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Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983
File 012
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Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 012. 1983-12-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/129.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-16). Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/129

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 012, 1983-12-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/129.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Hyde, Robert
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 16, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript Dec. 16,1983 / Montrose Voice 11 Night of Candles By Randy Alfred WHY? Five to ten thousand marchers joined a candlelight procession from Castro Street to City Hall Nov. 27 to observe the fifth anniversary of the assassinations of Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk. A group of local anti-Marcos Filipinos joined the march to mark the birthday of assassinated opposition leader Benigno Aquino. A representative of the Kennedy family and a statement from Coretta Scott King turned this year's annual ceremony into a general protest against assassination as a political weapon". "We are here for three main reasons," said organizer Cleve Jones as he opened the program in front of City Hall. "To show that we remember Harvey and George, that we love them; that we're continuing their work, to say that no bullets, no coward's bullets, will stop us. For every leader who is shot down, five will emerge the following day "And thirdly, tonight we say that gay men and lesbians are taking our rightful place among the ranks of decent working men and women all across this planet who stand together in these perilous times for peace and democracy and social justice. That is our message tonight. LONG RUN FORCES: Scott Smith, Milk's business partner, former lover, heir and executor, echoed Jones' thoughts: "The assassin made the same mistake that many others make, believing the leader of a movement is the force behind that movement. Assassination seems to be an easy solution to complicated problems. And in the short run, it can be effective and disruptive. But in the long run, the forces of history win out. "Bullets can stop one person or two or 10, but there are a million of us left to carry on the work, and that's just what we've done here in San Francisco. That'B just what black people did when so many of their leaders were gunned down. And right now, millions more continue to work for democracy and freedom in the Philippines, despite the murder of their leader, Ninoy Aquino." PERSONAL AND POLITICAL: Similar thoughts came from former member of Congress John Burton, whose elder brother Phil, also a congressmember, died suddenly in April. "We lost friends, but we did not lose their ideals," John Burton told the throng. "We did not lose the direction that this city and our society will take, and your being here is a reaffirmation of the commitment that George and Harvey had to a world that will be at one, with peace, justice and equity for all men and women, regardless of age, race, disability or sexual preference." ALL TOGETHER NOW: Lupita Kasha- wahara, a leader in the Filipino-American resistance to Marcos, sister of Benigno Aquino, and wife of ABC News reporter Ken Kashawahara, sounded a note of solidarity: "Since Ninoy's death, millions of freedom-loving Filipinos have rallied around the battle cry, 'Ninoy, you are not alone!' George Moscone, Harvey Milk, John Kennedy, Martin Luther King and Ninoy Aquino, you are not alone!" HIS HONOR: John Laird, the newly elected openly gay mayor of Santa Cruz (about 75 miles south of San Francisco), told of Harvey Milk's influence on him: "He used to talk about people from Altoona, Pa. ... Really he was talking about all of us in the non-urban environment that he needed to give us hope. He needed to hold out a chance that we could make our maximum contribution and still be who we are and be honest about it. "And for myself at that time, in watch Dateline S.F. ing Harvey's career, I'd been a congressional assistant and a delegate to a national political convention, but I was still thinking about giving up a shot at a political career on the basis that I probably just couldn't be myself, that I just couldn't be honest and open and still make my maximum contribution. "But Harvey Milk held out that dream, and he held out that vision. And when he died it really sealed my dream and my conviction that nothing was going to stop me from being exactly what I wanted to be. "And this last week, when I was given the title of mayor of my city, a title that George had when he died, and one that would eventually have been Harvey's had he lived, it's now my chance to experience how this dream is continuing.... "We have the first returns from Altoona. And we're hearing from Altoona and Boston and Key West and San Francisco and Santa Cruz and Laguna Beach and even Bunceton, Mo." In November, Boston elected an openly gay man to its city council, and Key West, Fla., elected an openly gay mayor. Bunceton and California's Laguna Beach had previously elected, respectively, an openly gay mayor and an openly gay council- member. "The vision is alive, and the dream is growing," Laird concluded. "We're getting closer to the day that there'll truly be justice, and we can all live our lives without fear of persecution. So keep it up." JUSTICE? Keep up the demonstrations, for one thing. Several are planned for Jan. 6 when the killer of Moscone and Milk will be released from prison. Dan White will have served five years and 40 days fortwo counts of voluntary manslaughter. Alfred's column originates at the "Sentinel," a San Francisco gay newspaper. ®19&3 Randy Alfred, all rights reserved. ITALIAN BEEF HOUSE • Italian Beef Sausage (with green peppers) • Italian Sausage Sandwich (with green peppers and grilled onions) • Italian Meatball Sandwich • Polish Sausage (grilled onions, mustard and relish) • Hot Dogs (Chicago style) 2703 Montrose at Westheimer ORDERS TO GO 526-8709
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