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Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999
File 025
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Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 025. 1999-12-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1430.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-10). Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 025. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1430

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 025, 1999-12-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1430.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 10, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 025
Transcript 24 OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 10,1999 • HOUSTON VOICE ZTRUTH-rv Seeker > Continued from page 17 I did very little explaining of the Violet Quill in the publicity. That was an interesting test, to see if they would get the book with people not knowing its background. HV: What do the members of the Violet Quill think of the book? FP; I dedicated it to .Andrew Holleran. Edmund White read it, so they both read it before publication. I didn't give it to them to say 'pass' or 'fail,' although we continue to give each other work to comment on. I thought they should read it, to see if anything offended them, or seemed patently false. HV: Did you feel a liberty to write more freely about those who find died? FP: Not really. I guess by the time you get to the half century mark you pretty much accept things about yourself that cannot be changed. It's really mixed up. By no means is anybody real, exactly definable. There were only seven of us and there are nine Purple Circle members in this book. Even though 1 fooled around with book titles, the give-away is where the narrator talks about his Nancy Drew hidden closet. 'The Book of Lies" is a serious literary mystery but also something of a Nancy Drew or a I lardy Boys book, or possibly even a computer game, like Myst where there are maps and curses, treasures to be found. HV: As io academia, there's some intrigue. Does this refer to certain academics liaving been fooled by literary hoaxes, such as the Harvard Gay & Lesbian Review being hoodwinked by Daniel Harris when he wrote a parody of an academic paper, and they published ii? FP: Not really, although that was funny. One of my closest friends was George Stambolian (a founder of early Gay Studies, and the first editor of the popular "Men on Men" anthologies). Between him, John Boswell and a couple other people who are still alive, I began to find out that academia can really be a crazy, cutthroat world. So this book is a tribute to them, for going through the absolute madness of it. HV: But wliat about academic misinterpretation of the artist's intent? Ross is running around trying to find the facts, but sometimes ignores the real people and their art. Perliaps that's why they're taking a joy in leading him around by the nose. FP: Ross discovers who these people were by finding out what the survivors around them are like, in the same way that an explosion can be investigated through its debris and scars. The reader sees what has taken place in the aftermath of this hurricane of writers, who lasted for only a brief while—10 years—and did a great deal of damage, whether intentional or not. One of the things I was trying to show was how artists go through their lives, what they have to do, and the toll this often exacts on the people around them. In one case, the surviving brother of Mark Dodge (one of the fictional literary group), who's living in the lap of luxury off his dead brother's royalties, cannot figure out what the hell happened 20 years earlier. HV: With academics poring over author's collected writings, do you become self-conscious about xvhat you want to leave as a legacy? FP: The Beinecke Library at Yale collects groups of American writers, including the Violet Quill and the group around Gertrude Stein. Both John Boswell and George Stambolian were behind the library collecting our work. They have 22 volumes of my journals from 1969 on, all the early manuscripts. Besides collecting the stuff, they have to chemically treat it, photograph it all. They're doing a massive job. Each author has agreements with them as to who will see the work, when it will be released, etc. HV: So, are there juicy literary scandals for future generations? FP: More personal scandals than literary ones, but I don't have a problem with that. When David Bergman was doing The Violet Quill Reader—some of it was pretty juicy—I had to notate who everyone was. Pat Loud (whose family was the subject of a 1970's TV documentary, "An American Family") was the agent for some of us. Also, a graduate student in Baltimore is working on getting more of my journals out (including in a Modem Library Association periodical). We're pretty much in agreement that the dirt gets published, and not just literary dirt, sexual dirt, too. HV: So it might be a gossip-filled confessional? FP: Not exactly, but it could be useful in other ways if these people at the Beinecke are right about the value of these journals, which I'm not sure about, that it has historical value, by virtue of me being a writer, editor and publisher in New York when I was. I got to meet just about everybody in the previous generation as well as my own and later generations— Isherwood, Auden, Williams, I corresponded with Vidal—just by propinquity. After he read the "The Book of Lies," Andrew I lolleran said, 'It'samazing, knowing all the people, and what you know, that you would make fictional characters.' I told him, 'Oh that's okay, dear. I'm saving the rest for my memoirs.' HV: Authors' personal lives become more acknowledged when we have documentation of their love lives. English instructors often deny gay authors their sexuality, but the Violet Quill group stands out by having been out from the beginning. FP: .And we were surrounded by lots of homosexual writers who would not do it. John Ashbury, James Merrill; they stayed in the closet somewhat longer than we did, maybe until we had already tested the ground. We felt it was literally up to us to do it. HV: The Len Spurgeon character echoes Neal Cassady and hozv his exploits touched so many Beat writers. Len seems to have permeated their lives in tliat way. FP: Obviously he hung around with them, and affected their lives. He's a baseball player, scam artist, con man, writer, hustler, porno actor, and not just their boy-toy. I think we've all known someone in gay life like Len. He's also the Henry Jamesian figure in the carpet. The other members are brought together by love affairs, professional jealousies. If men like him did not exist, we'd be forced to create them. HV: Is he based on an actual ball player? FP: I've been sworn to secrecy. magazines paperbacks smoking items ADULT NOVELTIES • ADULT GAMES • PERSONAL ITEMS SOMETMm FOX 4U UFES7VLES VIDEOS RENTALS & SALES ALL RATINGS REE • video vieiving «i»«»ci PRIVATE ROOMS :3DE0 selections in each room. - ALL RATINGS AVAILABLE SCREENS CONTINUOUSLY OPERATE • NO TOKENS NEEDED ADMISSION FEE REQUIRED STAY AS LONG AS YOU'D LIKE! a < s UJ □ o I ^VIDEO MEMBERSHIP CLUi
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