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Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999
File 010
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Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 010. 1999-12-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1415.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-10). Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 010. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1415

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 010, 1999-12-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1415.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 10, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 10, 1999 VOICES AND ECHOES VIEWPOINT Hate on the highway meets a rainbow foe by RANDI BEARDEN k The practice of queer folks putting rainbow and similarly identifying stickers on their cars has often been a two-edged sword, lt gives us a visibility to recognize each other, but it also gives those that hate us tin'same power. Still, as a dyke who is out, it has been a life choice for me to put these stickers on my vehicle. I do it to remind people that I too share this world with them and to let my brothers and sisters know they are not alone. The road is where I spend a lot of my time .and usually I'm alone. That's how it was the weekend before Thanksgiving, going from the Carolinas to a meeting in Atlanta and then working my way to Tampa Bay. My gas gauge was showing low, so I pulled into a gas station not too far from the city. There was a new Thunderbird parked at the pump ahead of me. 1 thought nothing of the deserted car, as I set about filling mv tank and cleaning my windows. A man came out of the store, crossing the tarmac to get into the T-bird. It registered peripherally that he was bald, wearing shorts and combat boots. Moments after he'd gotten into the car; loud, nerve-wracking heavy metal music blasted from his windows. It was so loud that it made me wince, the bass pounding in my chest. Tlie guy got out of the Thunderbird and went back into the store; again I didn't pay very much attention to him. He exited the store and stood in front of my car, legs spread, arms crossed. I looked up from the back window where I was cleaning off the road grime. The full realisation of what this guy was about hit me with a foire that stopped my breath, the iron taste of fear filling my mouth. All up and down his arms were tattooed the symbols of the white supremacist movement. About the same time, the lyrics from the music in his car filtered into my brain: "white power, mud people, faggots, spies, kikes, wetbacks, kill them all..." He looked very deliberately at my front tag: a rainbow background, with "Chicana" engraved in white and a Mexican flag underneath that. Guess he thought he'd hit the jackpot of intolerance, a two-for-one sale as it were—a Mexican-American dyke. He raised his eyes to meet mine, the hatred dripping. He lifted his hand and pointed a finger at me and then slowly brought his thumb up so that it became the trigger of his symbolic gun. Though he never spoke a word, his words screamed at me with a deafening force. just when I thought my lungs would burst from their fear-induced paralysis, a car pulled into the spot on the other side of the pump. At this intrusion of a possible witness, the guy began to step back, his "gun" in front of him, still aimed at me. After about three steps he dropped his hand, turned around and walked to his car. He got into it and turned up the music even louder, if that was possible. Then at long last, time began to move again as he pulled away from the pump and left. He drove away from the highway, and I breathed a huge sigh of relief. I had always known that there were people like him in the world; today I knew it personally. It was during the trip back home that 1 was reminded of how much I appreciated tlie queer folks who brave the world and put tlie rainbow and other queer stickers on their cars. It has always been mv habit that if I see another rainbow on the Interstate to wave. The occupants of the other car usually acknowledge me and then we tend to stay close to each other going up the highway. It lets me know I'm not out there alone and makes me feel safer. I really needed that feeling as I headed back home. Not long after I had gotten onto the Interstate, a truck with Georgia tags passed me with a HRC equal sign sticker on the back window and a couple of dykes in the front seat. In an instant my uneasiness disappeared; 1 was not alone. A short time later, I met a red truck with Kentucky plates, a rainbow sticker and pink triangle on the back window and a dyke who kept me company almost to Attanta. Not only did I feel better, but I knew how much it makes a difference when we put stickers on our cars and make ourselves known. To the brother and sisters who rode up the road that day with me, thanks for your courage to make yourselves known. It gives me great hope and that dav it gave me great comfort. Randi M. Bearden is a self-described "Mexican-American dyke" who co-founded of Project FFREE, a gay grassroots organization in Greenville, S.C; she can be reached at 864-322-5488 or SCChicana@aol.com. Let us know what you think Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) or op-ed submissions (800 words maximum). Names may be withheld upon request, but submissions must include a name and phone number for verification Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston, TX 77006 fax: 713-529-9531 • e-mail: editor@houstonvoke.com Euro Pine Direct Importers of Fine Furniture 'Where The Trade Is Always Welcome' Antique Country Pine at Competitive Prices Phone: 713-266-4304 Fax: 713-781-8445 E-mail: hbw4gla@acninc.net www.europinedirect.qpg.com 3029 Crossview Houston, TX 77063 One Block East of Fondren and Westheimer VESTHEIMER ROAD Cl ARKCRESI RICHMQNC Mon.-Fri. 9*7, Sat. 10*5 1212 Westheimer @ Montrose 713-529-6789
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