Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983
File 018
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 018. 1983-12-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/135.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-16). Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/135

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 018, 1983-12-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/135.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Hyde, Robert
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 16, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript Dec. 16,1983 / Montrose Voice 17 Mark Janas Shapes Montrose's Boys in the Montrose Live Chorus for Tonight's Christmas Concert By Robert Hyde The Montrose Singers are presenting their annual Christmas concert this evening (Dec. 16) at St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, and since September, their new director, Mark Janas, has been pulling every string from his professional background to whip the group of volunteers into what he calls a "really spiffy organization." Tonight, he sincerely hopes that the community will appreciates endeavors "^'whori hT brings his rflfc gay chorus " together for the music so cherished during this season. Accompanied by piano, organ and brass, the chorus will enter the church singing a processional especially arranged by Janas inspired by his love for Gregorian chants which have been haunting music lovers since the Middle Ages. Although the piece is the traditional "Oh Come All Ye Faithful," Janas directs his own personal interpretation, which is based heavily on his classical training. Also joining the chorus will be soloist Stella Zambalis, a mezzo soprano recently involved with the Metropolitan Opera. On a more accessible level, the traditional favorites will be sung, as well, and there will be comedy numbers designed especially for this performance. The concert's finale will be a sing-along to wrap up the evening. Afterwards, members of the community are invited for waisal, good cheer and a chance to get to know the boys in the chorus, as well as Janas himself. When Janas first joined the group in September, after being invited to do so by Montrose Singers president Clark Moore, it was only a group of 12 gay men who simply wanted to pour their hearts out in song—many of them had had no professional training. Today the group consists of 30 members, all intent on being one of the best choral groups in the country. Under Janas' direction, they might just make it. "My plans for the group are to see it increase in number and ability," Janas said in a recent interview, mentioning that he would eventually like to see the chorus increase to 48 excellent singers. "And I'm always amazed at how much better they're reading music and how everything is coming faster." To some, Janas might seem a bit arrogant—or temperamental—as "they" say in the art world. But his charm is disarming, and his arrogance might just be a little justified—he's worked with Leonard Bernstein, has a master's degree in conducting from Rice University and has toured Europe twice with his baton in hand. Furthermore, his chorus members sincerely appreciate him. "I don't think I'm temperamental at all," he Baid, smiling and looking a bit amazed that he even had that reputation. "I always try to keep (the chorus) excited at rehearsal. If I think they need to be cheered up, I'll try to joke with them. If I think they're acting like kids and need a little discipline, I throw a little tantrum every once in a while. They understand what I'm trying to do, I think." Then Janas set back and took a closer look at himself, perhaps thinking that some of the criticism might be justified. "I'm too much of a perfectionist for my own good," he said. "Being a perfectionist gets me in trouble lots of times. Sometimes I plan beyond the scope of the group involved—sometimes my own scope. That's something that an artist always has to watch out for. Planning for something you can accomplish in more time than you have is always something I struggle with. "I've always been too much of an optimist. I also know it takes optimism to grow. You have to believe that something can be better and much better. If you aim at a five, you might get a three or four. If you aim at 10, you might get that five. That's a rule of life." Go to the concert this evening and see what the boys in the community have come up with. I have a feeling that we'll be in for a special treat. And I know they've certainly worked very hard at it. Montrose Theatre Group Hqldi^jS Audit* ?& Diversity Players, th'a^grbup'who broTight you Noel Cowaed's Private Lives and entertained packed houses for several weeks at the new room at the Pink Elephant, is holding auditions for its next production, the more serious Boys in the Band. Auditions for the play will be held this weekend on Saturday from 3-6 and on Sunday from 1-3 at the Pink Elephant, 1218 Leeland. One final audition is scheduled for next Wednesday from 6-* For more information, contact Joe Watts at 266-1111 or 522-2204 (evenings). Montrose Singers' Mark Janas NYC Gay Men's Chorus Scores with Christmas Album By Robert Hyde It's not Johnny Mathis or Nat King Cole— and it's miles away from Elvis Presley— but if you get in a reverent mood this holiday season, you might want to pick up the New York City Gay Men's Chorus Christmas album, A Festival of Song. Not only is the album a major contribution to the gay community—it's the first recording by a gay chorus on a major label (Pro-Arte)—but the selections are performed well enough to stand as a comparison for our local groups. Under the direction of Gary Miller, the 150-men chorus displays all of the attributes that packed New York's Carnegie Hall several times, as well as Lincoln Center. Most of the album is sung a cappela, that is to say, without instrumental accompaniment, and this approach to most of the selections allows the chorus to display their musical talents and challenges them to the maximum, since a cappela is extremely difficult, especially when sung softly. In Bruckner's Ave Maria, the voice balancing is perfect, and the chorus performs it as if it were written for them. "La Virgen lava panales" is another fine piece which offers a nice solo effort on this traditional Spanish carol. Michael Praetorius' "Lo, How a Rose E'er Blooming," a very inspirational piece and nicely done, demands repeated listenings. Also the differences in the men's voices emerge in Gabrieli's "Jubilate Deo." The highpoint of the album is Thompson's interpretation of Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" from his "Frostiana." This selection opens and closes nicely with piano, and displays the chorus' best use of vocal texture. I could almost see the snow falling softly in a New England wood. The chorus does have problems, however, which make the album fall short of four stars. The baritones are a bit heavy on Vaughan Williams' "God rest you merry gentlemen." Sweelinck's "Hodie Christus natus est" needs to be lighter—it's not the joyful piece it should be. And Thompson's "Alleluia" is monotonous to the extreme. Imagine listening to the same word for five minutes and 59 seconds! The voices are also too heavy on Susa's "The Chanticleer's Carol," although the trumpets and trombones in this piece are a NYC Gay Men's Chorus taking a break from their May recording of their Christmas album nice change from the a cappella of most of the works. Unfortunately, the instruments are too loud, and it's difficult to hear Susa's words. Otherwise, Kountz' "The Sleigh" captures all the spirit of Russian Volga boatmen desperate to catch the last sleigh into Moscow, and you can almost see the lum berjacks in the traditional "O Tannen- baum," which is sung first in German, then in English. For the most part, appreciators of interesting classical music should enjoy the album. It's also a nice professional boost for the gay community and a recording event of which it can be proud. MCCR Choir to Present Cantata The MCCR Choir will present their annual Christmas Cantata Sunday night, Dec. 18, at 7:30 p.m. at the church at 1919 Decatur and extends an invitation to the everyone in the community to come and enjoy traditional Christmas music. This year's Christmas festival will feature Christmas spirituals, a Christmas medley, 'Twas on a Cold and Wintry Night" and "Symphony to the Savior." These selections offer many favorite carols and a few new ones. Choir members will also be featured in solo works throughout the concert. "We found this music to be enjoyable and challenging," said John Kirkland, director. "The use of new and traditional Christmas carols is the reason." He stated that the concert represents many hours of choir members' personal dedication, and that the group of musicians is an asset to the entire gay community.
File Name uhlib_22329406_n164_017.jpg