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Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999
File 002
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Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 002. 1999-12-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1407.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-10). Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 002. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1407

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 002, 1999-12-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1407.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 10, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript 17 TTT>TTm voice The father of Tracey Lynn Deel, who was shot and bK"*v robbed last month after leaving a aaaaaPF^*^** "^ Montrose bar for lesbians, makes an emotional plea for finding his daughter's attackers. Page 3 What is truth? > Felice Picano may know, but in his latest novel, literary truths become tMh' rib an elusive k ^^ *«v mystery. Page 17 ISSUE 998 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. DECEMBER 10, 1999 'Don't ask, don't tell' comes under renewed fire Parents of slain gay soldier call Pentagon policy on gays a failure as son's killer is sentenced; Hillary Rodham Clinton also criticizes policy her husband created The Pentagon's "Don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays in the military came under renewed attack this week from the family of a slain Army private, gay activists, and Hillary Rodham Clinton during a campaign stop in New York. All called for the end to the policy—intended to make it easier for gays and lesbians to serve in the military—because they said it has failed to work. '"Don't ask, don't tell, don't pursue,' did not protect our son.... It won't protect anyone else's child. This policy must end," said Pat Kutteles, reading from a statement Thursday after an Army private convicted of bludgeoning her gay son to death was sentenced to life in prison with the possibility of parole. Pvt. Calvin N. Glover, 18, was found guilty of premeditated murder Wednesday in the beating death of Pfc. Barry Winchell. The offense carries a mandatory sentence of life in prison; the only question before the military jury on Thursday was whether he should be eligible for parole. Glover showed no reaction to the sentence. He will also be demoted and dishonorably discharged. Glover used a baseball bat to crush the skull of Winchell, 21, a barracks mate, as he slept in his cot at Fort Campbell. There had been a swirl of rumors on the base that Winchell was gay, and prosecutors said Glover was driven by hatred of homosexuals. Winchell's family called for the end of "Don't ask, don't tell." "We knew Barry could be deployed and come into harm's way for our country. We never dreamed that he would be killed by labeling, prejudice and hatred at home," Kutteles said. Glover, who is from Sulphur, Okla., apologized in court earlier Thursday, saying he was drunk at the time of the July 5 attack and has since found God. "If I had acted as half the man, even half the soldier as Barry was, he'd be with us right now," Glover said, his voice cracking. Before the court-martial, Glover admitted to a lesser charge of unpremeditated murder in hopes of receiving a lighter sentence. But prosecutor Capt. Gregg Engler went ahead with the court-martial on a charge of premeditated murder. When he offered his plea Tuesday, Glover sobbed and said he did not know why he hit Winchell "at least two or three times" with a bat as Winchell slept. C. Dixon Osburn, co-executive director of the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network in Washington, said the case proves that the Pentagon's "don't ask, don't tell" policy doesn't work. "I think this case shatters any illusions that 'don't ask, don't tell, don't pursue' is somehow a benign policy," he said. "This is a policy of violence." Under "don't ask, don't tell," gay members of the military Pvt. Calvin N. Glover, 18 (left) was sentenced on Thursday to life in prison for bludgeoning to death Pfc. Barry Winchell (right), a barracks-mate rumored to be gay. can continue to serve—and their superiors cannot investigate and expel them—as long as they keep their sexual orientation to themselves. During the court-martial, a sergeant testified that complaints about harassment of Winchell by other soldiers who suspected he was gay were not investigated because superi- y- Continued on Page 10 Texas activist takes new role with Millennium March Dual jobs prompt questions of how Dianne Hardy-Garcia will organize a national event and avoid ignoring her duties with statewide lobbying group here in Texas Dianne Hardy-Garcia, executive director of the Lesbian Gay Rights Lobby of Texas, says her new role with the Millennium March on Washington won't diminish the work of the statewide lobby group. by GIP PLASTER After two years of planning, the departure of its founder and numerous attacks on the way it is being planned, details of the Millennium March on Washington planned for April 30 are finally becoming clear. The march's new vision is largely due to the work of Dianne Hardy-Garcia, executive director of Lesbian Gay Rights Lobby of Texas (LGRL). She has taken over as co-executive director of the march and is running the event's Washington, D.C. office. As executive director of a large and powerful statewide gay and lesbian organization, Hardy-Garcia has become one of the most vocal and influential activists in Texas. But if Hardy-Garcia is running the march, who is at LGRL working to organize and mobilize gay men and lesbians in Texas? 'Not abandoning anything' "We're not abandoning any work. We're not abandoning any projects," said LGRL board co-chair Steve Atkinson of Dallas. "We're not changing anything. There's nothing changing except Dianne's physical presence not being in Austin." Atkinson said he can contact Hardy- Garcia at any time if necessary. LGRL's office staff and board have taken on increased day- to-day responsibilities in her absence, but Atkinson said the short time frame and the timing of the march when the biennial Texas Legislature is not in session makes this a time when Hardy-Garcia can afford to be away from Austin. "It's the only time that she could do it," Atkinson said. "It's a very short time frame and when if s over, she's through and done with it." Hardy-Garcia asked, and received, permission (rom the board to take on increased responsibilities with the march. She will continue to be p.aid as a full-time employee of LGRL and is expecting to also be paid a full- time salary by the march. The potential of receiving two salaries is appropriate, Hardy-Garcia said, since she will be doing work to benefit both organizations. > Continued on Page 13
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