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Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999
File 015
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Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 015. 1999-12-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1420.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-10). Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 015. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1420

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 015, 1999-12-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1420.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 10, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript 14 NEWS DECEMBER 10, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE $100 OFF! Sale! Voted #1 in Customer Satisfaction! 4040 MILAM 77006 (713)524-9932 Monday to Friday 5 am - 10 pm Saturday & Sunday 8 am - 8 pm Provider dedicated to serving the HIV community Now Accepting Medicare, PPOs & Standard Insurances. Exercise Programs Personal Trainers Nutritional Intervention Massage Therapy Stress/Pain Managment Neuropathy Therapy Peer Support Workshops & Seminars Steroid Education Increase Self Esteem Patricia Salvato, MD Medical Director For more information call (7131349-9750 Ed Kinser BSMI, CRS Director: Kinetic Sports Health Briefs Steamy new book documents same-sex behavior among animals OTTAWA, Canada—A provocative new book about gay animals is challenging the belief that homosexuality is an aberration of nature, the Ottawa Citizen reported. "Biological Exuberance," a ground-breaking review of homosexuality in the wild kingdom, documents hundreds of cases of mammals and birds enthusiastically engaging in sex and long-term relationships with members of the same sex. The list of gay creatures, according to author and biologist Bruce Bagemihl, would fill Noah's Ark: apes and monkeys, dolphins and whales, giraffes, zebras, warthogs and woodpeckers. Lesbian gulls mate for life and raise chicks together. Male manatees splash around in group orgies. In all, the book notes 471 species, including fish and insects, that exhibit varying types of same-sex behavior. The 751-page work, which took nearly 10 years to research and write, not only challenges the notion that homosexuality is unnatural and simply doesn't occur among animals— it contends many animals engage in homosexual sex for the same reason people do—they enjoy it, the newspaper reported. The book also explores the debate about the origins of homosexuality—genetics versus environment, biology versus culture and nature versus nurture. French doctors urge World Trade Organization to help fight AIDS PARIS—The French medical charity Doctors of the World urged countries meeting at the World Trade Organization summit on Dec. 1 to allow Third World states to import and produce anti-AIDS drugs cheaply without fearing trade sanctions, Reuters news service reported. The charity argued that production costs for AIDS drugs were only a fraction of their normal cost. But, it added, "without an international campaign, only a small minority of the total of 33.6 million people suffering from AIDS have the right to treatment.... At the start of this new WTO negotiating round, we demand that existing... rules allowing developing countries to produce and import medicines be applied without the threat of trade retaliation." But poor nations shy away from doing this under the threat of trade sanctions by the United States and West European countries, another French medical charity, Nobel Peace Prize-winning Doctors without Borders, charged last week. New Russian AIDS drug may replace AZT, to be produced in 2000 MOSCOW (AP)—A new Russian AIDS drug that could be substituted for the commonly prescribed AZT will be produced beginning next year. Like older anti-AIDS drugs like AZT, phosphazide slows the replication of the HIV virus, which causes AIDS. But it is believed to have fewer of the side-effects of AZT, which can cause anemia and nausea. The new drug has met with cautious optimism among Canadian experts who carried out laboratory tests on it in 1997. Vadim Pokrovsky, head of the Russian Center for the Prevention and Treatment of AIDS, said that phosphazide was licensed in Russia in October and will be produced starting early next year. World AIDS Day marked by events, setbacks around the globe Several events were held around the world to mark World AIDS Day on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1. Among them: • In Paris, Dr. Luc Montagnier and Dr. Robert Gallo, two scientists who were once locked in a bitter dispute over who first isolated the HIV virus, shared a stage. Montagnier, of the Pasteur Institute, warned that an effective AIDS vaccine could be 30 years away unless governments change their approach and encourage wider research. "Nobody yet has a miracle solution, but there are many clear ideas on vaccines, and governments must enable these to be developed. If we concentrate on just one theory and that fails—what will we do then?" Gallo, director of the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland, was more optimistic that an effective vaccine can be found, and dismisses talks of a period of up to 10 years between its discovery and marketing. • In Los Angeles, Southern California activists held a rally focused on the issue of free condoms in gay bars. The Hollywood-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation has launched a petition drive aimed at putting a measure on the West Hollywood ballot requiring some bars and alcohol-serving restaurants in that city to hand out city-purchased condoms. Bar owners already are complying with a voluntary city-sponsored program to distribute 250,000 condoms, said David Cooley, owner of the Abbey restaurant and bar." Are we now going to have condom police checking the businesses?" he said. Foundation President Michael Weinstein contended that the voluntary distribution has been spotty. • In Beijing, the first nationally televised advertisement promoting condoms for AIDS prevention were pulled from Chinese television because they violated a ban on advertising sex products. The advertisement aired Nov. 27 and 28 on China Central Television's Channel 1. The State Administration for Industry and Commerce banned the ad Nov. 30. The condom ad had been seen as a breakthrough in efforts to reach large numbers of Chinese and confront traditional taboos against discussing sex and contraceptives. —From staff and wire reports
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