 484, February 2, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 2, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript MONTROSE VOICE THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE D (Cmwnuniftj puaUefpng ttiuiipmiu D p R | D/\Y February 2, 1990 D ISSUE 484 MONTROSE WEATHER FRIDAY NIGHT Showers, low 50 SATURDAY: H h 62. low 50 SUNDAY & MONDAY Partly cloudy. Highs about 6! 7b advertise or subscribe to the Newspaper of Montrose, call 529-8490 WEEKDAYS 9AM-6PM Feminists new chief- approve to-be r* r v !$&* ^ Ml Houston City Council is scheduled to vote this coming Wednesday »n whether to confirm Mayor Kathy Whitmire's ap- pointment of Elizabeth "Betsy" Watson os police chief, replacing resigned Chief Lee Brown. Watson, named on Jan. 19 by the mayor to head the Houston Police Department, is the firel woman ever to be appointed police chief of a major city. While many feminists are hailing the appointment some other minority groups say they are taking a "wait and see" attitude. Some soy their assessment will hinge on who is named hv Watson to other top HP!) posts. The Police Advisory Board, a panel representing interests of citizen minorities to the department, is expected to meet with the new chief this month, according to Joe Thornton, a member of that board and Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus' police committee liaison. Annise Parker, who represents the Community Alliance i if Houston on the board, said Watson was the favorite of two proposed recommendations by the board for police chief. Watson has made HPD history twice before, as the department's first woman captain in 1984 ami the l.rsr woman deputy chief in 1987. Watson, 40, joined the department in 1972. Would-be library may be torn down The original proposed site for the Montrose Branch Library, vacant and boarded up for years since the library department's decision to move the branch into the Campanile Center at 41(1(1 Montrose, may finally be demolished. The former strip shopping center, located at the corner of Mandell and Richmond, has reverted to the city's dangerous building department, and asbestos abatement proceedings (required before demolition or salel are in process. David Bates, director of public information for tbe Houston Public Library, said the city plans to sell the siteon the commercial real estate market. The market, how ever, has been deemed currently "inappropriate'' for sale ot the property. Bates said "It's kind of up in the air right now," he said. The problem is that the proper ty was purchased several years ago, when real estate values (and pricesi were considerably higher than today. Also, the buildings themselves are now inadequate for public use. according to Len Radoff, head of Library Branch Services. City council requires building sites to be inspected for asbestos before they are razed or the lots sold, Hates said. He said Radoff had informed him the proceedings were taking place at the Mandell site. Other buildings in the vicinity, also belonging to the city, were recently demolished. Bates said. Bates said since the buildings are no longer a branch library facility, they are now under the administration of another city department and hewas unsureofthe property's ultimate fate. Dangerous Buildings, which has jurisdiction, is a branch of the Housing and Community Development Department. That department's spokesperson, Alvin Hebert, also said he didn't know whether the city would sell the land or retain it while market conditions indicate the sale would result in a loss. Hebert said he also did not know1 if or when the building would be demolished. The Montrose Branch of the Houston Public Library opened March 5, 1989 in a remodeled former church building in the stylish Campanile, near the corner of Montrose and Richmond. AIDS patient receives first legal marijuana Group calls for resignation of top health officials AP LASERPHOTO BY DOUG SCHRES Prescription pot is displayed in the hands ol Steve, tke first AIDS patient in the U.S. to obtain a prescription The marijuana r. tobacco cigarettes and comes in e standard prescription bottle. AUSTIN (AP)-About 30 gay rights activists Jan. 19 demonstrated outside the Texas Department of Heallh to protest what they described as "right wing" tactics in state AIDS funding and demanded the resignation of the agency's top (wo officials The group, AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP), said it was angered by a recent interpretation by the Health Department on state funding lor AIDS aervic- Earlier, the Health Department soul stale funding could not he given to groups that advocate illegal activity or lobby for the repeal of the state's sodomy law. Health of- continued page 4 SAN ANTONIO, Texas (AP)-A San Antonio AIDS patient last weekend started smoking his first supply of government-grown, medically prescribed marijuana. Steve, who asked that his last name he withheld to preserve his privacy, received approval Dec. 13 from the Pood and Drug Adminis- tration to use marijuana as "an investigational new drug" He is the first person in the na tion with acquired i ciency syndrome to be approved to use the drug. Bob Randall. 42, a Washington, D.C, glaucoma patient, in 1976 was the first person in the country to get legal approval to use marijuana medically. Randall, who heads the Alliance for Cannabis Therapeutics, was in San Antonio Jan. 26 to help Steve "I am on AZT (zidovudine is a drug used to slow the progress of AIDS), and my doctor agrees with me that the only olher medical ion I need is marijuana to control the nausea and vomiting so I can deal with other problems," said Sieve. 33. in 19H5 and packaged in 1986. "It's dry and harsh. I'd say it is pungent without being fragrant!' Randall said. Steve said he has been trying for 2 1/2 years to get marijuana legally. He was arrested last March on a charge ol aggravated possession of the drug. His trial is scheduled for February, li convicted, he faces a possi- 1 ble five-year prison sentence. Community Alliance re-elects Coleman, other officers By HIL1.IK DUNCAN The Montr,,..,- Voice Community Alliance of Houston Tuesday elected officers for the coming year and discussed the effective neas of their involvement in theeam paigns of Beverly Clark and Anthony Hall. Montrose businessperson Marion Coleman was unanimously reelected as president of the Alliance and six incumbents were returned lo the board of trustees, with only one new trustee. Annise Parker, coming on the board Coleman appointed John Milinn to fill Ihe vacant position of ireasur Several candidates were present or had sent representatives lo ihi meeting. In attendance k Stone (running for oSth Disincl Court), Ray Hill (Justice of the Peace, Precmcl I. Place 2), Katy Cauldwell (Harris County Treasurer), Leslie Perez (Harris County Democratic Chair) and Sylvia Ayers (incumbent. Precinct SS Judge). Nikki Van Hightower. running for State Treasurer in the wake of Ann Richards' bid for governor, sent a representative and is seeking the group's endorsement. Ed Jamail. vice president, gave examples of the group's effectiveness in the last election. He said that Beverly Clark, who unseated Jim Westmoreland, had only screened with a couple of groups when Westmoreland made his remark about renaming Houston's Intercontinental Airport "Nigger Interna- On the Sunday before theelection. she called the Alliance because she had no press packets, no headquarters and no room to hold a victory party. John Nix, on Ihe board of the Alliance, tracked Clark down campaigning in a black area of town, Jamail said. Nix then told her that she would be more likely to convert votes in the white area of town, and took her in hand. A group from the Alliance then wrote her campaign acceptance speech, said Jamail. and helped ar- range a place Ibr her victory party. "We Hun r expect anything in return." said Jamail, "nor would we ask for it It was just very satisfying to help a qualified candidate." In a race in which the endorsed candidate did nol win, thai of the 1 Sth Congressional I >istrict, Jamail pointed out the effectiveness ol the organisation in the area it targeted. The Alliance was asked to work the ta in the westernmost section ofthe sprawling district In those precincts in the general elec lion Washington had garnered 436 more votes than Hail, explained Jamail The Alliance then mobilized block walkers who papered the district with door hangers and talked wilh anyone who was home. In the run off. Hall wound up wilh 56 more votes than Washington in the targeted precincts, said Jamail He then said that Washington could be expected to serve the people well and that with Hall on the Metro On Feb. 22, the Alliance will be voting oh the endorsements for the March balloting. Screening of the candidates will begin immediately, said Jamail, with the group endorsing candidates in both the Republican and Democratic parties. "Of coursed he said, "we only endorse if people screen with us" He explained that the process was designed to weed out people who had prearranged answers designed for "special I merest" groups, leaning instead on questions of the philosophic grounding of the candidates. The candidates with the highest human rights profiles are the candidates endorsed He pointed out that specific answers are nol always indicative of the candidate's human rights profile. One candidate who sought the group's endorsemeni recently was asked what the top health problem in the area was. He replied. "Mosquitoes." As it turned out, the candidate was from Denver Harbor and the top health concern in that area certainly was mosquitoes that carried the St. Loais encephalitis virus. The rest of his screening showed that he had a high sense of human rights, said Jamail. and he was endorsed by the Alliance. Speaking on the progress of the Police Advisory Board. Annise Parker, the Community Alliance representative, said that in the wake ofthe string of events that included the Ida Del any shooting, the board was gearing up lo be a more visible force in Houston. "It will be a much more active group than we have had in the past." she said. Parker gave a run-down of the sorts of action the board had taken so far, which included analyzing and reviewing an arbitration system, checking into the workings of the "cantina squad" and examining the difference between the policy of the police department in the handling of arrests of PWAs and the actuality. She also informed the meeting that the mayor had asked the board to give her criteria that they would like to see met ill hiring the new po lice chief. They also put in two names of people they would have recommended, said Parker, hul they were told they were not to recommend so they removed the names. "The top name nil the lis!." said Porker, "was Elizabeth Watson" Parker said the meelings were open to the public. ('(immunity Alliance mem her Charles Armstrong asked what had been discovered in their examination of the "cantina squads," those groups responsible for the bar raids that include raids on gay bars. Parker replied that the board had found the raids to he in violation ol stated policy, but that was not why they have slowed down. The reason. she Said, is there is no money in the budget for ad hoc police action She said the raids were inefficient and Candidate Katy Cauldwell asked about the board's involvement in investigating and making recommendations about violence at abortion clinics by "right to life" radicals. Parker said that problem was "be ing addressed." At the end of the meeting, the names of the newly elected trustees were announced. They are Cathy Lenahan. Bettie Naylor. Dottie Newton. Nix, Barry Mandel, Parker and Jeff Pickett. The nexlmeeting ofthe Commune ty Alliance of Houston willbeThurs- diiv. Feb 22, al the Bristol Bar and Grill. ;i Greenway Plaza, at 6:30 p.m. 'Sunbelt' conference is on AIDS in black community The Thurgood Marshall School of Law and the National Association of Social Workers Texas ore sponsoring a conference on "HIV/ AIDS in The Sunbelt: Special Issues in the Black Community" on Friday, Feb. 9, 8:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m., on the campus of Texas Southern University. Since the initial description of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), the accumulation of medical knowledge about it has been astounding But as ihe full picture has been unfolding, many special legal and social issues facing the black community in the Sunbelt have been overlooked or ignored, say the organizers of this conference. The conference will focus on three of these issues, male- to-male transmission, drug use and children—extended families. Unlike al demographics, the vast number of minority AIDS cases in the Sunbelt is due to male-to-male transmission. This poses unique prob- con tinned page 4
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