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Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999
File 005
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Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 005. 1999-12-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1410.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-10). Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 005. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1410

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 005, 1999-12-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1410.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 10, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript NEWS DECEMBER 10, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Around the Nation Christmas "Eve "' -r■"" 'ham WSmWlWSm ■ Resurrection MCC's mctuary Choir ospef'EnsemBie i'lJi'lf'IMH (Ihe Anointing & Incfra Jiaviland ifiWtt 'lllllt free and open to ..ation, please call 713-861-9149 ry will be available for this event) Resurrection MCC catur St., Houston, Texas 77007 www.mccr-hou.com Hawaii Supreme Court says gay marriage challenge is moot HONOLULU—The Hawaii Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a 1998 constitutional amendment passed by voters renders the move to legalize gay marriage moot. The court ruled that the amendment validates the state ban on gay marriages by removing any concerns about equal protection under the state constitution. The amendment gave state legislators the power to determine whether marriage licenses should only recognize unions between a man and woman. That is something they did in 1994. The court said the state ban now must be given full force and effect. That overturned a lower court ruling that the ban was unconstitutional and the state must show a compelling reason for continuing it. The issue first arose in 1990 when three gay couples were denied marriage licenses by the state health department. They sued the state in 1991. Former Houston teacher seeks up to S1M in discrimination suit HOUSTON—A former teacher who is gay contends the Houston Independent School District discriminated against him and failed to hire him in a year when there were more than 300 teaching vacancies because he is HIV-positive, the Houston Chronicle reported Dec. 4. The charges came during a two-day trial before U.S. District Judge Vanessa Gilmore. William Ellsworth, who worked for the district for five years, argued that his former principal wanted him back after he returned from living in New Mexico for two years. But Ellsworth was later rejected after an interview with HISD, and charged in court that he wasn't hired because his former principal was aware that he is gay and HIV-positive. Ellsworth wasn't hired in part because of his low scores on an interview test, the school system said. "HISD does not discriminate in its hiring practices," said Myra Schexnayder, HISD's attorney. "HISD did not even know that Mr. Ellsworth was HIV-positive." Ellsworth, 51, is seeking back pay and front pay until he is age 65. He also has asked for attorney's fees and punitive damages—a figure that could top $1 million. Gilmore is not expected to rule immediately. Lobel resigns as head of National Gay & Lesbian Task Force WASHINGTON—Kerry Lobel has resigned as head of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force effective April 7, 2000, the organization announced last week. Lobel moved to Washington, D.C, from Arkansas in 1995 to become deputy director of the organization, which focuses on aiding grassroots activists at the state and local level. She became executive director in December 1996. Both Lobel and NGLTF's board of directors said the decision to leave came from Lobel, and the board praised her tenure with the organization. "NGLTF and our movement will forever be stronger because of Kerry's leadership," said Rachel Rosen, board co-chair. Task Force accomplishments under Lobel's leadership included almost doubling Ihe group's budget and staff and expanding the NGLTF Policy Institute "think tank." The board will begin an immediate search for a new executive director. Utah hate crimes law ruled useless without named groups SALT LAKE CITY (AP)—A Utah district judge has found that since the state's hate crimes statute does not specifically name any of the groups it is intended to protect, the statute is unenforceable. Judge William Barrett dismissed hate crime charges against Brian E. Hilt and Jason Dale Millard, two men who allegedly attacked and harassed several men they believed were gay. Barrett ruled that law was "incomplete" because it does not specify what classes of people are protected by the law. Defense attorney Rebecca Hyde argued that Utah lawmakers deliberately meant to exclude protection for gay people. But instead of eliminating protections just for gays, the legislature wiped out all classes of victims, leaving Utah with an unenforceable hate-crime law, Hyde said. "Born of ignorance, animosity toward gays, and cowardice, Utah's hate crimes statute is unworkable," Hyde argued Challenge to DP laws in two North Carolina towns moves ahead HILLSBOROUGH, N.C—A challenge to the domestic-partnership laws of Chapel Hill and Carrboro remains alive after a judge rejected an effort by city attorneys to quash it, the Raleigh News & Observer reported. Both towns have local laws allowing the payment of benefits to the domestic partners, whether gay or straight, of its employ- 5 ees. Twelve residents of the two towns chal- 7. lenged the law in June. Attorneys for the i towns had argued that the residents did not ■ have the standing to sue. A similar chat % lenge in 1996 overturned Chapel Hill's -* domestic partnership ordinance on the grounds that North Carolina law explicitly prohibits common law marriage. "I certainly don't view this as a setback," said Carrboro Mayor Mike Nelson, who is gay. "Attorneys make motions all the time; some of them are approved, and some of them are denied. What we're really talking about is how families are treated in our culture." Openly gay Carrboro, N.C. Mayor Mike Nelson said he isn't overly concerned by a court ruling that supports a challenge to the town's DP benefits (or gays.
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