Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 89, July 9, 1982
File 001
File size: 11.38 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 89, July 9, 1982 - File 001. 1982-07-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1491/show/1466.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-07-09). Montrose Voice, No. 89, July 9, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1491/show/1466

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 89, July 9, 1982 - File 001, 1982-07-09, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1491/show/1466.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 89, July 9, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date July 9, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript 4th of July Celebrations in Montrose remembered (above) while Montrose Live looks at talent of Keoki Kona (right), in this week' s Voice. Houston team wins tournament Dirty Sally's captures 1st place, Houston's Galleon takes 2nd, while the New York Eagle's Nest wins third. Complete story, photos, inside, on the Lone Star Classic '82. The Newspaper of Montrose Issue #89, Published Weekly Friday July9 1982 Good Evening Montrose weather toniaht: Partly cloudy and warm and a lo of 76°. Saturday: Sunn.. 6:28AM. Partly cloudy and hot with a slight chance of afternoon thunderahowem and a high of 96° Sunset 8:25PM. 2 MONTROSE VOICE I J ULY 9 , 1982 Our Plant €:/ Flower Priees Can't Be Beat! House & Bedding Plants Hanging Baskets $9.95 Lime Trees $7.00 Hibiscus $7.00 Periwinkles $4.00 Caladiums $9.95 All Bedding Plants 80¢ Cut Flowers Long Stem Roses $10.00 dozen $15.00 bunch (2 dozen) Tyler Rosers $2.75 bunch Mixed Flowers $4.95 bunch ABC FLOWERS GARDEN CENTER 1303 Westheimer (Across from Brasserie II) --------------------- 30°/o OFF ON ALL MERCHANDISE ABC FLOWER & GARDEN CENTER 1303 Westhelmer Offer expires July 16, 1982 Bring In This Coupon Today! ---------------------- MontroseNews/TheNation Final 'Cell Block Buddies' aquitted By Johanneo Stahl The final three of 22 defendanto in the "Cell Block Buddies" case were acquitted July 6 and 7. Phil Osburn and Mike Mil­burn were found innoncent of charges they were publicly lewd and Different Drum owner Bill Bailey was found not guilty of liquor violations. Defense attorneys Debra Danburg and Clyde Df'Witt presented their case in Judge Jack Treadway's municipal court and the three men joined the othe1 19 defendants already cleared of similar charges which stemmed from a police raid on the Drum, a gay leather bar· at 1732 Weetheimer, last September. Dan burg said that this was the second trial for the final three because the first one resulted in a hung jury but with only one vote for the guilty verdict. She said that the district attorney usually doesn't refile charges on such a case with only one diBBenting vote from the jury. "Thie is a total matter of the police vice squad pushing the D.A.'s office,'' said Danburg. "We presented a well docu­mented case and had evidence of police harassment and selective enforcement." Prosecution witness HPD Sgt. P.M. Hogg, who supervised the Sept. 9 raid, apparently remembered more during this second trial. Danburg said he testified that he heard defendant Phil Osbum's "zipper unzip" 14 feet away. During cross examination, thedefenae brousht in a pair of blue jeans and the noi• from the zipper could not be heard in the quiet courtroom. Danburg claimed the not guilty verdict will "diecourage future bar raids and police haraaement.'' Bailey said he feels that the entire raid lut September was "a gross miscarriage of justice and a squandering of thousands of lal<payen' dollars." Bailey oaid he hopeo this will make the police depart­ment "sit down and re-evalutate their objectivee." Since Bailey wu charged with eervins liquor to intoxicated persons at hie busi­ness but since the persons charged with being intoxicated were found not to be so, Judge Treadway instructed the jury to ROGER GENTRY Drum owner Bill Bailey return a not guilty verdict for Bailey. A victory party was held July 7 at the Different Drum, with champagne, the defendants and defense attorney Danbura. At the time of raid, Sgt. Hogg said the "loft" or "fort" was the main reason for all the arresto. It was a dimly-lit area that has since been dismantled. Hogg also claimed, "We've gotten com­plaints from numerous civic groups and other gay clubs that said they didn't approve of what aoee on in the loft." A.ked to nome py clubo that com­plained, he declined. Bailey said he believed the action was instigated by the police themselves. He pointed out that Sgt. Hogg was the same officer which supervised the raid on Mary's Lounge, 1022 Westheimer, prior to Gay Pride Week 1980. Counterfeit beepers If you're the last on your block without your own packet paging system, you can still become the first with a fake pager, JULY 9, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 reports the Los Angeles Times. Hallad Paging Systems is offering a bogus beeper that goes off a few seconds after you press a secret button. The electronic status system sells for $30. Sex can be a pain in the neck Heavy breathing during love-making can cause headaches, say British medical experts. According to the Sun, a British news­paper, doctors at a London hospital say hyperventilation caused by sexual exer­tion can trigger painful attacks for migraine sufferers. One reseracher said many after-sex headaches ere caused by tension, but for some, the problem is simply over· breathing. Gay Switchboard to hold meeting for club owners, managers The Gay Switchboard of Houston will hold an open house for gay bar managers and owners July 13, they announced. 0 We want them to know what we are doing, and how we can work together. Not only do we refer hundreds of people to local clube each month, but we tell the commu­nity about all of their events," a apokeeper­eon ll&id. The open boue will be held in the new Switchboard ofliceo and will be open to manqen and ownera of clubs only, they said. The community is still not sure what the Switchboard does in that it is a telephone service and has no visible image to the community like other or1anizationa, they laid. The Gay Switchboard of Houoton ill a telephone co1111 .. llntr and lnlonnalion _. vice, which al80 ofren a community calendar of events and profeuional referals. Their number is 529-3211 and is in oper­ation nighUy, 6:00 p.m. to midnight. Montrose Mouth Montrose beauty awards Richard H•rdy and Stew•r1 McCloud got the July Beauty Award from the AwondaJe Auoclallon Well. watt a minute. We mean their Houlton Gunt Houee. 106 Avondale. got the award for its fine appearance. which is "an asset and insp;ration to the community,"' said the associatton. They won in the multiple dwelling category Winning the single dweUmg category for July was Arthur Talk. owner of the property at 2604 Whitney And sharing this month"s .. Rusty Lawnmower Award'' wss Houston Ugtttlng Ind Power for property located between Hyde Park. Fairview. Mason and Genessee. and W.L. R•ynor for his property at 101 Stratford -·- The poem credited last week to Hou910n Coftlmunlty ClowN on our ~ers page was actu•lly written by w.,... McStar. It was passed out at the Gay Pride Parade and received many glowing comments -·- The .. Womyn's Mini Fest"" will be held this Sunday, 1-Bpm, at Heldr1 & Co.. 1905 W Alabama. a feminist store in Montroee. It will feature a slide show, live music. a vanety of booths. clowns and 1 tattoo •rtist. -·- - T.,._.• p...,.. of ~ shop on Westheimer has closed for restructuring. says Bill He's discontmuing his line of paints and will now be concentratmg on custom framing, pottery and other handicrafts when he reopens, in a week or IO. -·­The-.~ Ille ca.r oi,.plco in Son Francloco thla Labo< Day - coiled to say that tickets have now gone on .... for opening and closing day ceremonies. They"re S25 tor both opening and closing or $15 for one. and, naturally, tickets are limited to the capacity of the stadium. 1500 atheletes will be competing , they said Order from Gay Olympics Games. POB 14874, San Francisco. CA 94114 By the way, that same weekend will also see ths Gay ~I WOfkl Se- in San Francisco, with one team from Houston participating. -·- The City of Houston HNlth Dept. will be at Midtowne Spa tonight (Friday), 9pm-1•m. for free blood tests and testing for gonorrhea and hepat1tis-B -·- Max 1s back. His humor is above most of the staff at the Voice. but if you're among the moreehte, you'll be happy to know his cartoons have returned to the classified pages here -·- Councilmember EINnor TNMr recently helped pass a City Council Land Development Ordinance that opponents contend 1s the beg1nn1ng of zoning U1 Houston But .. Not so." says TinSley "Zoning dictates what goes where. This ordinamce holds out hope for easing Houstqn·s traffic woes tor the future. For the first time. thecitywiU have a say about commercial development. For the first time we will have a planning ordinance ... Well. anyway, Sten lhlftett. president of Citizens tor Human Equality (CHE), urges us. especially professionals who have a stake in the effects of this ordinance on their business. to attend a Tuesday, July 13. meeting at 1106 Berthea (Watson DeNagy Galleryl. C?Cktails will served at 7 :30 and the meeting begins at 8:00 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 9, 1982 NU'PIBERS THIS SUNDRY JLIL~ 11 -..... l,cooo L'c 1co''' -''-'-'I 11 _ILl_ILI 11 I Ll~'E IJITH BRNO SRTURDR':J JULY 11 / 300 IJESTHE/l"IER•HOUSTON. TEXAS 77006 ?73-526-6557 1 YearAgo ,July 10. 1981 Fire destroyed 27 buildings in heart of SF gay area An arsonist's fire erupted in the early mom ing hours in a dosed gay bathhouse and then raced through 26 other buildings in the gay ghetto district known as the Folsom or South-of.Market area. The section is known as the city's gay leather area. Half a city block was destroyed and 60 people were left homeless. The bathhouse, known as the Fol~om Stret>t Barracks, was being remodeled. Damage was etttimated at $6 million , July 1.1, 1981. Man sentenced to 20 years for rape A man charged with raping a woman abducted from the parking lot of the OJd Plantation, 2020 Kipling, was sentenced to five years in prison. Timothy James Snow. 25, of 10200 W. Bel· lfort, who pleaded guilty in January 1981, waA sentE"nced by state District Judge I.D. McMaster July 1.1, 1981: Public views changed little Americans' ".iews on social iBSues such as abortion, buffing and gay rights changed lit­tlf> deHp1te the conservative swing the year before that put. &>publicans in the White House and in control of the U.S. SenaU>, an Associated Press-NBC News poll showed. On the frequently cited social i88ue of homosexual rights, the changes were small. The poll sai_d 48 percent favored extending law_s protecting equal job and housingoppor­tumties to homosexuals, with 38 percent opposed. Fourteen percent were noteure the poll &aid. ' Montrose Voice the newspaper of Montrose 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copynght •1982 Office hours. 10am-6pm Henry McClurg publ1stt.r1ec111cx Johannes Stahl fl9WS9di/Of Bilhe Duncan •nt•rt•inf'fWHlt·1porrs 9d•tcx Ed Martinez Nick Fede Acel Clark gr1phte1 Wilham Marberry ttdV9rt111rig dlf9CIOI Randy Brown /MIY9rltSlllg David Petluck adv9f14lflg Lyt Harns ~fill/lg Ronnie Stephens IH1V9f/1Jl/lf1 Gene Oh..,er •d"9fl•smg Foufld•ftfJ MfHJll:>M G1y Pr.u Auoc11tion N•w• S.rv•cH lnt9fn1hon1t G1y Ne)ola Apency. P1c1hc New• "'""'" Syndte•t9d FHtur• S•rwc., & Wr•t•r• {San Franci.co) Chro-nicle F,.lurH. United f .. tu1• SyndlCll•. Jetlrey W1l1on. Randy Allred. Sto.-..wall fHtur• Synclie1te. Brl•n Mc Naught POSTMASTER S.nd 1ddr8M conect1on1 to 3317 MontroH 130&. Hou11on. TX 77008 Sllbtcr1p11on ,.,. In us $49 P«' yHr (~2 lllUM). $29 pet IOI month• (26 ,..u..1. or SI 25 per ....... (1851 thin 29 1uu..) N1fl0n1/ ~111np ""'"'"'"rv• Joe D•Sabllo. R1vendell Mlrklhr'lg. Me 91h AvenUI. New YCIB 10011 , (212) 242-15863 Aa...,.,.,,ng dud!m• EM:h TlleM11y (I OOpn tor IHI.II r .... ted NCh Fr1d1y evton1rig Montrose celebrates the 4th of July Photostory by Johanne& Stahl The Fourth of July or Independence Day conjures images including barbeques, brass bands and parties. Several local organizations and bars provided these tra­ditional forms of entertainment for the Montrose community. The Montrose Symphonic Band held a short concert in conjunction with a fund· raiser on the Fourth in the parking lot across the street from Mary's Lounge, 1022 Wt>stheimer. Hundreds of ballons were released with names and telephone numbers attached to the strings. The bal­loons were sold for one dollar each and the name and numbers on them will deter­mine the greatest distance travelled by a balloon. The proceeds are to help pay expenses for the band to travel to New York City next May for a concert at Carnegie Hall. Andy Milla directed the band a& they played favorites such as the march from "Mickey Mouse" and of course the "Star Spangled Banner." The Montrose Country Cloggers gave three performances at The Barn in con­junction with the traditional barbeque held at that bar. They were accepting donations to help defray travel expeni:;ieR to the Gay Rodeo in Reno, Nevada in August where the group will perfoml. Several other bar& held barbeques and other special activities during the holiday weekend, which was especially welcomed by visitors who were in town for the Lone Star Classic Softball Tournament. Photos: the Balloon launch on behalf the Montrose Symp/wnic Band (above), an obuious dedicated American celebrating the 4th of July (l-Ower left) ' and the Montrose Country Cloggers. ~~ ©'lil!Co~'­,41' 1""4&.-- U•IM' f6ATIJll• 1'<{/IPIQ.r- JULY 9, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 - IT~ PHYLLIS SCHL.AFLY ... SHE'.S NOW CAMPA16NIN6 AGAIN$T 5'HOOL TEXTS WITH FEMINIST INFLUENCES .. , THE NUCLEAR FREEZE AND SE}( EDUCATION! 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 9, 1982 LET YOURSELF GO! TO llL ..., Gt.ttlG•~ .l Ptf" ""EDn'IO"' ~\id>~;~'Blll~ Produced By IRYlll FELD and KE=llll"'E"'TH=FE="LD"":=~~~~ Juiy 13 thru ~y 25 • THE SUMMIT '"' WED TltUR '" SAT " " '"' *SAVE 11 17 11 llOOAJh· llll'• '",. $1.00 .. ,.., .. ,.. . llOl'M• .. ,. .. , . , .. ,. " Z1 " " " " OH CHILDREN UNDER 12 .. llNAllll• ,... .. ,... ..,.. .. ... .. tKPac- FAMll. Y HIGHT TV ALL TICKETS s 1.85 • $3.35 $4.85 a S&.35 UO PM SHOW Tuesday, JULY 13 TICKETS ON SALE: SUMMIT BOX OFFICE • TICKETMASTER All Alu MO"ll60MERY WARD SkN'IS. DOWNTOWN TICKET • nff::li:N1 ".:':,:Jo~K~o~~~o!:R~~ouJ~s1c ROCXERFELLERS. UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON STUDENT CENTER. ASTlllOOOME 80X OfACE. TOWER THEATRE WESTCHASE TICKETRON FOR INFORMATION CAU: (713) 9&1-9003 FOR GROUP RATES CALL: (713) 127-M70 lJll'M .... l•I'• 71111'M liii(IJ,·1ri• CALL: (713) 627-9452 I MONDAY ttw\I SATUfllDAY 1tHXI AM to t110 PM ; \ Use Your YISA or MASTER CARD I (SUI a.ntc. Cll.erte ................. AT STARRED PERFORMANCES AlLSEATSIUSERVED $4.35-15.15 17.35-11.15 =~':°s:!. ~.:.,,~·==-~ _. cMcll W 111 0 ,,,... .. A 0 C ll~·c:: .. a.::-:.:= AU. TICUTS FOil llAll. OllDDtS R!:CEJVED W1THl1f 7 WOUIHG DAYS OR LESS IITORE SHOWTIME WU&. IE HEU> AT WILl.·CAU WDfDOW AT THE SUMMJ'T. BACCHUS GOES DANCIN' at 523 Lovett Come in and strut your stuff on our new dance floor. We're open SEVEN days a week for your drinking and dancing pleasure. Bring your best guy or gal and enjoy our warm and friendly room, or our beautiful deck. Happy hour 4-7, Well drinks 2 for 1, Beer 85¢ C&W Band this Friday & Saturday, 9-1 (cover) Let's Get Acquainted Happy hour entertainment: Marquerite at the piano. Wednesday evening entertainment: Maryanne Mahoney & Mata Hari (cover charge) 523 Lovett 523-3396 Reasonable Hours Likeable Prices at Francisco's 901 Richmond Jerry's Everyday Prices: haircut/blow dry or haircut and set $10 permanent waves $35 colors $20 & up Call us 523-0438 TWELVE, FOURTEEN, SIXTEEN INCHES? Star Pizza will deliver hot and juicy to your door COME PLAY IN OUR NEW UPSTAIRS VIDEO GAME ROOM * OVEN HOT DELIVERY * PIPING HOT CARRY OUTS * CASUAL DINING ROOMS * New York-Style hand-thrown pizza * Chicago-style deep-dish pizza * Also available with whole wheat crust * Vegetarian pizza 2111 NORFOLK * Starburst deluxe pizza (the worksl) HOURS: * Super sandwiches & salads Mon: 11:30am-11pm * Fantastic deserts ~=~:s~~~Io~:~~tpm *. Imported & domestic beer Thu: 11:30am·11 pm TRY OUR NEW LASAGNA Fri: 11 :30am-mldnight Sat: 4pm-midnight Sun: 4pm-10:30pm CALL 523-0800 PLEASE ALLOW 1 HOUR FOR DELIVERY Montrose Patrol is silent this summer Ry Johannes Stahl Summer in Montrose certainly brings a sense of celebration to the community. It also can create a sense of fear as violence on the streets climbs sharply. The summer violence of three years ago Jed to the organization of the Montrose Patrol, a group of volunteers that worked on car and foot patrols in the neighbor­hood and cooperated with Houston Pohce Department to deter violence to gay &.nd non-gay citizens. This summer no help can be expected from the Patrol because as of mid-April they ceased operations. Mickey, McShan, a member from its inception, said that they lost the.ir office space at 502 Westheimer at that time and in the chaos most of the equipment, includ­; ng FM and CB transceivers turned up missing. Records of calls were also "unac­counted for." The Patrol's demise is attributed to lack of volunteers and funding. Volunteers often experienced "burn out" because of heavy patrol schedules brought about by insufficient staff. A large number of volunteers did not even live in Montrose. At one point, the Patrol was answering caJls all weekend on -reports of arson, murder, rape, vandalism and of course muggings. Their efforts led to a conviction rate of 87% of all cases brought for prosecu PLAN NOW FOR SKI SEASON!! Seats are limited & going fast * Denver * Breckenridge * Aspen * Steamboat Springs * Vail * Keystone We specialize in special ski groups Accomodations available al the Bunkhouse, gay resorl in BreckenridRe For more information on these tours, and for airline tickets worldwide, call Bob Houston Travel Consultants Assm:1ated with Crernspuint Travel Center Phone 8Zl·2577 (24 hours) We accept all major credit cards Custom Fine jewelry Gita's Jewelry Call 680-3579 Jeweler for the Gay Community Custom designed rings, wedding bands and other jewelry About 1 ·2 price of retail jewelry stores Call and consult with our designer tion thus preventing a cnminal's return to the streets to do more violence. McShan said the Patrol has no official plans to start operations in the near future but that another organization may uitder­tske the Patrol's function. McShan give the following suggestions for protection on the streets: • Always look around to see if som~ne suspicious is behind or ahead, cross the street if necessary, criss-cross from one side to the other. Walk toward other people or lights. Don't be afraid to run. •If a car approaches and you are threat­ened, scream and run in the direction oppasite that of the car. so the driver "''ill need to tum around to pursue. •Walk near the curb and avoid passing close to shrubbery, dark doorways and other places of concealment. JULY 9, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 •Avoid shortcuts through backyards, schoolyards, parking lots and alleyways. •Have keys in hand, so the house or car door can be opened immediately. •Know the area, including stores and restaurants open late and homes with lights on. If an attempt is made to attack, run to these places. -.no not stop to give directions or talk to strange people, even if they're well dressed. •Make arrangements v.-i.th friends to walk in groups to p8l'ked vehicles. Avoid walking alone. McShan added that muggers will go for people who are an easy target such as peo­pJe obviously drunk or who are not paying attention to other people on the street. If a victim doesn't 11ee his assailant clearly he won't be able to identify him later Last Week Celebrate the superb talents of Ruth Hastings Opening Tuesday, July 20 Samantha Samuels "She looks like a cross betwttn Theda Bara and Mary Martin, and she sings as if her life depended on it."-Billie Dun­can, ii1ontrose Voice "A lady radiating star quality with a force that puts the first thrtt rows of tables in mortal danger."-S~ Wal'Ten, After Dark 402 Lovett 527-9866 Our chef has done it again! Elegant dining and wonderful prices. Happy Hour 4-8pm 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 9, 1982 ·-----------------------~ GYRO GYROS SANDWICH SHOPPE 1536 Westheimer 528-4655 JULY SPECIAL, WITH THIS AD with this ad Gyro Sandwich, Fries and Coke, $2.85 Open 11am-10pm everyday (till midnight Friday & Saturday) Imported Beer and Wines ~-----------------------· Investment Opportunities Real Estate Syndications Base Financial Group 330 Fairview 524-1871 Barbara Hanson Income producing properties 1n the Montrose. Binz and middle city areas. owner1broker/syndicator "ll!!!S:.~ v Paul 0. Fraternal!. 0.0.S. Cosmetic & Restorative Dentistry in Montrose Located just off Montrose Blvd at 6 CHELSEA PLACE Call 523-7432 For appomtments Tuesday-Friday Insurance assignments welcomed Patricia Anne O'Kane Attorney at Law • Criminal matters • Estate planning • Corporations • General civil practice • Seven years experience 3323 Yoakum 526-7911 Tues. -Buck mghl {$1 admission) Wed.-leather mght Thurs -Gym night t$1 with gym card or s~~~~uddy nigh! (2 tor 1) ox BED HOUSE SALE! SALE! SALE! SIMMONS BEAUTY REST DISCOUNT CENTER Km• qs $R6E0G0. oo now 15QOO Queens ~4%300 now s149oo Other Sizes Available 523-8278 2115 Norfolk 10-7 M-F 10-6 Sat This Saturdax &. Sunday, Sp_m-midnight THE DIXIE KINGS 715 Fairview Open Noon-2am 7 Days a Week 621-2792 THE H,~~'~, LE Wednesday thru Sunday at the Top of the Hole 109 Tuam KEOKI KONA 528-9066 -- L.I 522-8227 SAN FRANCISCO $271 R.T. Air NEW YORK $149 R.T. Air DENVER $149 ~~ (Must purchase before July 15. Ticket good one year) Call Rick for Details Serving the Gay Community Sunday, July 11 8-lOpm John Day &Company Monday, July 12, C&W Student Dance Competition Monday: Fn·<· C&W lA:-sHonH by Dt'nnis · Rudngu<•z, 7-9pm Tm•.'lday; 8t<'nk Night Wi'(fn f'sday· Country & We8k'j~i~it~~d Thursday: PcH1l TournnmC'nt-IOpm Morning Happy Hour ?am-Noon Evt"ning Happy Hour 4 -7::JOpm NEVER A COVER CHARGE 1213 RICHMOND • 527-9071 Extra parking on the comer of Mt. Vanon A Richmond Court upholds Oklahoma law barring gay teachers The National Gay Task Force (NGTF) said July 3 that it will appeal a federal court's refusal to overturn an Oklahoma law that allows school boards to deny employment to homosexual teachers or others who sup­port gay civil rights. "Keeping this diecriminatory law on the books is an outrageous denial of several constitutional rights," said Lucia Valeska, Executive Director of NGTF, plaintiffs in the class action suit filf>d in 1980. "We are confident an appeal will be successful." . The bill bars lesbians and gay men from teaching in public schools and also alJows school districts to fire anyone 11advocat· ing, soliciting, imposing, encouraging or promoting public or private homosexual activity which creates a substantial risk that Ruch conduct will come to the atten· tion of schoolchildren or school employees." In his June 29 decision upholding the law, known as the Helms Bill, U.S. Die· trict Judge Luther Eubanks rejected NGTF's argument that such restrictions on teachers violate their federally pro­tected rights to freedom of speech and association as well as privacy. The court's opinion declared "public homosexual conduct would cause a sub­stantial and material disruption of school activities." While agreeing with the court's recogni­tion of the government's interest in regu­lating standards for teachers, ACLU attorney and NGTF board member Bill Rogers, who along with Gay Rights Advo­cates (GRA) represented NGTF, criticized that part of the decision which Hequates a teacher's homosexuality with disruption of the school's operation." Rogers said the decision a lso fails to pro­tect a teacher's private homosexual conduct. He noted however that Judge Eubanks wa r ned school boards that denying employment to a teacher solely for advo­cating gay right.a might not pass consti tu­tional muster GRA'a Legal Director, Leonard Graff, siad, "We are committed to an appeal to the Tenth Circuit becuase this law is also vague and overbroad, it does not ade­quately define 1hQ1Itosexual conduct'." It is now doubtful that a teacher in Okla­homa who says 'I am gay' can keep his or her job," Graff said. Va leska added, 0 There is a silver lining to this cloud: Our success on appeal will provide a precedent with greater effect than had we won at the lowest federal court level. The bill was introduced by state repre­sentative Mary Helm ans was based on the defeated Briggs Initiative in Califor­nia. A laws uit was filed against the sta­tute in 1980. A rose by any other country is underselling our own Something smells rotten in the flower­growing industry. U.S. growers complain they're being undersold by an increasing number of imported, foreign-grown fl ow· ere, reports the Washington Post. Domestic growers say nearly 15% of all pompona and 59%of all carnations bought hE"re were grown elsewhere. The growers cJaJm they're at an unfair disadvantage, because many South Amer· ican countries have cheaper labor costs and, since they're closer to the equator, have fewer problems with heating. Playgirl Follies This Saturday, July 10, 10:30pm, $1.00 cover Special guest VERONICA LAKE Happy Hour Saturday rnidnight-2arn Sunday noon-midnight Mon-Fri 4-8prn Open 10am Mon-Sat, Noon Sun A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE Pink Elephant "Oldest & Friendliest 2 in Texas" 1218 Leeland 659-0040 .~ TRY OUR XEROX 9400 FOR QUICK COPYING WORK IN A RUSH RESUMES-hundreds in mmutes on reg· ular paper of special stock REPORTS-printed, colltted & bound in a)lfly LETTERS-printed on your stationery or letterhead PROGRAMS-Ready on time for your special event. PRICE LIS TS-keep up to date BUSINESS FLYERS-hundreds while you wait. ALSO, WE ARE A FULL-SERVICE OFFSET PRINTER Our prices are low but quality work is what we are known for Among our featured services are: • Stationery, enve­lopes. business cards • general printmg • typesetting • carbonless business forms • color printing • announcements & invitations When you are getting price quotes, give us a call 667-7417 FREE DELIVERY & PICKUP Quality is the difference at SPEEDY PRINTING SER VICE Bellaire Store 5400 Bellaire Blvd. The Commumty's Ouallly Printer & Stat10ner JULY 9, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 ~HA1-R-CRAFT- couPoN SPECIAL Men's & Women's Summer Survival Cuts s15°0 with this coupon only 2110 Lexington 526-5472 MASTER CARD & VISA ACCEPTED • ·------------------------ Midnight at the Oasis A touch of Elegance, In timacy and Fine Ethiopian Food Reggae Music every Friday and Saturday night Tuesday 1s lady's night Free drinfis 10pm-2am Wednesday Happy Hour all night OPEN for lunch and dinner Daily Lunch Special with complimentary glass of wine from 3ss Herra rs Ethiopian Cuisine and CJub 428 Westheimer 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 9, 1982 More Houston Gay Parade Photos PHOTOS BY ED MARTINEZ. JOHANNES STAHL AND WILLIAM MARBERRY reservations necessary 2702 Kirby 524-6272 Monteomery, Maves & Stritch 'fhru July-Shows 9:30 , 11:00, 12:30 serving Lunch Monday·Friday 11:30·2:00 Dinner Monday-Thursday 6:30-11:00, Friday 6 Saturday 6:30-12:00 Sunday Brunch 11:30-3:00 Briar Patch 1294 W. Holcombe 665-9678 HAPPY HOUR 12-8 everyday Spaghetti-7pm Tuesday Pool Tournament-9pm Wednesday Buffet-4pm Sunday JULY 9, 1982 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 0 o\scoU ERCOME 1'. ar, anxiety, guilt, depression , nervousness, drug abuse, alcohol abuse, anger, loneliness, weight. STVDENT AND nRST VISIT SENIOR CITIZEN CALL 977•:148S DISCOUNT DISCOUNT WITH AD Houston's Friendliest Country & Western Bar SUNDAY Buffet for MDA KON-SAT: Open 7am I· )(Oli'DAY: Barn T-Shirt Night & MSA Bowlers Night. TUESDAY: Steak & Marguerita Night. WEDNESDAY: White Light'n Night. THURSDAY: Club Color Night & Pool Tourney. ' 710 PACIFIC 528-9427 Member Houston Tavern Guild & Home of the Mustangs 12 MONTROSE VOICE/ JULY 9, 1982 Letters& Comments Reader objects to Gay Olympics slam From Bobby Patton I am writing in regards to the recent Com­mentary by Allen Young entitled "How gay will be the 'Gay Olympics'?" First of all, I could care less. However, having been a member of the Great American Yankee Freedom Band of Los Angeles for two years, Mr. Young's observation is entirely wrong! The GAY Freedom Band of LA is in no way "creat­ing a new culture." Quite the contrary? The band has appeared in two gay parades annually, and approximately a dozen non­gay ones! The band has marched in many cities in southern California for various community functions, such as the Altad­ena Old Fashioned Day parade and the Encino Founders Day Parade. It was our way of joining with a commu­nity, not impose upon it! The Montrose Symphonic Band and the Oak Lawn Sym­phonic Band do not have the opportunities that their LA counterpart does. The LA GAY Band has placed first in almost every open competition it has entered and has earned it the right for the past two years of appearing on national television in the Los Angeles Santa Claus Lane Parade as "a West Hollywood community band made up of over 200 members-period!" Without any gay /non-gay connotations. I hope that he will not do too much more "seeming'' without checking. Towards another topic. Please advise Neil le bin regarding the incident of arrest at Mary's prior to the parade, and theares­tee, if known, that I personally observed unnecessary physical abuse and search of the individual and that I have photo­graphs of the entire incident which would prove most helpful in possible legal action. Atlanta to host 'Hotlanta' raft weekend The "Fourth Annual Hotlanta Raft Week­end" is scheduled to be held July 30 through August 1 in Atlanta. This year's announced theme is uTropical Fruits" and is to be kicked off with a dance and cos­tume hula ball, organizers said. The highlight of cruising in Atlanta that weekend will be a rafting trip down the Chattachoochee River, they said. Other activities planned include a T­Dance at an Atlanta disco and the 1982 Mr. Hotlanta contest. Twenty men are vying for the title and more than $2000 in cash and prizes, they said. After the raft ride on Sunday, there will be a luau and pool party at a major midtown Atlanta hotel, they said. "The Hotlanta Raft Weekend is strictly a social event sponsored by the North Georgia Association of Watersportsmen, Inc., a non-profit organization in Atlanta," said president Mark McCut­chan. The world is watching Pacific News Service Privacy may be gone for good. The latest trend among New York decorators is the no-door bathroom. Other designers, .flushed with openness, are placing bathroom sinks in hallways and one has installed toilet facilities at the bottom of a spiral staircase, beneath an apartment's living room. H you want to do some peeking yourself, the trend is featured in June's House and Garden magazine. '?Jfals,~ r:;g etlSI!/ Houses & Apartments, Montrose & Downtown area Base Realty Inc 330 Fairview 524-1871 Hardwood floors, mini blinds, track lighting adults only MONTROSE TRAVEL 3 days, 2 nights, Hotel & Round Trip Air Fare, Welcome Cocktail. Many other special attractions, Hosted by Charlie's Bar of Denver $199 based on double occupancy Call for details, 2506 Ralph, 522-8747 A Simple Statement for Better Living 'ITestheimer ''INTERIORS 1727 Westheimer Houston, Texas 77098 Telephone 520-1397 JULY 9, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Sally's wins Lone Star Classic By Billie Duncan The out of town competition was stiff, but at the end of the Lone Star Classic, two MSA teams wound up matched for the championship. Dirty Sally's had not lost a game. but the Galleon had. So when they met, all Dirty Sally'• had to do was win one game and the tournament would be over. Apparently that was too easy a way out of it. In the first championship game, Sal· • ly's lost to the Galleon, 12-8. The Galleon moved ahead quickly by scoring three runs in the first inning. They remained ahead the entire game. Arthur Castillo was 3 for 4 on the day, as was Pat Foreman. A certain Ross Gore was a respectable 2 for 4 for the good old Galleon. Dirty Sally'• still looked decent m the game, however, with Don Davidson and Jesse Young both hitting 2 for 3. A lot of the action was in the stands rather than on the field, with loyal fans (some of them out of townere who had The Galleon came in second. MSA Softball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS WHkend. July 3·4 no Hlague g•mes schtKlulfKJ STANDINGS Won LOii Pct 08 South Division .xGalleon 6 3 xJ1m'1Gym 6 3 A&K Jewelry 3 6 Briar Patch 3 8 Montroae Voice 2 7 North Division y01rty Sally's 11 1 Montrose MJnlng 5 • Mary· a 5 • Barn 5 6 Brazoa River Bottom 2 6 xcl1nched playoff spot ycl1nched first pl1ca In d1v111on THIS WEEK'S GAMES 667 667 333 273 222 917 555 555 •S.O 250 (All p,.... .i l..-y F~ Ff'On'I Montro-e. go OU1 Aichmof'd_ .-1 K•rby. let! on ENttoae > Saturday. July 10 M1ry·1 vs Montrose Voice. Spm Montrose Mining Co. vs Galleon. 6pm Barn v1 Jim's Gym, 7pm Brazos River Bonom vs. A&K Jewelry, 8pm Briar Patch vs. Galleon. 9pm Sunday, June 27 Briar Patch vs A&K Jewelry, 8pm Dirty Sally's vs Mary's. 7pm ...... 5~ 7 Brazos River Bottom vs Montrose Mtn1ng Co., 8pm J1m'1 Gym vs. Montrose Voice, 9pm MSA Women's Softball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS WHk•nd. July 3-4 No Q•mn schfldultKJ never seen the teams before) forming enthusiastic cheering sections. At one point the atand that was pro-Galleon and the stand that was pro-Sally's challenge<! one another to see who had the most enthusiasm. They both won. The excitement was running high for the final and deciding game of the day. Sally's came out swinging in the second game and soon it was all over. Sally's took the game and the Lone Star Classic by defeating the Galleon 8-4. Mario Marchena (who was the leading hitter on Sunday with . 700) was 4 for 4, and Jesse Young was 2 for 4. The Galleon was not exactly idle in the game, with Barry Pirkey hitting 3 for 4 and Arthur Castillo {who batted .571 that day) smacking 2 for 4. It had been a tough fight for the Galleon to get to the championships, having to first defeat the gutsy New York Eagles, in a game that was finally pulled out in overtime. The Eagles have a strong defensive ED MARTINEZ Renegades Duck• Hell R111era Armadillo Grph Twins Kindred Spin!• Royal A's Chuck's Angels STAND-INGS 7 • Special Blend 1 5 THIS WEEK'S GAMES WHkend, July 10.11 Pe• 1 ()()() 687 571 571 500 375 375 .286 .167 21+ 3 3 ..3..'.• 5 5'h No g1mes scheduled (play offs tentatively set tor July 18) MSA Monday N ight Bowling LAST WEEK'S GAMES Mondey. JL1ly 5 No Qamn schfK!uftKJ D1v~lonA 1 Eurolan lnt'I 2 B1rny1rd Hoers 3. 69era '4 Daddy'1 D1V1s1on B 1. Five Easy P1.ce1 2 Loli Lanea 3. E/J'• Protein Supptlment1 '4 Hole E Rollers STANDINGS Division C 1_ Cock·Tailers 2 Citizen Pain 3 Strikers '4 Strike Force D1v1111on D 1. Happy Tra1111 2 G1lleon One 3 Gator·Aid '4 Interact THIS WEEK'S GAMES fAlt I_,. 11 Stadl..., Bow1 8200 B• .. m&!r't) Mondey. July 12 Regular compel1Uon. 9pm MSA Eddie Chavez Mixed Bow ling League PREVIOUS WEEKS' GAMES Thursd•y. July 8 R•ults next week Sports New York'• Eagle's Nest captured third spot. HIGH GA.WES Larry Lentz Rich Mayer Thursday. July 1 221 Mark Hall 213 Kevin Hull STANDINGS (Through Juty 11 212.203 204.200 1 Just Marion & 7. Seit & Pepper II Lynn's Tropical 8. '4 to 1 Fruit 9 Thursday Night 2. Chases Tricks 3 The Rockettes 10. Gutter Sluts 4 Kindred Spirits' 11 . Kindred S~rits' Aces High Leather & Lace s_ For a Few D1ddl• 12_ Hang 10 More 6. Thursday Knlghtl CURRENT SUMMER SEASON RECORDS HIGH TEAM SERtES Salt & Pepper II 3096 Just Manon & Lynn's Tropical Fruit 3089 Thursday Knights 308' HIGH TEAM GAME For a Few Dadd•• More 1112 Thursday Knights 1078 Hing 10 1on HIGH SERIES (SCRATCH) Men· Butch lr11h &48 Women Pam Weaver 539 HIGH SER1ES (HAHOtCAPl Men, Phil Bla«eway 716 Women: Clara Esparza 628 HIGH GAi.iE (SCRATCH) Men Butch lrllh 2'3 Women: Nancy Peral• 209 HIOH GAME fHANOICAP) Men Biron BaldrKtge 287 Women: Nancy Perales 257 THIS WEEK'S GAMES !All GI'"" 11 Sl.td1Um eo....1. 8200 Br-111) Thursday. July 15 Regul1r compet1t1on, 9pm Pool Tournaments THIS WEEK'S GAMES Monday, July 12 Kindred Sp1r1ll 1~45 Bu"•to Speedway. 665-1751) II S 30pm, l•flQlll ••i.rn•NltOl'I. S2 erttry. wtnMf take Ill Rlr'ICh lM20'°' ,,..,,... ~17301 at I prn. 11ogle .. 1m•Mll()tl 12 1t1try_ Wll\l'lef taka au (S50 guarani•) Tueed•y. July 13 la'"90ll 12•17 Tt'"91 Blvd, 528--1821) It lpm, .. ngi. etim1Nhon. S2 entry. W•no.t take all W~y.Juty'4 8r'9f Pl:tch f22iM w Hotcomb9. ~71' at ilrpltl. .. "O .. ehminatl()tl. U entry. $50 pnn GB I (1'11 R•Chmond. 52&-8903) at l!IJMft, 11ng1e el11n1N1hort. S2 entry.""',..,..., tua all and new poo4 cue Tflvr«l•y. Jul'f 1.5 e.tn (710 Pec1f>C. 52&--SM2n at ep.n, c1out1111 e11m1n.t>on. S2 *1try. S2S fl1111 round~- 11s MCOl'id round pnie Ju11 Manon and Lynna (117fa•~ . .s2H110)atlpn.l2 W1tryt ..... ,,nertakaall E/J'1 (1213 RIChmoncl. 527--9071) at 10pm doublll el1m1na,hon. $2 ..-itry, Wll'lner take all MSA Tennis LAST WEEK'S MATCHES Jim Kitch over Aon Landrum 4-6, 6-0. fr'4 Dav+d Robtcheaux over L•ter Vela W. fr~ Davtd Robicheaux over Jon Colb9rt 7-S. 6-0 Richard Cot O¥« Lester VN 5-4. fr7. fr1 M1chMll Houston over Mike Green 7-S. 6-4 Rich Corder OVlf T•ry Rich fr1, fr2 Rich Corder ov• Chat11e Brown~. 6-4 Terry Rich over Edd .. Chavez fr2. fr2 Robert Arriaga OVf/lf Char11e Brown frt, fr2 Jim Scott ovet Jimmy Thamel 6-0. 6-0 STANDINGS TOPTt~ eLAOOUI 1 Rich Ryan 1 Michael Houston 2. Fred Lopez 2. Mike Green 3. Jim Kitch 3 Rich Corder ' Ron Landrum '4 D1v1d Garza 5 John Ryan S Tetry Rich 8 David Robicheaux 8- Robert Arriaga 7 Richard Cot 7 Charlie Brown 8. Lester Vela 8. Eddie Chavez 9 Jon COibert 9. Jam Olson 10. Don ''R1ngerM Smith 10. Jim Scott 1 RyarvRyan 2. Lopez.IHopkins OOU8LES lAOOEA 4 Colbert/Landrum 5. HoustontGreen 3 RotMchNuXIElliot THIS WEEK'S MATCHES !Coo.N1i!OeatldOl'l ... ~..O.of Mwl'lallal Dr'WWI...,_... Pwtl) Sunday. July 11 Regular compet1t1on, 10 30lrn. Courts fr10 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 9, 1982 team and they pull out all the stopis in order to make an out. The Galleon started playing the same way. At the end of four innings, there was no score and one bystander obaerved ~a\ whoever got the first run just might win the game. In the fifth. the Eagles scored one run, knocked in by manager Mike Carey. But the Galleon tied it up in the top of the sixth. At the end of the seventh, it was still tied up. Then in the eighth, the Galleon man­aged to send four pair of feet across the plate and the Eagles did not send any. So the final score was Galleons. Eagles I Arthur Caatillo, Ross Gore and Al Bel­garde were all 2 for 4 for the Galleon. The Eagles had been more successful against the Loa Angeles Hotshots. whom they squashed. 10-6. led by Mike Carey (3 for 4J and Howie Katz (3 for 4). in a game that saw the San Francisco fans cheering lustily for the New York team. The Hotshots bad defeated Brazos River Bottom, who finished in sixth place in the tourney. The BRB team included in its ranks the super-hitter from the Barn, Bill Schmidt, who took some flack from the more faahion-conscious players over the combination of uniforms that he wound up wearing. The Eagles had gotten their shot at the Hotshots by edging the Kansas City Cabaret S-7. So, the top te8.IIUI were Dirty Sally's first; Galleon oecond; New York Eagles third; Loa Angeles Hotshots fourth; Kan­sas City Cabettt fifth; and Brazos River Bottom aixth -·- ThP tournament was a auccess off the field aa well as on with the excellent organiza· tion of all aspecta of the tournament help­ing to create a friendly and relaxed atmoaphere for everyone. Wayne Romero said, "We think the Lone Star Classic really set the standards for gay softball toumamenta ... Housing and transportation were handled with no problems. One unfortunate incident, however, was that Tulsa's Tim'a Outlaws left their equipment bag at <>ne of the playing fields and it •0di88appeared." After raising the money to come and participate in the Clas· ate. it is a shame that they had to go home without their equipment. But a.a saddened as they were over the Joas. it did not affect their appitites on Sun­day evening when the Brazos River Bot­tom hosted a barbeque dinner, complete with brisket, chick.en, several salads and ma.uive trays of 8.880rted vegetables and relishes. When BRB owner Smitty was asked if he had foloeen the Sunday games, he replied, "Honey, I haven't gotten an opportunity to aee anything. I've been working on this barbeq ue for three days." The out of town teams talked to had nothing but praise for the way the tourna· ment was handled. ..There were no hitches," said Howie Katz, player on the New York. Eagles and commiasioner of the Manhatten Community Athletic Associa­tion Big Apple Softball League. Howie said. "We've had a great time. Our hoet waa the Galleon." He noticed a Galleon player listening and added."Wha­tever happened to Southern hospitality?'~ One Eagle. player •u.atained a broken arm on Sunday. Rick Fafard was pinch running and deeded to oteal third. "The guy didn't know how clooe I was." He caught the ball and ~wung around just when Rick touched base. "I could have stepped back and not fallen, but then I would have taken my foot off the base." So, inotead of being called out. he fell over backwards. still maintaining his foothold on the b&Be. He received emer gency treatment for the break:, but the end of the radiua waa crushed and he will have to undergo aurgery when he returns to New York He atill maintained that he had a good time. Also enjoyingthemaelveswerethegood· time team from Dallas who wound up being called the Independent.s ~ause their aupposed sponsor, Fitness Exchange, wound up not being a sponsor at all They lost their first game to Jim's Gym by a scant 8-7. "WewerenotecRtatic,'1 said rover Je~u;e Vatley. In their second game, they were slaughtered by a score they refused to divulge. Jesse was philosophical about it, though. "! was very glad because I didn't have to play another game. Besides I stubbed my toe at first base and I was dirty and I was hot." Hot in an entirely different way were the cheerleaders that the Kansas City Cabaret brought along. Led by Bruce, who is not only a bartender at the Cabaret, but is also Miss Gay Kansas, they wowed the crowd with their innovative cheering and athletic abilities. They cannot wait for the next tourna­ment in Kansu City, tentatively sched­uled for August 21, 22, because some of the Houston teams that they befriended just might be there. Tennis adds a ladder The Montrose Sports Association Ten nis League is expanding and has added another ladder. They now have the Top Ten, the B Ladder and the C Ladder. . Rich Corder is hoping that there WJll soon be enough women players out on the courta so that they can start a women's ladder. "And with the softball season ending, we'll get a lot of the softball players," said Rich, and added, "It's really gonna build when we start getting the results of the championships." The league players are easily distin· guished on the Memorial courts now because of their bright red and white T­shirts. The colors may have been chosen in honor of the color of the players eyes after the Texas Challenl{e Cup. More tournament news will be forth­coming after the July 13 meeting at Rich Corder's house, where the discussions wil! include the summer championships and the national tournament that will be held this fall in HouMton. Anyone interested in the meeting should call Rich at 524-2151, he said. There will also be a tournament in Dal· las in October and MSA Tennis is plan· ning to attend. CAAL FRIES Tulsa TwiM at bat Kansas City Cabaret cheerleaders EO MARTINEZ EO MARTINEZ • " . 529-7525 Saturday & Sund"'a y only $5 Liquor Bust, 4-7pm Houston's Wettest Happy Hour WEEKLY SPECIAL: Frozen Strawberry Daqueries · .. ~ ... WHEN YOU'RE TIRED OF GAMES ..... BC CLUB HOUSTON 2205 fannin 659-4998 ..... . 16 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 9, 1982 Montrose Art Introductions: a special event of the Houston Art Dealers Assoc. Pbotootory by Ed Martinez Saturday, June 10 is the opening of a cooperative venture by Houston art dealera during which a number of artists will be featured in their first significant local exposure. Many art galleries well known to local art aficionados will be staging shows for these relatively unknown. at least to Houston, artists. Some of these are the Moody Galleries, Dubose Galleries, Pritchard Gallery, Kauffman Galleries and Archway Gallery. Of these, Archway Gallery has selected the woru of Audrey Dygert, Ben Howatt and Carol Stoddard to display prominently. Ben Howatt is a young man originally from Boston who came to Houston in 1979 and whoae work has appeared in s uch placea as the Wooklake Square Festival. the Westheimer Festival, the Houston Festival, the Art Showcase '81. and numerous other locations in Houston. He has etudied at Ohio Wesleyan University and in New York with Deborah Remington. His work ia scheduled to appear at one man ehows at Two Hou.ton Center in August of this year and at the O'Kane Gallery at the University of Houston Downtown campus in September. Archway Gallery is a particularly interesting gallery in the Houston art scene. Located in the Village at 2517 "Solatice," oil and acrylic on canvas by Ben Howatt. University Boulevard, Archway is a cooperative partnership of recognized artists joined together to provide a showcase for their work. The artists have an opportunity to display their work free from the exploitation that is, unfortunately, often an inescapable part of the modern art world. Archway's quarters are in a building in the Village that has high ceilings and large open spaces conducive to browsing and close inspection of the artists' works. The gallery atone time was in a building near the M uaeum of Fine Arts on Montrose, and even then, some years back, the quality of the work offered by the partnen in the gallery was of a uniformly high quality. This move to larger spaces speaks well of the gallery's progress and the taste o{ Houston art patrons. Ben Howatt readily admits his debt to both M.C. Escher, the brilliant Dutch artist who expanded the state of perspective so dramatically, and DeChirico with hia view of metaphysical space. The works of Howatt employ certain tested techniques such as trompe l'oeil, as in his "Arcade," in which heavy lines seem to float in space. His interest in and clever use of creative perspective give his canvases a dimension frequently lacking in modern art. Mr. Howatt works primarily in acrylic, but he also uses both oil and acrylic in the same canvas, a technique not widely used Ben Howatt with hi• "Arcade," acrylic nn rnn11n.1t "Scape," oil acrylic on canvas by Ben Howatt these days. There is a strength to all of his works that employs emphatic line and texture for dramatic effect on the viewer. Part of the impetus for Mr. Howatt'a inspiration undoubtedly comes from his experience& in Nigeria, during which he worked for a subsidiary of Shell Oil creating graphics in training manuals for that company's use in operating manufacturing facilities in that country. Mr. Howatt apake freely and with obvious enthuaiaam for the people in Nigeria with whom he worked and that he helped to train as part of his duties. The exhibition at Archway Gallery continues to August 29 and deserves viewing by anyone interested in the work of fine artist.a handsomely displayed. Now an estimated 21,600 readers each week NO ONE covers Montrose like the Voice NO ONE covers Gay Houston like the Voice ~rving Mon1ro~ .Since 1974 *JULY* *SALE* 30°/o OFF ALL 14Kr GOLD NECK CHAINS & BRACELETS The ROUGH CUT 520 Westheimn Suite K '20-70' 0 JULY 9, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 17 Keoki Kona: Kamp with a Kapital 'K' By Billie Duncan His fulJ name is Salvatore DeNio Keoki­keonikalanilehuakona. and his full life is much too full to put in one story. Hawaiian from the waves in his hair to the curls in his toes, Keoki Kone provides organic musical entertainment most every night at the Top of the Hole, known affectionately to habitues of the club as the Pineapple Palace. From behind his multi-layered organ, Keoki beams out to the Hole crowd. He plays show tunes, standards, oldies and tht traditional Hawaiian songs that make him such a unique entertainer in Montrose. Where else can you hear "Hawaiian Wedding Song" in two languages? His organ is equipped with a built-in rhythm synthesizer with which Keoki forms the rhythmic base of his perfor­mance. Bui1ding on the gently rattling beat of the synthesizer, he manipulates the keys of his instrument to create surges and swellings of music, interspersed with the soft rambJings of his mellower moods. Keoki is the master of the half-measure and can play any song to his his own par­ticular memory of it or to the necessity of his level of inebriation. People who must have their tunes played to the precise measurements of the map on the sheet of music had better go elsewhere and leave the Pinaapple Palace to the people who appreciate the peticuler talente of the Pineapple Princess. And those talent.a keep the Top of the Hole filled nightly with people who love to be entertained. Keoki Kone knows how to entertajn the crowd. His wit is generally warm end only breathlessly touched with the enevitable edge of the razor. He enjoys a good line from the audience 88 much a8 the audience enjoys his come-barks to those lines from aouls brave enough to throw them. He is never threatened by comments from the audience, and will sometimes just sit quietly while some clown who thinks he baa a penchant for humor hangs himself quite neatly by not knowing when to shut up. At that point, he can destroy his "oppo­nent" with just a look and a raised eyebrow. Keoki haa raised other peoples' eye­brows also. When he was in his early 20a, the movie The Boy with the Green Hair came out starring Dean Stockwell. A pro­ducer in Hollywood told Keoki that he needed a gimmick in order to be recog­nized so Keoki dyed his hair green. For' eighteen years, hew as known as the Boy with Green Hair. L'Oreal ?f Paris did the hair coloring as a promotional stunt and everywhere he went, he got his hair done for free. Of course, t~is method. of achieving recognition did have its dr~;;t:~:iike Jiving in a fishbowl," said Keoki. But apparently he did not mind overt attention all that much because another part of his outrageous act was the on-stage appearace of two huge Hons. In one town, the lions were against the law and Keoki had to go to court. He did-splendidly dreRsed in Japanese robes with hie green hair flowing. Ont' time when he went to get his hair done in Chicago, he met a young and per­sonable man, and they hit it right off. They were together for the next 15 years. Keoki incorporated him into the act and he became "Kolo Kona," while the act became "The Kona Brothers" and the green hair dissappeared. Besides Keoki (known then as Koki) and Kola, the show featured authentic Hawaiian dancers and they toured (•xteneively. After a while the road got a ~it w~ary .. so the Kone Brothers settled m W1tch1ta, Kansas and opened a club. It was .. a satel­lite club in which the customers brown­bagged" it. The laws changed and the club cl°SoedKeoki opened a couple of Hawaiian Keoki Kona gift shops. He was burned out with no insurance. He went into club management. Along the way he loat "Kola" to the bar scene. Entertainment was in his blood, how­ever, and he could not give it up. He went to Tulsa where he did concerts for a while, but he explained, "Tulsa is not a nightclub town." But when he was there, a man came in and told him that he should go to Houston. He did. No sooner had he hit town than his trailer was ripped off of everything but his organ. So he really felt like he was starting out all over again. "I was showcased for three months at Warren's Inn, then I worked at an Ameri­can Legion Club for a year. I was just about to leave town when Joe Anthony (whom he had met at Warren's Inn) said, 'Don't leave town,' so I waited. '' After six to eight weeks, he started work­ing at theTopoftheHole. While he waited, "Joe and Mike took care of me, believe me." His overaJI experiences in Houston have been good. "It's the friendliest town J've been in. If I go back on the road again, I will still make my roots here." Something may come up that would not only keep Keoki in town but would give Houston something that it lacks. Joe Anthony and Keoki have plans to open a club that would be named The Pineapple Palace (for real) and would feature live entertainment from Hawaii and other Pacific locales. But for now, the lucky Montrose can catch Keoki in one of the more fun and offbeat ahows in the area. Aloha, and happy organ! BILLIE DUNCAN 'Cactus Flower': a complete meal By Billie Duncan The story of Cactus Flower is simple. Dr. Julian Winston, D.D.S., has told girlfriend Toni Simmon& that he ia married in order to keep from being tied down by having to marry her. He decides to marry her, and she insists on meeting the wife so that she can feel lees guilty about being a homewrecker. Dr. Winston must produce a wife. Meanwhile, back at the office, loyal nurse Stephanie Dickinson, who has been wife to Dr. Winston in every way except name and bed, waters her cactus. Since she is ao devoted to him, the gallavanting dentist enlists her aid in his charade. The rest of the evening is spent watch­ing the enevitable happy ending unfold. The play provt-s that predictability is not necessarily dull. The Windmill Dinner Theater, 309 Town &Country Blvd., ia presenting Elke Sommer in Cactus Flou:er through July 18. The script is by Abe Burrows and is based on a play by Pierre Barillet and Jean·Pierre Gredy. The show hes a plentitude of good lines and enough space for good actors to have fun. The Windmill's cast is pretty good. Elke Sommer as Stephanie Dickinson, the true-blue devoted nurse, is a marvel, handling the comedy with just the right balance between schtick and humanity. Her characterization is competent, varied and sparkling. Working well with Sommer is David Hull as Dr. Julian Winston . Hull brings a sense of middle-age charm still touched with college boy devilment to a character who could become unlikeable as he he is Montrose Live caught in his web of Jieo. Cynthia Wood brings her curves to the ·part of the gullible, but loveable girlfriend, and Montrose-based actor Chris Kinkade (who recently starred in Bent) does a superb job of walking around in a towel. Both Wood and Kinkade show a develop­ing comic sense. Johnny Greco as the social leach, Har­vey Geen field, is very good and Helen Ack­erman (an actres who obviously has many years of dinner theater under her belt) gives a fine performance as the matron with the mouth of plenty. Mrs. Dixon Durant. The play is filled with satisfying laughs and provides a pleasant evening of fairly mindleBS theatre. 'Oh! Calcutta!': a definite bore By Billie Duncan The 60s aex sensation Oh/Calcutta played June 29 through July 4 at the Music Hall. The show is no longer a sensation. Even the inclusion of former Montrose entertainer Tug Wilson could not save an inept road company playing tired material to an audience that had out· grown it. In the revolutionary malestom of 1969, Oh! Calcutta! was a considered. to be a brave and ground-breaking endeavor that would help to wipe away the idea that sex should neither be seen nor heard In 1982, Oh! Cal<utta!is a gaping yawn. We have seen naked bodies. We have explored the various sex myths. We have learned more about tht"' relationships between people. Now, if the show were good theater with excellent music and an intelligent script, then the history of the show would not be needed to keep it afloat. But the show is not very good. The music is completely forgettable and at times does not even fit the action or the choreogrphy that accompanies it. The skit.a are 1uat that: 111kits. No great prose here, although the show has pretensions of granduer by listing JuJes Feiffer, John Lennon, Leonard Melfi, Sam Shepard, Sherman Yellen and others as "authors." Well, every writer has a bad day. By the end of the performance that THE VOICE reviewed, at least a fourth of the auclience had walked out, including the reviewer. The lobby conversation was much more sparkling, intelligent and humorous than anything that had appeared on stage_ The audience members who talked to this reviewer in the lobby did not Jeave because they were shocked. They left because they were bored. • Duncan's Quick Notes Manly Monday: Baja's has taken the plunge. They are trying a male singer on Sunday and Monday. The singer is Jerry Quinones and he is ably backed by the fine piano playing of Charlene Wright. Ruth Hastings recenUy made the obser­vation that the cabarets will allow female talent to develop, but they expect men to be perfect the first time out or they are out the first time. Her thrust was that male talent needed to be given the same consideration as female talent so that the musical diet of cabaret-goers could become more varied. Jerry Quinones is definitely talented. Go by, if you get a chance, and support him as he developes. He already has a hell of a lot on the ball. The Osmond& Return: Donny and Marie and the Osmond Brothers will appear this weekend at the Arena Theater. I seem to recall that the last time they were in Houston, they were campaigning for Jack Heard. la that true? A:re Donny & Marie just a litUe bit country and a litUe bit "law and order?" Bowing to Pressure; For those of you who keep aoking when I will be perform· ing again, I have good news. I will be 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 9, 1982 doing a show at E/J's on Tuesday. The fint part of the show will be me and my guitar doing original mwric. Then Houston/ Off Braodway will join me for some improviaatioanal fun. And then we will top off the evening, cabaret style, with T?mmy Williams accompaning me on the piano. You lucky dogs! That'• 'Melo' not 'Mellow'; Don't Print That!, or Ten Nights in a Newsroom, by Montrose-based playwright Eddie Cope seem.a to be developing as a real romp and atomp boo-and-hisser. It opens July 23 at Theater Southwest, complete with oleo acts. including one fea­turing Montrosian Sam Cannon. Now. let's hear it for the hero! Don't Cry for Me, Jones Hall: What could bring 10 many Montrosians down ~ town so many nights in a row? Evita, of course. The award-winning musical ha~ on Eva Peron'• short but expansive life is playing at Jones Hall through tomorrow, July 10. If only it would play a bit longer. Sigh. Towering Talent: Well, give me a Florence Lacey as .. Evita," playmg through Saturday at Jones Hall beaded headband and a dog-spelled­backwards- is-god button. The Mamas and the Papas are back. Okay, it's not the original mamas, but the papas part io intact with John Philips and Denny Doherty teaming up with new mamas. Spanky McFarlane and Macken­zie Phillipe_ Spanky (whoae voice bears a resemb­lance to Mama Cass's) was the leader of Spanky and Our Gang, and Mackenzie is the talented daughter of John who gained fame as an actress in American Graffiti and in One Day at a Time. They ar\' doing two performances tonight, July 9 at the Tower. Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose Fr>Oay '""'YI. tP\fougl'I Thut9day, Jut>/ 15) •PIANO Montgomery, Mayes & Strltch 9pm Tuesday through Saturdliy at Rascals. 2702 Kirby, 524-6272 Jim Cater Spm Friday: Tom Williams Spm Saturday. Monday. Wednesday. Thursday. Greg Davis 8pm Sunday, and Kenton Parton Spm Tuesday at Key· boerd. 3012 Milam. 5~988 R1Chard Askin and Dana Rogers 10pm nightly (except Monday and Tuesday) at the CoPI (piano blir). 2931 Fbchtnond. 528-2259 Ruth H•t1nga 9pm rnghtty (except Sunday and Mon· day); Jetty Ou1non• 9pm Sunday and Monday at ea.-·a. 402 Lovett. 527~ Lee Lllforge e-30pm ntgl"llty (except Sund9y) --1th Alexandra HUI Friday. Satur~ and Wlldne.day •I Amo·a. 4002 Montroee. 52&-2993 Marquerite 4 30pm Monday through Friday at Bae· chua. 523 L~ett. 523-3396 •ORGAN Keok1 KoN Spm Fnday and Saturday. 3pm Sunday and Spm Wednesday and Thursday at the Hole. 109 Tu.am, 528--9066 • COUNTRY 6 COUNTRY/ROCK Ab & the Rebel Outlaws 9·30pm Fnday and Saturday and 8 30pm Thursday at the Exile. 1011 Bell. 65S. 0453; and 8 30pm Sunday at BrazOli Aiyer Bottom. 2400 Brtz.Oli. 526-9192 Flying Blind Band nightly (except Monday and Tu•· day) at Miu Char1otto. 911 Drew. 528-8840 Mustang Band 930pm Friday, Saturday. WedneKlay and Thuraday at BrazOli River Bottom, 2400 Brazos. 52&-911)2 •GUITAR "'l'" 9pm Frlday and lnah Folk 9pm Wednesday at the Park>ur. 2402 Mandell. 529-8069 Susan Christian 5pm Fnday; Lyra/Kat Graham & Linda Aum Rhyme Spm Monday, Wednesday and Thursday; and Rawslyn Ruffin 5pm Tuesday at Kindred Spmts. 5245 Buffalo Speedway, 665--9756 • SHOW GROUPS 01x1e Kings 8pm Saturday and 8pm Sunday at Happy Tra1l1. 715 Fairview. 521·2792 Mata Hari 9 30pm Fr1day and Saturday at Lampost. ~~~~~~9:2~1~~~,85~~jj;.;id 8pm Wednesday at "Oh! Ca/cu/ta!" cast (left), Elke Sommer (above) arnJ the MamtUJ and PapO-B (right) John Cay & Co- Spm Sunday at E/J"s. 12u Hien· mond. 527-9071 • JAZZ Robert C9Nllos Group 9pm Sunday and with Jimmy Ford 9pl'n Fnd•y. Saturday. WedneKlay and Thurw· day at Lii• Bnau. 814 W Gray, 52&-9959 Paul English 4pm da1ty (except weekends) at Amo's. 4002 Montrose. 52&-2993; and nightly (except Sun· day) at Cody's. 3.coo Montrose. 522·9747 W1ndrose 9:30pm nightly (except Sunday and Mon· day); and HoraceCnsby 9·30pm Sunday and Monday al Birdwatcherw. 907 Weathe1mer_ 527·0595 • ROCK I ROLL Automatic 3pm Sunday at Grant Street Station. 2377 Grant. 528--8342 •NU WAVE The Haskella and The Explosives 9-30pm Friday: X~ Spand-X and The Rude 9 JOpm Saturday: OC-3 9 30pm Thursday at Omni, 1540 Weslhe1mer, 528-­• 230 • IMPRESSIONISTS Tiffany Arriegus. Donna Day. Naomi Sims & Hot Chocolate Sunday evening at the Copa, 2631 Rich­mond, 528--2259 Little Bobby. Tracey and gueat Sunday everung at Exile. 1011 Bell, 65S.0453 "' Playgirl Foll1es'' 10:30pm Saturday at Pink Elephant, 1218 Leeland, 659--0040 • MISCELLANEOUS Talent shows Tua.day evening at the Copa. 2631 Richmond, 528-2259. Wednesday evening at Mldmte Sun, 534 Westhe1mer. 526- 7519: and Thursday eve­ning at Twins. 535 Westhetmer. 5~0244 Bilhe Duncan Show 8pm Tuesday at E/J's, 1213 Rich­mond. 527-9071 GRANT STREET Live-on the patio, Sunday Rock 'n Roll with Automatic STATION KRAZY HOUR 7 days a week, 9-10, 75C well drinks 2377 Grant at Fairview 528--8342 A People Place ••••••••••• JULY 9, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 19 Sunday, on the patio, a real live (as opposed to dead) Country/Western, _ Rock 'n Roll, Hillbilly band ~~- Monday-Leather Night! ;-t Wear leather and get :i happy hour prices and ;:__c ~~~:. ~~~hing else you ;;~ Tuesday's movie-"To Have and Have Not" starring Humphrey Bogart & Lauren Bacall ("You know how to whistle, don't ya?") Every day, every night: Receive a free numbered ticket with each visit to Mary's for a chance to win $20 if your number is drawn the next day. If the cash prize is not claimed the next day, the pot builds $20 daily. No purchase required. 20 MONTROSE VOICE / JULY 9, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat JULY JULY 9 10 JULY JULY JULY JULY JULY 11 12 13 14 15 F-.r ~l•CC\81 intormeuon e""""t •veru 'sled belOw. IOOk for th<' lpt·c•aonng org.an1zet'°n under r_.,g11~.z.11TlQtll' In the MortlrOM CiasSlllflO Selected Events through 7 Days rAFRIDA Y: Interact Houston's Community Coffeehouse 7·30pm·midnight, 3405 Mulbe!TY rAFRIDA Y: Lambda Alanon meeting at First Cnitarian Church, 5210 Fannin II.SATURDA Y; MSA's Softball League games, 5pm, Levy Field ILSATURDA Y: Bodybuilders contest, Cherryhurst Park. July JO -SUNDAY: "Womyn's Mini Fest" 1·8pm July II, Heidi's & Co .. 1905 W Alabama -SUNDA Y: MSA's Softball League games, 6pm, Levy Field .. YON DAY: Annual con!erenC'f> of International Gay Asaociation opens in Wa•hington, D.C., July 12 -.MONDAY: Montrooe Sports bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •TUESDAY: Montrooe Sports Volleyball League games 7:30 p.m., Gregory·Lincoln School, 1101 Taft •TUESDAY: CHE meeting, 7:30pm, Watson-DeNagy Gallery, 1106 Berthea, with City Councilwoman Eleanor Tinsley •THURSDAY: Montrose Sporta bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •THURSDAY: Wilde 'n SU!in gay radio show lOpm-midnight on KPFT Radio, FM-90 Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN 2 WEEKS: Colt 45s "Pillabury II Bake Off" benefit at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazoo, July 25 U N 2 WEEKS: "Assembly '82," 3rd biennial convention of Lutherans Concerned for Gay People, opens July 29 in Houston, laMting through Aug. 1, at Grace Lutheran Church U N 3 WEEKS: 7th Annual Reno Gay Rodeo, July 30-Aug. 1. with Joan Rivera & Rose Maddox as grand marshalls m!N 3 WEEKS: MSA Women's Softball League post·season tournament July 31·Aug. 1, location to be announced m!N 15 WEEKS: National gay leadership conference in Dallas, Aug. 13-15, sponsored by Dallas Gay Alliance at Grenelefe Hotel •IN 15 WEEKS: MSA Volleyball wumament Aug. 14 at Fonde Recreational Center •IN 7 WEFJ<S: 1982 Gay Athletic Games in San Francisc:o begin Aug. 28, lasting to Sept. r. • IN 7 WEEKS: Gay Softball World Series begins in San Francisco Aug. 31, lasting to Sept. 4 IUN 1 WEEKS: Integrity International Convention opens m New Orleans Sept. 2, lasting to Sept. 5. m/N 8 WEEKS: Texas Gay Conference in Houston , Sept. 3-5 IUN 8 WEEKS: North American Gay Men's Music Festival, Sept. 3-5, Minneapolis IUN 8 WEEKS: Labor Day, Sept. 6 IUN 10 WEEKS: 3rd Annual Gay American Artll Festival in Chicago opens Sept. 17, lasting to Sept. 30 m/N 13 WEEKS: Gay Academic Union 8th national conference Oct. S.10, Chicago IUN 14 WEEKS: Gay Atheist League of America national convention in Houston . Oct. 15-17, Americana Hotel, 3301 Southwest Fwy. m/N 14 WEEKS: Westheimer Colony Art Festival Oct. 16-17 Montrose Classified a·uS•NESS Ow NEAS ( 1 i w1 "'' ''" eecr. w-. rn """directory (a) bl.I.,,..... •tabliahmenll _,,,t'IO aa d1tlr•bUtlOfl po1nt1 lor !he ,,..,.~per (b) current Oi10l•V ect-..rtlM,.. lcJ en Houalot't gaybata&prrve1ecklb1(torlhebene«ilolOU1-o' town v•Sltoral ertd ;d) ~ol1t community 0<gani.z•l10ria 91ndiCit" M0nttoM Voke d61h1bullon polntl DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES Med Center-The Works from the low $40s' 5'4down! 11.5%> avail. New construction. Park on Cambridge Call Gary Sykes, 797..()443 Acker­Blum & Assoc .• Realtors There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with over a hundred distribution locations MONTROSE: LUXl!HY DESIGNER TOWNHOUSE for lease. 2-story end unit, 2 bedroom, 2'h. baths, mlr­rorred dining area, chandeli­ers, celling fans, area pool, covered parking, cable TV. $895 per month. ALL UTILI­TIES PAID. (713) 526-3369 or 871-8074. Ask for Del. WM, 6~ 1751b9. altracl•¥8 -& a!hletu .. M&kl same to an.re 1 bedroom apt riear Me1NJr111 City $13Slrno•S50dep. elec Cat187G-l'I• · before 3 ~ Hk !or Mark Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 M•ture, rHponalble male or fem•le lo share 3 bedroom house nHr Med· h:el Center. Swimming pool, washer, dryer. $325 Includes utllltlet. Plu1 deposit. 664-6984. Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have n l·hoke of the .. ~ istyles; OCP9f egvl•rwon:io 5' ~ERALlCAPJfAL W0R01n6-po,tttly1>9 Hll'lci"'°r hef• jllutJng ,..,. WOl'"dl in tr. 1 Ille ?I' I een1enng on• 1ne c->m~el80C•ltM vs•ngme•1mum8regue1 wo.~c ALLCAPTALWOROS oei.ne 25e per regular word or 40C PER AL1.. CAPITAL WORD 1n 8-poml t)'pe. as shown here. (If using few words in this srze or 1f centering on a lme, compute at $1.50 a line. using maximum 6 regular words or 4 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a lone ) 40C per regular word or 60C PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 10-point type. as shown here. (If using few words in this size o r if centering on a line. compute at $2.00 a line. using maximum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) 50¢ per regular word or 75C: PER ALL CAPITAL WORD In 10-point bold type, as 30C per regular word or 45C: PER shown here. (If using few ALL CAPITAL WORD In 8-polnt words In this size or II cen- ~d-'= ~: :.':!!'. ':~:;!!~~~: tering on a line, compute at on • Une, compute at s1 .so a line, $2.00 a llne, using maximum using m1xlmum 5 regular words or 4 regular words or 3 ALL 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to 1 llne.) CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) Individual or few words in a ny one size should be computed a t the per line rate. You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lower case wor9.s, and regular and bold words, providro they are all the same type SIZE (6, 8 or 1 O point). Simply compute each word individually. BUT you may· NOT mix type SIZES on the same line. THERE IS A MINIMUM charge of $.1 per c/asS1fted ad. BLIND BOX NUMBERS can be assigned for $2 per week extra. Run the same classified 4 weeks m a rou· and deduct I .5%. If your classified is lengthy, you may wa nt to cons ider running a "display" ad instead. Call our advertising sales depa rtment for information. WRITE OUT your ad on a plain sheet of paper. lndude your name, addre1;.'i and signature. and mail or bring it to the Montrose Voil'e, 3.117 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. We do not bill. rAtE 11; Nt1t:Sl./1LL, IF WS tUJSE AJ.L rNr GAr .B/l/'r$, ~LrNEdAYlllfrNSANI J.IE ALL ~LP.ENroF ()Ult $0 CALLE' .SIN.f, Yd<l'D 14 Our 11,: aos1N1s.r- ~ H411(.f. (~ C~vsAP6fi Nd ,_.,d-'E lfONEY.' ---- EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment GAY BARS {Al Houston Tevern Guild membel" •nd1C111t0fl, pieced In tt111 directory 111 their requr'il •1AccHul--5ITTM11---5ii3396 live enter· l11flmen1 See our ad elsewhere this issue •.B.U.t.·a -40-Z Lovetl-·52i-Q866: w•th rest11u rent. l•veentttrtamlnetlt See our ad elsewhere this issue • AIAAN 710 P1u •• fic 528·9'27 country See our ad elsewhere this issue • BRAZOS RIVER BOTTOM- 2400 BratOI f!ii!B-9192:CO\Jnlry _ ,•.•,". '"" PATcH m. w Hoecotnt>e~MS-­See our ad elsewhere this issue • C~A$ES· 14f6R, hmond--~~1~ ~·-:CO ,•,C .H. tCKlN -COOP s35-w.auie•mer--52ft.. See our ad elsewhere this issue • COPA· 2831 Richmond- 528-2259 d1,co w111'11how1 COvE 2912 s -shtlp~d_: 5~"~_170 Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in 1-fouston in the Montrose Voice eTHl OHP .2212 Cof'lverM· S28-~J4 See our ad elsewhere this issue •DIFFlAENT ORUM ·1132 Wft~'"* -$21- 152!. leetner See our ad elsewhere this issue • .i.DIATY IA.LL ra-- 220-AYOndil•--529-7525 See our ad elsewhere this issue •EJJ"1 ·1213 Richmond----:_527.9071 See our ad elsewhere th is issue • A!_X..!1.:-f- -10119elt-65~53 e<><1nlry Support, join your community organizations •OALLEON _;2J03Ri(timond-522·7618 See our ad elsewhere this issue • GAY BOY 1NT ERNAi10NAi(O-e 1 1~1 .. 1v Richmonct-526-8903 ,•G,.R..A,.N.,T iTREiTITATl0N-9i1-~N-­See our ad elsewhere this issue •HOLE HOUK · 109 Tuem-52&.IKiee See our ad elsewhere this issue • j R ., · :ec:i Pac1l1C-521·25"19- 9Ji.JST: MARION & LYNN;S-817 -F-e1rview 52&-9110: i.blen HIY•oAAD -·30f2-M11em 521-9988 with ~no enterta 1nmen1 See our ad elsewhere th is issue •KINDRED .,.,., Tl-5245 BullalO SpMdwey-fl65-9756 pt9dommenuv IMboan See our ad elsewhere this issue • LA ~iP0ST· ·2411Ttmee81;ci ~528-e921· 1e1: ''" it LAZiJ-312Tuem-s2S.9.343 • i.OAD1NG-~OOC1<----:: 1735 -w.S1rieu,.;:-s20:" 16111 leelhet d11CO •~MARY't ~1022weitMtmer-528."8851 See our ad elsewhere th is Issue • .i.MIONITE SUN :5J.t we11he1mef-S26-1Sl9 d11CO. ah(>WS • MISS CHARLOTTE"S-5111 W Orew-523- 8&40 country eM6N'fR05E--MlNING C0-805 PKiflc- 529- 7 ... • NUMIUll 2--300 WHlheimer- 526-6551 d•KO See our ad elsewhere this issue e PINK f:LIPHANT ~ 1 21 11 L .. land- 859--0040 with shows See our ad elsewhere this issue eRANCH--M20o-t M••n-S28=a130 - e RASCAL I -270"2° i(,rt;y::524=ifil w71-h7•­t• urarit. hve entertainment See our ad elsewhere this issue Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 • ROCKYS- ~3418 W O&J1u ....::528-8922- lelb.1n • iWiN·s--::-535- w9.ttMt;mer:..52o-02,.-,.-1e.b1an d •ICO eVeNTURe--1;.r.::2923M&,n-s22-oooo ORGANIZATIONS A CAPELLA ChonA P9r1 ol {Montrose) Church olCtmat ~CLu- 123eWGr1y-~ AMERICAN LEATHERMEN (1oc11I ctub) ­mMtl It D•~lttlt Orum. 1732 W•lhelmet- 5~_2_!_ club _ f'llght _W_od __ _ 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment ASTRO Rainbow All~nce-52 ...... 793 (vcuce i. TTY) BERING Memor1ll ~ethodisl ChurCn- 1..tci Hawthor09-528-1017 United Method1tl wOf­ahlp MfVlC. 10 509.m &Jn BETwEENTWOworid.-i~:19i3- mee1i;.•ry other Thur• BLACK , -WHilfiJ1ENTogether cBwMT)-529- 5006. 7• 7-9812 :o=~Jf.~'!~~R~;!.~~= "'" CHURCHOFCHA1STiANFA°ITH-•1J W9'1-t\et- ~~:=n~B=~~~ni TUM ~mng•.:..£_hotr_~c;11C!_W:~~mg There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice C1TlzENS FOR HUMAN EOUAurV ICHE1- =:;~n•1 X1 1 - -236-eeee bollrdmMtong2M COlT-•575 (so<:18i club )- ~• •t BrazM River Bottom. 20:) Brazot-52&-91g2 e CoMMLiNITY -COFFEEHOUSe =s;;o;;cl of l/H Inc .. 7 30pm Frld•ys •t 3'05 Mult.rry CONG Aril: CHAYIM - mMll •t MCCR. 1g1g Oec•tur - 552· 13'0. &88-8997 MrVice & •ocial epm 2nd & 'th Fr1<l•Y• CONROE AREA GaY -wo~- 75&-0J5.4 COuRT-OF-THe s1NGi.ESTAA=mMii ii!Pin11 Elfl>h•nl. 1211 L"l•nd -65t-Cl()o40 Max :e HOUSTON CRIS"iSHOTLINe--22._1505 Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice OtAL-11-a.v-Alh.1•1- :52¥-2222" pro)Kt ot G.y AtM1•t Lugue ol Amenc• 01ANAFOiJN0ATION -2700 Muon~ riiGNtTY-m..11 St ~t-"°lic--s1uden1 Center 1703 Bolsover--5~92e9. 52 .. 76« rr-hngs ~pm SaturO._~• Support, join your community organizations FAMILY & FRIENDS oTGav•-~ FtR-SfUNlf.iRIAN ChUrch- 5210f.nn•n· :""52&: 1571. worship 1erv1c• 111Slm SUn GREE-NSPOINT/FM 1ii0 Ar-.~ Friendl- 821 -9681 GAY& ALivE~i; E;p.nence (GASE>- 52&-1311 . 528-0881 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with over a hundred distribution locations GAY ARC:HtVES of Ta1ta1 pro~ GAY ATHEIST L..Que oi ArMn ca-524-2222 national corwen11on Oct 15-17. Amencan• Hot••. 3301 South-I Fwy - HOU•lon a...·y HISPANIC CAUCUS~ -2122 N;.....m.;;-112= 521-0037. met11 3rd ThurSday1 0AY--iT~lfAN o-.:Ou"P- 5~98«---­GAY NuRsES a PHYSICIANS ot Hou1ton-c/o GPC, 4'500 Main 111217 - n7-2287 GAY POLITICAL CAUCUS (GPCJ:..:tioo Mam #217· 521·1000 genaral bUllnMI meeting 7 30Pm 111 Wednetday1. educa11ona1 forum 7_ !>P.!!'~~d ~!!!id41_~ Now tremendous circulation in Montrose, but yet still low advertising rates-the Voice GAY PRioi WEEK_ S:z_ &,.,,,,.uttee- :J&i""-­G;; Y SWITCHBOARD- ~11 -- -- ~t~=i~=-~~.~~;:·~PR!r.::: Mol'\lrOH Voice. SPH<fy Pnnt1ng. Soud-lrlike Tra'lel Tech traval 1ogency HEPAT1Tus HOTLINE-J•m_0r_o.v_ld_ .tm. 2287 a pro;ecl of GPC"s M9d1C11I Cornm111 .. HOME COALnloN-·1.oe- o.kdale---521--0198- HOMOPHILE INTERFAITH AlltanCit. ~29 Manor · 523-0809 Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 Hou11on -Area -GAY &T-EsiflAN ENGINEERS & Sclenli•I• · -528· 73U mHU 7pm '1h Wlldn•daya H0Usf6N COMMuN•TY CLOWNS~--a152--:.iJ14 0) Now that you've met my ego, let me introduce my id. HOUSTON DATA-PROfESSIONAL.5-mMU in Easl Room. HoMay Inn Centr.I . ~ South Mein- 5ZHl922'. meellng 7.30pm 2nd TUMdliys .H.O.U. STON HUMAN RIGHTS LEAGUE- 523- HOUSTON MOTORCYCLE CLU8-clo Mary·a. 1022 W•thelmer- 528-8851 HOOliOti'"TAVERNGu1LD• Wbera----;;-e-S.rn. 0.rty Sally"•. E.ule. Mary's, Mldnrt. Sun VH Inc 3'°5 Mulberry 52&-701 • , 894-1732 Community CoffHtlouM 7 30pm-mtdnight Frt ~;~o:i,''~~=•111:o;~~~:p~8~ Thursd•ys INTEGRITv/HoU.ion (t~merly EP"iiCop-il ~~.-=1~g·~ ~~ =~:v:u•n­~~ fo1~~~~~- 1IH.1nc.- 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment e KPFT Re<liO. FM-90-41g L.cw9tt 81\.d--529= 4000 'Wilde ·n St•n- gay r.clio show 10pm­mldn1ghl Thvrs LAMBDA ALANON--meott1 at 111 Un1tanen Chorch. 5210 Fann1n--52 1-9n2 meetrng Frt ~•ng LESBIANS .. GAY PEOPLEtti ~IC~ '7e«t meeting 7 ~ 111 Satun:laya LUTHERANS coNCiRNEO-~ Lutherlf'I Chvrch. 2'15 Waugh- 521-0983. •53- •~.!.:!.m~Bil 3:' ~m::~~=llO~~~ eran• COncetned tor G•y People. July 3-Au~ 1 METROPOLITAN Community Church of the R .. urr•CllOfl (MCCR)-- 1919 Decelur- 991· !.!!~ ro'~! ~n;~~30Cn ~17 =·e.,:~ membentup inquire~ clua 7 30pm Mon Alanon meeting 9pm Mon . AlcohoUcs Anonym­Ol. ll mHl1ng 9pm Mon. & Thurs There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice MONTROSE:-CIVIC C1ub(N9artown)· -meeta at Bermg Chvrch. 1440 Hllwthorne-522--1000 meeting 7 30pm fourth T uesct.ys MONTROSE CLINIC-104 -W..tneimer- 52._ 5531 ot*'I &-10pm Frt, 1-5pm SUn &-10pn T~ ~ Thv~ _ _ _____ _ MONTROSE COUNSELING Center-900LO¥elt 11102 - 529-0037 MOtiTRo se PATROL-520 WH~ 2273 MONiROsES"1NGER~l"i'i ..CCR. 1919 0.C.lur-528--0650 MONTROsE SPORTS iliOCiA TION{ MSA):.. 022-330< =~.!~.~1-~~r:.·~~~~;i ~~-~ _!_ ThYrs ~nmg1 Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montro se Voice JULY 9, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Commentary The Gay Olympic Games: An Imminent Infant By Tom Waddell, M.D. Any new idea invites an abundance of new views. The Gay Olympic Games, the first international athletic and cultural event sponsored by the gay community, has received its share of comments, but only recently have I read the first article that detracted from the concept of the Games. At first, I thought it beat to dismi88 the piece as "sour grapes," but then I decided to address the sentiments it contained, since the ideas it contained might be plaguing others. Allen Young (last week's MONTROSE VOICE) seems to be dis­turbed by the notion that the Games are more than just another gay disco or parade. The scope of the Olympiad bothers him, and he is offended that we view the Games aa an opportunity to gain respect from non-gays and to stretch the image of gay people in a way that challenges the perspective of the Moral Majority. I don't know Allen, only bis writing. He is obviously not a sports fan_ His ideas about what it means to be gay come for the '60's, when militante and drag queens were the only gays bold enough to declare themselves and demand equal righte. Thanks to thooe days and efforts, there has been a near-renaissance in gay life in the United States. Allen still thinks we need to develop our own self·respect, and then the rest of the world will respect us as well. We're past that, Allen, a great many of us do respect ourselves, but that doesn't get much mileage when confronting a Bible-belt mentality who doesn't give a damn how liberated we "feel." There are a number of approaches to the problem of gaining parity in the eyes of a bigot. One can try to legislate against the bigot's activities and discredit his evangelism. That is being done with equiv· ocal success by several politically active gay groups. You can grab the bigot by the throat and throttle him senseless. Very satisfying, but ultimately counterproductive. There is a better way to do something that is good for us and also non-threatening, pleasant, positive, and spirited in the eyes of the bigot. Let them be educated by identifying with our event. If we already spend some of our energies in organized athletics, why not amplify that aspect of our lifestyle to our advantage? I do hear what you're saying, Allen. You are afraid that the Gay Olympics will not be aggressively sexual when you feel that after all, it is our eexualtiy that makes us gay. '!Tue! The 'Games will not be aggressively sexual. No slogans, no graffiti, nothing sexually suggestive. The Games will be serious for those who take their game seriously, and sexualized only to the extent that the individual imagination wante to sexualize them. Want to sit in the stands and fantasize about two men wrestling, or two women boxing? Have at it; many do. But what i.9 gay about exercise, or recreation, or athletics, or compe­tition? Ia there some form of basketball that gays play differently from that we already know? Is there gay swimming? Gay hurdles? What does a gay javelin look like? (I'll probably get some graphic ideas in the mail.) It's just athletics, Allen. A great many gay people, and a great many non-gay people enjoy them for a lot of wholesome and healthy reasons totally unrelated to sexuality. And being a "si88y" baa no meaning on the playllig field; if you can't throw a ball, try swimming. If you don't like any }'port, come and cheer for your friends. Your comment that we are "taking a sad, defensive posture in regard to our aexuality" makes me think you are projecting a wee bit. A firm majority of the gay men and women I know are not only not defensive about their sexuality, they believe they are advantaged! That is also the tenor of the Games. We, who live openly as gay have already achieved a freedom in a critical area our our lives which is not enjoyed by those who strive for traditional sexual roles. We, at least, choose a role that fit.a us, rather than fitting ourselves into a pres­cribed role. Aren't we lucky, and haven't we got something important to teach! Response to the Games has been phenomenal We get inquiries from all over the world for both participante and spectators. There is a level of excitement that transcends diversity. Even you, Allen, found the Games sufficiently intriguing to write about, though it was to com­plain that they are not what you want them to be. Do you ever attend any non-gay event.a? Some of uado, and manage to enjoy ourselves because we are people first, and gay second. Reverse those priorities, and you get a ghetto with a ghetto mentality. Wouldn't it be nlce if we could make freedom of aexual choice a desirable thing for everyone? Then all thooe closeted brokers, secre­taries, politicians, clergy, police, truckers and housewives might be happier people. If they watch the Gamee, they will see all those categories represented. We are everywhere. . . . If you are in San Francisco on Auguat 28, 1982, Allen, I will mvtte you to watch gay men and women from all over the worl? lined up behind the flags of their citiea, liotening to the Gay Olymp1ca Games anthem played by a spectacular array of gay marching bands, and watching the Gay Olympic Torch complete 1ts Journey by runners from Stonewall in New York. They will see it light the Gay Olympic Flame and signal the beginning of the First Gay Olympic Games. How much more gay can that be? And they are the first. They won't be perfect, but can you imagine what those first Games werB like in ancient Greece? Pretty tattered, I imagine, taking place in some obscure corn field. The Gay Olympic Games can grow in a beautiful way. How about your support? •1982. Stonewall Features Syndicate 22 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 9, 1982 ''I'm JOttY, but we haven't any room ..• You'll hove to sleep in the hovoe.'' "No, no, nol Now, try it again! .•. Remember, this lo - - and only ticket out of het'el" Gary Larson The African rhino: An animal with little or no MnM of humor. "Hello, Emily. Thil is Gladys Murphy up the st,_t. Fine, thanks, .• Say, could you go to your window and detaibe what's in my front yard?" r::.r°r.s:f:~ll~~~~~ ~~I dLle;: 523-0413 .., .. Naon puiy Apnt 17-July 18 ~o:.~'So~-=I~~~ 3s!·rfe~Y~~J~~,~~ AIJQ 31-Sepl A Mo,..1ro.. Spe>rlt -WOMEN-·s SOFTBALL League-7211-9371 post-Mason tournament .i'Ut>' 31·Aug 1. k>Ut•on 10 be 1rtnounc.d Motltrose 5Ports iENNIS----524=°2-151- - Mol'ltrOI. - sPOr11 v·oLLfveAiL-~2930 ~~:.-;.~~~,..!:,,~~~?';~;,=:en:=: tionel Center ~0NTRo5E:-SYMPHONIC 1>mnd=mee11at 8er­mg Church. 1440 H1wtt1orn1-527-9669 meet­ing 7 JOpm Tun MUSTANGS 1.0C111-Ciub-)~-me.t1 at the Barn 710 P1c11ic-528-IM27 club night Thurs Recre1110,..11 Land Fund Committee organ1za­t1on11 meeltng 8 30pm. July 4 OPERATION oocuMENTAi10N- -proie"Ct 01 GPC AECReATIONAL Land Fund-Comm•lt&e­PfOf" CI ol Mu111ng Clul) Rice· uni. G.y1L1~&iwoft Group-52-•- 012• TEXAS BAY .AREA G • .,.:..:-m---:J131- meeting Thurs...,.,..~ Support, join your community organizations TEXAS GAV CONFERENCE 1x--eee=fi31 woi· lerence s.p. 3-5 11'1 Hov9ton TEXAS GAY TASK F6RCE-s&70u. 522· llSS9 at•I• cocil~reN:e "" Hou•IOn Sept 3-5 TExis HUMAN - RIGHTS Foundllt.on- 1519 Marylaoid- 52'-9139 rE.xAs RIDERS- <Jo Mary·•. --1022~ w"th• mer- 528-15851 IJNITARIAN/UNIVERSALIST Gay CaUCts•·-clO 1•1 Unllanan Cl'll.lrcl'I. 5210 Faoinm-521).9787 52&-6M2 mMhng 3rd Suoi. allemoon• WESLAVAN-FELlowSHIP- 864-8899 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with over a hundred distribution locations WESTHEIMEA C0t.oNY-ARls Al.SOel.!On- 908 W..tfle<l!W-521--0133 lall lfttv•a• Oct IS. 17 w.iiei. MM'"Qrii.ppie_ m11~eTne7Kil Au 50 ~~:!'i311~~. ~~'i~~."N~~11:~~8!- MMt lhe rung aluda' PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS ~~=RJ:!.~1~ ·~r:.'~1~g ftoor. HoultOn. TX nooe. Editor.....,..... nght to ~::',~~Otlpe~~;:~llp~::1::~ ~Inning ol lhe Clua1l1eda HAN050M-f HeALTHY.-OvERWEIGHT ::!~~h-;syt~I ~:~~=:.~~:=lg~=~ ~~~~~~~·r;_;1:~~~: Box1~~· INVIGORATING BODY MASSAGE BY RICK. DETAILS BY PHONE. 991- 4736. CAMPING BUDDY, 30'o, helllthy, mocho, lrlm, Mrlouo. 5211- 1513. Now tremendous circulation in Montrose, but yet still low advertising rates-the Voice BODY MASSAGE. Your place or mme Afternoon or evenings, Bruce. 521-2009 FOR AN .ATMOPSHERE ot aoc1•I virtety and .~., ,~, ~~~~·! ~;~~-.=~~~ii~~=:~r1:4~~ Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 PRIVATE GAY CLUBS :.~x OFF'iCE -1825 Ru;;hmond--522-1825 ~~~a~OUITOflll 8a1t11-~ F--..,.,,n-~ See our ad elsewhere this issue. 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment • FRENCH QUARTER ThNt.--3201 -LOWI•· an•--527.0782 male ••oro...: PA '3100 fanruoi-522-2379 mo~ See our ad elsewhere this issue RESTAURANTS •8AJA"I 402 LO¥ett--52M~866 See our ad elsewhere this issue .e,B.R. ASc;ERIE T00-1322--W.Stheuner-528= eCHA-PUlTAPfc--e13 Richmond-52~2365 .e.o,e,C ATliR -CAFE· -1--ae-W~b.ma -=-s2S:. • GREEK ISLAND--3o2 Tu,;m:.:.:s22-1o4o­• OVRO OVROI s-.ndW;chsti'OP=tili Wntheimer--52~ See our ad elsewhere this issue eHA-RiU,A ' I Ethiopian Culsina-428 Wfflhetmer--526-2895 See our ad elsewhere this issue •HONG THONG 42' We1theimer-528-82i5 See our ad elsewhere this issue i HOuSEc>;-PrES~3112 Kirt>y 528-3816 •INTfRN.iTioNAL Club-·Rw.-u-;;;t-=2i3 W91tt'lelrnet-523-2795 See our ad elsewhere this issue • JADE ORAGON-=22• w .. tMi"*-526-2683 ,•M,A,R_CE L0·5+c;cfHm:::1521 w.~ eil!ftl 13o:iw'81-lhe•rner-S2&--8823 - See our ad elsewhere this issue e 0MAR~~_L?".'9__!!:--5~ •RAICAL.1-2702 K1rt>y-s2~n See our ad elsewhere this Issue • RAUL ~seR"ASS RUeBIN"G-914"-w Al1bllm1 -!'in-<:1627 • S:Pu6-u.l1KE__:•1ewei1ne1rM'r-5~­• nAA ptzv. .:1111-N0rt0ik:s2~ See our ad elsewhere this issue. • STEAK ·N· EGG- 4:Z:.\i Mo:titroae -528-81~ • T1M'S eo11M st.op--1525 westt. ... m-.;.. ~29- u• - --­• WIN'E S'ELLUI -1408 Wllll'le•ttMtr-528-3878 See our ad elsewhere this issue SERVICES EXPERT PAINTING EXTERIOR/INTERIOR, LOW PRICES LARGE & SMALL JOBS RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL Power washing, sheetrocking, mil· dew removal , plastering, gutter repairs. texturing, siding repairs, wallpapering, stucco repair, tiling FREE COLOR CONSULTATIONS FINANCING AVAILABLE GARY, 271-5545 TYPll\IG, ALL KINDS 526-8780 Quality wallpaper hanging & painting. Cal' 447-6109 . LESBIAN PROBLEM SOLVING AND SUPPORT GROUPS AND INDIVIDUAL AND RELATIONSHIP COUNSELING. Dr. N1netto Bruckner, p1ychologl1t, 523--2180. REMODELING/IMPROVEMENTS. Full carpentry Including French doors, cabinets, • kitchens, bath­rooms. Excellent workmanship, experienced, references. 529-3869 ATCO ""' eonvot-see-.1331----- See our ad elsewhere this issue eFITNES50:CHANGE1it,.... ~ Richmond· ·524-9932 ~aco·•hilf· ui0rl-to1 R1Ct1mon<1- See our ad elsewhere this issue :..i::IACAAn hHea~1"91on-52&= See our act-elsewhere this issuA :~~~~20-<;Y:JT HOusE lodg1ni- .iQe HOUITON TAAY'El C:Oniuii."'fiii=82fzs77' See our ad elsewhere this issue e JCENH0wER- e-11u1Y'-s7h"OOl=321 Wntl'leomer-520-71172 JAMES D. KRISTIAN PhD, hypn010Q"1il-977- 2'85 See our ad elsewhere this issue e KWIK KALL Mau 8o•ll :331f M<W>lro.,._ 522·1898 :2\~:Ds +ia1r -Oeaign--«ie wn1Morri1r .e.u.o.N EL Ha;-O..ign-3220 Yoek~· -52&= • MONTROSE HA-1R-0..1gn --017 M<.>nt.0.. 622-2822 •MONT .. OH: TRAVEL· 2509 Ralpl\- ·522- 87'7 See our ad elsewhere this issue •MONTROSE VOICE -.piper---331f Mo;;: lrOll, third lloor-529-6490 MOVING, HAULING. Movemeatera, 521-3155. PATJUCIA ANNE O'KANE, allorney--3323 Yoell.um--52&-7911 See our ad olsewhere this issue ePRl\IATE POSTAL SYSTEMS mail boxes- 1713 WNlnei~r · °'63-3020 • SALONDANIEL -hair C.r1 111°2G-Cher,.Y hu,..t-520-9327 Murphy's ManorByKurtErichsen WcU, he lcaft W.- Saudi Aro1>ia lq+ Ocbb&r, "" I 911vc hW.. an unfi>rqctW>I& far-.wc.1 .... I C)Ot clr"'lr an! 1Dld h•ITI he WIS fflc onl!j ...., I codld CVCY' love ... sPElov PAINTING-·~S.00 S.U.ire BIYd -687- 7417 See our ad elsewhere this issue ~VIEL TECHl~~-5719Kuby-5z'2- See our ad elsewhere this issue WOAOCR.t.ri typeMn1;;'9-~2s1 See our ad elsewhere this issue SHOPS & STORES ARCHAEOLOGICAL ARTS A unique gaJlefy apec1ah:r.1n9 1n auth4ml1c mUMUm quai.ty 1rl ind ar11taci1 from anc11n1 G.-..ce. Rome, Egypt ind Boble Landa Items 1000 1o 5000 )'M,.. old In 111 pric1 l'llnges «33 .8.1.u.o ,n. e.c . su•t1204 TUftdaylnruFnday 1·5pm .• ,A.l_l·S_TA A-·Adu11 Neowt--1..07 RIChmGr'd· e ~TH.t.TGDTIERs-o,tti-432SMOn1~ .522-6978 9 RtCHAR0A-Li.ENfkm11-·18'8Wllttwimlf"­' 26-m5 ,.,.~,....'., *-.:11~-,--swfwy ... eASYt.UM Ad.Jtt Baoi.11or-..12o1 R•Ch~ .•.B ALL PA-RKAM eOOi,;ltQ;:...::.1aif w At;. ~ eBAllC llROTHEAI ~~1220 W•theuner-.522·1126 See our ad elsewhere th is issue •THE HD HOUIE-2115 N0rlolk-. si~si1i See our ad elsewhere this Issue eBLUE 1R1S:- 36111 s snephird- S23-1827 • BOOM TowN-BLOOMS- t10we,;:...32ws Shepherd-·52&-8110 f,~=~~i'.. ~ :.,~~ ""'' e CARGO tfOUSE-1802 Park- 'i~ ecoNE o.-.NCEWEAJf-4704 MOn1;oM=5n: 1673 • COMPANY 8 m1111•rYw-;;;'-53ie W•lheltnlr-965-9753 Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice e OINER'S Ad-:ii ~40 W;;u;;;;;,-:~: ""'° • 00U8RA-VA JONES: lhe Mlt'lhoie ciothtng- 1113 w Grey-~·1089 .e,O..O WNBEAT~:...2111RK:nmond: 523- 90RAMATil<AQ1tta-=3224 Yo.ll.um-528.-5'57 •fAC~4-12wfttn;m;r::-5a-141' •FRAM! Of Fl!.FIEA'ENCl p11n1 & lrammg- 1533 Westhe•"*-52<H>710 See our ad elsewhere this issue .e.F..R IDA-Y~ FIOrttl-·Tiji Wetlhlim•r 4 -°52-:i. il<IRBv Nl'*St1nd-- ~3115i(;rt)y- -520-02'6 eMONrRosEJEWELRY-·and· Loan- 121-i W•theo""-r--5~5&41 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with over a hundred distribution locations • OH' BOYILeethet" GOoc..:...112 w.iithltmet-­~ 4:.!__85!_ eONE MOAE TIME rff.111 ~ue-1406 C.lofom•a--523-5551 See our ad elsewhere this issue • OPTIONS 1~. -1503 Yil9 i1-1s.,;..:-aa:a: 3330 i PLANf HOuSE .:a12 W11"it1e•mer--m--1195 •_~1 LEA~~~W~!'he,mer.-:521-904~ Now tremendous circulation in Montrose, but yet still low advertising rates-the Voice eAECORDAACK ~ .... :-31oil s- S~d- 524--:.'!02 • THI "OUOH CUTifl,;;y -"i°20Wff1n.7rr..-­S2Q.. 7Clr~ See our •d elsewhere this issue ,e,:.....-_f0_E WAFIE,...OUSE-2024 W••l,..11nlt' • s•lii1s LoCKE:A Cll>t ng 'H, Wiii,,... ~ ~ • '>TuDz.t.ctu11-N-s-11:£W A-lablirna • TEiAsCARAvAN & Armadillo Fw. .. S-211.s Out'l:a~~~7019 e T1Mfi[s$TAHiTA- c'olhlng 1·823 w .. the•m91"-62f..6299 • TOTAL"irvSrORE::-1-121 w-<!~r.:..S2&-i1ii0 Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 ,e.T,.R ESCHiC ey1w. .r -~"° Wllthe•mer-529= eiTREYw.NQ',hi"4 -4(J7 Westh1•"*:523-0228 •,,i.JN."IO"N JA°CI(° c1oth1ng-·121i' W..1~rNr= eWESTHEiMERFLEA- MARK-Ef: 1733 -W•t• 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment ew1l6E iSTE!N boOll It~--=- ".J.-W-t· .. ,..--:;~101• o•ir JULY 9, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 Fortunes By Tycho For Fr1d•y evening. July 9, through Frid•y evening. July 16, 1982 ARIES-Passing through )'Our sign this week: the Moon, from Mon· day morning to Wednesday afternoon. Someone younger than you needs the help you can give. Don't take advantage of this situation for your own selfish needs. Don't play the martyr, either, giving and giving until you're given out. Be an example and a guide. TAURUS-Passing through your sign this week: the Moon, from Wednesday afternoon to next Friday afternoon, July 16. Problems you've been having with brothers, sisters and best friends will come to a head and be worked out, if you're honest and direct in dealing with them. Just when things seemed totally screwed up, you may have found a better way of relating to each other. GEMINI-In your sign all week: Venus. The Moon will enter your sign next Friday afternoon, July 16, on its monthly pass through. Last week's flirtation could turn into a full·tilt affair. The effects of this new person in your life v.---ill be inspiring. You'll bea powerhouse at work, with your career going in the right direction. Ah, what love can dol CANCER-Jn your sign this wttk: the Sun and Mercury. That ten· sion that was strong in the air Jast week is stilJ there, but your attitude has changed. You can see the lighter, more humorous side of things. The dance of life goes on, with old or new partners. LEO-Seeds that you've planted and nourished have grown. The rewards of your labor are tasty and bountiful. Nothing forbidden about this fruit, so sit back and relish it. Mmmmm: VIRGO-Being passive is easy and sometimes fun, but there are Jimits. Don't be bullied into something you know ifm't right. Rules may be changing, and weird v.rinde blowing, but stand your ground. You can be foolish sometimes without being the foo1. LIBRA-Jn your BiRn this u:eek: Mars. Saturn and Pluto. You're asking questions and demanding answers. Coupled with your ability to understand what's going on, this could lead to a surprising position of power and influence. Watch where you're headed. Things are get­ting very interesting. SCORPIO-In your sign th'a wttk: Jupit,r. This isn "t the best time to take a vacation, but it"s a good time to plan one. Even so, thatcould be half the fun. Don't consider going alone, though. Ask. a friend or join a group. Sharing is a big part of the picture. SAGITTARIUS-Jn your sign this week: Uranus 41td Neptune. Chaos and confusion at home can be cleared up this week, but it won't happen all by itself. Kind words and gentle touches go a long way in getting things moving. Tum the other cheek, or the others. CAPRICORN-The line you're walking is between duty and self­gratification. Keep your arrogance under control and satisfy both. Ask for a leg up instead of just etepping on people. AQUARIUS-The Moon has been in your sign since Wednesday (July 7) and w11l leau< lat• Fruiay tl1€ning (July 9). Something'• a little devilish about your being so cool Everyone's huffin' and puffin' in the heat, but summer breeze make you feel fine. WorkiiJ' like the devil all day, lovin' like the devil all night. PISCES-Passing through your sign thi& u:eekend; the Moon, from late Friday evening to Monday morning. Some good, common sense could lead you to a gold mine-or a golden boy. Don't scheme, or dream, or try to pull off any funny stuff. Just stick to the facts and get your reward. •1•2 STONEWALL FE.ATUAES 8YN0tCATE Last Word It'll work every time By Henry McClurg All right, I've got it, for ah you shy people uncluding myselO: a fool-proof way to be the hit of every party; and an absolute guaran­tee to a successful night of carousing the bars. Are you ready? It's the "Hi, I'm Shy" T-shirt. (Stop laughing. This is serious.) No one makes these shirts yet. but they will. (I've got connections.) How many nights have you found your ·elf ~tanding in a comer at a bar, alone, wishing Pnnce (or Prince88) Charming would come over. Well, your "Hi, I'm Shy" T-shirt will solve your problem. The reason someone generally doesn't approach someone else is the fear of rejection-the fear that maybe that pel'1!on doesn't really want to be bothered. And the ironic thing is that all that time one person is thinking he doesn't want to be bothered, the other's thinking, "Gee, I wish he'd come over here." You "Hi, I'm Shy" T-shirt will signal that it's okay for people to open up a conversation. Watch for 'em soon. {Maybe I could market these nationwide on TV. Gosh I'm gonna get rich. "Yea, that toll free number for this really am~ng offer is l~ ..•. • ") 24 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 9, 1982 I . ' ! T IONAL CLUB 243 WESTHEIMER (in Montrose, near Downtown) Tel: 523-2795 A GOOD PLACE FOR YOU TO ENJOY "CHINESE LUNCHEON BUFFET" ALL YOU CAN EAT .•• Only $3.75 Buffet served 11am-2:30pm Monday-Friday **** DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY 4 to 10:30 pm J * TRADITIONAL CHIU-CHOW STYLE (OLD CHINESE)* ~ * Chief cook with 20 years experience-just came from China * * Crispy Kung Fu Duck * Crispy Fried Scallops * Sharks Fin with * Chiu Chow Style Crab Meat Shrimp Rolls *Sliced Abalone with *Chiu Chow Style Black Mushrooms Fried Oysters * Lobster Tail with *And Many, Many More FREE PRIVATE PARKING AREA Black Bean Sauce * Special Bar Service *****A ll Kinds of Mixed Drinks * Professional Bartender * Lovely Waitresses * Oyster Bar Open 5pm-8pm *Relaxing Atmosphere * Fast & Courteous Service
File Name uhlib_22329406_n089.pdf