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Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983
File 015
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Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 015. 1983-12-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/132.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-16). Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 015. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/132

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 015, 1983-12-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/132.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Hyde, Robert
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 16, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript 14 Montrose Voice / dec 16,1983 I Won't Dance: Don't Ask Me By Sharon McDonald To me, there is no more awesome sight than a dance floor filled with human twosomes moving in time to a common beat. I know Eleanor Roosevelt said no one can make you feel inferior without your consent, and I believe it. Situations, on the other hand, frequently make me feel inferior without my consent and having to perform on the dance floor is one of them. It's during adolescence that dancing first rears its ugly head, along with other timely delights like menstruation and body odor. As a teenager, I was blessed with only moderate acne and personality bland enough to spare me overt social ostracism. By some quirk, I was a nondescript swan, secretly waiting to turn into my true ugly duckling self. I watched those around me who fell as casualties of the teenage social scene and knew that there but for a set of braces, 30 pounds, or four square inches of pimples, went I. Those execruciating years introduced me to the particular despair endemic to the dance floor. But what I felt then at those awkward high school dances was just the tip of the iceberg. In retrospect, it was relatively easy—if anything in those days could be described as "easy"—to bluff my way through social obligations without ever really learning how to dance. My high school years and several that followed were years of dancing with heterosexual men who are notorious for having invented the Brick Wall School of Dancing. This is closely akin to their Brick Wall AIDS Not 'White Gay Man's Disease' as Many Thought By Dion B. Sanders Via GPA Wire Service SAN FRANCISCO—City officials, healthcare professionals and leaders of the gay and minority communities reacted with shock—and in some cases, anger—to the disclosure that up to 40 percent of the more than 2500 AIDS cases in the United States are ethnic minorities. Gay newspapers around the country recently carried a copyrighted story revealing data from the National Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta that showed that more than 25 percent of all AIDS cases nationwide are black— including Haitians—and that an additional 14 percent are Hispanic. Amazingly, less than 1 percent are Asians and Native Americans, according to the CDC statistics, which were as of Oct. 19. You're Reading the MONTROSE VOICE One of America's Major Gay Community Newspapers The high percentage of nonwhite AIDS patients sharply challenges a widely held belief by the general public—and especially by minority communities—that AIDS is a "white gay man's disease"—a belief that stems from a perception of the gay community as being exclusively white. Harry Britt, the only openly gay member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, told GPA that he wasn't surprised by the year-long period between the first dissemination of the AIDS ethnic data by the CDC and the reporting of it by the news media. "'Gay' triggers into the American consciousness a certain image—a white image," he said, adding that "the general slowness of the press in dealing with (the gay community) except in the stereotype of the white male" is the chief reason why the AIDS ethnic data had not previously been reported in the media—mainstream, gay or minority. School of Emoting. No men I ever danced with thought my erratic swoops and lunges on the dance floor were the least bid odd; they were plunging about with equal abandon and equal ineptitude. Later, when I can out, I entered a politically active circle of feminists whose last brush with fashion occurred a decade before. De-emphasizing personal appearance was a feminist statement. We hung around one homey women's bar, lurching our way through our favorite Bongs, unperturbed by prevailing community standards about what constitutes a dance. The life of gay women before feminism was never like this, I am told. You had to know how to dance, drink and shoot pool to win the woman of your dreams. Anyone doubting this should have seen the two 60-year-old women I saw clear the floor one night waltzing wonderfully to an old. old tune, showing the youngun's how it's done. It seemed like I'd only been out of the clost a few months when dancing, real dancing, experienced a revival that has yet to subside. No longer did shuffling around face-to-face with your chosen victim suffice; suddenly couples were kicking and twirling on cue. In a matter of months, the happy camaraderie of the local bar became the close scrutiny of anxious eyes looking to pick up dance pointers. And I'll admit it, this change did not exactly cause my contemporaries to dance a path to my door. Okay, so I'm not so light on my feet, but I have a great personality. But people are so fickle. My friends stopped asking me to dance with them altogether, and my lover started pretending she was dancing with the woman to my left. Dancing now meant you had to do a predetermined ser- Commentary iee of steps, in sequence and in time. Well, forget it. A wiser woman than I would just resign hereself to learning how to move it with the big kids. Not me, boy. You won't catch me in a gym full of third graders going, "One, two, three, turn!" I ignored TM, est and macrame, and I can outwait this silly and tenacious preoccupation with actual skill on the dance floor. Alright, so I don't have rhythm. I'll wait 'til the Old Values come back around: Money, Looks and Power. They're a lot more versatile and easier to acquire. McDonald, who lives in Los Angeles, is co-winner of the 1983 Certificate of Merit for Outstanding Work in Feature Writing from the Gay Press Association. Her column appears here and in other gay newspapers. Now... Ride in Widebody Comfort to Los Angeles... EASTERN'S L-1011 Wisperliner Departs Daily at 5:35 P.M. —o— Starting January 9 New Widebody Service to New Orleans, Miami and Las Vegas. Check our Affordable Fares! Call your travel agent or Eastern Airlines in Houston at-738-8615. EASTERN, Houston's oldest and largest major carrier serving you since 1936. ^ FERIM America's favorite way to fly.
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