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Houston Voice, No. 796, January 26, 1996
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Houston Voice, No. 796, January 26, 1996 - File 001. 1996-01-26. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/14280/show/14251.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-01-26). Houston Voice, No. 796, January 26, 1996 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/14280/show/14251

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 796, January 26, 1996 - File 001, 1996-01-26, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/14280/show/14251.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 796, January 26, 1996
Contributor
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Window Media
Date January 26, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript HOUSTON % / I f^ | ? JAN. 26,1996 V UlUii “ •A Weekly Community News Publication Stop the By KIM THOMPSON Houston Voice/Houston Queer Nation’s call to the community to rise and rage against the recent stabbing murder of Fred Mangione and other hate-motivated attacks was answered by hun­dreds of concerned Houstonians on a frizzly evening in Montrose. "Take Back the Streets Four: A Candle­light March in Memory of Fred Mang­ione” last Saturday, Jan. 20, was the first official action sponsored by the newly revived activist “tribe,” whose plac­ard- waving members were joined in those by a diverse crowd of supporters. Silver-haired seniors and matronly church mem-violence bers with toddlers in tow joined spirited young gay demonstrators at the gather­ing point at West Drew and Montrose—site of the murder of Paul Broussard five years ago—and along the march’s winding route through the Westheimer bar district. Marchers carried signs and lit candles while chanting: “Hey hey, ho ho, homo­phobia has got to go.” When the proces­sion rounded the corner of Stanford and headed down Pacific Street, the cry turned into “Out of the bars and into the streets.” And even non-gay friends yelled along, “We’re here, we’re queer, we will not dis­appear!” (Continued on Page 5) A diverse group joined the new Houston chapter of Queer Nation in march to 'Take Back the Streets' from gay-bashers Saturday, Jan. 20 (Photo by Kim Thompson) Vickie Shaw gets a massage from Khristen Lister at the Lesbian Health Initiative's health fair. ^hoto by Kim Thompson) Lesbian health fair informs, entertains Houston women (HOUSTON)—The fruits of countless hours of planning and organizing were realized for members and volunteers of the Houston Lesbian Health Initiative last Saturday as the organization’s first lesbian health fair took place at the Metropolitan Multi-Service center. Lesbians 96: To your Health!/Lesbi-anas ‘96: A Tu Salud was the first full-fle­dged exposition to directly address the health care needs and issues of lesbian women in Houston. (The group sponsored a smaller Lesbian Health day event last year). An estimated 200 women attended the unique fair, which featured work­shops, demonstrations and entertain­ment, along with on-site mammography, cholesterol testing, blood pressure checks, alternative health screening, massage therapy and much more—all in a woman-centered, lesbian specific, drug, smoke and alcohol-free environ­ment. LHI board member Pokey Anderson said she was “very pleased” with the event. (Continued on Page 9) City, state and nation mourn resonant voice for equality By MARK HENRY Houston Voice/Houston Barbara Jordan’s death last week sent shock waves throughout the country. She was the embodiment of class, integrity and con­science. Known to many as “the voice of moral authority,” she was also the eloquent voice of a nation. Jordan died of pneumonia, due to compli­cations resulting from her bout with leuke­mia. What many people were unaware of, however, was Jordan’s courageous bat­tle with multiple sclerosis which she has endured for many years. Her funeral last Saturday in Houston was attended by numerous dignitaries, including President Bill Clinton, Attor­ney General Janet Reno and former Texas Governor Ann Richards. She was laid to rest in the State Cemetery in Austin later that day, where she is believed to be the first African American interred—an ironic and fitting final entry in a long history of ground-breaking. A former U.S. Representative, Barbara Jordan was one of the most respected and admired women in politics by Democrats and Republicans alike, and was often con­sidered as a vice-president candidate. She was one of the most influential African- American women in history, along with the likes of Mary McLeod Bethune, Fannie Lou Hamer and Shirley Chisholm. She was renowned for her oratory skills, which many a critic has hailed as spellbinding, and was a sought after speaker for many causes. She represented Houston for three terms until 1979, when she retired from Congress as a result of her neuromuscular disease. Not one to rest on her laurels, the wheel­Former U.S. Rep. Barbara Jordan was buried Saturday, Jan. 20 at the Texas State Ceme­tery in Austin (AP Photo by Taylor Johnson) chair-bound Jordan began teaching public policy at the University of Texas with tremendous success. Jordan was always ready to assist her coun­try when summoned. Her thunderous voice and thought-provoking orations earned her the title of World’s Best Living Orator, which was bestowed upon her in 1985 by the International Platform Association. She was a friend to many, including her foes. Across political boundaries, it would be difficult to find anyone who did not admire the incomparable Barbara Jordan. The only way to understand her prominence and influence in the world of public affairs is to listen to her words. She brought a new defi­nition to the term “word power.” Her words had power, and we listened. In July of 1974, during the Nixon impeach­ment debate, Jordan stated: “My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total, and I am not going to sit here and be an idle spectator to the diminution, the sub­version, the destruction of the Constitu­tion.” (Continued on page 4.) 2 HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 Pornj-nunriy C ir firolyn Roberts If you would like an event listed in this sec­tion, please feel free to call me at 529-8490 or fax the facts to me at 529-9531. Friday, Jan. 26 * Borders Book Store Gay/Lesbian Book Club meets at the Espresso Bar at 9634 Wes-theimer. Call 782-6066. * HIV Art classes at the Art League. Call 523-8817 * HATCH meets. Call 942-7002. * 12 step program at Montrose Counsel­ing Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Aftercare Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Houston Tennis Club meets at 7:30 p.m. Call 868-5039. * Free Buffet at the Brazos River Bot­tom. 4:00 p.m. * Film at MFA: Complaints of a Dutiful Daughter. 8:00 p.m. Call 639-7300. Saturday, Jan. 27 * Houston Chain Gang Bicycle Club rides. Call 863-1860. * After Hours on KPFT 12:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. 90.1 FM. Call 526-5738. * Texas Association for Transsexual Support meets at 7:00 p.m. Call 827-5913. * Film at MFA: The Seventh Seal at 7:30 p.m. and The Magician at 9:15 p.m. Call 639-7300. Sunday, Jan. 28 * Houston Chain Gang Bicycle Club meets. Call 863-1860. * Front Runners meet at 9:00 a.m. at the Tennis center in Memorial Park. Call 522-8021. * HATCH meets. Call 942-7002. * Inner Loop Sunday Bowling League. Call 522-9612. * Out in Ft. Bend meets. Call 344-0638. * Brunch at the 611 12:30 p.m. $3 * Steak Night at the Brazos River Bottom. 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. * Pool Tournament at Chances. 6:00 p.m. * Houston Tennis Club meets at noon. Call 868-5039. * The Women’s Group meets at 10:45 a.m. Call 529-8571. * Film at MFA: Only a Mother. 7:00 p.m. Call 639-7300. Monday, Jan. 29 * AFH Creative Writing Class. 3:00 p.m. Call 623-6796. * Gay Fathers/Fathers First support group. 8:00 p.m. Call 861-6181. * HeartSong open rehearsal at the Com­munity Room in Sharpstown Center. 7:00 p.m. Call 526-9095. * Calendar/Computer workshop for Pride Week. 7:00 p.m. Call 529-1223. * Agora meets at 7:30 p.m. Call 623-6796. * Positive Living Group at Montrose Counseling Center. 2:15 p.m. Call 539- 0037. * Outpatient Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Women and HIV/AIDS Group at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 6:15 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Men Survivors of Sexual Abuse Group at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:15 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Lesbian Survivors of Cancer and their care givers at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:30 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Men’s HIV Group at Montrose Counsel­ing Center. 7:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Gay and Lesbian Readers group meets at Barnes and Noble. 3003 W. Holcombe at 7:00 p.m. Free! Call 349-0050. Tuesday, Jan. 30 * Front Runners meet at Memorial Park. 6:30 p.m. Call 522-8021. * Helping Cross Dressers Anonymous meets at 239 Westheimer. 8:00 p.m. Call 495-8009. * Basic Computer Skills Class at the Kolbe Project. Call 522-8182. * Southern Country gives dance lesson at the Ranch. 9200 Buffalo Speedway. 8:00 p.m. * Gay Men HIV + Psychotherapy at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 4:30 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Outpatient Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Aftercare Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Bereaved Partners/Spouses at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 6:15 p.m. Call 529-0037. * AIDS Alliance of the Bay Area meets at 7:00 p.m. Call 488-4492. * PROTECT support group meets at 7:00 p.m. Call 520-7870. * Women Survivors of Childhood Abuse at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:30 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Free Dance Lessons at the Brazos River Bottom. 9:30 p.m. Call 528-9192. * Live Jazz at Borders Book Shop. Call 782-6066. Wednesday, Jan. 31 { * Shiela Lennon performs at Chances. 9:00 p.m. Call 523-7217. * Houston Pride Band practices at Dig­nity Houston. Call 524-0218. * GLOBAL meets at 4:00 p.m. Call 743- 7539. * Toopee’s Coffee Bar has “Activity Night” with a complimentary buffet. 5:00 p.m. to 8:00p .m. Call 522-7662. * HIV survivor Support Group meets at 2929 Unity Drive. 7:00 p.m. Call 782-4050. * Men’s Network at Montrose Counsel­ing Center. 7:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Houston Tennis Club meets at 7:30 p.m. Call 868-5039. * Lambda Rollerskating Club skates 8:00 p.m. Call 933-5818. * Women’s Network at Montrose Coun­seling Center. 7:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Ongoing Mixed Living in Process Group for men and women. Call 622-7250 for more info. * Living with Chronic Pain at Montrose Counseling Center. 9:30 p.m. Call 529- 0037. * Aftercare Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. (Continued on following page) Dale Carpenter: man with a mission By CURT MORRISON Houston Voice/Houston Is the term gay conservative an oxymo­ron? Not according to Dale Carpenter, former board member of the Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus and cur­rent president of the State Log Cabin Republican organization. In a recent interview with the Houston Voice, Car­penter spoke candidly on this and a host of other issues. Carpenter, 29, believes that the gay com­munity is as diverse as any other sect of society, and that the perception by gay people and straight people alike that all gays tend to be “naturally liberal in their politics” is another example of stereo­typing gay people that “needs to be over­come if we are going to achieve equality in this country.” The Log Cabin Republicans are a 10,000 member national organization whose basic purpose is to change the hostility towards gays and lesbians in the Republi­can Party. There are chapters in most cit­ies and states throughout the country. Although the chapters are autonomous, the organization is unified by ideol­ogy. The organization hosts an annual convention where priorities are set and guest speakers address the members. Carpenter’s enthusiasm is evident when he discusses the organization, its impact and the successes that have been achieved. Carpenter credits Rich Tafel, the executive director of the national office in Washington, D.C., for his instrumental efforts on behalf of the organization’s ascension in the politi­cal arena. As state president. Carpenter plans an “aggressive effort to educate the com­munity” about Log Cabin and its mission. He feels that there is a considerable amount of mischaracterization and misunderstanding as to what the organ­ization is about, on the part of both the community and gay publications. As a result, he believes that it is absolutely nec­essary and essential to correct those mis­interpretations, and he promises to issue more press releases and stay in con­tact with gay publications. Carpenter intoned that The Log Cabin Republicans are as diverse as any other political organization. Some mem­bers, he noted, are pro-choice; some pro-life. Others are Libertarians; others Moderate. The fundamental cohesive element of the Log Cabin Republicans is their desire to see the party change their attitude about gays, he said. That is the ultimate litmus test for the organiza­tion. Carpenter recalled how the organiza­tion “unanimously endorsed the Con­tract with America and ten minutes later, close to unanimously endorsed the con­cept of gay marriage.” The organiza­tion is basically comprised of gay men and women who are fiscally conservative and have a host of other views on social issues. In 1994, Carpenter and Brian Vezey, a friend, co-founded the Lincoln Project after a tumultuous falling out between various members of the HGLPC, which he did not elaborate on. The two were con­cerned that moderates and conserva­tives were abandoning the caucus and leaving it entirely in the hands of the gay left, hence the Lincoln Project was born. The project was a sub-committee of the caucus, and its purpose was to recruit moderates and conservatives and get them re-involved in the caucus. They accomplished this by holding monthly meetings with guest speakers who would discuss how gay conservatives and mod­erates can be involved in the political process. One of their speakers was Betsy Lake, the Harris County Republican Party Chair—which, according to Car­penter, marked the first and only time that she has ever spoken to a group of people for­mally associated with the Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus. In addi­tion, the Project was instrumental in endorsing, and raising funds for, gay­friendly Republican candidates with considerable success. In March of 1995 Carpenter started a cooperative venture between Log Cabin and the caucus entitled the Precinct Ini­tiative. Its mission is to seek and elect candidates, gay and heterosexual, men and women, to run for precinct chair positions in the Republican Party. Car­penter emphatically states that the Pre­cinct Initiative was “designed to build on whatever success we are able to have to change the party.” He adds that it is “vital that gay people get involved at the grass­roots level in the Republican Party, because that is precisely the way the relig­ious right managed to take control of much of the apparatus of the Republican Party.” Carpenter says that although the status of The Lincoln Project is unclear at present, the Precinct Initiative is “alive and well...and regardless what happens, the Precinct Initiative will go forward and be successful. It has a life of its own.” The concern iterated for the Lincoln Project’s status is a reference to the recent resignation of Carpenter and Brian Vezey, who were the co-chairs of the project, from the board of trustees of the HGLPC. Carpenter’s resignation has been the subject of speculative conjec­ture that bears clarification. He says he did not resign as a result of an apparent dis­agreement with Pat Gandy, the newly elected president of the caucus, as has been rumored. Gandy, who ran unopposed, won the seat on a vote of 28 to 20, according to the cau- Dale Carpenter, state president of Log Cabin Republicans cus. When asked about the incident, Car­penter was forthright without hesi­tancy. He said he did ask Gandy the follow­ing question: “Assuming that a Republi­can is endorsed by the caucus, could you support that candidate publicly, given that you serve on the state Democratic executive committee, the highest pol­icy making body of the Democratic Party in the state of Texas? And she replied “I will uphold the bylaws., 1 And that was the end of it according to Carpenter. Carpenter said he resigned with “regrca and disappointment.” He indicated that he felt that he had failed in his efforts to make the caucus more representative ideo­logically for the community and felt that he was not anywhere near reaching his goal. He would not hesitate to get involved again should circumstances change; how­ever, he feels that there are other organi­zations and methods for achieving his goals. (Continued on Page 16) HOUSTON VOICE/ JANUARY 26, 1996 3 Community Calendar (Continued from preceding page) Wednesday, Jan. 31 * Women’s Issues Process Group at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:30 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Women’s Action Coalition (WAC) meets at 7:00 p.m. Call 867-9581. * Lesbian/Bisexual Survivors at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:30 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Bi-Net of Houston meets at 7:00 p.m. Call 861-9149. * All About Menopause...DHEA and Natural hormone replacement sem­inar presented by Dr. Arlette Pharo. 7:30 p.m. Call 492-6077. Thursday, Feb. 1 * Montrose Ice Picks skate at the Gal­leria. 8:00 P.M. Call 629-1432. * Broadway Showtunes at J.R’s. 9:00 p.m. Call 521-2519. * Art Classes at The Art League. 1:00 P.M. Call 523-8817 * Front Runners meet at Memorial Park. 6:30 p.m. Call 522-8021. * Gay Men’s Chorus of Houston open rehearsal at 7:00 p.m. Call 521-7464. * Twentysomething meets at 7:30 p.m. Call 531-9396. * KPFT Lesbian and Gay Voices airs at 8:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Call 866-6505. * Burger and Chili night at the Brazos River Bottom. 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. * Steak Night at the 611 Pub. 6:30 p.m. * Dance lessons at the Brazos River Bottom. 9:30 p.m. Free. Call 880- 0670. * Safer Sex for Lesbians at Ms. B’s 9:30 p.m. Call 666-3464. * Ongoing gay men’s Living in Proc­ess Group. Call 622-7250. * Open Mike Night at Cafe Artiste. 1601 W. Main. 8:00 p.m. Call 528-3704. * HIV+ Men Psychotherapy at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 1:15 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Relapse Prevention at Montrose Counseling Center. 2:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Outpatient Group Treatment at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Aftercare Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Meditation and Chanting Group meets at 7:00 p.m. Call 942-0923. * HIV Affected at CASA. 7:00 p.m. Call 796-2272. * Men’s Therapy Group at Montrose Counseling Center. 7:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * “Cupid’s Arrow: The Real Story” relationship therapy workshop pre­sented by Patrick J. Vachon. Free. 4100 Montrose at 6:30 p.m. Call 529- 1913 X4. Can't Always Find Your Copy Of The HOUSTON VOICE ? Subscribe (713) 529-8490 A QUALITY OF LIFE ALTERNATIVE WHEN SELLING YOUR LIFE INSURANCE POLICY MONEY TO EXTEND LIFE. As the largest and oldest Gay Owned and Operated Viatical Company in Houston, we simply provide the best service and get the most money for your LIFE INSURANCE POLICY. MONEY TO ENJOY LIFE. Linked Benefits OF HOUSTON A Viatical Service Company 811 Westiieimer V Suite 208 Houston, Texas 77006 (800) 275-3090 V (713) 528-6777 4 HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 In Loving Memory GENYE ELAINE ALLEN Bom: February 12, 1963 Died: January 15, 1996 Genye went home to Jesus on January 15, 1996 surrounded by her family, spouse, and spouse's family. Born in the Rio Grande Valley, Genye graduated from Texas A&M, and spent most of her adult life helping those with mental retardation. Her spirit and love of others reached out to touch hundreds of lives. She was always concerned with helping others; causing her to be exposed to HIV while administering first aid to strangers in an auto accident. Genye was survived by her spouse of 8 years, Jackie; her mother; father; two sisters; and a brother; and her best friend, Pam; as well as hundreds of friends. At the time of her death, she was a member of the Board of Directors of MCCR, a member of the sanctuary choir, and serving on the pastoral search committee for MCCR. Her devotion to her God, her church and to others was an example for us all. Her spouse and family would like to thank Dr. J. Gathe, Jr., Dr. Stool, Park Plaza's Sth floor nursing staff, and the exceptional MICU nurses that cared for Genye. We would also like to thank her wonderful friends that supported us, cared for us, prayed for us, and held us through this difficult battle. Genye, we all love you, and miss you. We need your ability to cut through the trash to what was really important. Your wisdom, selfless giving, and bright Christian light will be an incalculable loss. God called you home when none of us were expecting it. Thank you for giving us time to say good by. I will see you again some day. Until then, you will be our special angel, always over our shoulder. See you at the East Gate, Love Jackie A memorial service will be held at Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrection, 1919 Decatur, Houston, TX at 1:30 pm, on January 28, 1996. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Genye Allen Memorial Fund, 1436 W. Gray, Box 219, Houston, TX 77019. Proceeds from this fund will be used to establish a scholarship at Texas A&M University. GARY ROGER KARIKER Born: January 15, 1940 Died: January 5, 1996 Gary, age 55, died of a long term illness. He is survived by his Mother, father, brother and sister. Gary will also be missed by many dear family and friends. Gary's memorial service will be at 2:00 pm, Saturday, January 27 at the Bering Memorial U.M.C., 1440 Harold, Houston, Tx 77006. The family suggests memorial gifts be presented to Sunshine Kids, 2902 Ferndale, Houston, Tx 77098, or Omega House, 602 Branard, Houston, Tx 77006. Love from all your family & dear friends. KENNETH HARPER NATIONS Born: December 27, 1940 Died: December 21, 1995 “Love bears all things, Believes all things, Hopes all things, Endures all things.” -1 Corinthians 13-7 Please join us in celebrating the life of our beloved friend, Ken Nations and his transition from Earthly life to the Infinite Universe. At 2:00 p.m. on January 28th, we will come together to remember how he touched our lives, mourn his passing from our world, and Rejoice in his new found freedom. The Memorial will be at 2833 N.E. 115th St, Seattle WA. Punch and food will be served. Informal dress. Inquiries may be directed to Dennis Kinnan 206-248-7982. DON IRVINE We pray for the soul of our friend, Don Irvine, who chose to end his life on December 26, 1995. He leaves to love him Rob Cavanaugh, his lover for three beautiful years, and many family and friends who loved Don very much. "When he shall die take him and cut him out into little stars... And he will make the face of heaven so fine... That all the world will be in love with the night... And pay no worship the garish sun." - William Shakespeare Another way to reach us! You can now send your letters, news leads, and other correspondence to the HOUSTON VOICE by e-mail. Address to: HouVoice@aol.com. VOICE A Weekly Community News Publication ISSUE 796 January 26, 1996 Published Fridays Established 1974 as the Houston Montrose Star, re-established 1980 as the Houston Montrose Voice, changed name to The New Voice in 1991 incorporating the New Orleans Crescent City Star, re-established December 1,1993 as the Houston Voice 811 Westheimer, Suite 105 Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 (800) 729-8490 Fax: (713) 529-9531 Contents copyright 1995 Office Hours: 9am-5:30pm weekdays Crad Duren/pubiisher Jack Leonard/general manager Matthew Pennington/production manager EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT Sheri Cohen Darbonne/editor Barbara Jordan was rare leader, orator STAFF WRITERS: Jon Harrison, Javier Tamez, Glen Webber, Mark Henry, Carolyn Roberts (Continued from Page L) At the behest of President Clinton, Jordan chaired the U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform and pre­sented its finding to Congress just last month. In her testimony to the Judici­ary Committee, Jordan proved once again why she has earned her sterling reputation. Here is a portion of her testimony (as reported in U.S. News and World Report) that sums up the Jor­dan mystique: “I would be the last person to claim that our nation is perfect. But we have a kind of perfection in us because our founding principle is universal— that we are all created equal regardless of race, religion or national ancestry. When the Declaration of Indepen­dence was written, when the Consti­tution was adopted, when the Bill of Rights was added to it, they all applied almost exclusively to white men of Anlgo-Saxon descent who owned prop­erty on the East Coast. They did not apply to me. I am female. I am black. But these self-evident principles apply to me now as they apply to everyone in this room.” Resonant, principled, pragmatic, and inspirational, Barbara Jordan will be missed. CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Jon Anthony, Andrew Edmonson, John Reed,Jazz Paz, Chris Lambert,Kerry Kadell, Sam Dawster, Curt Morrison CARTOONISTS David Brady, Scotty, Earl Storm PHOTOGRAPHERS David Goetz, Kim Thompson ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Carolyn A. Roberts, Susan Scott Beer and burger burglars strike Mary fs (HOUSTON)—Mary’s, a popular, 25- year-old gay bar located in the heart of Montrose, was burglarized early Tues­day morning by bandits who may be more likely to convert their ill-gotten gains into a cookout than cash. The burglars entered the bar’s patio area by using the base of a discarded Christ­mas tree to pry open a locked gate, then raided a refrigerator where hamburger meat and steak are stored for the club’s Steak Night. They also broke into the locked beer cooler for the patio bar. destroying the cooler doors in the proc­ess. Schnapps and well liquor stocked at the back bar were also taken. Owner Gaye Yancey noted, however, that curiously, some more traditional break-and-run “booty” was left behind, including a stereo and television set. No cash is kept in the registers at night; the cash register itself was not taken, and the cigarette machine had not been broken into. Nevertheless, Yancey said the bar would be taking additional security measures in the future. “We’ve been lucky,” she noted. “This is the first time anything like this has happened in many, many years.” Yancey estimated damages to the bar at about $4,500. The intruders apparently heard a noise and ran away when Tim Watson, an employee who was working overnight cleanup duty and was in the bar when the breakin occurred, shut off a wet vac he had been using inside the building. Watson said they were gone before he realized what had happened. “I guess I’m lucky they didn’t do anything to me,” he said. CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS Maggie Bralick NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Rivendell Marketing, P O. Box 518, Westfield. NJ (908) 232-2021 Notice to advertisers: Advertising rate schedule thirteen was effective March 1995 —Partial or complete reproduction of any advertisement, news article or feature, copy or photograph from the Houston Voice is specifically prohibited by federal statute —Opinions expressed by columnists or cartoonists are not nec­essarily those of the Houston Voice or its staff and we assume no liability for the content expressed or implied of said articles or likeness of persons living or dead, real or fictional in the cartoons —Publication of the name or photograph of any person or or­ganization in articles or advertising in the Houston Voice is not to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientation oi said person or organization 1 —The appearance of advertisements or opinions expressed therein do not constitute an endorsement or guarantee by The Houston Voice or its staff POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to 811 Westheimer Suite 105. Houston, TX 77006 Subscription rate in US (by carrier or US Mail): $1.75 per week ($45 50 per 6 months or $91 00 per year) Display advertising deadline: 12:00 p.m. CT Monday to reserve space. 5:00 p.m. CT Monday to furnish ad copy, for Friday publication Classified advertising deadline: noon CT Monday for Friday publication Responsibility: We do not assume financial responsibility for claims by advertisers but readers are asked to advise the news­paper of any suspicion of fraudulent or deceptive advertising and suspicions will be investigated Member: National Gay Newspaper Guild; Gay & Lesbian Press Association; Associate member: Associated Press HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 5 Many march in Montrose against hate crimes QN’s Laura Mitchell challenged crowd to “rage against injus­tice of any kind” (Photo by Kim Thompson) (Continued from Page 1) Many of the marchers related disturb­ing accounts of hate crimes perpetrated ^gainst themselves and others. "Mary Perez said she was attacked in high school by two guys who beat her and a friend with a crow bar. Mary woke up in a hospital. Luckily, her attacker was tried and sentenced to 10 years. Q-Patrol member Doris Smith recalled her first night on foot patrol. “We saw somebody getting bashed and pre­vented a possible murder,” she said. The First Unitarian Universalist Church had a large presence. The pastor and many members of the church marched and spoke on the issue of hate crime. Member Sharon Plummer said, “I think it’s very important that we all feel safe and have physical safety as we move around our city. It’s a right we should all demand.” But while there was no doubting that the event centered on a sad and serious issue, the par­ticipants and some of the onlookers seemed energized and empow­ered. The candlelight march turned down Grant Street, passing restaurants where patrons and workers clapped and waved from windows. As it headed down Wes-theimer, passing motorists honked horns and joined in the chants. “House­less” Montrose citizen Wyoming and his buddies'joined in the march: “You don’t have to be gay to hate a hate crime. You only got to have a heart.” The marchers turned down Montrose and gathered on a lot at the corner of Mis­souri and Montrose. There, they spent a few minutes in the street, with candles raised and banners displayed to oncom­ing cars. The news media was present to report on the event, with representa­tives from all major networks. Rev. Bob Schaibly of First Unitarian was first at the podium. He spoke of the importance of everyone coming together to demand safety for all. “This violence threatens everyone. It threatens our sanity, it threatens the common safety of all citizens regard­less of gender orientation,” said Shaibly. “Our lives are interwoven. Injustice any­where is a threat to justice eve­rywhere.” Queer Nation member Laura Mitchell followed with a dynamic speech urging the gath­ered members to use their anger and energy in a focused, produc­tive way—to use the memory of Fred Mangione to speak out against violence. “We are not invisible, we are not apathetic to violence, and yes, we do care about our own,” she said. “We must rage against ignorance, rage against indifference, rage against injustice of any kind.” She went on to say that everyone has a place in the effort, whether it be stuffing an envelope or car­rying a banner. She concluded: “Please, let us go forward with a renewed spirit and a new sense of purpose.” While many said they were pleased with the turnout, others, including attorney/activist John Paul Barnich, expressed disappointment. “Fred was every one of us. It could hap­pen to any one of us,” Barnich said. “I hate that more did not attend.” Queer Nation meets every Monday at 7:00 p.m. Call 869-1240 for location and additional information. 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Add the complexities of living with a life-threatening illness, and our lives can. at times, seem out of control. I lowevcr. there arc t and there are choice Legticv Benefits is a paving the maximum for yonr life insurance policv. But we don’t stop there, not if you don’t want us to. To continue our support after von viaticate. Legacy Benefits has developed L.A.M.P.. an on-going program equipping you with self-empowerment tools. I’he Legacy Assistance Membership Program™ provides (he following: • A Fki i: Fivwciai. Planning Consultation • Pkescription Drug Discount Prcmjra.m • Marianne Williamson’s Seminar Tape • L.A.M.P. Hotline • L.A.M.P. Newsletter Choi Legacy Benefits Corporation 1-800-875-1000 225 West 3-nh Street Suite 1500 New ^>rk. NY 10122 Your Yialical Sen lenient. Company • \ I’ounding Member <>i lite Yiatieal Assix’iation of America Night Parade Proposal Supporter FROM DAVID W. DAHLQUIST Houston, Texas I would like to join the list of people who support keeping Pride Week focused around the Stonewall anniversary, but moving the Pride Parade to the evening. I think it is important to keep public awareness focused on the Stonewall event. No other single event has had the impact on gay life as this particular weekend in New York City in the summer of 1969. I came out a year after Stonewall. The event precipitated the formation of the Gay Activists Alliance. And it was two members of that group, in navy blue t-shirts with bright orange lambdas, appearing on the Dick Cavett Show in 1970, that convinced me to rip open the closet door. I’ve never even thought of going back. While it is good to remind society that gay people have pride in themselves and their community, it is also good to remind them that gay people have finally stopped taking the abuse of.centuries, and fought them back. None of us should ever forget where gays used to be. That is the only way we will continue to prog­ress. I think the idea of an evening parade is great, especially for those living with HIV. I remember that my late lover, Michael Cole, could not attend the parade (in 1992) during the last year of his life, because of the incredible heat. He was, to say the least, extremely disap­pointed. At a time when all else that he loved so much was slowly being taken from him. I remember attending the parade that year, and when it was over, I felt so empty that he couldn’t be there, that I reached up and pulled down a large pink glittered tri­angle with pink ribbons streaming from it. It was one of the parade route decora­tions, and I wanted to give it to him. I gar­nered quite a few surprised looks from passers-by. To me, it was only a small sub­stitute for (his) not being able to attend. I have watched other friends living with HIV literally wilt in the afternoon heat, and have to leave the parade behind and return home. This is a sad legacy for our friends who are already living with prob­lems far beyond most people’s compre­hension. Australia switched to an evening parade several years ago, and today it is one of the largest events in that country. There us something about a parade that evokes fantasy, and something about nighttime and torch lights that makes fantasy come alive. I heartily recommend that members Houston’s gay community support keeping Pride Week focused on the Stonewall anniversary, and move the parade to the evening. Clinic History Was Off- Track FROM MICHAEL J. WHITE, R.N., C.C.M. Houston, Texas May I take a moment to correct a state­ment made by Mr. Webber in last week’s issue? In his column, Glen states that the Thomas Street Clinic was “an aban­doned railroad station.” Though it built by a railroad, it was never a railro^J station. In what could be described as an origi­nal form of managed care organiza­tion, the Southern Pacific Railroad pro­vided health care for its employees, as was common in its day, through a series of clinics and hospitals that it owned and operated. The Southern Pacific Hospi­tal was built in 1911 at the corner of Bishop and Thomas Streets to be close to the nearby Southern Pacific Railway shops. The Southern Pacific Hospital Asso­ciation was dissolved and the hospital closed in 1968, at which time the building was donated to the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital, where it began a new life as a rehabilitation hos­pital for patients recovering from can­cer and cancer-related treatment. It continued to serve the needs of cancer patients until well into the 1980’s. It came into the possession of Harris County when M.D. Anderson traded it for the property owned by the county near Anderson’s Medical Center location (the former Center Pavilion Hospi­tal). So, in short: though originally built by a railroad, the facility at Bishop and Tho­mas Street has been a medical facility devoted to people with special needs almost continuously since it was built in 1911, and with the new renovations, appears to have several good years yet. Much of the above information was compiled by District 9 of the Texas Nurses Association as a part of a Bice^B tennial project. It was published dur­ing my term as president of that organi­zation, in a volume titled Nursing in the Houston Area, Past as Prologue . 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Theirs is a beau­tiful love story...without the happy end­ing. Don chose to take his own life on Dec. 26. No one knows why, but I’ll share with you what we do know. Rob is the lover. A tall, handsome man, he reminds me of Rhett Butler: a real gentle-pan, and very caring. We recently dis- ’ cussed Don, and what might have caused him to kill himself. Don was one of the most charming and delightful people I’ve ever met. With his Robert Redford good looks and his warm, embracing personality, he would instantly make you feel welcome. While I was in the hospital recovering from my car wreck, Don came to see me. He brought me a gift, and we had a delightful visit. I was grateful he came by. He really cared about people. Rob says, “We were surprised at the time of his death. He was at the pinnacle of his life. He had just finished remodeling his beautiful home in the Heights. He just completed getting his Masters in com­puter science. And, after seven years of trying, he got his giant schnauzer puppy from East Germany. Don bad a large col­lection of animals, including snakes, liz­ards, a tarantula, and other animals he used as teaching aids when he talked about AIDS.” The most unselfish act of kindness and love I have ever heard of came from Don. He was a school teacher and taught all the kids computer skills. He also was their bene* factor. Whenever he heard of a student or a student’s family needing assistance, he would give money to the principal to give to the family. The principal would always explain it was “a little extra money in the budget.” No child went without clothes, or food, or school books, thanks to Don. I believe this is the greatest loss in Don’s leaving us. All those children, who Iboked to Don as a big brother, confidant, father figure and leader, all looking forward to school, so they could share their Christ­mases with him, will now find their hero is gone. It makes me very sad. Don’s own childhood may hold some keys to why this successful man would choose to end his life. He had a severe case of Dys­lexia, which caused him many years of prob­lems. His childhood was very difficult. He had alcoholic parents who got drunk and fought, especially over the holidays. Don did not have one Christmas where his parents weren’t drunk and fighting. For a sensitive young man, this must have left terrible scars. This was not his first attempt. Still, the question still haunts me: what despair, so deep in his soul, would take control and lead him to such a desperate act as suicide? “We were together three years. We were planning to move in together very soon. Many people asked how he committed sui­cide. That I can’t discuss. Because I know what he was dealing with, his internal rage and many frustrations, I knew this was not a spur of the moment thing. He thought about it for many years,” says Rob. “I can’t blame myself. I’m not mad, upset or disap­pointed. I’m sad, because I miss him.” Rob adds: “These last three years with him were the best and happiest time of my life. I expected us to be together forever. I will always remember the good times.” I won’t pretend to understand suicide. It is a choice that every person has the right to make. But killing yourself is such a per­manent thing. Is there any problem or sit­uation so bad that death is the only way out? What we have lost in Don can never be made up by anyone else. He was the sunshine in so many peoples lives. You knew when he walked into a room that things would be all right. I will miss you, my dear fiend. And all his students, his family, his lover, and his friends will miss him as well. God bless you, Don. You made our lives so much better. Compiled by [J Mark Henry ® I Heroes of Our Time President Bill Clinton and Mother Teresa are the most admired people in the world today according to a recently released CNN/USA Today/Gallup Poll . The annual poll asks participants to name the man and woman they most admire. The most revered males in descending order were: Clinton; Colin Powell; Pope John Paul II; Rev. Billy Graham; George Bush; Newt Gingrich; Ronald Reagan; Jimmy Carter, Nor­man Schwarzkopf, Bob Dole and Nel­son Mandela. The woman who were most admired: Mother Teresa; Hillary Rod­ham Clinton; Margaret Thatcher; Barbara Bush; Princess Diana; Oprah Winfrey; Queen Elizabeth; Maya Angelou; Nancy Reagan and Whitney Houston. The poll has a margin of error of three percentage points. Sky Diver’s Luck Ray Paite of Chicago was horrified when he spoke with reporters about his brush with death. Paite plunged 9000 feet to earth after his parachute failed to open, but the frantic Dad survived with barely a scratch—when he landed in a fresh pile of stinky steaming cow manure. Paite was so relieved that he sur­vived his “worst nightmare.” Paite indicated that everything was fine until he reached 3000 feet and pulled the cord on his parachute, only to realize that it was not opening. The terrified father of two attempted to deploy his emergency chute to no avail and thought he was going to die. Paite, still trembling from the trauma, told reporters that he “just closed my eyes and waited, and then SPLAT!—I landed in a pile of the squish-iest, most god-awful stuff I’ve ever seen.” Paite said that he initially had no idea what he hit until he wound up three-feet deep and suffocating in it. “I had it in my ears, I had it in my nose, I had it in my mouth, I had it in everything, man. Then it dawned on me that I wasn’t going to die after all, that I was hardly even hurt—and suddenly, cow manure never tasted so good.” Paite does not plan to skydive anymore in the near future. Beginners to Experts welcome. 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Allow us Io kelp you in obtaining financial I fpeedom---- ike highest cask payment in the guickest " possible lime. Oup sepvices ape fpee and confidential with no obligation* < ...and Then Along Came Steve There is a cardinal rule in politics that most pundits and media representa­tives tend to forget. The rule is simple enough, it dictates that nothing in poli­tics is certain and should not be con­strued as such. Steve Forbes’ recent ascension in the polls is demonstrative of this dictum. Up until just recently, the media and political pundits alike, were convinced that the upcoming presi­dential elections were going to be a run­off between two moderate. President Clinton and Senator Bob Dole, candi­dates. Then along came Steve Forbes. Forbes’ meteoric rise in the polls has raised the ire of his opponents who did not take him seriously from his campaigns inception. How unfortunate. The signs were evident as far back as Colin Pow­ell’s decision not to run for the presi­dency. There were many moderates in the Republican Party who were left without a candidate to support after Powell’s decision not to enter the race. It would stand to reason that they were looking for an alternative and lo and behold, they found one in Steve Forbes. Many people in the Republican Party are uncomforta­ble with Bob Dole for various reasons, mostly however, due to their belief that he lacks conviction and shifts his position to whatever way the wind is blowing. Sound familiar? The lackluster field of Republican candidates should have realized that the citizens involved in the Powell cam­paign were looking for alternatives and seized the moment. Steve Forbes did and targeted those former Powell support­ers with a fervor. As a result, he is now reaping the benefits, much to the cha­grin of front-runner Dole and Senator Phil Gramm. Forbes is now running sec­ond among Republican voters in nation­wide polls and is on the cover of this weeks TIME and Newsweek magazines. Six month’s ago Steve Forbes candidacy was considered a lark, today his candidacy is taken seriously and no one is laughing. Forbes has spent millions inundating the airwaves in Iowa and New Hampshire promoting his 17 percent flat tax with no deductions. This alone has set off a rau­cous debate within the Republican party. What’s more, Forbes is running second in Iowa to Bob Dole and in some polls, he ranks even with Dole in New Hampshire. Forbes decision to make taxes the paramount issue in the GOP race is the primary reason for his surge in the polls. Senator Dole should heed that message before he looses the momentum he has going into the convention. The American public abhors taxes and every time the GOP campaigns on the issue of taxation, they tend to win over the pub­lic. Doles remarks several weeks ago that he might be willing to reduce the amount of tax cuts the Republicans promised in the 1994 elections was the closest he has come to political suicide. Voters remember when you renege on the issues of importance to them. Steve Forbes may or may not win the Republican nomina­tion, my guess is that he won’t but that remains to be seen; however, he will be a force to be reckoned with and anyone who thinks otherwise should choose another profession. Forbes has the ability to finance his campaign all the way to the convention and amass enough dele­gates to have significant influence on setting the Republican policy agenda. Interestingly enough, the RepublL can candidates have caught on, albtA late, to Forbes’ popularity and have responded in typical form. During the Jan. 13 debate sponsored by the Des Moi­nes Register, all of the candidates focused their criticism and attacks on Forbes and his flat tax agenda. I realized then that the negativism was only going to get uglier and it has. Texas Senator Phil Gramm, who stands to lose the most if Forbes’ momentum continues to rise, is the first of the group to resort to the lowest common denominator. Gramm and his supporters are mounting a campaign to focus on Forbes “liberal social agenda,” specifically his support of gay rights. Now there’s a surprise. This is the type of campaign rhetoric you woid^ expect from Jesse Helms, Pat Buchanan W Pat Robertson, not Phil Gramm. It dem­onstrates just how desperate the Texas Senator is with regards to his fledgling campaign. Phil Gramm needs to realize that he doesn’t need to cater to the fringe elements of the party in order to receive the nomination. If that were the case, he would have long been the odds on favor­ite. Gramm would have been wiser to focus his campaign on his economic prowess, rather than on social conservatism. Perhaps if he had, he would be the front­runner. Another point that seems to be remiss in all the commentary concerning Forbes is that he has single-handedly managed to control the debate in this primary cam­paign, which is a testament to his lead­ership abilities. Everyone who is campaigning and/or focusing on the campaign is discussing the issue of a flat tax. Even Richard Gephardt introduced his version of a flat tax proposal. I seri­ously doubt that would have occurred without Forbes steadfast adherence to the flat tax concept. Forbes consis­tently talks about his flat tax and does so at every opportunity available. That is why his stock is rising. The American public knows very well when someone believes in what they are espousing, and what better way to con­vince the electorate of your convic­tions than to constantly reiterate them. Ronald Reagan knew this very well and used it to his advantage in controlling the agenda this country embarked up^^ Steve Forbes has replicated that to p^ fection. President Clinton, who has admittedly studied speeches that Reagan made, apparently missed that les­son. The American public is looking first and foremost for a leader in their choice for president, someone who has conviction and the strength to follow through with their mandate. President Clinton and Senator Bob Dole need to demonstrate that they can fill that void and based on their records to date, they have there work cut out for them. Finally, the argument that Steve Forbes does not have enough experience is moot. Where is it written that in order to be a politician, you must have a law degreA What do lawyers know about running business? Steve Forbes runs a publish­ing empire and knows how to balance a checkbook and meet payroll. Perhaps this country needs a businessperson to run the business of government. Regardless of what the outcome will be in Nov. 1996, at least the race won’t be as lethargic as everyone thought it would. We can all thank Steve Forbes for that. HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 9 /n^^a/uei f faff 'Pay Domestic Violence: Les­bians Not Immune In 1988, my first girlfriend beat the shit out of me. I have always been a big woman. Strong. Made good money. I was bigger than her. But she broke two fingers on my right hand and left me temporarily blind. She begged me not to—and then forbade me to— call the police or seek medical help, because she feared arrest. I feared for my life, so I didn’t report her. I didn’t tell anyone. Who could I tell? My friends (the ones I had been allowed to keep) were her friends. And after years of trying to educate my family about my orienta­tion, how could I go home like this? I tried to kill myself. In 1995, 61 Texas women died from domes­tic violence; 12,053 sought shelter; and 153,199 made calls to shelter hotlines. Some of this violence was perpetrated by men against their female partners. Some of it was lesbian women beating and killing their women lovers. Deborah Reynolds was “loved to death” by her female lover in Port Arthur in 1994. Witnesses testified that they saw the driver of a moving vehicle beating Deb, heard her cries before she fell out of the truck onto her back. She lay crumpled in the street without moving. She died five days later at a hospital of massive head inju­ries without ever regaining conscious­ness. Although the death was investigated by law enforcement, the Jefferson County Grand Jury no-billed Deborah’s partner. The police dismissed the women who tes­tified as “you people” and waved their concerns back into the closet. The friends and family of Deborah Rey­nolds were left alone with their grief and rage and questions. And life in Port Arthur, Texas continued. Juli Johnson was Deb’s best friend for 14 years. She knew the circumstances Deb suffered. She knew Deb was afraid and wanted out of her relationship. But she was unable to persuade Deb to leave. Some battered lesbians don’t leave their abusers. Those who decide to find few options or resources to help. There are no lesbian shelters. There is no organized underground, nowhere to hide. Some lesbians fight in the bars. Some fight when they’re drinking, when they’re sobering up, when they’re breaking up. We call these fights “roles”; we call it jeal­ousy; we attribute it to stress over living in a homophobic society. We allow each other to be beaten because we don’t know (or won’t admit) our lesbian sisters are being battered. And if we know, we don’t know what to do. Juli Johnson and the friends and family members of Deborah Reynolds now know what to do. They have created a riv­eting educational video (produced and directed by Dawn Wieking, in associa­tion with Casa de Esperanza, a latina women’s organization in Minnesota) that documents the abuse of Deborah and other lesbian and bisexual women across the country. Survivors of same-sex abu­sive relationships speak out about their own experiences, and professional therapists discuss the warning signals of dangerous relationships and the impact of oppression when addressing woman-to-woman battering. My Girlfriend Did It is the first of its kind in the United States. It is an excellent tool for educators, counselors, law enforcement agencies, battered women’s shelters, nurses, doctors, clergy and support groups. And survi­vors. Ms. Johnson and other mourners of Deb­orah Reynolds are showing their work at public meetings whenever they are invited. There is no fee, and they will even pay their own expenses (although a meal and a spare guest room is appreciated if their travel is overnight). They are available to speak at functions and help organize local awareness/support groups. And they will continue in this mission until lesbians battered by their lovers are heard, and believed, and protected. I wish I had known Juli Johnson in 1988. To schedule a presentation of My Girl­friend Did It , call 409—962-8318, or write Juli Johnson, 4531 Evergreen, Port Arthur, TX 77642. First LHI health fair a success Trish Cunningham, RN, checks Susie Rokes on Saturday, Jan. 20 (Continued from Page 1) “Health is a very scary subject for peo­ple, and especially for lesbians, Anderson said. “We wanted to have a event where we could pass out serious informa­tion and have real health screening, but at the same time, have a fun atmosphere. We wanted (the fair to be) an environment) that would take out the scariness.” In 1995, the Lesbian Health Initiative, a nonprofit organization, completed and distributed the results of a comprehen-blood pressure at the Lesbian Health Fair sive survey of Houston—area lesbian, bisexual and transgendered women. The results of the survey, in part, inspired the planning of activities at the Jan. 20 health fair. Anderson said it took “dozens of volun­teers and thousands of dollars” to pro­duce the event, and that it would happen again as soon as the organizers have the dozens and thousands again. “We have to take control of our health, and this is one step,” she said. ROB MILLER^ LIGHTED AND SECURE PARKING WEDNESDAY $1.00 DOMESTIC LONGNECKS ALL Day - ALL Night VENTURE-N Where Houston's friendliest crowd drinks 2923 MAIN ST. (713) 522-0000 PULSE • VISA Where Michael MC > AMEX serves you! VENTURED- HOUSTON ^VoL'flUi/u' 'i ^DuLf JL&oe CJ-eit Funny but FactuaI SaFe-Sex SemInar.- Free CoodiES... FREE BottIe of ChAMpAqNE to a Lucky CouplEl! SEheLa siisiqs too! WatcFi For our Breast Cancer Awareness BENEfiT...FEb. 18tFi Hot Beer & Cold Bartenders... Come enjoy The Game with Raci, Kody & the rest of usl! Let's PARTV 'til we drop....After The Game!! 1100 WESTHEIMER - 523-7217 - Located next door to Charlie's Coffee Shop Check OUT Our New Cook - Menu - Owners at Charlie's 10 HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 Ifs time you he a Sunday, January 28 9AM & 11AM Worship Services Reverend Doctor Steven Pieters, jh UFMCC AIDS Ministry Director f f 0 Wl (diagnosed in 1982 with AIDS, survived A a multitude of opportunistic infections... AI n © today he is healthy & active!) If W ■Qioh A Hank Hees & other local musicians performing new HQUsto^TXr Tyco? music written by and for people ^Aw^with AIDS. (Washington @ White... 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Stage Clips: ‘Julius Caesar’ and ‘With and Without’ (L-R) John Feltch, Corin Redgrave and Ewart James-Walters in "Julius' Caesar” Theater Reviews By JAVIER TAMEZ Houston Voice/Houston There’s a certain warm-fuzzy one can sometimes get from confirming the expected. In this case, the utter brilliance of the collaborative production of Wil­liam Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar , by the Alley Theatre and the Moving Theatre, based in London. The Alley has as fine a repu­tation as any regional theater in the coun­try, and it has made itself known in inter­national theatrical circles, as well. The Moving Theatre, though not quite two years old, brings with it the storied weight of having as two of its co-founders siblings Vanessa and Corin Redgrave; and in the acting world Redgrave means royalty. The combination of the two companies would seem, then, a natural for superla­tive productions, and that is precisely the type of production we have here. This is a beautiful, richly traditional produc­tion that radiates with the words of the pearl of English literature. Actor/director Corin Redgrave has done a masterful job. He evokes strong per­formances from his cast, and most criti­cally, he successfully melds two distinct approaches to acting, maximizing the focus of the production on the text without appreciably diminishing the contri­bution of the individual players. His staging is salutary. Action on the stage is tightly controlled with very little ques­tionable movement or stage-crossings by any of the cast members. And he keeps the special effects to a minimum but uses them effectively when he does utilize them, thereby not detracting from the text. Now this is not to say that this production was flawless. There are some reserva­tions to be noted with it. The conflicting accents are initially awkward, and there is an adjustment period in becoming accus­tomed to them. Mood music is utilized which, though constructive and reflec­tive of the action, is not really necessary (Shakespeare leaves little doubt regard­ing his emotional intention). And Redg­rave uses Elizabethan instead of classi­cal Roman costuming. But none of this serves to lessen the incomparably beau­tiful language of the play nor the story it tells. Actually the play could be more aptly titled “The Tragedy of Marcus Brutus,” for it recounts the circumstances that lead Brutus (John Feltch), the “noblest Roman of them all,” to betray Caesar (Corin Redg­rave). Though warned by a soothsayer of the danger awaiting him on the Ides of March, and despite the foreboding of his wife, Calpurnia (Aicha Kossoko), Caesar feels compelled to appear at the Senate on the fateful day. A group of conspirators led by Brutus and Cassius (Howard Saddler) assassinate Caesar, and they spread the word though Rome that they have saved the city and the empire from a tyrant. However, when Mark Antony (David Harewood) eulo­gizes the slain dictator, he turns the mob against Brutus, Cassius and their fellow conspirators. Antony forms an alliance with Caesar’s nephew, Octavius (Ariyon Bakare), and they defeat the conspirators on the battlefield. The power of this production, or for that matter any production of a Shakespear­ean play in which the bard’s words are not decimated, is the text. And it is here that Redgrave has made his most significant error. Not that he mangles the text. Far from it. Rather he fails to recognize the strength and clarity of the text. While conceding that “Shakespeare is universal and eter­nal” (as he was quoted in the Chronicle), Redgrave also asserts that for Shake­speare’s plays “to be relevant today, they must be placed either in Shakespeare’s time or our own time.” What nonsense! Selecting Elizabe­than garb for the costuming is all well and good, and it is historically accurate. On the stage of the Globe Theatre, contem­porary costumes were used. Indeed it was not until the late 18th century that period costuming became common in theater. However, the magnitude of Shake­speare’s words certainly overrides any choices vis-a-vis setting or costumes. In “Julius Caesar” the tale of treachery and duplicity, loyalty and commitment, misguided patriotism and unwavering principles, will remain intact and uncom­promised. Dressing the players in togas and stolas, or leggings and ruffled shirts, or three-piece suits, or for that matter space suits, won’t decrease or increase the rele­vance of the play one iota. Redgrave’s choice of costumes is fine, but his justifi­cation for it is bunk. No such reservations exist about the per­formances. Redgrave plays the title role with an imperial haughtiness. Caesar alone among the major characters seems larger-than-life, making his flaws seem all the more pronounced. Redgrave’s Caesar is shallow and unsympathetic, charac­teristics many historians ascribe to Caesar. One almost cheers for the conspir­ators, Caesar is so self-absorbed. John Feltch is outstanding as Brutus. The deep conflict which divides Brutus’ loy­alty is clearly etched in Feltch’s perform­ance. Though at times difficult to under­stand, Feltch gives his characteriza­tion such impassioned torment, that his meaning is never lost. David Harewood makes a sound, almost proletarian Anttony. He has the strong­est accent by far, but it underscores his ability that Anttony’s dedication to Caesar and manipulation of the mob are nonetheless displayed in fine dramatic fashion. Howard Saddler makes a diabolical Cassius. Were it not for his clenched—teeth determination, all sympathies would lie with the conspirators. Saddler imbues the plot against Caesar with the ele­ment of evil and envy that are not present in Brutus. (Continued on following page) HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 11 Houston Stage Clips (L-R) Robert Skehan, Celeste Cheramie, Mark J. Roberts and Rachel Ollagnon in "With and Without" (Continued from preceding page) Redgrave’s stage (which was actually sister Vanessa’s idea) is split into two levels and is given a courtyard appear­ance. This allows for easy transition from one scene to another and facilitates audi­ence realization of indoor and outdoor action. Julius Caesar is a timeless work by the greatest playwright of all time. This col­laboration would do the bard proud. What: Julius Caesar Where: The Alley Theatre’s Large Stage (in collaboration with Moving Thea­tre) When: In repertory with “Antony and Cleopatra” through Feb. 11. With and Without Everyone knows relationships are com­plex creatures and each has its own idio­syncrasies which must be taken into account if the relationship is to survive. Knowing what to tell and what to leave unsaid is an inherent part of remaining within the parameters of a given rela­tionship. And little white lies can go a long way. None of this is of course new. But it cer­tainly does not have to look as worn and in need of a fresh coat of paint as it does in the context of “With and Without,” a short play by Jeffrey Sweet, having its South­west premier at Main Street Theater. This is how the plot works: Mark (Mark J. Roberts) and Shelly (Rachel Ollagnon) are married, and they’re supposed to be spending a relaxing week in a lakeside cabin with their friends, Jill (Celeste Cheramie) and Russ, who are also mar­ried. Problem is Jill is at the cabin with Mark and Shelly, but Russ isn’t, and no one is sure whether or not Russ will actually show up. The interesting twist (you knew there had to be one) is that Shelly and Mark used to be romantically involved with each other. And Mark is not really comforta­ble with the whole idea of he and his wife spending their vacation with an old girl­friend and her husband. Especially since there are problems with the friends’ mar­riage. So Mark and Shelly spend time trying to allay Jill’s concerns, while lamenting the loss of their relaxing week. At one point they even toy with the idea of just leaving the cabin and spending the week else­where. Alone. Jill, through one glass of wine after another, complains about Russ and her fears that he may be having an affair. In an effort to bring a sense of contentment to the week, Jill agrees to go to a nearby video rental outlet and bring back an old movie. But instead of bringing back a movie, she brings back a man. Glenn (Robert Skehan) is a local yokel without a clue regarding city life or yup­pie phrases such as events planner. What he does know is an animal lust for Jill—a lust which a drunken Jill reciprocates. Jill and Glenn continue their get-to-know-each- other dance and eventually disturb Mark out of his sleep. Realizing what’s happening, Mark speaks to Jill alone and admonishes her to be careful. She is making a mistake she will regret if she sleeps with Glenn. Jill offers the expected protests regarding who Mark thinks he is that he should tell her what’s good for her. Will she or won’t she? And what about Russ? And who cares any­way? With these characters in this situa­tion, not many people I know. Playwright Sweet never really makes his characters interesting enough to evoke concern, much less care, from the audience. His observations on relationships are lau­ghably trite and he pads his skimpy dia­logue with moronic platitudes such as “Just because you have ammo doesn’t mean you have to use it.” The four performers all do adequate jobs with their respective characters, and director Robin Robinson makes the most out of the material. But this play is more suited to the love crossings of junior high school. What: With and Without Where: Main Street Theater When: Through Feb. 4 The Houston Voice welcomes well-written, insightful and to-the-point commentaries for our opinion/editorial pages. We also welcome "counterpoint" articles that represent a different view on the issues approached in articles we have already run. We reserve the right to edit for length, format and clarity. The views expressed in guest commentaries and letters to the editor published in the Houston Voice are those of the writers. We seek to provide a broad-based forum which reflects the varying points of view of our rich and diverse community. Selection for publication is at our discretion. Send articles to: The Houston Voice, Attn.: Editor, 811 Westheimer, Houston, TX 77006, or fax to 713-529-9531. 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Holcombe • 665-9678 EiiiBiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijE ^330776516671303107125160718 ^ 12 HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 State news in brief Station not gay ‘Friend’-ly (PORT ARTHUR)—An episode of the hit television sitcom Friends that depicts a lesbian wedding got a decidedly unfriendly reception from an East texas TV station. The NBC affiliate KJAC pre-empted the highly publicized installment portraying the wedding of characters Carol and Susan, replac­ing the popular show with a locally-produced Super Bowl special. KJAC usually airs the show in the Beau­mont and Port Arthur market. “We do not believe this episode of Friends meets prevailing standards of good taste in our community,” said Ron Kelly, the station’s general manager, in a pre­pared statement. The episode was to air Thursday night. The Houston Chronicle reported on Friday that the station and Port Arthur radio stations were flooded with calls, many from fans of the show irate over the station’s decision. The call—in lines for morning shows on Houston radio stations also logged in numerous com­plaints about the action. KJAC, how­ever, claimed they received more sup­portive than negative calls about the decision. The episode, actually titled “The One With the Lesbian Wedding,” cele­brates the marriage of Ross’ lesbian ex-wife to her partner. Candace Gingrich, half-sister of House Speaker Newt Gin­grich, portrayed the officiating min­ister. The Port Arthur station was one of only two—the other in Lima, Ohio—stations nation wide to cancel the episode. Friends is watched by an estimated 20 to 30 million viewers each week; the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defa­mation describes Carol and Susan— along with their baby boy, Ben—as one of the most visible non-traditional fam­ilies ever. Log Cabin To Open San Antonio Chapter (SAN ANTONIO)—The Log Cabin Republicans, a group dedicated to changing the hostility towards gays and lesbians in the Republican Party is planning to open a chapter in San Antonio. More than 40 people attended the groups first meeting which was held at the home of longtime gay community, organizer Chuck Jordan. A second meeting to elect officers and adopt bylaws will occur on Saturday, Feb. 24. State Log Cabin President Dale Car­penter said that attendance was higher than expected and indicated that there was great potential for the gay Republi­can movement in the Alamo City. “We’re thrilled both at the turnout and at the enthusiasm shown by the resi­dents of San Antonio,” said Carpenter. Residents who attended the meeting expressed a sigh of relief that their city would finally have an organization that reflected their political views, primarily fiscal conservatism cou­pled with social moderation and tol­erance towards gays and lesbians. Ironically, The meeting was being held on the same day that a Republican Proudly Presents Mr. BKE 199C Ccntest Sunday January 28th at 7:00 pm Benefiting Colt 45's Stone Soup * * t ? 11 Mondays - Happy Hour - All Day-All Night Every Tuesday $1.75 Domestic Longnecks All Day-All Night * ♦ . ? 2400 BRAZOS • HOUSTON * (713) 528-9192 women’s group were protesting a meet­ing held at the Central Library to dis­cuss the possibility of building a com­munity center for gays and lesbians. Carpenter asserted that the Log Cabin meeting demonstrates that not all Republicans share the views of the anti-gay protesters and stated that Log Cabin believes in the “values of limited government and individual liberty, values which these protesters have evidently forgotten.” The timing could not have been more opportunistic for the group to begin a chapter in San Antonio. The Texas Republican state convention will be held in San Antonio June 20-22 allowing Log Cabin to have a highly visible pro­file at the convention. Log Cabin is the only statewide gay civil rights group with chapters in individual Texas cit­ies. For more information concerning Log Cabin Republicans of Texas call (512) 476-9797. Boycott Backlash Brings Paper New Support (AUSTIN)—A gay newspaper under attack by the conservative American Family Association of Texas is get­ting support from clergy members and advocacy groups. The American Family Association, which says the Texas Triangle has offensive content, has urged a boycott of businesses advertising in the weekly newspaper, and sent threaten­ing letters to the paper’s advertisers. In response, the new Triangle sup­porters urged people to instead make a point of doing business with those advertisers. “We need to work for a different cli­mate— one that finds this kind of cruel and divisive activity unacceptable,” said Cecile Richards, daughter of Democratic former Gov. Ann Rich­ards and executive director of the Texas Freedom Network. The network, which bills itself as “a mainstream alternative to the radi­cal right,” coordinated a Tuesday news conference in front of a book store that advertises with the Triangle. Par­ticipants later planned to lunch at a res­taurant that’s an advertiser. Among those attending were repre­sentatives of the clergy, Gray Pan­thers, Texas Family Planning Associ­ation, People for the American Way, the American Civil Liberties Union, Catholics for Free Choice, the disa­bility rights group ADAPT and Texas AIDS Network. Also speaking out for the Triangle was the Rev. Jim Rigby, a Presbyterian minister and representative of Texas Faiths United for Religious and Social Tolerance. Rigby said he’s heard his “Christian brothers and sisters” on the radio sta­tion for which Roberts works “con­stantly preach condemnation and mis­information about homosexual per­sons.” “You claim if gays and lesbians are shown respect and acceptance that America will fall. How can I say to you in love that these are not the teachings of Christ, but are the rhetoric of the Nazis?” he said. What did Jesus say in condemnation of homosexuality? Not one word. What did he say in condemnation of judgmental religion? Plenty,” Rigby said. HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 13 imunity Crsanlzatlons letin Board AVES Recruiting Amigos Volunteers in Education and Services (AVES), a Houston based non-profit agency which provides a variety of services to the HIV/AIDS infected and affected community, is recruiting bilingual (English/Span-ish) volunteers for its hotline, and to help conduct outreach among men who have sex with men. All volunteers receive intensive training in HIV/AIDS basics, and in the skills necessary to be an effective vol­unteer for these and other projects. The next volunteer training sessions will take place in mid-February. Space is limited, so reserve yours early. If you are interested in giving a few hours of your time and ability to your community, please contact Michael Gurnas, the volunteer coordinator at AVES, by calling 626-2837 or e-mail at hailaves@neosoft.com. HPMA Monthly Dinner The Houston Professional Men’s Association will meet for its regular monthly meeting at the Hobbit Hole Cafe & Restaurant, 1715 South Shep­herd, from 7 until 9:00 p.m. Friday, Feb. 2. The restaurant is located on Shep­herd, north of Westheimer, just before West Gray. Parking may be dif­ficult, be advised. The group will be meeting upstairs in a private setting. The cost is $10 and the normal $5 for HPMA will not be collected. Please RSVP to Mark at 266-5510 before Jan. 31 for this. Please telephone 866-4079 for more information about the organiza­tion. Avant Garde Women The first meeting of the new year for The Women of the Avant Garde, a group designed to explore the very latest soci­etal trends and entrepreneurial ven­tures and platforms is planned for Thursday, Feb. 1 from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m. This group hosts periodic social gath­erings for women in the Houston area that will enlighten, educate and pro­mote new ideas and offer an entertain­ing forum for the exploration of these issues which target support and suc­cess of women in business. Tickets are $35 and more information is available from Amanda Barhorst at 414-9936. Switchboard Training In early February, the Gay and Lesbian Switchboard of Houston (GLSH) will hold 1996’s first weekend training session for everyone interested in volunteering for the switchboard. GLSH volunteers provide a valua­ble service by using the Switchboard’s extensive resource guides to connect callers to community organiza­tions, businesses and professionals and inform callers about upcoming community events. Volunteers are also trained in pro­viding vital safer sex information and lending an understanding ear when callers are coming out of the closet. Training gives switchboard volun­teers the tools to assist the gay and les­bian community, but it also teaches participants important communi­cation skills they can use everyday. Training will begin Friday Feb. 2 from 6:30 until 10:00 p.m. and the following Saturday and Sunday from 8:30 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. each day. Telephone 529-3211 to sign up for training or to get more information. Switchboard Connects Thanks to Neosoft, the largest int­ernet provider in Texas, the GLSH has a complimentary commercial account and can store files on the company’s server, connecting the Switchboard services and information into the world wide web. The 15 year old service organization has been connecting callers to com­munity organizations, profes­sionals and other resources primarily in the Houston area. Their ability to connect is greatly increased. For additional information please telephone 529-3211. Benefit Exhibit Opening “Proof of Love,” an all-media exhibi­tion devoted to the theme of love will open at the Lynn Goode Gallery (2719 Colq­uitt) Feb. 2 with an opening night recep­tion from 6 until 9:00 p.m. The show, which runs until Valen­tine’s Day, will benefit DIFFA as the artists have agreed to donate a portion of their sales to the Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS (DIFFA). Additionally, DIFFA will be hosting a series of parties throughout the month of February. For more information about the opening or the private par­ties, contact DIFFA at 552-9445. Pride Committee Fundraising Lesbian Gay Pride Week is now participating in the Kroger Share Card Program. Here is how it works. Everytime you go to your local Kroger Store in the Houston Division, you hand the cashier your special Pride Committee Share Card, the cashier scans your card, making sure that it is the very first item they scan, that is very important and guess what? 1% of your total sale is given to the Pride Committee of Houston!! To get your share card, call the Pride Line at 529-6979, leave your name, address and telephone number. Houston's Only Entertainment ^Retreat for the Alternative Lifestyle “Exclusive Location ^Private & Discreet Theme Rooms — Fetishes Domination Now Hiring (Best Equipped Dungeon in Houston) 527-^950 427 Westheimer Vi off session with coupon. Houston Voice Expires February 29 ... uatwuMyff SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 4|*m SUPER BOWL PARTY On The Patio with Walter Hot Dogs & Fixins!! Happy Hour Prices!! (During the game only.) Watch the Game with Us! Coming February 7, 1pm The Return of Slop Shot Pool Come play with Gaye & the Boys Happy Be-lated Anniversaries Meg - 2 yrs. * Devin - 6 yrs. Scotty - 4 yrs. * Johnny - 4 yrs. HAPPY HOURS Morning 7am-2pni * Afternoon Spm-Ppm ■ Saturday Tam-Tym 1022 WESTHEIMER • HOUSTON • (713) 527-9669 14 HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 This &- That! by Jon Anthony It's here! Superbowl XXX arrives this Sunday at 5 p.m. on NBC affiliate Channel 2. The Dallas Cowboys take on the Pittsburg Steelers in what promises to be an intense game. Vanessa Williams will belt out the national anthem and Diana Ross will dazzle us with her half-time show. NBC's comedy phenom Friends follows the annual event with the highly touted hour-long episode of the series featuring Julia Roberts and Jean- Claude Van Damme.... If sports is not your forte, ABC and CBS offer some impressive counter programming to vie for your attention. CBS will repeat the Emmy Award Winning movie To Dance with the White Dog, a delightful movie featuring the late Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn. ABC will air the theatrical release Deceived, starring Goldie Hawn.... The recently discovered memoirs of Lucille Ball have been sold to Putnam and should hit the bookstores this fall in time for the holiday season. Lucie Arnaz, Ball’s daughter, discovered the manuscript while going through her mother’s personal items. The memoirs were written with the express intent of publishing them posthumously.... Faye Dunaway and Matt Dillon will star in Kevin Spacey’s directorial debut Albino Alligator.... 3rd Rock From the Sun is emerging as a bona-fide hit. The NBC series, which debuted several weeks ago has garnered impressive ratings for all of its episodes to date. The sitcom, which has consistently out­performed its lead-in. Wings, regularly beats its competition. The Client (CBS) and Hudson Street (ABC). As a result, ABC is revamping its schedule and plans to move Hudson Street starring Tony Danza to Saturdays and replace it with the ratings staple Coach. 3rd Rock From the Sun stars John Lithgow and Jane Curtain and airs every Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.... Dick Cavett has decided to retire his six year old talk show on NBC. Cavett did not elaborate as to the circumstances surrounding his decision.... Roseanne will produce and occasionally star in a Saturday night variety series for the FOX network to compete with NBC's Saturday Night Live flagship.... Liberace will be profiled on Biography Jan. 25 at 8 p.m. on A&E. The special will coincide with the release of Liberace Unplugged (New Foundation Records), a companion record compilation of hits and seven new previously unreleased songs. The proceeds will benefit the Liberace Foundation for the Performing and Creative Arts. Liberace Unplugged is available through mail-order only and can be obtained by calling 800-483-4392.... Bruce Willis has agreed to appear in an upcoming episode of CBS's Cybill. The cameo will reunite the former co-stars of Moonlighting for the first time.... Mel Gibson is currently working on Ransom, the latest film from director Ron Howard.... Madonna arrived in Argentina this week to begin production on the much ballyhooed Evita amidst protests and controversy. Many Argentinians feel that Madonna is ill-suited to portray the late Eva Peron. .. Lynn Redgrave will fill in for Carol Burnett in Broadway's Moon Over Buffalo beginning March 5 for seven weeks. Burnett plans to return after fulfilling other commitments.... Country crooners Wynona Judd and Tanya Tucker have turned to matrimony. Wynona got married last Sunday and “The Texas Tornado” announced that she is engaged. Tucker is currently penning an autobiography that promises to sizzle and delve into her reputation for tempestuousness and her tumultuous relationship with Glen Campbell. The book is slated for release in early fall.... Speaking of tumult, Elizabeth Hurley has agreed to co-star with her significant other, the satyr Hugh Grant, whose satyriasis is legend, in the medical thriller titled Extreme Measures ... John Stamos (Full House) has replaced Matthew Broderick in How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying on Broadway. Broderick who only planned to stay with the show for a specified period of time won a Tony award for his performance and plans to resume his movie career.... Bronx hunk Chazz Palmintieri co-stars with Cher in the upcoming comedy Faithful. Ryan O'Neal will also co-star.... George Clooney (E.R.) and Michelle Pfeiffer are planning to work together on a big screen project.... Enya's new album The Memory of Trees has just been released to critical praise and impressive sales.... Pamela Lee (Baywatch) stars in Barb Wire, a film based on a female action-hero comic-book character that is slated to be released in May.... Patrick Stewart stars in a made for TV-movie based on Oscar Wilde's tale The Caterville Ghost. Ghost airs on ABC this Saturday at 7:30 p.m.... The CBS series Touched by an Angel starring Roma Downey and Della Reese is the top-rated show airing on Saturday's and its performance this season has befuddled critics and industry executives alike. The show has gained more audience share than any other returning series this season. Maybe there are Angels among us after all.... Sharon Gless and Tyne Daly reprise their roles of Cagney and Lacey for the last time in the CBS movie True Convictions airing Jan. 29 The 23rd Annual American Music Awards airs Live Jan. 29 at 7 p.m. on ABC. A tribute to Tammy Wynette is slated and Live performances will run the gamut from Reba McEntire to The Smashing Pumpkins.... John Wayne was selected as America's favorite actor in a recently released Gallup Poll, this despite the fact that “The Duke” has been dead for more than a decade. Fittingly, the A&E series Biography will offer a retrospective on Wayne's career Jan. 31. at 7 p.m. and 11 p.m.... UB40 will visit with Lauren Hutton on her late night talkfest Feb. 1 at 1 a.m. on UPN affiliate Channel 20.... Top of the Charts: From Dusk Till Dawn was king of the box-office last week raking in $10.2 million on its opening weekend. Friends topped the weekly Nielsen’s. Mariah Carey and Boyz II Men continue to dominate the singles chart with One Sweet Day and The Soundtrack to Waiting to Exhale tops the Album chart. Faith Hill's ditty It Matters to Me is the top country song, the Immortal Beloved Soundtrack is the top Classical Album and Van Morrison's delightful new compact disc How Long Has This Been Going On is # 1 on the Jazz Album charts. The Horse Whisperer by Nicholas Evans reclaims the top spot on The New York Times best-seller list. The Road Ahead by Bill Gates remains the best-selling non-fiction title. Quote of the Week: "I've always been in love with Diana Ross. When I was growing up, I studied her album covers for my makeup tips.RuPaul on Entertainment Tonight c so cn o3 2 € m o • Drink Specials • • Good Food & Booze* Show with Marilyn "Consuela" Marks Tu Bffw at 11 Starring Catia Lee Love Also including Jade Mykels Katrina LaShawn Jamie Lennox & talent night winner 2517 Ralph Street at Westheimer C713J 527-9071 • Happy Hour 7am-9pm weekdays • $1.50 Well 4-7 Saturday • $1.50 Uodka 7am-6Ptn • Mug Club 7am-10pm • $3.75 Pitchers & $1.25 Mugs MALE STRIP CONTEST at 11:00 pm with PAIVI MALE STRIP CONTEST at 11:00 pm with PAIVI Burgers in the Back with the Burger Bitch South of the Border Amateur Talent Search 11:00 Pm MC Tara Dion - Miss EJ s 95 ishing you a smooth reign Congrats to Emperor XII, Jim Halbert and Empress XII, Ruby Stone!! February 1, 11pm COMMERCIAL MEMBER HOUSTON • 1993 HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 15 Houston Entertainment Notes Art Imitates Life: plays focus on hate crimes James McGuire By JOHNNY MADDOX For the Hous­ton Voice The July 1991 gay-bashing murder of Houston banker Paul Broussard inspired James Alan McGuire of Mon­trose to write his first short play, Fundamental Things, about a young man murdered outside a gay nightclub. Last summer’s performance of the ID-minute script at Stages Repertory Theatre was vide­otaped and is currently being shown on Access Houston. The hour-long collection of award-winning short plays also includes a scene from His Only Forgotten Son , a play by another Montrose playwright, Don Maines. Entitled State vs. Showbiz, it, too, involves a hate crime, as a gay law professor lives to tell how he was attacked by a gang of teenage gay—bas­hers. The scene con­cludes with an empower­ing, surprise ending. Don Maines McGuire saiji, “I wrote Fundamental Things because I wanted everybody to be out­raged by hate crimes.” The Broussard murder “hit close to home,” he said. “It made me angry. Although I set out to write a full-length play, and origi­nally planned it to be more closer to Paul Broussard’s murder, this was my first try at playwrit­ing, and I decided to write it short with a fictional twist. In contrast, the scene from His Only Forgotten Son began as a monologue and developed into a full-length play. In Feb. 1993, Maines wrote and performed State vs. Showbiz at Hyde Park Theatre in Austin. It devel­oped into a two-character piece he performed that summer in Chicago, and ultimately a full-length play in which Maines played dual roles when it pre­miered at the Alley Theatre. The Houston Public Library recently added a four-camera videotape of His Only Forgot­ten Son to its film collection. Maines is a Houston attorney whose plays Wheels of Justice, Is Alexander Gudunov? and Reindeer Games have been pro­duced a number of times. Due to work, he explains, he was not ■involved in the production at Stages. “In fact,” he said, “when it’s shown on televi­sion will be the first time I’ll get to see how things went.” Access Houston began broad­casting the plays Saturday (Jan. 20). Upcoming scheduled showings are at 7:00 p.m. Mon­day, Jan. 29; 10:00 a.m. Satur­day, Feb. 3; 11:00 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 4; 10:00 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 10; 11:00 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 11; 10:00 a.m. Saturday, March 2; and 11:00 a.m. Sunday, March 3. ‘Queers' at Country Playhouse Houston playwright Bob Sca­nlon’s latest work. Killing Bob Scanlon Queers, has been selected for presentation in the Country Playhouse’s fourth annual New Play Reading Series. Killing will be unfurled Sunday, Feb. 25 at 7:00 p.m. at the theater. The presentation is free and open to the public. Bob Scanlon began writing plays after a 40-year career in the advertising business. This play is Scanlon’s eighth work; all of his scripts to date have focused on gay themes. Earlier plays have been showcased by Theatre LaB Houston, in the 1993 and 1994 productions of “Houston Playwrights Respond to AIDS.” Another script was produced at Stages Repertory Theatre as part of an anthology titled A Stonewall Celebration. Scanlon, a Native New Yorker, served in the Navy during World War II. He attended New York Univer­sity’s School of Business and now works in Houston. He is a member of Scriptwriters/ Houston, an organization of playwrights and screenwri­ters, and the Dramatists Guild. Country Playhouse, a non­profit community theater, is located at 12802 Queensbury in Town and Country Village. For more information, call series producer Diana Howie at 784- 1750. Black History Month Show at Kuumba- House In celebration of Black His­tory Month, KuumbaHouse is presenting / Sing Because...! , a world premiere production, co-written by KuumbaHouse Artistic Director Linda Yeni and writer/composer Naomi Carrier. I Sing Because...! is a lively, entertaining and histori­cally- based account of the songs and music, composers, musi­cians and singers of the people of African descent in America. The play covers three centu­ries of music styles; from “field hollers” to spirituals; blues to ragtime; swing to jazz; rock ‘n roll to soul; all the way to present day rap music. I Sing Because...! relates how songs were used by the slaves and their descen­dants, to cope with life or bring hope. Co-writer and director of / Sing Because...! , Linda Yeni, is well-known for her directorial and choreographic skills. The show is her second collabora­tion within six months. Her other work, Outsiders On The Inside will be seen in late Jan. 1996 at the Heinen Theatre. Carrier, a composer, poet, musician, and playwright has collaborated with Ruthe Winegarten to script the popular regional touring show, I Am Annie Mae . The cast is comprised of vet­eran performers William Coleman, Vincent James, Dolly Smith, LeVita Marshall, Dominique Denman, Rodney White, and Colton Richard stage managing. This touring show is availa­ble to schools and other institu­tions from Feb. Sth through March 29th, 1996. All shows must be booked through Kuumba House at 811 Westheimer, Suite HOB. For fees and other information please call Sharon Hendrix at (713) 524-1079. SUPER BOWL SUNDAY JANUARY 28 BIG SCREEN W/BUFFET AT 5PM MARDI GRAS BUS TO GALVESTON FEBRUARY 17 BUS LEAVES RIPCORD AT 11AM (BAR OPENS AT 10AM) BROTHERHOOD OF PAIN: SLAVE AUCTION FEBRUARY 2 10 PM “THEY’RE HOT AND THEY CAN BE BOUGHT” 16 HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 Opinionated, outspoken Houstonian heads Texas Log Cabin (Continued from Page 2) Carpenter does not hesitate to detail his opinion on issues that are para­mount to our community, nor to delib­erate upon how we should go about achieving them. For example, he believes that we as a community are “too focused on the narrow political tactical questions and not focused enough on the longer range funda­mental job that we have, which is to build bridges with the rest of Ameri­can society and allow them to under­stand us by understanding our diver­sity.” He adds that “this business of coalition building (as defined by gay activists) very often just means pro­gressive coalition building; it means just building coalitions with groups that are identified with lib­eral politics.” Carpenter thinks that in order to achieve success and inclusion in society, “we are going to have to build coalitions with groups like the Republican Party that we are work­ing to change, other than just liberal groups. So that when we have an elec­tion like the election of 1994, we haven’t put all of our eggs in one bas­ket. If the Democrat Party goes down to defeat in a given election, we still have sympathetic Republican leg­islators that we can rely upon to get legislation passed that is important to us. If the Republican party goes down to defeat in 1996...we will have the Democratic Party and legisla­tors in the Democratic Party to fall back on. “It is sheer folly for us to think that we are going to gain equality in this coun­try by pursuing a one party strat­egy.” Carpenter points to the successes Log Cabin has achieved at making inroads into the Republican Party as an example of how to build those bridges. Their efforts have appeared to pay some dividends. Betsy Lake has welcomed the gay community into the local Republican party and attended Log Cabin meetings. The group will even be hosting a fundraiser honor­ing her, on Lincoln’s birthday, for her cooperation. Most Republicans—like most Amer­icans— are not right wing fanatics. Carpenter adds. Rather, he says, the majority are basically fiscal con­servatives who are-somewhat mod­erate socially and do not hate gays. They do not know a lot about gay peo­ple... and these are the individuals who Carpenter wants to educate about gay people and the mission of Log Cabin. Carpenter feels that “we have a role to play in educating both the gay community about gay conser­vatives and what we want and we have a role to play in educating people in the Republican party about what we want.” Carpenter believes in the bedrock principles of the Republican party which are “fundamentally about belief in individual liberty and lim­ited government intrusion on our lives.” He finds it ironic that some members of the party, the so-called “Big Government Conservatives, as I like to call them,” are trying to “regulate people’s personal lives on the social side and on the economic side, they are the Patrick Buchanans who are now turning, it appears, to economic and trade regulation which is traditionally liberal.” With respect to Pat Buchanan, Carpen­ter feels that he is “pursuing this agenda of liberal economic popu­lism, just as the social conservatives in the party, which he is also a part of, are pursuing a big government social conservatism. I am opposed to both of those things and I believe that most peo­ple in the party are.” Besides Buchanan, Carpenter did not hesitate to express his views on other prominent ' figures in the Republican Party. With respect to Senator Bob Dole, Carpenter labeled Dole’s handling of the now infamous Log Cabin contribution to his campaign as “Clintonesque.” He added that Bob Dole has a long record of “moderate Republicanism.” He has not been “a crusader for gay civil rights by any stretch of the imagina­tion, but he has not been an anti-gay cru­sader in the mold of Jesse Helms or Pat Buchanan or, to a lesser extent, Phil Gramm.” Carpenter said that Dole supported the Ryan White Act in 1991 and is on record in print that “he does not believe in discrimination against gay people and that he believes that gay people should be fully a part of the country and that he hasn’t made up his mind on gays in the military, which surprised me; however, he subse­quently retracted those comments. ...to some extent when he was pres­sured by the religious right.” He was, however, instrumental in making sure that the Ryan White re-authori­zation bill was put on the calendar for a vote against the opposition of Sena­tor Jesse Helms, Carpenter said. On the question of gay civil rights, Car­penter states that “Bob Dole has been all over the map this year on the ques­tion of gay civil rights. I do not trust him or his word on gay civil rights right now anymore, really, than I trust Presi­dent Clinton and I don’t trust Presi­dent Clinton’s word on anything.” (Continued on Page 24) LEATHER BY BOOTS Manufacturers of Quality Specialty Leathers Soiree Aubergine Raffle Tickets are Also Available at Both Leather By Boots Houston Locations Congratulations to EMPRESS XII - RUBY STONE & EMPEROR XII - JIM HALBERT * HOUSTON * 2424 Montrose (713) 526-2668 Open 12-8 7 Days ♦ DALLAS * 2525 Wycliff, #124 (214) 528-3865 Open 12-8 Mon-Sat * HOUSTON * 715 Fairview (Inside Ripcord) (713) 526-0444 Open 8pm-2am 7 Days PLEASE PRINT NAME: ADDRESS: HOME PHONE: Number of Tickets requested: Amount of $ enclosed: THIRD PRIZE Round Trip Airfare For Two(2) To New Orleans Courtesy of Atlas Travel To purchase RAFFLE TICKETS please fill out the form provided. Include $2.00 for each ticket you request. You may pay by money order or check (made payable to B.C.S.F. [Bering Community Service Foundation]). Mail to: Soiree Aubergine V Raffle POBox 541126 Houston, TX 77254-1126 You may also pay by VISA or Master Card (minimum purchase of $20.00 by credit card) by calling 713-523-5436. Your portion of the Raffle Ticket(s) will be mailed to you. Thank you for supporting Soiree Aubergine V. SOIREE y RAFFLE “Everv^ Ticket FuMbs & Meal” GRAND PRIZE Round Trip Airfare For Two(2) To any Destination In the 48 Contiguous States Courtesy of Continental Airlines SECOND PRIZE New Orleans Getaway - Round Trip Airfare and Two Nights Hotel Lodging for Two(2) Courtesy of Travel Trends, Inc. RAFFLE TICKETS: $2.00 RAFFLE DRAWING - SUNDAY, MARCH 10 NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN J4.IT Proceeds (Benefit 'THe Bering Cave Center Meats (Program, HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 17 SPA, DiverseWorks take on PS 122 Field Trips Performing Arts Notes (HOUSTON)—What do you call a touring show made up of four award-winning per­formance artists (two of whom have been featured on their own HBO specials) hailing from New York’s P.S. 122, i.e. Performance Space 122, originally Public School 122? P.S. 122 Field Trips , of course! Society for the Performing Arts, in association with Diverse- Works, presents comedic performer Reno, actor Danny Hoch, choreogra-pher/ dancer Melissa Fenley, and vis­ual and performance artist James God­win in the inaugural performances of the 1996 P.S. 122 Field Trips on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 2-3, at 8:00 p.m. in the intimate Cullen Theater of the Wor­tham Theater Cen­ter. Houston marks the tour’s first stop— and the only Texas performances—on its U.S. tour to 17 cit­ies. This fast-paced sampler of the best of New York per­formance art crosses the bounda­ries of dance, thea­ter and stand-up comedy and offers an unusual twist on an American thea­ter tradition by utilizing the standard musical and TV variety show format and apply­ing it to exper mental perform­ance set in an infor­mal theater con­text. SPA and Diverse- Works will host an evening with the artists on Thurs­day, Feb. 1, at 7:30 p.m. at DiverseWorks, 1117 East Free­way. Sure to be provocative as well as hilarious, this special event is FREE to P.S. 122 Field Trips ticket holders. Seat­ing is limited, so arrive early. Call 227- 1911 for more information. You know you are in for an innovative and highly unusual evening when the printed program reads: “Program sub­ject to radical change.” The evening will open with Danny Hoch’s Work in Prog­ress: Evolution of a Home Boy , followed by Melissa Fenley’s Regions. Chore­ographed and performed by Ms. Fenley with music by Maggi Payne, lighting by David Moodey and costumed by Angela Wendt, this work has three sections enti­tled Chair, Ocean Walk and Mesa. Fol­lowing intermission, Reno will per­form excerpts from Citizen Reno. The evening will end with James Godwin’s Antler Man and Other Characters. Brooklyn-based performer Danny Hoch has written a pair of solo shows and helped found the New Stage Company. Hoch won a 1994 Obie Award for his per­formance in his solo show Some People at PS 122. He has toured extensively and was featured on HBO last fall. Dubbed “Rush Limbaugh’s vision of the AntiChrist,” Reno is a stream of con­sciousness style solo comedic per­former who lives in New York City. Her evening-length shows have had several runs off-Broadway, both commercially and at the Public theater, and tour reg­ularly. She adapted her show Reno in Rage and Rehab into an HBO Comedy Hour, for which she received an ACE Award nomina­tion for best writing for an entertainment special. Dancer/choreog-rapher Molissa Fen­ley formed her own company in New york in 1977. Since 1988, she has concentrated on choreographing and performing solo works; her recent works include Chan­nel, Sightings Nul­larbor and Tilliboyo (1992) and Sita (1995), all of which premiered at The Joyce Theater. TV credits include PBS’s Live From Off Center and a music video on VH1 of Meta­morphosis by Phil­lip Glass. Born in Pennsylva­nia, James Godwin spent most of his child­hood pretending'to be Jacques Cousteau. From then on he was fascinated by masks, protective out­erwear and tools that enable us to explore other realities. Now a visual and per­formance artist specializing in mask­making, puppetry and persona) mythology, Godwin has his presented solo and ensemble work at PS 122, Dixon Place, Franklin Furnace, The Public Theater and other venues. Tickets are $20, $24 and $30 and are available at the Houston Ticket Center in Jones Hall and the Wortham Theater Center as well as all Ticketmaster locations including Foley’s, Fiesta, Randall’s and Blockbuster Music Plus. To charge by phone, call 227-ARTS in Houston or 800/828-ARTS if out of town. Reno is one of four artists appearing in ‘PS 122 Field Trips,’ to be presented by Soci­ety for the Performing Arts and Div­erseWorks at the Wortham Theater Center Feb. 2-3 Did I Say That? “It’s great that she has a job. I mean my sis­ter is pursuing her own career. She s doing her own thing. We disagree on the public policy that’s involved but she’s my sister and I’m delighted that she is a success. —Newt Gingrich on his lesbian sister Candace, who recently appeared on the hit comedy Friends in which she performed a gay wedding ceremony. “The trouble with some women is that they get all excited about nothing , and then marry him." —Cher “It would provide a place that will let the people Lome Michaels doesn’t allow— particularly women, black people, gays and drag queens—to speak.” —Roseanne, in Out magazine, on her plans to produce a sketch show for FOX to go up against Saturday Night Live “I feel like I know Tammy Faye because I am a Christian and a Southern Baptist... Tammy Faye is my mother.” —Jim J. Bullock, openly gay actor ( Too Close for Comfort ) on his decision to co­host a talk show with Tammy Faye Bakker, in Out magazine. LOBO, your gay and lesbian video source proudly presents “The Incredibly True Adventures of 2 Girls in Love” “Love and Human Remains” and “Night Watch II” with LOBO’s own Brian Maxx 713/522-5156 1424-C Westheimer Houston, TX 77006 512/454-5406 3204-A Guadalupe Austin, TX 78705 Great Rooms in the Neighborhood All-Gay Guesthouse $39 to $79 a night LOWER WEEKLY & MONTHLY RATES AVAILABLE Queen Bed, TV, VCR, Private & Shared Baths, Free Laundry, Breakfast, Maid Service Montrose Inn 408 AVONDALE 520-0206 18 HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 KOLBE HOUSE A house of spirituality and ministry for the gay & lesbian community. February 1, 1996 • 7:00pm POT LUCK DINNER Please bring food. COMMUNITY CONCERNS "Bugs - Get'em Out, Keep'em Out" by Jerry Griffin ♦ February 8 • 7:00pm Prayers for Healing with Anointing Catholic Mass - Every Mon. 7:30pm - Wed. 8:30am - Fri. 10am 1509 Fairview Street • (Montrose) • Houston, Tx 77006 Additional Parking on Hyde Park cul-de-sac. (713) 522-8182 C.... U.....N Bering Memorial United Methodist Church A Reconciling Congregation 1440 Harold St. Houston,Texas 77006 Bering Methodist Church, [Cherch] n 1. A building for worship. 2. A reconciling congregation. 3. Come worship with us. Sunday Worship 10:50 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. (Paid Advertisement) <- ASK THE PASTOR Q: "What is the difference between our "spirit" and our "soul"? If our soul goes to heaven, where does our spirit go? Do we have both while living as well as after we are dead?" Rev. Janet Parker A: Scripture makes a distinction between our spirit and soul. If we look at I Thessalonians 5:23 in the New Testament we read, "May God. the God of peace, sanctify you through and through. May your whole spirit, soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ." Another reference is given in Hebrews 4:12 which reads, "For the word of God is living and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart." The word "spirit" in Hebrew is "ruah" and in Greek it is "pneuma." The word "spirit" means wind or breath and refers to the immortal part of a person. There are basically three aspects to the human spirit: 1. It is the Life Principle meaning that its entry gives life and its removal means death; 2. It is the Seat of the Emotions, Intellect and Will. It is within the spirit that the soul lives. 3. Our spirit is Divinely affected by God's Spirit. God's Spirit gives vital force to our spirit, upholds it. can grant reason, can impart artistic sense, can frustrate our plans, harden our will, etc. The word "soul" in Hebrew is "nephesh" and in Greek it is "psuche." The word "soul" means breath or breathing creature. Soul also refers to the inner nature and entire personality of a human being. You might say that the soul is what makes you. YOU. The soul is the seat of your feelings, desires, affections, and aversions. The soul is regarded as a moral being and is designed for everlasting life. We find reference to this in 1 Peter 1:9 which talks about the salvation of your soul. Matthew 10:28 talks about not being afraid of those who can kill the body. We are to be concerned about our soul. Scripture talks about salvation in three tenses: past, present and future. We have been saved, are being saved and shall be saved. What is saved when is more the question being asked. Our spirit is saved (set free) when we are born of the Spirit. When God's word is planted in our spirit through belief in God's sacrifice through Jesus Christ, our spirit is born of God's Spirit and we are made a new creature in Christ. This new creature will never die. Meanwhile, back at the ranch, the soul is in the process of being saved. It is that part of us which is full of emotions, intellect and will. We learn day by day to surrender every part of our soul to the leading of God's Spirit. It is a lifelong process. The degree of our yielding to God’s Spirit determines how well we will experience the victorious life in Christ on the earthly side (this side of heaven). Our physical body will decay upon physical death. God's word promises that there will be a physical resurrection. We shall all be changed and clothed with a body that will be immortal. It is safe to say that we will have our body, soul and spirit joined together in heaven in a "new" sense. Yes, all of you will be together in heaven. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ASK THE PASTOR A QUESTION, WRITE:REV. JANET PARKER, MARANANTHA FELLOWSHIP MCC, P.O. BOX 667032, HOUSTON, TX. 77266-7932 CH VRCH CALENDAR OF EVENTS FRIDAY-1/26 * "Your Sacred Self - study group using the best seller by Wayne Dyer. COME learn more about your sacred self, sacred sisters & brothers, & the sacred, loving Creator God who made it so. Kingdom Community Church. 4404 Blossom. Call 862-7533. * Catholic Mass at 10:00 a.m. Kolbe House. 1509 Fairview. Call 522-8182 SATURDAY -1/27 * Traditional Mass at 7:30 pm Dignity Church, 1307 Yale. Call 880-2872 SUNDAY - 1/28 * Maranatha Fellowship Metropolitan Church Services "Looking at Relationships from a Godly Perspective" & "Homosexuality & the Bible/Spirituality & Sexuality Integration" at 10:00 a.m. Praise and Worship, Ministry of the Word, Drama and Personal Ministry. 11:00 a.m. Maranatha Fellowship, 3400 Montrose, Suite 600, 528-6756. * Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrection (MCCR) worship services. 9:00 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. 1919 Decatur. Call 861-9149. * Community Gospel Church worship service at 11:00 a.m. & 7:00 pm 501 E. 18th. Call 880-9235. * Houston Mission Church worship service at 11:00 a.m. 1505 Nevada. Call 529-8225. * Kingdom Community Church worship service at 11:00 a.m„ Sunday School at 10:00 a.m. Call 862-7533. "The Celestine Prophecy, An Experiential Guide" at 10:00 a.m. * Ecumenical Catholic Church Mass at 10:15. 1405 palm. Call 526-8095. * Covenant Baptist Church. Worship service - 1:30 pm 6610 Alder. Call 668-8830. * Bering Memorial United Methodist Church Worship service. 10:50 a.m. Seekers class 9:15 a.m. 1440 Harold. Call 526-1017. MONDAY - 1/29 * Catholic Mass at 7:30 pm Kolbe House, 1509 Fairview. Call 522-8182 * MCCR Handbell Choir Rehersal at 7:00 pm, 1919 Decatur. Call 861-9149. * Sex Addicts Anononymous Support Group. Meets at MCCR. 7:00 pm Call 861-9149. TUESDAY - 1/30 * MCCR: CODA Support group meets at 7:00 pm. Empowerment for Living support group & pot luck dinner at 6:00 pm. Gloryland Singers at 8:00 pm. The Gospel Ensemble at 6:00 pm Call 861-9149. * PROTECT meets at Bering Church. Call 520-7870. * Basic Computer Skills Class at the Kolbe Project. Call 522-8182. * Over Eaters Anonymous support group meets at MCCR - 6:00 pm. Call 861-9149. * "Shepherd Group" meets at 7:30 pm for Praise, Prayer & Bible study. Call Maranatha Fellowship at 528-6756. WEDNESDAY - 1/31 * MCCR: Bi-net Support Group meets at 7:00 pm. Jubilation Mixed Ensemble meets at 6:30 pm. Midweek uplift service at 7:00 pm, Bible Study, Lecture Series & Choir Rehearsal 7:30 pm 1919 Decatur. 861-9149. * "A Course in Miracles"- Study Group using the book, published by the Foundation for Inner Peace, which is aimed at removing the blocks to our awareness of one's presence. Kingdom Community Church 7:30 pm Call 862-7533. * Ecumenical Catholic Church Mass at 7:00 pm 1405 palm. Call 526-8095. * "Shepherd Group" meets at 7:30 pm for Praise, Prayer & Bible study. Call Maranatha Fellowship at 528-6756. THURSDAY - 2/1 ♦ Community Gospel Church worship service. 7:30 pm 501 E. 18th. Call 880-9325. < KINGDOM Tl1 COMMUNITY CHURCH Catch a glimpse of the Kingdom of God Sunday School - 10 A.M. Sunday Worship Service - 11 A.M. Wednesdays: A Course in Miracles ■ 7:30 P.M. 4404 Blossom at Snover 713-862-7533 Wei.lowship Metropolitan Uoininnnity Cliurdi PR,VISING • TEACHING ENCOURAGING fAn evangelical ministry with celebration services 3400 Montrose, Suite 600 (Handicap accessible) (Montrose at Hawthorne) For info, on weekly home groups, call of Praise, Prayer and Study of God’s word. Bible Class: 10am 528-6756 COMMUNITY GOSPEL CHURCH 501 E. 18th at Columbia • Houston, Texas 0 A.M. RSHIP Thurs MIDWEj 7:30 P.M. <K SERVICE * Sun, P EVE G E Pastor - (713) “A Church Chris Chiles 880-9235 Built On Love” YOU, Cime thare the LOVING EXPERIENCE. Serving the Gay, Lesbian, Bi-senial Community of Catholics & Friends. Become a part of Dignity U.S.A. SERVICES Saturdays 7:30 pm Traditional Mass Inclusive liturgy celebrated. Call and press 4 for our Social Events & Schedules. Todos bienvenidosl (Full details in ’95 - V6 Gay and Lesbian Yellow Pages) In the Heights 1307 Yale Ste. H Phone 880-2872 HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 19 All greased up and ready to go. IMC DOES NOT PRE-SCREEN ITS CALLERS AND ASSUMES NO LIABILITY WHEN MEETING WITH SOMEONE THROUGH ITS SERVICE. ADULTS 18 YEARS OF AGE OR OVER ONLY. ‘FREE TO CALL WITHIN THE 713 AREA CODE. TOLL CHARGES MAY APPLY IF CALLING FROM OUTSIDE THE 713 AREA CODE. Over $5,000 value Airfare for two to Sydney, Australia 13 nights accomodation at the Park Royal Hotel $500 US spending money ’No purchase necessary. To enter, send hand printed name, telephone number (including area code) and address on a 3" x 5" card to: IMG Manline Mardi Gras Madness, 181 Carlaw Avenue, Toronto, ON M4M 2S1 Canada. All entries must be received by IMG no later than January 31, 1996 Void where prohibited by law. Manline is now in Australia and we want to celebrate with you. Win two weeks 'Down Under' for the annual Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras Festival in Sydney, Australia! From December Sth, 1995 until January 31 st, 1996, you're automatically entered each time you buy an hours' worth of time on Manline.* ALWAYS FREE TO CALL! http://www.interactivemedia.com 917-3939 ENTER CALLING CODE 105 GfeA® 20 HOUSTON VOICE/ JANUARY 26, 1996 522-1896 1411 Taft Houston, Texas 77019 RAVEN’S LAIR SERVING THE GAY, LESBIAN, & BISEXUAL COMMUNITY PRINTING 526- 3723 CUSTOM HANDCRAFTED B&D S&M PRODUCTS SPECIALIZING IN DUNGEON DESIGNS & EQUIPMENT S&ofi Ext 9353 Ext 9353 Ext 9356 Ext 9354 Ext 9355 PROUDLY SERVING THE MONTROSE AREA SINCE 1978 Men Seeking Women Women Seeking Men Men Seeking Men Women Seeking Women Couples Seeking Couples 6900 LAWNDALE HOUSTON. TEXAS 77023 713/928-5141 Carburetor I and Fuel Injection Taft Street Auto Repair & Service DIRECT LINE: 713/921-6623 PAGER: 713/415-8869 $25.00 Weekly Copy Ready Only Please Your Business Card Could Go Here LOOKING FOR A DATE? Call Now And Date Tonight!! 1-900-255-4242 PAGER 616-4297 M-F 7:00 PM -10:00 PM SATURDAY NOON - MIDNIGHT Electrical Repair Complete Brakes nri FOREST A PARK JllllIlL FUNERAL HOME*CEMETERY Betty McGehee Family Service Counselor Funerals. Property. Markers, Monuments • Quality Printing • High Speed Copies 3400 MONTROSE • Color Copies • Fax Service • Pick up & Delivery Furniture • Fine Art • Mirrors • Lamps Crystal • China • Accesories 1819 Waugh Drive Houston, Texas 77006 A (713) 529-5069 I Tues.-Sat. 10 AM to 6 PM Consignments Accepted Daily Major or Minor Repair $2.99 per min 18 yrs or over Touch-tone Required Serv-U (619)645-8434 West Gray i O SlWillard -E Westheimer SUPPORT THE ADVERTISERS OF THE HOUSTON VOICE The LONE STAR in HOUSTON'S Gay/Lesbian News HOUSTON VOICE To Report the News Subscribe • Advertise (713) 529-8490 Nationwide (800) 729-8490 Fax (713) 529-9531 Gr.Am.Puz. Solution c.1995 GULF FEATURES, Puzzle TX162 initialed names: Robert Browning, George Bernard Shaw, Newt Gingrich SNUFF LINDA EROSION RACKENRIDG E^V G MML BIERf'BASE A CggH E R^M^A U S T I N POLK ALAMO!, ALIEN , - CU E E O CiW-Lj^U PDATE'! AWAKEN Y D^V E LAS CO|^Z A S Lt E A R I A^^T^N G^B^S A B I N E K^B RAZOS U, AK^ROE"D Z E N^A LLI GATOR E L.P I NBW O K Z U^S EVEN CRAD DUREN, M.D. 1213 Hermann Dr, Suite 430 (713) 520-0653 Internal medical practice offering discreet confidential care to the community, including HIV/AIDS diagnostics & theraputics HEALTHCARE FROM THE HEART Anonymous Testing & Counseling Major Credit & Personal Checks Accepted Insurance with Qualification Medicare fl 9). $14.99 $1.99 st. 1 Dz. Long Stem Roses Cut Orchids a Pol limeijs fill Plants - Pot floral arrangemonts FTP World Wido Sorvica m Fresh Cut Flowers Terrl^Gt Bedding Plants Topiary Tropical Plants Hanging. Baskets Vases, Cards, Gift Ideas & &oTe 812 Westheimer (near Montrose Boul^ror^ (713) 529-6050 HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 21 FrontRunners The revival of FrontRunners Houston appears to be off to a healthy start with 18 members focusing on increasing mem­bership and two or three weekly runs and a Thursday dinner after running. Two FrontRunners completed the Houston Tenneco Marathon this past weekend. Beginning in a 52 degree foggy morning they completed the 26 plus mile run along with thousands of other runners. Don Saint finished in 3 hr. 36 min and Al Salinas completed the race in 4 hr. 13 min. For more information contact Rick at 522-8021. RollerSkaters The Lambda RollerSkating Club will host a “Benefit Skate” Wednesday, Jan. 31 at the Starlite Rink from 8:30 until 10:30 p.m. The Starlite Rink is located at 8075 Cook Road (corner of Beechnut and Cook). Proceeds from the skate will be donated to Team Houston to help offset expenses for the Gay Games ‘98. Admission is $5 and skate rental, if needed, costs only $1 additional. Everyone of all ages and ability are welcome. For more information about this Skate Benefit or the Lambda Rol­lerSkaters, telephone 933-5818. Bowler Notes The Montrose Monday Night Men’s League reports the following stand­ings. Division A is headed by Dem Damn Dawgs, The Queen Sick Court and Party of Four. Division B reports Five Easy Pieces in first, Tennis Anyone in sec­ond, and In By 9 Dirty in third. High scratch game of 262 and series of 706 was bowled by Chris Bennett. For more infor­mation call Gardy at 641-5424. The Inner Loop Alternative Sunday Evening League is headed by Screw It! in first place. Too Wong Fo U? in second and Sticky Wickets in third. For the men, Bob Roberts bowled high scratch game of 280 and Richard Dauchy series of 656. For the women, Terry Shannon bowled high scratch game of 235 and Pam Spayde series of 572. For more information call Tom at 522-9612. The Wednesday Night Mixers has in first, 3 Tops and A Bottom; in second, Half & Half; and Robbed Call 911 in third. For the men, Richard Dauchy bowled high scratch game of 221 and series of 570. For the women, Sandy Boyd bowled high scratch game of 224 and Terry Shannon series of 595- For more information call Tom at 522-9612. The Monday Night Women’s League reports first place is taken by Maybe, Maybe Not, second by Festive Four­some, third by Lesborados and fourth by TAZ Club. For more information call Pat at 437-6218. Softballers Recruiting The Montrose Softball League (MSL) will begin its 17th season of play on Sun­day, April 14 at Memorial Park Fields #4 and #5. The league is now recruiting for players, managers, coaches and spon­sors and hopes to make this season one of its best. There is no experience neces­sary to play in the MSL—-join and “learn as you play.” MSL is divided into three divisions. The Competitive Division, or “A,” boasts experienced players and is looking for former players and new players with extensive softball skills. The Recreational Division I, also known as “B,” looks for those players with good softball skills but through injuries or lack of recent play are not able to play in the Competitive Division. The Recreational Division II, also known as “C,” looks for any players who mainly want to have fun, with no compet­itive edge, and especially look for those with no softball experience who want to learn how to play while having a great time. Most of MSEs games are played on Sun­days at Tim Hearn Field, located at Jack-son Hill and Waugh Drive, just north of Memorial Drive. Once a month, the league usually plays at Memorial Park Fields #4 and #5. Playing times vary from late morning to late afternoon. Various fundraisers are held throughout the year to assist MSL in donating funds back into the commu­nity. For the past few years, MSL has donated over $2,000 to organizations such as Soiree Aubergine, Colt 45’s, The Assistance Fund and Body Posi­tive. Besides raising money for worthy causes, these events provide a fun, pos­itive social atmosphere for MSL mem­bers and friends. MSL is a coed organization, and is looking for male and female players, coaches, managers, and sponsors for the 1996 season. Anyone interested is encouraged to call 867-3913. Leave your name, phone number and address and a representative will contact you! Billiard Standings The Independent Billiard League reported the following pool standings for the first week of the season. Tied for first place are Pool Party and Suicide Squad. Third place goes to Jun­iors. Hot Pockets and Ripcord 3 are tied for.4. The league is still looking for inter­ested people to play in this male/female league. Please call 524-9261 for more information about joining the league. Persons wanting more information about this news item are asked to call Gil­bert Vargas at 524-4190 (home) or 284- 9605 (work). REPORT YOUR SPORTS! Send your updates, scores and information on coming events and tournaments to the HOUSTON VOICE, 811 Westheimer, Suite 105/Houston, TX 77006; Fax 529-9531; Phone 529-8490. Q Patrol needs volunteers. Anyone can join - there are no physical fitness requirements. Spend one night a month with us and see what you're missing! Call 528-SAFE. PHYSICAL FITNESS COMPLEX; | #24 HOURS A DAY * 365 DAYS A YEAR ■' awn - vwars asm » 22 HOUSTON VOICE / JANUARY 26, 1996 A New Emperor
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