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Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983
File 019
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Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 019. 1983-12-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/136.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-16). Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 019. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/136

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 019, 1983-12-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/136.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Hyde, Robert
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 16, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript 18 Montrose Voice/ Dec. 16,1983 Montrose's Robin Mosely Is Working Her Way Up to Cloud 9 By Billie Duncan Now, let's see, the actor who plays the stuffy father in the first act plays hiB own effeminate son in the second act whose lover is played by the same man who played his mother in the first act. Confused? That's only the beginning. How about this one. The white man who plays a black servant in the first act plays a five-year-old girl in the second act. Not only that, but the second act takes place 100 years later than the first and the characters have aged only 25 years. The play is Cloud 9 which opens at the Alley Theatre on December 29 on the Arena Stage. It is expected to draw a large gay audience. That is not to say that the play is a gay play, per se. It is a play about breaking free of sexual stereotypes—whatever they are. One of the players in the production is an Alley favorite, Montrosean Robin Mos- ley. "It sounds very confusing," she said, "but it will take maybe three minutes into each act to figure out what's going on." Robin seems to have a handle on what's going on in her own life, in any case. Her father was in the Air Force, and she Actress Robin Mosley was bom in Wiesbaden, Germany, about 30 years ago. She went to 13 schools in 12 years and lived in at least six different states. Travelling around helped her to learn skills that she would later use as an actress. "You have to learn how to perform. You have to learn social skills early because you're going to constantly be meeting new people. You have to be very aggressive. "I would entertain constantly as a child. I think the motto was 'anything for a laugh.'" Robin smiled. "I think I learned young how to deliver a line. 'Cause I was such a smartass." As far as seriously getting into acting, Robin explained, "When my older sister did it, I wanted to do it. I wanted to do everything she could do. I remember when she used to hang out at the Dairy Queen and I wanted to go hang out at the Dairy Queen, too. "But I was still more interested in getting on my bike and going exploring the quarry than hanging out at the Dairy Queen and eating french fries and talking to boys. I was still at that stage where (it's) 'Let's go poke a stick in that hole and see if a snake comes out.'" Most of her life she lived in San Antonio, but she came to Houston in 1972 to go to University of Houston. She has yet to graduate. "No papers. She's no pedigreed girl, this," joked Robin about herself. Even though most of her acting has been at U of H or the Alley, she did a stint at a dinner theatre in the northern part of the Btate. "I was the belle of the Texas Panhandle for about two weeks." The theatre she played was out on a highway in the middle of miles and miles and miles of cotton fields, but her name was on the marquee. So she took a picture of the marquee. Then she panned around and took a companion shot of the cotton fields. When she got back to Houston, she appeared in the Houston Shakespeare Festival as Lady Macbeth, dircted by Sidney Berger, to whom she gives great thanks for casting her in so many incredible roles at U of H, including Olphelia and Juliet. "Having the opportunity to play those roles at that age.... It was great." From there whe went to the Alley's Apprentice program. "The first year I did the children's show and laundry." In the children's show (Alice in Wonderland) she played the Mock Turtle and Humpty-Dumpty. Her costume for Humpty was more of a house than a costume. "Inside it looked just like an outhouse," she said. One day, one of the crew put in a roll of toilet paper. "As the Mock Turtle, I looked like a giant green cheeseburger with ears and a tail." Her work as an apprentice so impressed the Alley staff that they brought her back to be a member of the company. She has been working there ever since. "Most people my age (in theatre) have been out of work from the years 20 to 30, and I got the chance to do one stage show after another in a big theatre with big production values. I've worked with some really fine people." As for her future, she admitted, "I think I would like to live in New York for a while and see what I could do." But right now, she is submerged in doing Cloud 9. "This play is geared towards making everybody look at the way they perceive people's relationships. It's very powerful writing in a very palatable, entertaining form." The play is being recommended for mature audiences only. "People might find the language shocking. Some of it is very graphic." As far as any personal relationships in Robin's own life, she would only say, "I have a lot of friends." Some of those friends are people who have seen her over the years and know her to be one of the very best actresses around. Cloud 9 would be a play to see, in any case, but with Robin Mosely in it, it is certainly on my must-see list. □ Duncan's Quick Notes There are shows and there are shows. And some shows show you things you've never seen before. In any case, there were plenty of things that moi had never seen before at the leather fashion show that was part of the first anniversary celebration at the Rip- cord, 715 Fairview. Boots Adams of Leatherworks, which has an outlet in residence in the Ripcord, came up with the idea for the show and off they went Boots insisted that the models wanted to be known only by their first names. They were Mike, Gilbert, Charles, Al, David, Randy, John, and Duane. It seems that there were more men than that on stage, but someone we all know lost her purse that night with all her notes and everything. After all the food and drink offered by the Ripcord, it's a wonder Yours Truly could find her head the next day. Oh, the food! There were three tables laden with everything from cold cuts and cheese to oysters on the half shell. There were meatballs, shrimp, even rumaki. The board of directors of the Ripcord worked for two days on the feast and it showed. Owner Vince Janis told me the week before, "If you're going to have an anniversary, do it in style." And that is just what they did. But back to the show. The emcee was Maude (Richard Smith), who went leather and became known as Motorcycle Maude. As usual, he kept things going and managed to sling dishes in every direction. The show itself featured some really darling items in the bondage section, including a full neck-to-heels multi- strapped apparatus in this year's fashion shades of black and silver. In a lighter mood was the full body ace David modeling in the Leatherworks fashion show at the Ripcord Randy prepares to go on stage at the Leatherworks fashion show at the Ripcord bandage in the traditional flesh color. Looking sleekly simple was the slick black straight jacket, complimented with matching boots. For those who do not care to be overdressed, that section of the show also included an outfit composed of a suspension harness and standard jock. The next section was the beautifully understated jeans and shirts entry. Lovely. Following that was a particularly intricate showing of restraints, tit clamps and whips. All were color-coordinated in the evening's favorite shades. Randy and David then showed off some outstanding chaps that were nicely complimented by T-shirt and tank top. The Finale of the Leatherworks fashion show at the Ripcord David sported plain arm bands, while Randy charmed the crowd with his studded gauntlet. Harness, jocks and briefs were next (need I say more), followed by David and Randy again in vests and boot straps. Every detail of both outfits was carefully orchestrated to go with their exquisite Rip- cord t-shirts. All that was left of the fashion show was the finale. All the models showed up on stage in harnesses with lighted candles. They formed a triangle. There was a moment of silence. Then they burst into "We Wish You a Merry Christmas." It was a hit. Then Tom Beck and Danny Villa joined in song to the true and sincere delight of the crowd and especially this reviewer. All in all, the show was a hoot and the night was too. Now, if I can only find my purse. If not, I will take some other purse with me when I go see the Montrose Symphonic Band's Third Annual Christmas Concert on December 17th at Cullen Auditorium at the University of Houston. If you have never been to one of these concerts, go. It is an evening of joyous fun and really wonderful musical entertainment. Another fun Christmas show is The Gift of the Magi at Chocolate Bayou Theater Company. Diane DeMille as Delia and Michael P. Giles as Jim both display that rare combination of good acting talent and excellent voices. And, talking about talent, the finals of the Exile's popular talent contest will be this coming Tuesday, December 20. Hmm, that's the same night as the VOICE'S Christmas party and the Houston Off- Broadway Holiday special at E/J's. Some nights it's just really hard to decide what to do. One night that will be particularly tough for decision-making will be New Year's Eve. There will be so many showB that night. Even Baja's will be bringing back live entertainment with the appear- ence of Louisa Amaral-Smith. There are so many other specials that I will just have to cover them all next week. Stay tuned. Diane DeMille (Delia) and Michael P. Gilles (Jim) in Chocolate Bayou Theater Co.'s Christmas production. The Gift of the Magi
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