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The New Voice, No. 569, September 20-26, 1991
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The New Voice, No. 569, September 20-26, 1991 - File 001. 1991-09-20/1991-09-26. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/14110/show/14081.

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(1991-09-20/1991-09-26). The New Voice, No. 569, September 20-26, 1991 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/14110/show/14081

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The New Voice, No. 569, September 20-26, 1991 - File 001, 1991-09-20/1991-09-26, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/14110/show/14081.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The New Voice, No. 569, September 20-26, 1991
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 20, 1991-September 26, 1991
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 24648896
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript The New R>ice GAY NEWS FOR south TEXAS and LOUISIANA "The Montrose Voice” SEPTEMBER 20-26, 1991 ISSUE 569 AUSTIN (512) 478-4245 HOUSTON (713) 529-8490 □ NEW ORLEANS~(504) 524-3279 □ SAN ANTONIO (512) 226-1833 ▼ ▼ ▼ DATELINE: HOUSTON Preview reception for gay-lesbian officials conference set for Friday The Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus and state Rep. Debra Danburg (D Houston) will host a “preview recep­tion” for the 1991 International Conven­tion of Openly Gay/Lesbian Elected and Appointed Officials. The event will be held from 7:00-9:00 p.m. Friday, Sept. 20, at 1827 Vassar Street. State Rep. Glen Maxey (D-Austin), the first openly gay member of the Texas House of Representatives, is the event’s special guest of honor. Donations are re­quested. The conference, which will be held Nov. 22-24 in Houston, will be the sev­enth such convention to be held in the United States and the first to be held in State Rep. Glen Maxey will be the guest of honor at a preview reception Friday for the 1991 International Convention of Openly Gay/Lesbian Elected and Ap­pointed Officials the South. Houston, as host city, and HGLPC, the convention organizers, will entertain openly gay/lesbian mayors, city and county officials, state legisla­tors; members of state, county, and local staffs, boards and commissions, and members of Congress. The conference will draw an international audience to seminars, workshops, meetings, and so­cials held here, they noted. The convention’s choice of Houston as 1991 host city “highlights our com­munity’s resilience locally and our strength and diversity nationally,” or­ganizers said. Several other national gay organizations have scheduled con­ventions in Houston, among them the Lesbian and Gay Bands of America (Sept. 28-30) which present a combined band concert with Houston’s Lone Star Symphonic Band on Sunday, Sept. 29; the Sixth National Women’s Choral Festival, hosted by HeartSong (Novem­ber); the Latino/Latina Lesbian and Gay Organization (LLEGO), no details available, and the International Confer­ence of Gay/Lesbian Pride Week Plan­ning Committees (October, 1992). For more information on the conven­tion of openly gay and lesbian officials, or the joint banquet of the convention and the Houston Gay and Lesbian Polit­ical Caucus on Nov. 23, call the caucus office at (713) 521—1000. ▼ ▼ ▼ DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Policy change: Amnesty International to aid gay prisoners NEW YORK, Tuesday. Sept. 17 (AP)— Amnesty International has voted to aid gay prisoners, a change that American­based activists said Tuesday they’d worked toward for 12 years. “The decision is a major development and victory in the more than 12-year battle to change the global human rights, group’s policy toward gays and lesbians” said the Gay and. Lesbian Task Force to Change Amnesty Interna­tional. In a decision made Sept. 7 in Tokyo but not previously reported, the London­based group voted to work on behalf of hostages, people forced into exile by governments, and people imprisoned because they are homosexual. The resolution adopted said that peo­ple imprisoned solely for their homosex­uality, including for “homosexual acts in private between consenting adults,” could receive the group’s “prisoner of conscience” designation. It was, adopted, “realizing full^ that this decision increases the difficulty of the development of our movement in many parts of the world,” the resolution said. Amnesty International said it would begin dealing with cases after writing guidelines that take into consideration “the cultural background of various are­as.” The group said it previously had tak­en up the cases of people imprisoned for defending the rights of homosexuals. And it added that it had never discrimi­nated against gays while working against unfair political trials, torture ana, rhe depth penalty. In a statement, Amnesty Internation­al said there are reportedly many gay prisoners “in the Soviet Union and else­where.” The Washington-based Nation­al Gay and Lesbian Task Force men­tioned Arabic countries, Latin America and Africa. “The new development also directly affects the U.S.” the task force said. “Currently, 25 states and the District of Columbia have laws criminalizing ho­mosexual acts in private between con­senting adults. Gays have been, and are, detained and arrested under these laws’’ Gay groups here said Amnesty Inter-national- USA, headquartered in New York City, was a primary force of change within the organization, along with chapters in Canada, Ireland and Norway. Swaggart found guilty of slander in televangelist trial By LEONARD EARL JOHNSON TNV New Orleans The jury in the $9 million Rev. Marvin Gorman vs. Rev. Jimmy Swaggart slander suit has decided the televangelist Swaggart did defame the televangelist Gorman, causing his collection plate to run dry and his ministry to go financially bankrupt. Jurors deliberated 26 hours before reach­ing their verdict, ending ten weeks of testi­mony during which Swaggart tried to prove Gorman’s actions, not his telling of the tale, led to Gorman’s financial collapse. The jury ordered swaggart Ministries to pat Gorman Ministries $9 million and Gorman himself $1 million. Swaggart’s at­torney said he will appeal. Jurors were not swayed by women Swaggart’s attorneys called to testify that Gorman had taken sexual liberties with them in the course of ministering to their spiritual needs. In one celebrated testimo­ny, Gail McDaniel testified Gorman had falsely accused her of being a lesbian and forced her into a sexual relationship with him by saying he could “straighten things out with the Richardsons.” According to McDaniel’s testimony, a member of the Richardson family had threatened her with legal prosecution over an alleged af­fair with then 16-year-old Gaylette Rich­ardson. 2 THE NEW VOICE / SEPTEMBER 20-26, 1991 Our endorsement of Mayor Kathy Whitmire was not an easy decision or one we took lightly. Our only reservation of the prominent Galleria figure with whom he was personally acquainted. Of all the Houston murders to choose from, Lanier's $£ 1 choice only reinforces his River Oaks image—despite his self-professed humble beginnings and harking to the Great Depression which to most voters is a historical fact only. Granted, the mayor has had ten years to become familiar with our city and its operation, but she still was able to come across spontaneously, with few if any notes. This while her two rivals seemed to response to a question seeking his reaction if a Mapplethorpe-type exhibit were to come to Houston. Lanier's response, after a typical pregnant pause, was “What's a Mapplethorpe ?" Turner, on the other hand, is obviously bright and ambitious. We can only assume his constant butchering of the English language is an intentional ploy to reach the “common man"—and to counterbalance his repeated references to his Harvard law degree. All the candidates are hotly pursuing the topic of the times: Crime. Lanier has chosen crime and the sanctity of the home as his big issue—if for no other reason then to cloud his original one-issue campaign, the monorail. Unfortunately, Lanier closed his debate on this issue by citing the murder of a Actually, Lanier had already forfeited such credibility from reports he receh^ following his appearance before the screening committee of the Houston Gay mayor is the City of Houston's record on AIDS and its relationship with the lesbian and gay community of which we are proud to be a part. But the developing campaign only reinforces our support for the mayor. This week's debate, if judged solely on verbal skills and intellect, went to the mayor in a walk. Further exposure of Bob Lanier before the television cameras should -----------------—~---------------------- destroy any credibility he may have had. repeatedly recite by root campaign bites " “.......................... memorized from three-by-five cards. Also of interest was the lack of debate between Lanier and Turner, only further supporting the theory of a hidden agenda between the two men. Reverting to our mentioned reservations concerning the mayor—AIDS and our community—at least Whitmire has established a dialogue with lesbian and gay leaders and recognizes our aspirations as we acknowledge her positions. Turner was not supportive in the last legislature ana whatever dialogue he established is with a handful of “anyone but Whitmire" leaders. Lanier—frankly he appears to have no concept of who we are, what we want and where we would like to go. This is not a contest as to which one hates crime the most—the mayor of this city can do little to affect this issue directly. Lamenting crime and outbidding each other on the size of the police force is just so much rhetoric. Whether you agree or not with the mayor on rail, in the final analysis Mayor Kathy Whitmire is the only qualified candidate in the race and she deserves our wholehearted support. LOBO 1424-CWestheimer (atWindsor) 522-5156 • T-Shirts • Magazines • Cards • Books • Leather • Accessories • Necessities Video Sales & Rentals him Bookstore w " SEPTEMBER 20-26, 1991/THE NEW VOICE 3 ▼ ▼ ▼ SAN ANTONIO SOAP Some scenes from Fallfest ’91 in San Pedro Park ▼ ▼ ▼ YOURS TRULY IN A SWAMP Have you heard the one? More jokes, true and untrue, from all over By LEONARD EARL JOHNSON TNV New Orleans In the words of Pee Wee, himself, “Heard any good jokes lately?” Frankly, yes. Have you heard the one about Pee Wee Herman going into a Florida bar and order­ing two drinks. The first he puts down his face, the second he puts his hand in. The bartender says, “I’ve seen a lot of two fisted drinkers in my day, but I have never seen anybody drink one and put their hand in the other. Pee Wee says, “Well, one drink’s for me and the other’s for my date.” In other living jokes, at the Battlie of the TV. Bible Thumpers—you know, where the badmouthed Rev. Marvin Gorman sued the badmouthing Rev. Jimmy Swaggart for saying he had experienced more sexual ac­tivity than he could recall enjoying. The Rev. Mr. Gorman’s attorney, Steve Hickman, pointed at Gorman in the judi­cious halls of new Orleans Civil Court and implored, is not this preacher a “living, breathing human being.” To which Ross Buckley, hired mouth on the side of the Rev. Mr. Swaggart, objected, saying There has certainly been no proof of that!” Could the Bard have said it any more eloquently? The Soviet Union was always a joke but never too funny. In the salad days of my seagoing years I spent two months-in the Soviet Union, waiting for the People’s train Dispatcher to locate trains enough to carry away our 40,000 ton cargo of wheat. It took two months. In two months, sitting around the port of Odessa, USSR, one hears a lot of broken- English jokes about life in the Workers Par­adise. In honor of recent developments there, allow me to share a couple of those Russian jokes: What would happen if the Soviets took control of all the world’s deserts? For the first five years, no change. After that, a shortage of sand! Three archaeologists are at a meeting in Paris. One is from England, one is from france and one is from the Soviet Union. The English archaeologist says he has dis­covered the Garden of Eden was in Eng­land. “It could not be otherwise, just look at the English divine sense of law and jus­tice.” The Frenchman says, “No, the Gar­den of Eden was in France, just look at the French appreciation of heavenly pleas­ures’’ The Russian says, “You are both wrong. The Garden of Eden was in the USSR. Where else could you find two peo­ple living without clothes, with one apple between them and thinking they are in par­adise!” So it went in 1979. That was 12 years ago. The people I saw in the Soviet Union had very little and they knew it. Communism had failed them and their faith in the sys­tem was gone. In the states, many of us had lots of stuff in 1979 and a rabid belief in something we called a pluralistic society. That is, simply put, a belief in liberal tolerance and opposi­tion to tyranny of the minority at the hands of the majority. So it went, then. Almost everyone had jobs, clothes, hous­es, cars, vacations. But, oddly, we were also losing faith in our system. In part, because the Vietnam War had extracted such an in­flationary tariff, exaggerated by the world’s greedy oil barons. And the Su­preme Court was consistently upholding the rights of “troublesome” minorities. We, unlike the Russians, however, and hope. Hope that a “new morning in Ameri­ca,” as Ronald Reagan put it, would stop the “unjust” from getting so much stuff. And hope a new right wing would quiet these minorities. Well, now lots of us do not have so much stuff and the Supreme Court has moved to the right to such a degree les­bians and gay men have been ruled as hav­ing no Constitutionally guaranteed right to privacy, a ruling the Court may extend to everyone. I wish the peoples of the former Soviet Union well. I hope they are as successful re­alizing their new found hope as we have been with ours. But I hope they target their problems better. (The contest to name in one sentence what we the citizens of the U.S.A, won in the Persian Gulf War is flooding to an end with over 1000 entries. Holy Cow! I have lost track of which states lead. I am about to lose my mind just reading them. Some of you are not well. There is still time to enter, if you must. Rules: One entry to an envelope, postmarked before Sept. 30. State in one sentence what Wheee! The Citizens won in the Persian Gulf War. Winner to be chosen by a panel, consisting of me alone. Here is a hint, I am looking for humor; long winded diatribes have not got a chance. Mail entry to Contest/Yours Truly In A Swamp. Leo­nard Earl Johnson, P.O. Box 72002, New Orleans, La. 70172). P/intex Plus Your Full sJ^Keftinter ond Copy Center WE OFFER ALL OF THESE SERVICES: • Copies • Invitations • Thermography • Business Cards • Announcements • Rubber Stamps . Letterheads • Newsletters • Notary Service • Envelopes • Manuals . Four Color Process Printing • Flyers • Business Forms . 24 Hour Business Cards . Brochures • Foil Stamping Plus More (713) 524-4365 FAX <713> 524-7587 SE HABLA ESPANOL 1617 W. Alabama ‘ Houston, Texas 77006 US/TX Toll Free 1-800-852-0809 Garnet Coleman Stale Representative District 147 Special Election, Tuesday Sept. 24 Highest Rating: GLPC Screening Committee Endorsed: Houston Ga?/Lesbian Political Caucus Your vote can make the difference. If you live in precincts 19,20,21,23, 24,25,30,32,67,85,136,137,154,156,193,194,198,210,218,226,247 343 389, 390. VOTE Sept. 24th. Make Our Voices Heard! Paid for the by Committee to Elect Garnet Coleman 4 THE NEW VOICE / SEPTEMBER 20-26, 1991 ▼ ▼ ▼ HOUSTON SOAP Miss Camp America crowned in front of 1700 at the Music Hall By TAD NELSON TNV Houston In Atlantic City, it was Carolyn Suzanne Sapp, Miss Hawaii, who won the coveted title among the bevy of beauties. In Hous­ton it was Gary Evans, also known as Dame Edith, Miss Hawaii who won Miss Camp America 1992. There were 1,700 people in attendance at the Houston Mu­sic Hall last Saturday night to see the in­credible show put on by the members of MCA. The winners of the top 10 honors this year are David Hurley, Don Pellerin, George Garcia, Gary Evans, Reno Wist, David Stewart, Bob Ferrell, Al Critz and Robert Yale. These beauties (?) have a whole year to plan another great show for next year Congratulations to the top ten and other members of Miss Camp Ameri­ca. By the way, Alex Smoke (MCA), we’re sorry to hear about what happened. Hope you’re up and running soon. (From the girls at Miss Camp and the Voice staffers). Another great show was put on last weekend at Miss Kitty’s by Victoria West and Jennifer St. John and other show members. Kitty’s has some great enter­tainment on Sunday nights. This Friday, Sept. 20, they will host recording artist Vi­ola Wills. If you’ve never seen her. Viola gives a dynamite performance. Some of her more familiar songs include “If You Could read My Mind,” “Up On the Roof,” and “Stormy Weatheif which hit the top of the international dance charts. I saw Vio­la in February on an RSVP cruise, and even when the waves were making the rest of us feel 16 shades of green and lounge furniture was rolling back and forth due to high seas, she could sing and dance while balancing on seven inch spike heels. Ask her about early morning aerobics on deck with the boys. Viola’s much better in heels than in tennis shoes. While we’re talking divas, I just got a press release from Randy and Bob at Heaven. No, they’re not the Divas, but Martha Wash is. The former lead singer of the Weather Girls and Two Tons of Fun has been booked into Heaven for Oct. 5. Martha was the center of controversy in a recent conflict with RCA Records, which J.R!s general manager Frank Capo (left) and Randy Victoria West and Jennifer St. John at Miss Kitty’s excluded her name from credits as lead singer in hits by Black Box and C&C Mu­sic factory. Her phenomenal voice can be heard in recent dance hits, “Everybody, Everybody,” “Strike It Up,” and “Gonna Make You Sweat (Everybody Dance Now).” For more information call Heaven at (713) 521-0107. Coming up this Sunday at Gentry is the Turnabout Drag Show featuring the staff and special guests B.J Summers, Patsy Cline and Sandra Darlene. This is a bene­fit for the Colt 45’s Stone Soup Fund and the Colts will be there as well as the bar­tenders. Del says “your non-perishable food items are welcomed.” Gentry is get­ting in on the bar-as-a-gallery concept by showing the new works of James Preuss beginning Friday, Sept. 27. And don’t for- Rita Boulevard is having "Oiler Fever” Maude emcees Monday night at Gentry and Tommy barbacks, too Miss Camp America 1992 Top 10, from left: David, Don, George, Gary (Miss Camp America ’92), Reno, David, Bob, Al and Robert get their new Wednesday night “Wet Jock­eys Contest” with Maude. Get it, Girl! Skip over at the Ripcord has reminded me that for you football fans, Monday night is football night at the Ripcord. They show the games on their giant projection screen in the main bar . For those of you who are avoiding Fairview because of the recent road work, it’s coming right along and won’t be long now. You can now access the businesses on the popular stretch including Past Time, Leather by Boots, C and N Cafe, Tex Chick and the Ripcord without a hassle. A little dirt maybe, but that’s okay. Speaking of dirt—Vera’s back in town! And she dug up a little dirt of her own. JoAnne (BRB), Vera tells me the girls keep coming to you on Sundays for bigger potatoes. What gives? Salad for five isn’t enough? Tommy, are you still driving your car and how was the meat at Reisner Hotel? Sue Ellen welcomes Vera home and wants to let her know that “she is no long­er lost—but found!”(?) Mark was seen dancing at J.R’s Vera, we hear you were a recent guest at Betty Ford Clinic and when they did a blood test on you, they discovered a new blood type, Cactus Juice positive. Enough dirt; now for more parties, etc. Our friends in Big D are having a party this weekend. Happy Party to the club brothers, Ambush, who are having the “Coyote Run ’91” Sept. 20-22. This Sunday, Sept. 22 is the Galveston Train, Skate and Bike Trip offered through the Lambda Rollerskating Club. For more info, call (713) 523— 6381. Skate Nite at the Carousel Rink will be next Tuesday, Sept. 25 art 7:30 p.m., and don’t forget Skate Nites at the Venture-N are Thursdays from 8:00 p.m. ’till close. Speaking of the Venture-N, David had compiled a list of events that are coming up in the near future. They are as follows: Sept. 29, National Gay/Lesbian Band Concert at Jones Hall; Oct. 11, National Coming Out Day at Diverse Works; Oct. 11 weekend—Oktoberfest at Venture-N; Oct. 18—Shades of Gray party on Polk Street; Oct. 19, Wigs On Fire at Heights Theater; Oct. 20, THE Grey Party at DV8; Oct. ---- The Fantasy Ball at Magnolia Ballroom; Oct. 27 -A Night of Magic at Metro Ma­jestic; Oct. 31—Freaker’s Ball at V-N; call me and let me know ifyou have other par­ties and events I didn’t mention.M And don’t forget, there’s just 100 days or so to plan for your Christmas tree recy­cling! ▼ ▼ ▼ HOUSTON QUICK NOTES Queer Nation, DiverseWorks to host 'Coming Out Day’ party Houston will have its first large-scale celebration of “National Coming Out Day” this year on Friday, Oct. 11, 7:00 p.m. to midnight, at DiverseWorks’ warehouse district headquarters. The party will include nationally known en­tertainers and a 45-minute “Debutante Ball,” said Queer Nation organizer Tracy Brown, and will be open to people of all ages. Queer Nation and DiverseWorks are co-hosting the party, which will be sponsored by several Houston gay/lesbian bars and busi­nesses. DiverseWorks, an alternative art space, was the site of this summer’s suc­cessful “OUT!” show featuring gay and lesbian artists and performers. One of the performance artists who appeared here during the run of “OUT!” is sched­uled to headline the entertainment for the Coming Out party. Los Angeles— based Les Stevens will ne emcee and fea­tured entertainer for the event, Brown said. New York City disc jockey Dean is scheduled to be the DJ for the Houston party. National Coming Out Day, founded in 1988, is promoted by a national non­profit organization based in Santa Fe, N.M. with a mission of making the na­tional lesbian and gay community more visible, and encouraging those in the closet to “come out “ and be open about their orientation. It is celebrated in Oc­tober in honor of the National Marches on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights which took place in 1979 and 1987. Gay and lesbian organization that would like free booth space at the event may contact Brown at (713) 524-4657. —AIDS Equity League The AIDS Equity League, a non-profit educational and informational organi­zation aimed at insuring fair treatment for the gay at risk community is now holding biweekly lunch meetings. The sessions are open to the public and will be devoted to discussing ongoing pro­jects of the League and other local AIDS issues. The lunch meetings will be held on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month from noon to 1:30 p.m. at Charlie’s restaurant, Westheimer at Waugh Drive. The first meeting is this Tuesday, Sept. 24. Participants will pay for their own lunch, but those wishing merely to at­tend or to “brown bag it” are welcome and will be provided a beverage. ▼ ▼ ▼ DATELINE: AUSTIN Austin’s Prime Timers making plans for a free Halloween party Austin Prime Timers, an organiza- Festivities will include prizes for Admission is free; the party is mation about membership in this ac-tion for older gay and bisexual men, “B.Y.O.B.,” and costumes are option- tive social organization for older will have a gala Halloween party on best costume8’ and soft dnnks, mix- aL men write prime Timers, P.O. Box Oct. 31. ers and munchies will be furnished. For details about the party infor- 436, Manchacha, TX 78652. SEPTEMBER 20-26, 1991 / THE NEW VOICE 5 Living Benefits. A Policy For These Times. Living Benefits purchases insurance policies from people facing life-threatening illnesses. With a single cash payment, the policyholder is able to benefit from quality health care, enjoy the comforts and pleasures of life, handle debts, and give personally to family and friends. With traditional life insurance, a policyholder doesn’t benefit from the policy. Living Benefits offers an alternative to tradition and the means to live with independence, free­dom and dignity. Our company pioneered the concept of advancing the proceeds of life insurance to those facing life-threatening illnesses. Today, we remain faithful to the highest level of ethical standards. For more information, call 1-800-458-8790, or write to: Living Benefits, 6100 Seagull Lane N.E., Suite 108, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87109- LIVING BENEFITS^® Dedicated to lives with quality and dignity 6 THE NEW VOICE /SEPTEMBER 20-26. 1991 ▼ ▼ ▼ DATELINE: HOUSTON U.S. public health representative to meet with local activists By SHERI COHEN DARBONNE TNV Editor A representative of the federal public health service is scheduled to meet in Hous­ton with local AIDS activists and others concerned about a federal Medicaid study which included patients at the Thomas Street Clinic, according to the legal direc­tor of the Texas Human Rights Founda­tion. According to Mararet Tucker of THRF, the clinic was among 10 sites at which 2000 people with HIV would be surveyed to stud-y the efficacy of state medical plans, deter­mine the use of public and private services by people with AIDS/HIV, and to deter­mine the point at which PWA’s make the transition from private insurers to public services and how that shift might be avoided. “Basically they want to know who’s providing services, how much the services cost and who’s paying for them,” she said. “This is the first survey of its kind, and from what I understand the pur­pose is to find out who’s bearing the (finan­cial) burden of AIDS. There’s no question the information would be useful.” However, Tucker and other civil rights and AIDS leaders were startled last month on learning about the survey, which was not publicized and for which community­based service providers were not contacted in advance for input. Some of the activists, including Rob Falletti and Gene Harrington of the AIDS Equity League, say methods used to collect the data violat­ed the privacy of patients and questioned the need for the survey to ask for release of confidential Medicaid files. The Public Health Service representa­tive, David Willis, was out of the country this week and the meeting date was not set, said Tucker. However, she said, the meeting arrangements should be finalized within two weeks after Oct. 14. The activists initially said they planned to ask state Attorney General Dan Morales to temporarily block the release of patient files for the study. Harrington said he is especially troubled by the fact that survey participants were paid to authorize release of their records. Participants in the survey, being conduct­ed by a private consulting firm for the U.S. Public Health Service, are interviewed at three month intervals and paid $50 each time. The Harris County Hospital District authorized the Houston leg of the survey, which includes about 100 outpatients at the district’s Thomas Street Clinic. Harrington said hospital district offi­cials told him participation is voluntary, because the patients give consent and are paid; however, he said, the added incentive of payment raises other questions. An indi­gent person being offered $50 by an author­ity figure may be giving consent that is not truly voluntary, he suggested. “Here we have these people, sitting there waiting at the clinic, and you have some­one from the government on one hand, and someone from the hospital district, asking them to sign a form,” he said. “Overall, I think the project is good. Our (AEL) main question is why they need the names (of participants)...We also want to be sure that the Harris County Hospital District adhered to all the ethical review procedures,” said Harrington, adding that he believes the survey concerns demon­strate the hospital district’s need for an HIV client ombudsman. Another concern that should be address­ed, said Tucker, is “that in the future, the people who are involved (with AIDS) know the information on what kinds of studies are going on.” Is Your Lover Driving You Crazy? fa-We Wel/L Male &. Female Therapists Available Sharon Stone & Associates 3935 Westheimer, Ste. 210 623*6081 ----------------------------------------------------------------—. Charlene Torres! CSW/ACP/LPC Counseling—Psychotherapy Depression, Anxiety; Relationship Issues Individuals/Couples 6300 W. Loop South #480 583,2629 • Gay/Lesbian Issues • Chemical Dependency • Depression & Anxiety • Outpatient & In Hospital • Sexual Abuse & Trauma • Psychological Testing • Couples & Family Issues • Bilingual Services Diana Quintana, Ph.D. Judy L. Stange, Ph.D. 840-8871 4801 Woodway 110 Cypress Station Drive GENITAL HERPES FREE treatment for qualified participating volunteers PLUS $210 on completion of study If you have recurrent genital herpes (at least 4 episodes per year), you may be eligible for free treatment in a study comparing a new anti­herpes drug to acyclovir (Zovirax). For further information, call (713)333-2288 The University of Texas Medical Branch Center for Clinical Studies St. John Professional Building, Suite 200 2060 Space Park Dr., Nassau Bay, TX 77058 INDIANA AUTO SALES 271 1 TIDWELL HOUSTON ROB—697-3325 We Finance Anyone! (Even HETEROSEXUALS) Zero % Financing Cars from $300 DOWN Heights Area 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage. Lot 75x120. Cent, air & heat. Large master bedroom. $75,700 Ask for Suzanne Suzanne Debien Realtors, Inc. 861-5040 Among Peter’s last accomplishments was to found with his lover and lifetime companion the ROTHEUDT/DIZINGER FOUNDATION. This worldwide non-profit organization is dedicated to fulfill travel and other wishes of PWA’s in need. If you or your organization know of anyone who could benefit from this foundation, or if you are a PWA with that special wish, please contact the foundation informally and confidentially. The ROTHEUDT/DIZINGER FOUNDATION 3701 Montrose Blvd., Houston, TX 77006 A memorial service will be held on Friday, Sept. 20,1991, at 6 p.m. at Bering United Methodist Church, followed by a celebration of Peter's life at La Columbe d’or. Peter Jurgen Dainger Christmas Eve 1943—September 13, 1991 Petecany one day with you I would not exchange for the remainder of my life, lhe blessed twenty years with you I would not exchange for promised eternity ■ W>nd' sea' ^°9ethec ire lived in perfect harmony. bide by side we were each other’s shadow into a life of infinite and unconditional love. With God’s help and your guiding spirit I will try to continue your giving task on earth in your name and memory... until we meet again. Zour Hobbes, always and forever SEPTEMBER 20-26,1991 / THE NEW VOICE 7 ▼ ▼ ▼ LETTERS TO THE EDITOR What does one say to help someone else find courage? From BILL KELLER I found myself in an interesting situation the other day, and one for which I have yet to find what wouldbe, for me, a satisfactory solution. I ran into someone to whom I had been in­troduced some weeks back by a mutual friend We learned at that we are both HIV­positive. (I am classified as having full­blown AIDS while I am uncertain about his exact status.) It was also disclosed (that I have) other medical conditions which are unrelated to HIV. This fellow, after we had been chatting for awhile, reached around me from behind (my attention had been distracted momen­tarily by something else in the bar ) and pro­ceeded to give me a long hug. During this, he made a rather unusual request: he asked me to teach him my courage. I am not often at a loss for words—to which I fell several friends will attest—but nothing came to mind that I felt I could say without seeming to be making light of his distress. It’s not the first time someone has asked me or wondered aloud how I deal with things—at times referring simply to HIV but at others to the “double whammy” con­stituted by HIV and my other medical situa­tion. In more light hearted moments I’ve had a tendency to reply “That’s just me!’ However, as this fellow was almost in tears, I strongly suspected that wouldbe inappro­priate in this case. So, what did I say? Nothing. I just stood there, trying to figure out an appropriate re­sponse, and letting him continue to hug me. In a sense. “That’s just me” is the appro­priate response. I’m the first to admit that medically I’ve been through hell more than once—several major surgeries as a child, another in junior high and, three and a half years ago, my original HTV/AIDS diagnosis which began a hospital stay of about seven months. Six rounds of chemotherapy is no fun (although one of my sisters said I looked cute baldl). Add to that growing up gay in a small town in northeast Texas—no picnic, I assure you—and I suspect a lot of people could see a recipe for potential emo­tional disaster. Instead, I like to think I’m reasonable well-adjusted.—a bit off the wall, I’ll admit. My health has the doctors somewhat con­founded— since leaving the hospital June 7, 1988, the only major problem I’ve had was when I came down with chicken pox last summer (I said I was weird); not bad far someone who wasn’t expected to make it to 27, but will, God willing, make it to 30 when October rolls around.... For whatever rea­son, although I occasionally have emotion­al bad days, on the whole I remain pretty much upbeat. Why? I really can’t say. I have some ideas, but whether any of them have any validity is, I think, a matter for speculation. I have a family that, while not always the most ac­cepting of my being gay, has stood firmly be­hind me in dealing with my medical prob­lems; friends who have helped me through rough spots; I have a fairly strong religious background which, although some may find it difficult to believe, does give me a sense of someone or something on which/whom to depend—as well as an early realization that life is finite and, in the end, there is little we can do besides live life to the fullest..! learned that when life tosses you a curve, ac­cept it and go on doing the best you can. I’m not saying it isn’t or won’t be difficult. Some days are harder than others.... I’m also saying what works for me, based on my background and experience. These are unique to each person, both physically and Rmnt.in-na.ily “Different strokes for dif­ferent folks” maybe a cliche, but it is just as valid for dealing with trouble and stress as it is for varying preferences in sexual prac­tices or dietary tastes. “Teach courage?” Somewhere, recently, I saw something where courage was defined as knowing a danger, respecting—even fear­ing— possible or probable consequences, and yet still going ahead with the course of action despite one’s fears and/or concerns. If this is a valid definition, it seems that pos­sibly courage could be “taught’,’ though to me it sounds simplistic. I think the only re­ally effective method may be to teach by ex­ample. That, if anything, is what I guess I’m trying to do. I’m not asking or trying to be a role model for anyone, I’m just trying to live my life—with this disease—as best I can. If I help someone by doing that? Maybe, then, I’m doing a little bit of good -“Good ol’ boy justice” From GENE WESLEY ELDER District Attorney Steve Hillbig, Judge Tar­ry MacDonald and Defense Attorney Eddie Garcia certainly must be slapping each oth­er on the back over their tongue-in-cheek punishment of the Marine who murdered because of gay advances (no proof necessar-y)- (Nicolo Giangrasso) received probation for his murder of Charles Resendez. Charles is dead and Nicolo says he doesn’t remem­ber anything that happened that night. He does know that the next morning he awoke to find himself and Charles in bed together and a used condom on the floor. Then Nicolo bludgeoned Charles to death in his sleep. The gay community will find it interest­ing to know that strangers from out of state can murder native Texans, call us queer and get a wink of disapproval from the court system. Good Ol’ Boy justice rides again. Does this (Giangrasso’s) probation in­clude regular interaction with the gay com­munity? If the Marine is scared of homosex­uals, maybe we should try to find out why. ▼ ▼ ▼ DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Arson guts Virginia townhouse repeatedly vandalized by anti-gay graffiti ARLINGTON, Va., Monday, Sept. 16 (AP)—A townhouse where vandals have painted anti-gay graffiti six times this year was gutted in a fire officials have la­beled as arson. The owner, Allan Silva, was away when his four-story house on North Utah Street burned Sunday. Arlington County offi­cials estimated damage at $200,000. Fire officials on Monday said the blaze was started at the back door with an “ac­celerant.” Officials would not identify the material. Firefighters originally called the blaze suspicious. County Manager Anton Gardner said the graffiti will be considered as part of the investigation. Residents said they already are con­vinced the crimes are related. “We’re all very angry,” said Julio Estrada, a neighbor. “It’s not fair for some­one in the neighborhood to be attacked that way.” Aletheia Praise & Worship Center Ronald Pigg—Pastor Service Times Sunday 11am & 6:30pm, Thursday 7:30pm 501 East 18th, Houston, TX 77008 (713) 863-8846 Counselling/ Support ©rtrtorg of tfje Spiritual Healing faints Sunday: 11am Wednesday & Eve of Holy Days 7:30pm Byzantine Rite 2507 Montrose #2, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 524-9184 Weddlngs/Unions Rites Of Passage metropolitan COMMUNITY CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION Rev. Elder John Gill, Pastor Ms. Carolyn Mobley, Asst, to the Pastor 1919 Decatur. 861-91*9 OFF WASHINGTON & SILVER Fri.sept. 20:7pm Single's Group worship services: Sunday, 10:45am & 7:i5pm; Wednesday: 6:45pm Kingdom Community Church COME EXPLORE HIS KINGDOM Sunday Worship Service 11 am 614 E.19th Houston 862-7533 748-6251 HOLY TRINITY CATHOLIC CHURCH TRINITARIAN CATHOLIC • Fri Sep 20. 7:30pm, Penance Service• Sun Sep 22, 1:30pm, Parish Council Meeting MASSES: SUNDAY 11am & 6:30pm, TUES.-THURS. 8am, SAT. 11am 1218 WELCH, Houston 523-8412 FR. MICHAEL OBERDIN, PASTOR PRIVATE AND DIRECT CREMATION $500 • •••• Private Memorial Services Available Design Your Own Services at CRISTO-REY FUNERAL HOME HOUSTON (713)237-1777 Mother Roberts Spiritualist, Reader, Advisor Help in Love, Marriage, Business Will tell you changes you should and shouldn’t make 816 Stuart at Travis (713) 523-2297 CALL FOR APPOINTMENT Open 7 Days 9am-6pm Guaranteed to Help You in Matter of Days The New Voice ISSUE 569 SEPTEMBER 20-26, 1991 Published Fridays Established 1973 as the Houston Montrose Star, re-established 1980 as the Houston Montrose Voice, incorporating 1991 the New Orleans Crescent City Star "The Montrose Voice” 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1991 Office hours: 9am-5:30pm Henry McClurg/pub/isher Sheri Cohen Darbonne/edftor Leonard Earl Johnson/correspondent Barry Bass/photographer ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Austin/Chris Luther Houston/Robert DeCola Houston/Tad Nelson New Orleans/Lee Weiss San Antonio/Eshcol Richard Wright Austin (512) 478-4245 Houston (713) 529-8490 New Orleans (504) 524-3279 San Antonio (512) 226-1833 POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Subscription rate in US (by carrier or US Mail): $1.25 per week ($32.50 per 6 months or $65 per year) National advertising representative: Michael Gravois. Riven-dell Marketing. P.O. Box 1268, Plainfield. NJ 07061, (908) 769- 8850 Final display advertising deadline: 5pm Tuesday for Friday publication Notice to advertisers. Advertising rate schedule Ten was ef­fective Feb. 15, 1991 Responsibility: We do not assume financial responsibility for claims by advertisers but readers are asked to advise the newspaper of any suspicion of fradulent or deceptive adver­tising and suspicions will be investigated Member: Associated Press; National Gay Newspaper Guild 8 THE NEW VOICE / SEPTEMBER 20-26, 1991 ▼ ▼ ▼ DATELINE: GAY AMERICA University chancellor rejects faculty senate recommendation NASHVILLE, Tenn., Saturday, Sept. 14 (AP)—Vanderbilt Universi­ty’s chancellor rejected a Faculty Senate recommendation to extend its rights protection policy to homo­sexuals. Chancellor Joe Wyatt announced his decision last week at this year’s first meeting of the senate. Jeff Carr, general counsel for the university, said its current policy covers race, sex, religion, color and national and ethnic origin. It ap­plies to all students and employees. “Vanderbilt’s formal statement of non-discrimination policy reflects legal requirements that apply to the university,” Carr said. “We have not in the past broad­ened that formal statement to ex­tend to areas beyond the universi­ty’s legal obligations” he said. The faculty group has taken no further action on the issue, said Mol­ly Miller, head of the group. ▼ ▼ ▼ SAN ANTONIO SOAP Signs of the season are everywhere in festive San Antonio By ESHCOL RICHARD WRIGHT TNV San Antonio Unlike those in the Willie Nelson lyric, the leaves in San Antonio have not ex­actly “turned to flame.” But regardless of the 95 degree weather, last Sunday’s Fallfest was a great success. All the lo­cal celebs were there, including one nice woman who has to be considered one of our community’s real institutions. I’m speaking of the Taco Lady of the Paper Moon. In the middle of all the volleyball and networking that afternoon, I bumped into our friend, Slater Anderson of An­derson’s Insurance Agency. This is the agency that is specially staffed to serve the San Antonio community’s insur­ance needs. In fact, Anderson’s has carved a special niche for itself by offer­ing free life insurance on a strictly confi­dential basis. Call for a private appoint­ment. Returning to the Fallfest festivities, it looked like rain might threaten Dena Kaye’s 7:00 p.m. performance. But as show time rolled around, the clouds mi­raculously parted and dena—fresh from shows earlier last week in Austin and Corpus—kept us thoroughly enter­tained. The best door prize in last year’s Fallfest went to Bubba Swan, who picked up box seat tickets for this year’s TGRA rodeo. And no one could possibly discuss rodeos and the Fallfest without mentioning Terry Neal in the same breath. Thanks, terry for pulling all this Some of the flowers that bloom at El Jardin...Roland, Leo and two of their friends The Stallion’s Ted Jones, all smiles as he serves those cocktails together. Incidentally, although they’re not counting the money yet, it looks like SAAF will be the beneficiary of over $1,300 as a result of Terry’s efforts. Speaking of benefits for SAAF, last Tuesday’s emergency benefit at the Wild Club will be remembered as the ral­lying point for our efforts to keep SAAF on its feet. Bar owners, bartenders and other representatives of San Antonio in­ner circle all took the night off from their own clubs to help give SAAF a shot in the arm. Bottom line? Over $2,000 was raised for SAAF Hats off to the Wild Club for this fantastic showing of com­munity spirit. And special thanks to the Pointless Sisters, who kept us laughing even longer than usual. There are other benefits for SAAF just Sexy Trey Allen and George Michael sail every Sunday at The Crew The Bonham Exchange is known for a lot of things, and one of them is “her” gorgeous and friendly bar staff, (from left) Big L, Daddy Eric, handsome Horace and Dennis the Menace around the corner. For example, as The New Voice goes to press this week, bar owners from all over san Antonio will gather at the New Zoo Co. for a fundraiser. The Pearl Mesta of San An­tonio— of course, I’m speaking of Lollie Johnson—will be our hostess for the evening. I can’t wait to be there. On Saturday, Sept. 21, the Wild Club continues with another of its series of theme parties. You remember the WC’s last big party, the Military Ball? Well, next Saturday, fatigues and sailor suits give way to boots and bandannas, as the Wild Club launches its first (annu­al)? Country and Western Party. So, dust off your leather chaps and two-step over to the San Pedro Strip to catch the live entertainment. Is that Roy or dale leaning against the bar? Last week San Antonio Soap showed a picture of Roger Galloway and Jim Duer, the new owners of the 106. These guys plan to refurbish the whole bar. We’re talking new lighting, new carpet and an expanded dance floor. That’s got to be a lot of work. So drop by the 106 and give Roger and Jim and encouraging word. After all, in­terior decoration is serious business. Those of you who like to frequent the downtown bars need to know the scoop on The Crew and El Jardin. Every other Saturday, The Crew will be featuring the best kind of live entertainment (Need I say more?), and every Monday night is talent night at El Jardin. Think of it as downtown San Antonio’s answer to The Gong Show. Looking ahead to October, the crown jewel of the fall season in San Antonio will be Gay Fiesta. This year, the big party is on Sunday, Oct. 13. And, our friends from Houston, Austin and New Orleans will converge on San Antonio for the festivities. To give you some idea of the popularity of this event, hotel space is already getting precious; Den­nis even had a hard time finding a place at the Fairmont. Got some news for San Antonio Soap? Then buzz me at (512) 824-4735. Until next time, adios from the Alamo City. DRAGO’S FLORIST | ClTY .;lDE—WORLD WIDE | MONTROSE MEDICAL CENTER DOWNTOWN 468-7717 1825BingleRoad Kathy Hubbard Texas Income lax Service Bookkeeping & Business Consultation (713) 526-6588 I jP.O. Box 66588 » Houston, TX 77266 Montrose Auto Repair FREE ESTIMATES ALL WORK GUARANTEED 100 Pacific WE DO OLD CARS 526-3723 CARBURETORS REBUILT ELECTRICAL REPAIRS ALL BRAKE WORK (713) 524-1682 MIDTOWN FLORIST RICK BELFORD MANAGER 806 RICHMOND HOUSTON. TX 77006 JAY’S GUNS Special Order, All Makes Available, Cost plus 10% HOUSTON (713) 738-7334 * EARN INCOME * “91” WRAPPING NOVELTY GIFT ITEMS EARN $200-5500 WEEKLY Send a stamped self-addressed envelope to: D&D MAILING SERVICE P.O. BOX 601532 TEJAS AIR, INC. Air Conditioning and Heating Specialists TACLA00610C All Work Fully Guaranteed Over 13 Years Experience HOUSTON (713) 880-4629 USED CARS, TRUCKS & VANS All makes and models, plus new Chevrolets $50 fee paid on closed referrals. Houston (713) 561-9900 Call Phil Flakes BETTER LAIDRS & QARDERS Total Lawn Maintenance Commercial Residential -Landscape -Lawn Care -Tree Service Free Estimates Best Prices 523hLAIDU SEPTEMBER 20-26.1991 / THE NEW VOICE 9 LIVING WITH HIV _ Every day, more and more people like Buddy are learning to live with HIV. People are finding ways to stay healthier, strengthen their immune systems, develop positive attitudes. They’ve found that proper diet, moderate exercise, even stress management can help. And now, early medical intervention could put time on your side. So, the sooner you take control, the better. anonymouX^ou X*he nUmber be,OW' FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 1-800-HIV-INFO □AcitivP Houston Amigos Volunteers in Education and Services, Bering Community Service Foundation, Chicano Family Center, Brought to you as a public service by* Body ro and American Academy of Dermatology, American Academy of Family Physicians, American College of General Montrose Clinic, Over The Hill Inc., RW.A. coalition netponathic Association American Social Health Association, National Association of People with AIDS; and Burroughs Practitioners in Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery, American w Wellcome Co. 10 THE NEW VOICE / SEPTEMBER 20-26,1991 ▼ ▼ ▼ NEW ORLEANS QUICK NOTES Gay-Lesbian television show celebrating its 100th broadcast By HANS HELMUT STAUDAAGER TNV New Orleans Just for the Record, the highly ac­claimed weekly television show aimed at the New Orleans lesbian and gay com­munity, is celebrating its 100th broad­cast. Just for the Record covers issues and events of interest to gay/lesbian citizens under the provisions of Louisiana’s non­profit corporation laws. It is largely de­pendent on volunteers to produce its pro­grams. A fundraiser for the program will be held Sept. 28 from 7:00-10:00 p.m. at American Aquatic Garden, 621 Elysian Fields Avenue. Tickets are $25. For infor­mation, phone Judith Wenger at (504) 484-6856. —Conference videos Segments of the 13th National Lesbian and Gay Health Conference, held in New Orleans July 24-28, were filmed by Just for the Record producer Valda Lew­is and are available for purchase. The conference, held at the Hyatt re­gency New Orleans, was sponsored by the National Lesbian and Gay Health Foundation and George Washington University Medical School. Over 800 people attended. Hundreds of workshops were conducted on topics ranging from homophobia to domestic violence. Indi­viduals spoke in meetings designed to showcase their expertise on subjects of concern to good physical and mental health for gays and lesbians. Controversy arose because some parts of the conference received funding from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. U.S. Health and Human Servic­es Secretary Louis W. Sullivan issued a statement saying his office was “out­raged and concerned” that a $25,000 fed­eral grant made it appear that the gov­ernment endorsed such activities as a “safer sex party for lesbians and gays.” While the “sex party” feared by Sulli­van never happened, a catalog of availa­ble videos of actual meetings and speeches from keynote addresses work­shops and plenary sessions may be ob­tained by writing Just for the Record, P.O. Box 3768, New Orleans, LA 70177; phone (504) 943-3067. —Poster premiere Friday, Sept. 13, saw the kickoff party for the 1991 NO/AIDS Walk . The gala was held at the elegant home of Roger Ogden and Ken Barnes. Participants cut the rug in a sophisticates evening of mu­sic produced by Sam Ross, vice president for development at Tulane University. Co-chairs for the event, along with Ross and Ogden, were Dean John Kramer of the Tulane Law School. Music was selected from the works of Noel Cow­ard, Cole Porter and George Gershwin. The gala was designed to thank corpo­rate and individual underwriters of the 1991 Walk. The unveiling of the 1991 Walk poster was a highlight of the eve­ning. The postei; a limited edition, was created by Maureen Donelon. —Krewe Of Petronius The Krewe of Petronius has booked Phoebe Legere for its 25th annual Satyricon party. Legere, star of the enter­tainment portion of the fall costume par­ty is a well known and critically ac­claimed cabaret performer in New York City. While she has been called “the Mae West of Rock and Roll” (”Where/New York,” March 1991), she refuses to cate­gorize her performance style. She is a for­mer New England Conservatory of Mu­sic student with a four octave range, as well as a former Playboy Magazine mod­el. The performance will be held in the Coker Room of the Municipal Auditori­um on Saturday, Sept. 28 at 8:00 p.m. Do­nation is $12.50 which includes a ticket for performance and the Roman Feast, featuring roast pig, turkey and other fowl and free flowing wine poured by the “gorgeous Roman slaves,” according to the party’s organizers. Also included will be the judging of the costume contest with prizes for best male and female at­tire “most evocative of ancient Rome.” Tickets may be obtained from any krewe member. For information, phone (504) 525-4498. —Monica Grant Monica Grant, an entertainer known in San francisco for comedy and music is coming to New Orleans for one perform­ance Saturday, Sept, 21 at the Unitarian Church, 1800 Jefferson Avenue. Last year; Grant performed to a sell out house. Performance time is 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $8 with part of the proceeds going to the Gulf Coast Women’s Land Fund. —Banned Books Week Alan Robinson, community activist and owner of the oldest lesbian/gay book store in the South, Faubourg Marigny Books on Frenchman Street in New Or­leans, will read along with other literary luminaries commemorating “Banned Books Week,” Friday, Sept. 27. The read­ings will be given at a 6:00-9:00 p.m. re­ception at de Ville Books and Prints in the One Shell Square Building at the cor­ner of Poydras and St. Charles. Reading with Robinson, who is also president of the Gulf South Booksellers Association, will be New Orleans au­thors Louis Edwards, Helen Toye and Shirley Pedlai; executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Loui­siana. De Ville Books will feature an exhibi­tion of banned or challenged books. A spokesperson for De Ville Books, Keith Twitchell, pointed out “no matches are allowed” in the bookstore, adding, “Come on out and demonstrate your sup­port for our precious and threatened First Amendment rights.” —New staff at NO-AIDS NO/AIDS Task Force has hired two new administrative assistants, David Kiviaho and Lois L. Stewart LaBranche, Also hired as an Early Intervention Services nurse was Ethel Claire Duplaa, R.N. Duplaa has spent the past five years coordinating experimental drug therapy for HIV patients in a private medical practice. She attended nursing school at LSU Medical School and Touro Infirma­ry- Kiviaho is experienced in retail and of­fice management and was a buyer for D.H. Holmes. He studied secondary edu­cation at the University of South Ala­bama in Mobile and plans to complete his degree at the University of New Orle­ans. LaBranche spent 28 years as a secre­tary for the Orleans Parish School Board. She was business manager for Girl Scouts of Chicago for three sum­mers and a volunteer with McDonogh 32 Elementary School Girl Scouts for 15 years. —Mint benefit Bartenders at The Mint, 504 Esplanade, are presenting a fund raiser for Project Lazarus on Monday, Sept. 23. “Turna­bout ’91” is an event where the bartend­ers reverse roles with the stage enter­tainment, making themselves in “lovely ladies” for the evening’s drag show. The regular draggers get down behind the bar, serving drinks and offering critical commentary on the performances. A Bonhage metal sculpture will be raffled during the evening along with a silk shirt by Ray Cole and $100 in cash. Tick­ets for the raffle may be purchased at The Mint, the 2601 and The Friendly Bar. Tickets are $1. Winner need not be present. Commented one of the Mint bartend­ers, Ricky, about the benefit show: “I do not usually do this sort of thing.” But, he added, “Let’s see, it’s on an Monday, so it’s okay.” The performance starts at 9:00 p.m. —PWA Coalition The New Orleans PWA Coalition is sponsoring the Cowpokers Ball on Sat­urday, Sept. 21 from 8:00 p.m. until mid­night at Mama Rosa’s slice of Italy Res­taurant, 616 North Rampart. The benefit will offer music by New Orleans Ex­press, a cash bar and door prizes. Tickets are available at the Boswell Center, NO/AIDS Task Force and Faubourg Marigny Books. For informa­tion contact Jamie Esposito, (504) 947— 0155; Fred Sahuc, (504) 945-4000; or Boswell Center, (504) 944-3663. Food baskets will be available for do­nations of non perishable food items and personal care products. In other news from NOPWAC, the LA Loft has completed its move to the Boswell Center at 3025 Dauphine. Cli­ents and donors should call Jason Guidry at (504) 944-4663 for pick ups and deliveries. LA Loft items and donations to the Darrell Hamby Memorial Food Bank should be made at the Boswell Center rather than the NO/AIDS Task Force office. The board of directors of the Coalition has named entertainer Becky Allen and AIDSLaw of Louisiana recipients of the Randy Giddings Memorial Award for the first and second quarters of 1991. Allen has often entertained patients and has helped raise funds for AIDS charities. AIDSLaw provides pro bono legal assistance to PWA’s. NOPWAC has also received a grant of $13,000 from Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Company for use distributing NebuPent (Pentamidine) through the Indigent care Program. Persons with no means of payment can qualify for this program. It is for emergency use only. For information, contact a social worker or case manager. ▼ ▼ ▼ FEATURE REPORT The music will go on’—Disco diva Viola Wills shares her views It was just after she had released “Gonna Get Along Without You Now” on another label. Although “Train” was recorded first, her label would not re­By CHRIS LUTHER TNV Austin Viola Wills is due some credit. Wills, singer-songwriter and stylist, will be coming to Miss Kitty’s in Hous­ton and Charlie’s in Austin this week­end to claim some ownership for a score of works that populated the disco charts of the 80’s. The litany of songs including popular interpretations of the Drifter’s classic “Up On the Roof?’ Gordon Lightfoot’s “If You Could Read My Mind,” Lena Home’s “Stormy Weather” and the hits “Gonna Get Along Without You Now” and “Don’t Stop the Train.” But although the talent to deliver “HI NRG” music seems to come to her easily, getting the credit, andtherewards, from her work has been more elusive. Like ex-Weather Girl Martha Wash in last year’s dance hit, “Gonna Make You Sweat,” Viola had her voice used with­out acknowledgement. In the early 80’s, when her voice carried the dance single “Don’t Stop the Train” to the charts, her name was conspicuously missing from the label. ord are gone. Today (an individual art­ist) can’t even get near a label, with (all the) lawyers and accountants. Every­thing is just a product.” She has never let the ugly realities keep her from her music, but she has de­veloped avenues to keep her humanity. “This (music) is my life, I do nothing else for a living. I (write and sing) music to survive...but I write literature for my­self, because I really love to write. In between gigs, Wills has begun working on a book. When asked about the relationship between her music and her other writings she replied, “I’m not sure they feed each other, What the mu­sic does is keep me alive, what the writ­ing does is feed my soul.” Remarking on her experiences as a disco diva, she adds: “I believe everybody has a bookin them, but I got a lot of them.” The book is about the disco era viewed from the other side of the record. “Our music went through a lot of changes, and there were a lot of changes that I had to go through. There will always be people who love disco, the music will go on.” lease her for another label’s project. “The producer had a property that he was losing money sitting on, so he released the song as a single with­out my name,” she shared in an interview with The New Voice. “He just left my voice on (the song).” “Don’t Stop the Train” turned out to be the bigger of the two hits, eventually eclips­ing “Gonna Get Along.” But Viola nev­er received any royal­ties from the song. “The business has Viola Wills will perform at Miss Kitty’s in Houston on Friday, never been fair to the Sept. 20 and at Charlie’s in Austin on Saturday, Sept. 21 artist that’s just the way it is.” Comment­ing on the Milli Vanilli scandal, Wills re­marked, “ It’s just gotten to be such a mega business...the days when an artist could walk into a label and put out a rec- SEPTEMBER 20-26, 1991 / THE NEW VOICE 11 ▼ ▼ ▼ AUSTIN SOAP Capital City fundraisers and other not-to-miss entertainment events Skidgell, Alton Samples (as Cher) and Ernest Rodriguez share a hammock at benefit for Project Transitions By CHRIS LUTHER TNV Austin In preparing for Diez Y Seis, the Latino AIDS organization Informa SIDA held its volunteer recognition party this past Fri­day. Volunteers, staff and east Austin ac­tivists gathered to celebrate the progress Informa SIDA has educating the Mexi­can- American community over the past several years. Among those in attendance was Latina poet and activist Maria Limo’n, who was featured with a full page profile in the Sept. 13 Daily Texan. Also last Friday, Project Transition, the only non-profit AIDS hospice in Travis County, held a wildly (and we do mean wildly) successful fundraiser at Chances. People were found playing in the sand and swinging three to a hammock while being entertained by some of Austin’s best musi­cians. Jean Caffeine, the principal organ­izer of the event, performed with her All­Nite- Truckstop Band. They shared the stage with Radio Hairdo, Hard Women, Girls In the Nose, Susan Lindfors, Steve Yurkey, Virgin Machine and the thought­ful Kris McKay. Sandra, the owner of Chances guessed that over 1000 people passed through the doors that evening. The hunky Jon Fraser, program director for Project Transitions, was very pleased with the turnout, noting that it was one of the most successful events ever for the hos­pice. Not one to rest on her laurels, Chances is gearing up for another benefit this coming Sunday. Columbia recording artists and local favorites Poi Dog Pondering will be headlining a benefit for the Austin Im­mune Clinic. The nearly four year old clin­ic is the largest of its kindin the country. It serves people with HIV concerns, supple­menting traditional medicine with holistic medicine and services including massage, acupuncture and chiropractic treatments. The clinic has gone through some growing pains this year, having to suspend services for one month earlier this year due to fund- Jennifer Clark, John Oeland and Marshal Quick at Buckles ing shortfall. However, the clinic has re­structured and is showing new strength as its approach is receiving greater support from doctors and researchers in the AIDS service community. On stage at the AIHC’s benefit along with Poi Dog Pondering will be the Cactus Cafe Orchestra, Coffee Sergeants, Guitar­ist John Riddenour, Paul Grundle, Coulda Shoulda, Susan Boelz Band, Jim Heald, Swag and TerraTona, David Garza and the Love Beads and the returning-to-do-an other-benefit- because-that’s-just-the-way- she-is Kris McKay. This show promis­es to be top notch and will, because of some of the names on the bill, pull a lot of hip Hets off 6th Street. That’s OK because once again, Chances shows itself as one of the best venues in the city, better than any­thing on the much touted 6th. And they don’t have hammocks. The only problem is, if Sandra keeps this up we’ll be having to deal with tourists. If you arrive early you might want to stop next door at Aimtie Mames and say hi to the husband and husband bartending team of John and Lee Allardyce. Because of the bigoted marriage laws in this state that still fail to recognize gay and lesbian families, they had to go through numerous legal hurdles to formalize their marriage. This included one of them adopting the other’s last name. When asked, they weren’t clear as to who changed who’s name, so that might be a real indicator of who supposedly wears the proverbial pants in the family. In addition, John will appreciate your well wishes as he recovers from his hip injury. This coming weekend there will be two other events that you will not want to miss. Think Pink will be the rallying cry at Charlie’s this whole weekend. This annual event is Charlie’s traditional way of wel­coming back UT’s students. Now in its eighth year, this theme party celebrating Philip Murphee’s favorite color is guaran­teed to make you think of all things pink and beautiful. Dress or undress appropri­ately. The talented Viola Wills will be per­forming Saturday (see related story in this issue) but don’t expect her to wear any­thing pink, she says she’s leaving those dresses in L.A. Also, for the more conservative country crowd, there will be the second annual Oil Baron’s Ball at Buckles. This event is Ed’s (Buckles owner) attempt to recognize some of the leading contributors to local AIDS Auntie Marne’s husband and husband bartending team, John and Lee and gay/lesbian organizations. Leading up to the ball on Sunday night, there will be a whole weekend of events. Friday night they will be giving away tickets to George Strait’s Saturday concert at the Drum. Then on Saturday, Buckles will be giving away a fabulous weekend package to TGRA’s annual rodeo in Dallas. This package includes tickets to the show, ho­tel, accommodations and 100 clams to boot, if you’ll pardon the pun. Sunday night will be the Black and White Ball. There will be a dance contest and prizes that include two belt buckle/ hors d’oeuvre trays. These are the same belt buckles that are being sought by the UT Astrophysics department for deep space wave research. When you wear these things, you never know what you’ll pick up...anyway, go see ’em for yourself. You’ll understand why Buckles continues to be one of the finest lil’ saloons in the state. Best wishes to the contingent of gay and lesbian students from area schools that are driving up to Dallas to march in that city’s Gay and Lesbian Freedom Parade. While there, they will be attending the Co­alition of Lesbian/Gay Students’ annual conference. (A report of their experiences will appear in The New Voice next week). Scarlett Leigh “on the ball” at San Fran Toby Johnson, Paul Gillespie and Kip Dollar of Liberty Books Cisco’s ▼ ▼ ▼ DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Hi-tech gays in Silicon Valley see hope in Lotus same-sex benefits By LAURA MYERS AP Business Writer FOR THE NEW VOICE SAN JOSE, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 10 (AP)—Gay and lesbian workers, who have been seeking recognition and rights for nearly a decade in hi-tech Silicon Valley, see new hope from Lotus Development Corp.’s pact with its homosexual employ­ees. Last week, the Cambridge, Mass.-based company announced it would let workers who have long-term same-sex partners sign contracts to qualify them for the same benefits offered to employees’ spouses. On Monday, Silicon Valley’s gay com­puter employee counterparts praised the decision and vowed to seek similar deals. “This is what we’ve been striving for for years,” said Don Nelson, a Lockheed Corp, worker and president of High-Tech Gays, a 500-member Silicon Valley profession­als’ organization formed in 1983. “The Lo­tus decision certainly allows us to hold that company up as an example.” “I think we’ve got some momentum go­ing here now,” added Bennet Marks, a member of Apple Lambda, a 5-year-old ho­mosexual employees group at Apple Com­puter Inc. “It s hard to be a trend setter when it comes to things like this. I think Lotus has shown it can be done. This will help us,” Marks said. Lotus, which makes the most popular computer software spreadsheet program, on Friday became the first major U.S. com­pany to offer benefits to partners of its gay employees. Benefits include medical and dental care, vision and hearing coverage and bereavement leave. Lotus estimates 10 percent of its 3100 workers are gay-a percentage that gay advocates say applies to the general popu-lation. The Bay Area Municipal Elections Com-mittee (BAYMEC), which endorses politi­cians, planned Monday night to discuss the Lotus decision at its board meeting m hopes of encouraging a gay workers rights movement. “There’s certainly been some movement in some private companies and some gov­ernments, but there hasn t been any giant sweeping movement,” said Judy Rickard, president of BAYMEC. “Perhaps this will open the door?’ Companies in Silicon Valley and the rest of the San Francisco Bay area generally are no longer hostile to homosexual em­ployee groups, but gay rights leaders said there’s still reluctance to deal with them. Apple Lambda, which has been in talks with Apple Computer for nine months seeking benefits for gay partners, is offi­cially recognized by the Cupertino-based company. But at Lockheed Corp, and Hewlett Packard Co., for example, the groups rep­resenting homosexual employees are warned not to use corporate names in a way that could make it appear as an en­dorsement of the organization. As a result, the groups are called the Gay, Lesbian or Bisexuals At Lockheed (GLOBAL) and the Gay and Lesbian Employee Network at Hewlett-Packard. “Companies are sensitive about this subject, although they discuss it now,” said Greg Gloss, a member of the gay group at HP which began in the late 1970s as a loosely organized social outlet. “Now that Lotus has set a precedent, we’re hoping it can be used as a.model situation.” Last year, HP reworded its non-discrimi­nation policy to recognize gay rights in re­verse; Instead of including “sexual orien­tation” on a list of categories of groups that can’t be discriminated against, HP cut out the list and replaced it with a broad anti-discrimination statement HP spokesperson Mary Lou Simmermacher said the company now is reviewing expanding benefits to all types of non-traditional families. Digital Equip­ment Corp., a Maynard, Mass.-based com­pany with a large Silicon Valley presence, also is thinking of expanding its “non-tra­ditional” coverage. Still, gay groups are battling compa­nies’ reluctance to increase health care coverage, said Andrew Swartz who is lead­ing the Apple Lambda talks with the com­puter company. Experience with nonprofit groups that offer same-sex benefits shows that not many sign up so costs don’t rise much, he said. “The reason companies offer health in­surance for spouses of straight workers is for peace of mind,” Swartz said. “This is true for my family, too.” 12 THE NEW VOICE/SEPTEMBER 20-26,1991 ▼ ▼ ▼ HOUSTON QUICK NOTES Lambda Bike Club planning train outing to Galveston Sunday The Lambda Bike Club held their second ride Saturday, Sept. 14, with 13 people at­tending. The next ride is Sunday, Sept. 22 in Galveston. The group will take the Tex­as Limited train to Galveston, bike around Galveston, take the ferry to Bolivar and shop the Strand. The Chain Gang Bicycle Club will join them on the train and lead the ride. The train leaves the Amtrak sta­tion, 902 Washington at 11:00 a.m. and re­turns from Galveston at 5:00 p.m. Partici­pants must buy the $28 ticket in advance. Bikes travel free in the baggage caron spe­cial bike racks. Ask for the Chimayo Car and get tickets at Fiesta, Foley’s or Ticketron, (713) 629-3700. The Lambda Rollerskating Club will al­so be participating in the ride. Those with­out skates can rent them in Galveston for about $10 for three hours, members said. Skaters will skate the Seawall, pay a visit to Mary’s II and shop the Strand before re­joining the train back to Houston. Walkers and trolley riders are also welcome on the train trip and can follow the skaters’ map. There are four bars on the fully restored seven car train, the Texas Limited, which will transport riders from Houston to Gal­veston. LRC will also have another Gay Nine­ties Skate Nite on Tuesday, Sept. 24 from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. at the Carousel Skating Rink, 9190 Old Katy Road, be­tween Campbell and Blalock. The $5 ad­mission includes skates and benefits the Montrose Activity Center building fund. Wine and beer are available. For more in­formation on skating and biking events, call (713) 523—6381, evenings. —Service Of Hope The AIDS Interfaith Council, a program of the Foundation for Interfaith Research and Ministry, will present a Service of Hope at 4:00 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22, hosted by St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 1805 West Alabama. The service will be fol­lowed by a reception. —Safe sex “playshop” Men of All Colors Together (MACT) and the United Colors affinity group of Queer Nation will present “Hot, Horny and Healthy,” a “playshop” for sexually active men, on Sept. 27. The experimental work­shop includes no sex, but will focus on frank, open and explicit discussion in a “party atmosphere,” where participants can talk about how AIDS had affected their sex lives. The discussion will empha­size the positive, members said, and be­gins at 7:30 p.m. For location and other in­formation, call (713) 663-7460. —Grace Lutheran pastor Kristine Kay Franke will be installed as “Fiesta on the Patio’’ a benefit for the Annise Parker campaign, took place Friday, Sept. 13 at the Lovett Inn. The event was coordinated by community leaders Jim Owens, Fe­lix Garcia and Jim Crary to help Parker, an openly lesbian candidate for Houston City Council, Dist. C Houston Lighting and Power workers install one of 35 bracket lights recently approved for the Montrose area. The new street lights were approved by city council to reduce crime in the Montrose area during a string of hate—motivated attacks against gays and undercover police posing as gays pastor of Grace Lutheran Evangelical Church, 2515 Waugh Drive, at 4:00 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22. SETSLA Synod Bishop Martin Yonts will officiate. A reception will follow. —AIDS and social work A free lecture will be presented by New Or­leans social worker and AIDS expert Dr. Gary A. Lloyd, ACSW, on Thursday, Oct. 3 at 4:00 p.m. in the University of Houston Hilton Hotel (UH entrance 1 off Calhoun). “Who Will Speak for Us? Social Work and AIDS In the Second Decade” is the topic of the sixth annual Helen B. Kapiloff Health Care Lecture sponsored by the Uni­versity of Houston Graduate School of So­cial Work. For more information call (713) 749-1741. —Queer Nation protest The lesbian/gay activist group Queer Na­tion continued its protest against Greensheet last Saturday with two demon­strations at businesses that refused to sup­port the organization’s boycott. Members picketed Randall’s, Shepherd and Westheimer, and Stop N’ Go, Montrose and Westheimer, the afternoon of Sept. 14 to call attention to the locations’ decision not to join several other Montrose area busi­nesses that have agreed to stop distribut­ing the weekly advertising paper. Queer Nation is demanding that Greensheet welcome advertisements for gay and lesbian organizations and allow the ads to include the words, “queer,” “gay” and/or “lesbian,” and allow gay and lesbian participation in the paper’s Heart T’ heart personal ad section with ads di­rected at same-sex respondents. Members said Greensheet publishers have agreed to the first demand. ▼ ▼▼INMEMORY OF —PETER JURGEN DIZINGER “Und nichts die Stunden wiederbringen kann, da leuchten durch das Gras, da Blut durch alle Blueten rann— klagen wir nicht, uns treibt die Kraft aus dem was uns verbleibt. Peter passed away peacefully at home on Sept. 13 1991, to be with his creator. He was surrounded by many friends and his lifemate of 20 years, Hans— Willi Rotheudt. Peter was born in Ebingen, Germany and having his masters degree in the beauty in­dustry he came to Houston in April of 1971. he worked at Gulfgate Beauty Shop and opened his own salon "Peter’s Place” in 1976. When Eurotan was born, Peter joined his lifemate as vice president and was instru­mental in the development, growth and suc­cess of the company. His creative and ad­ministrative talents made the Eurotan line of suntan products well known nationwide and in Europe. He was truly a proud example of the “American Dream,” because when he came to this country he had nothing in his pockets and could not even speak the lan­guage. Peter’s wish was to lead a prosperous and happy life in his beloved United States while touching the hearts of those around him. He fulfilled his wishes many, many times over. Entertaining in his home was one of Pe­ter's loves of life, which resulted in many memorable parties. From his numerous trav­els around the world, he collected artistic and sentimental pieces which he displayed masterfully. He always adorned his sur­roundings with the charm of floral arrange­ments and thriving plants. Peter is leaving behind his lifemate, rela­tives in Germany, devoted employees of Eurotan, hosts of caring friends all over the world, and of course man’s best friend, his dogs Ben and Rex. "Peter: you were that special someone who only comes along once in a lifetime. I miss your warmth and your charm, that spe­cial way that you had about you that could make me smile in the midst of turmoil. I’ll never forget you, my Bobbes. You are truly one in a billion. Keep the lights on at Heav­en’s door;. I’ll be looking for you one day and I cannot wait to have you in my arms again and again. I love you forever and a day!—Ich liebe Dich in alle Ewigkeit und bin dein Bobbes fuer immer/ A memorial service will be held on Friday, Sept. 20 at 6:00 p.m. at Bering Memorial United Methodist Church, followed by a cel­ebration of Peter’s life at La Colombe d’Orat 3410 Montrose Blvd. (One of Peter’s last accomplishments was to found the Rotheudt/Dizinger Foundation, a non-profit organization, dedicated to fulfill travel and other wishes of PWAs in need. In lieu of usual remembrances, a tax-deducti­ble contribution may be made to the above foundation at 3701 Montrose Blvd., Hous­ton, TX 77006). —JIM BACK On Aug. 27, 1991, Jim Back left his home in New York City for a well deserved transfer to the world where the music never stops, champagne flows from the faucet, the Barn­ey’s is open 24 hours a day, the conversation is always clever, all meals end with strawber­ries dipped in white chocolate and the beach is always warm and sunny. Jim was born on Aug. 1,1950 to June and Morris Back. He graduated from Pasadena Sam Rayburn High School and the Universi­ty of texas at Austin. He lived in Houston for many years, where he made many good, life long friends. In 1984, his employer, Gulf Publishing, transferred him to New York City where he added to his already large family of friends, In new york, Jim was an active sup­porter of many organizations and served on the board of directors of Multi-Tasking Sys­tems, the nation’s first non-profit corpora­tion aimed at re-employing HIV-positive in­dividuals. Jim’s last moments were at his Manhattan home, with his parents, June an Morris, of Pasadena; his nurses, and his kind and lov­ing friend and neighbor, Joe Pumphrey. We, in Houston, are all forever indebted to these special people, as well as to Dr. Linda Laubenstein and Dr. Virgil Hatcher and their staffs, whose skill and manner were an im­portant difference. As Jim requested, there was no memorial service. As a befitting remembrance, please volunteer time or make a donation to the AIDS service provider of your choice. Watch Us Grow! SEPTEMBER 20-26, 1991 / THE NEW VOICE 13 ▼ ▼ ▼ DATELINE: GAY AMERICA Sex-identity researcher Robert Stoller dies in traffic accident LOS ANGELES, Tuesday, Sept. 10 (AP)— Dr. Robert J. Stoller, a ground-breaking psychoanalytic theorist on sexual issues ranging from gender identity to homosex­uality, died of injuries suffered in a traffic accident. He was 66. Stoller, a member of the University of California, Los Angeles, faculty since 1954, died Friday after his car was struck as he backed out of his driveway onto Sun­set Boulevard, said UCLA colleague Dr. Richard Green. Stoller’s contributions “pushed the fron­tiers” of psychiatric and psychoanalytic thought about sexual development, Green said. His earlier work, in the 1960s, was on gender identity and focused on a variety of people, including transsexuals and those with an intersexed male-female anatomy, said Green, a member of the psychiatry de­partment at UCLA’s medical school. He also began to examine from a psy­choanalytic viewpoint how people develop their masculinity and femininity. In later years, Stoller took on the role of “iconoclast” in challenging the idea that homosexuality was a psychological disor­der, Green said. He questioned the line drawn between the perverse and the nor­mal in sexual behavior. He studied many diverse areas of sexual­ity, including what factors lead to sexual excitement and sadomasochism. Stoller also was “an extraordinary teacheif ’ Green said, and an eloquent writ­er of numerous books, including “Sex and Gender: On the Developmentof Masculini­ty and Femininity,” and “Sexual Excite­ment: Dynamics of Erotic Life.” Stoller received his bachelor’s degree from UC Berkeley and his medical degree from UC San Francisco. He is survived by his wife, Sybil White, who was in the car with him at the time of the accident but suffered only minor inju­ries. He also is survived by four sons. Man pleads innocent to attempted AIDS-related extortion of doctor LOS ANGELES, Wednesday, Sept. 11 (AP)—A man charged with demanding $10,000 to keep quiet about a doctor who carries the AIDS virus has pleaded in­nocent to attempted extortion. John Michael Fountain, who said he was a student at Harvard University, was arraigned Wednesday and entered his plea before Superior Court Judge Gary Klausner. The 21-year-old Fountain remained in jail with bail set at $5,000. Fountain was arrested at a West Hol­lywood bar after allegedly trying to pick up an envelope containing $10,000 in ransom money, according to the district attorney’s office. Authorities said Fountain was work­ing for a doctor’s accountant when he found out the doctor had tested positive for the AIDS virus. Fountain then alleg­edly used a photocopy of the doctor’s business card to address two letters to him. One said, “I know your secret,” and the other demanded $10,000 in return for Fountain’s silence, prosecutors said. The doctor called the sheriffs depart­ment and deputies established surveil­lance at the address where the money was to be dropped. Authorities said Fountain arrived but did not find the money and went to a nearby bar where he was arrested. The doctor later checked his files and found that Fountain had been one of his patients, authorities said. Fountain was charged with one count each of sending a threatening letter for extortion and attempted extortion. Records won’t be sealed in attempted murder case of 'handcuff man’ TAMPA, Fla., Friday, Sept. 13 (AP)— Records in the attempted murder case of a man suspected of being the “Handcuff Man,” who allegedly stalked men he thought were homosexual prostitutes, won’t be sealed, a judge ruled. Robert Lee Bennett Jr., a lawyer, also faces charges of aggravated assault in Atlanta. Circuit Judge B. Anderson Mitcham on Wednesday rejected efforts by Bennett’s attorney to seal records, a moved opposed by the news media, said prosecutor Dale Cisco. Bennett, 44, goes on trial Oct. 28 in Tampa for the attempted murder of Gary Clapp, whose burning body was found Feb. 22. “Gary Clapp has since had both legs amputated,” Cisco said. “He had his genitals set on fire while he was uncon­scious. We wouldn’t have filed the case unless we had something.” Bennett, free on a $200,000 surety bond, is required to stay in Hillsborough or neighboring Pinellas counties. But he received permission Wednesday to travel to Towanda, Pa., “to take care of some business,” Cisco said. Bennett has homes in both Towanda and Clearwater; Fla. Bennett, released on $100,000 bond in the Atlanta case, pleaded innocent there to two counts of aggravated assault. He is accused in the beating and set­ting afire Max Shrader, then 20, on April 25,1985, and of an alleged attack on Mi­chael Jordan, then 21, on May 13,1985. ANDERSON INSURANCE Insuring our community with care 1. Low cost ma|or medical insurance with unlimited payout for any illness or accident. 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VAC DUST BATH RMs MOP & WAX KITCHEN LAUNDRY Maty's Maid Service General Housekeeping Honest Dependable.! new service SPECIAL $35.00 for 3 bed, 2 bath Cott NOW (512) 824-4735 SAN ANTONIO Wild West Night featuring Live, in Concert “High Lonesome” Saturday. Sept. 21 9Ptn-2am • •••• After Hours Party with Wild Club Dancers at 2am 18-pIus welcome after 2am SAN ANTONIO 820 San Pedro (512) 226-2620 14 THE NEW VOICE / SEPTEMBER 20-26, 1991 ▼ ▼ ▼ DATELINE: SAN ANTONIO Outcry increases over Marine’s light sentence in killing of gay man By SHERI COHEN DARBONNE TNV Editor Protests continued this week over District Judge Terrence MacDonald’s sentencing of Nicolo Giangrasso, a 21 year old marine private who beat a 37— year old gay schoolteacher to death on New Year’s Day, 1990, as more new facts in the quirky, con­troversial case came to light. Laurie Eiserloh of the Lesbian/Gay Rights Lobby of Texas said LGRL is writ­ing a letter of complaint to Bexar County District Attorney Steven Hillbig and Judge MacDonald regarding MacDonald’s grant­ing of ten years deferred adjudication to Giangrasso, who claims he killed Charles Resendez because Resendez made “homo­sexual advances” toward him. Eiserloh said she is asking for an expla­nation of a reported plea bargain and the process through which Giangrasso re­ceived 10 years probation, with deferred adjudication, for voluntary manslaughter in the beating death of Resendez. Previously, activists with Esperanza Peace and Justice Center and New Queers on the Block had decried the sentencing, saying it showed blatant bias against both gays and Hispanics, and all the groups said they were planning direct protests, but no specifics were available. Particularly at issue, say activists, is the fact the Giangrasso changed his story about what happened the night of the slaying several times during the trial; MacDonald’s appar­ent acceptance of his latest version of the story without question; Giangrasso’s ad­mission early in the investigation that he did not remember everything that hap­pened that night, and a plea bargain nego­tiated by the district attorney’s office that kept Giangrasso from being tried before a jury for murder. Among peculiar developments this week, Rick Casey, the columnist for the San An­tonio Light who had followed the story of the sentencing and ensuing reactions closely Sept. 10-11, printed a retraction of some of the statements he made in those columns. In particular, Casey retracted a connection he had drawn between MacDonald and Giangrasso’s defense at­torney Eddie Garcia, who once shared of­fice space with MacDonald before he be­came a judge. Casey said Garcia was not Giangrasso’s original attorney and was hired after the case was assigned to the 186th District Court in March 1990. MacDonald won the Democratic nomina­tion to the court in March 1990, and be­cause he had no Republican opponent, re­mained judge-elect until January of this year, Casey pointed out. Meanwhile, a lawyer representing Resendez’ family said this week that the family is considering legal action against the D.A.’s office or Judge MacDonald in wake of the outcome of the trial. The attor­ney, Martha Fitzwater confirmed Tuesday that “we are looking at various legal op­tions for the family.” “I want to emphasize that we are not go­ing to let this injustice go,” Fitzwater said. A media source who said he has inter­viewed family members claimed they were concerned that certain details—including the fact that Giangrasso initially reported he had met Resendez in a gay bar—were not considered during the sentencing. The source, who said he could not speak for the record, also claimed Giangrasso had changed his story at least twice since the original story broke in January, 1990. According to N.Q.O.B. and Eiserloh, news reports seemed to downplay factors in the case that might have called into question Giangrasso’s own sexuality—in­cluding a suicide attempt immediately af­ter the incident, the fact that the motel where the killing took place has a “reputa­tion” among gay men, and the Marine’s story that he beat the man to death after waking up newt to him in the room and finding a used condom. According to court records, Giangrasso at first said Resendez had given him a ride, stopped by the motel room and entered alone. He told his Marine superiors that he waited a few minutes, followed Resendez into the room and flew into a rage when the man tried to grab him. Casey, of the San Antonio Light, report­ed in his Sept. 11 column that Giangrasso changed his story 20 months later, claim­ing he passed out in Resendez truck and woke up in the motel bed. According to the column, Judge MacDonald believed the second story, that Giangrasso had been drugged and raped. However, the columnist questioned the 20-month delay by Giangrasso in reporting the alleged rape, and wondered ho the courts would have handled the case of a woman rape victim who killed her attacker, then waited 20 months to say she had been raped. (Editor’s note: Bobby Mayes, TNV San Antonio, also contributed to this report. Both District Attorney Steven Hillbig and Martha Fitzwater, attorney for the victim’s family have consented to be interviewed and will tell their sides of the story in next week’s issue). ▼ ▼ ▼ HOUSTON LIVE New comedy ‘Old Doves’ opens Main Street Theater’s 17th season Main Street Theater will open its 17th season this weekend with “OldDoves”a new comedy by actor/author William Whitehead. (Clockwise, from left): Marcy Bannor, Rebecca Byars, Lisa May and Steve Garfinkel By THE NEW VOICE STAFF Main Street Theater is opening its 1991-92 MainStage subscription series with the world premiere presentation of “Old Doves” Thursday, Sept. 19. Written by na­tive Texan William M. Whitehead and filled with magic and mythology, this bit-ingly funny play exposes old family wounds and scars on the landscape during a surprise reunion of the Fussels of Caddodoches Springs. “Old Doves” pre­views Sept. 14 and 15, and runs through Oct. 20. In the play, writer, expatriate and recov­ering alcoholic Hollis Fussell returns, un­invited, to the East Texas community she once described as “a town of a thousand toxic hearts,” ostensibly for her niece’s wedding. What she finds, however, is Lila Lee dumping her fiance to elope with an­other man, brother Ray and his wife Ra­chel dumping on her last books, and the town dumping something smelly into the once pristine—and perhaps holy!—bayou country place of dearly departed old wom­an. That old dove’s funeral five years be­fore occasioned Hollis’s last visit. Now she’s back, sober this time, to uncover all their dirty little secrets and, with a little Caddo magic, just maybe save their souls. MST founder and artistic director Re­becca Greene Udden chose “Old Doves” to open the Village district company’s 17th season because of its fresh look at one of the most maligned groups in contempo­rary theater—the Southern rural “com­fortable” class. Whitehead , born in Dal­las, reared in Longview and educated at SMU and Baylor, understands small Tex­as towns and those who leave them. For the last two decades, the playwright has worked in Hollywood and regional theater and will be a member of the Denver Theater Center’s acting compa­ny during the 1991-92 season. Director Robin Rob­inson and her cast and production team worked with the play­wright on “Old Doves.” The play features long time MST compa­ny members Steve Garfinkel as the blustering Ray and Marcy Bannor as his stalwart helpmate Ra­chel. The cast also in­cludes new company members Rebecca Byars as Hollis and Li­sa May as her niece. Maurice Tuttle designs the set; costum­ing is by Udden and Patti Bean, and Su­san Diane Koontz is the lighting designer. The production stage manager is Debs Ramsey and Charles Fuller is the off-stage voice of the sheriff. “Old Doves” opens Thursday, Sept. 19 at 8:00 p.m., and the audience is invited to stay for the after-show cast party. The pro­duction will then play Wednesdays at 7:30; Thursdays through Saturdays at 8:00 p.m. and Sundays at 4:00 p.m. through Oct. 20 (there will be no performance on Oct. 9). For ticket information, call (713) 524-6706. —Audition notes Horizons Showcase Theatre is casting Terrence McNally’s savagely amusing tragi-comedy “The Lisbon Traviata.” The cast requires four actors, ranging in age from 24-45. The play deals with mature subject matter and contains some nudity. Auditions will be held by appointment only on Friday and Saturday, Sept. 20 and 21. One two-minute monologue will be re­quired in addition to a headshot and re­sume. These are paying roles. To schedule an appointment, call Hori­zons at (713) 728-8562. Also, Dreem Katz, a Houston ensemble group which presents original material will hold open auditions for “In Chains,” a play presenting a provocative commen­tary on the subjugation of women. Auditions are Saturday, Sept. 21 from 1:00-5:00 p.m. Male and female actors 21 years of age and older are needed. Bring comfortable attire for improvisation and movement. For more information, call Dreem Katz at (713) 869-6757. ▼ ▼ ▼ DATELINE: TEXAS Week in court winds up in tennis star Navratilova’s hearing By MIKE COCHRAN FOR THE NEW VOICE FORT WORTH, Saturday, Sept. 14 (AP)— The dispute between tennis star Martina Navratilova and her former lover, Judy Nelson, is not a matter of money but a “matter of the heart,” Nelson says. “We had a relationship that was very special. I think it was very good, very healthy,” Nelson said. “She is a very spe­cial part of my life that I would never take away, and I don’t think she would either. In the bizarre Friday the 13th windup of a zany week in court, Navratilova denied calling Nelson a “money-grubbing para­site” but suggested it was time her ex-lover found a job. “I’m disappointed,” she snapped, “that the only way Judy is capable of making a living is through me, one way or another” Nelson, claiming she is not emotionally ready to work, replied: “That was really hard. I think that Martina was lashing out at me because she was angry. She had to be here this week and she didn’t want to be here. She wanted to be on safari in Africa.” Navratilova also said Friday a dispute over book rights about her affair with Nel­son is blocking a settlement in their stormy palimony case. “This is really the only stumbling block,” she told reporters at the conclusion of a week-long legal battle to have Nel­son’s lead attorney removed from the law­suit. Later, Nelson denied that a movie or book deal is the issue but blamed a less tangible demand that she surrender her “right to freedom of speech.” Baited by a foreign press contingent, Navratilova said Nelson insists on errone­ously blaming their breakup on ski cham­pion Cindy Nelson and declared: “Judy has a hard time understanding I left simply because our relationship fell apart. She has to blame it on somebody. We (Cindy) are friends but I’m friends with lots of other women. “It seems that every time I’m seen with a woman, we’re having a relationship.” She told a British reporter in response to a question that there is no woman in her life at the moment. The back-to-back news conferences came after Nelson testified at the prelimi­nary hearing that her lead attorney, Jerry Loftin, is a friend dating back to schooldays and “my lawyer all my life.” She said she was “very distressed and upset” when she broke up last winter with Navratilova, and Loftin “was willing to help me at a time when I needed some help. “He was willing to take this on a contin­gency basis and that really was the only way I could do it.” Opposing lawyers maintain Loftin’s representation of Nelson is a conflict of in­terest because he represented Navratilova on previous legal matters and was privy to confidential records. It is undisputed that Loftin’s legal aide in fact helped her and Nelson draw up the “non-marital cohabitation agreement” that lies at the heart of the current dispute. But Loftin contends he had no knowl­edge of his aide’s role in preparing that document in 1986. State Judge Harry Hopkins ordered at­torneys Friday to provide him written clos­ing arguments by Oct. 7 and said he would rule on the Loftin issue by Thanksgiving. He said he would then set a trial date agreeable to both sides. At stake is half of Navratilova’s earn­ings during the seven years of the relation­ship, estimated between $5 million and $9 million and the source of much bitterness. “Judy wants me to pay for the pain I caused her in not wanting to be with her anymore,” Navratilova, a nine-time Wimbledon champion, said in interviews this week with Dallas-Fort Worth newspa­per reporters. “My crime here is stupidity, naivete, and not loving Judy any more. For that I have to pay.” In her comments Friday afternoon, Navratilova said: “The reason the case is not settled is be­cause Judy insists on having the rights to write about our story personally. She would write a book about it, whatever.” She said part of the settlement specifies no more publicity, “and Judy wants the right to do that.” Nelson said she had a problem accept­ing “some infringement that I could never speak about this in my lifetime,” adding: “That’s not to say that I want to or ever will. It’s just a basic right. It’s called free­dom of speech ... Let’s don’t call it book or movie rights. It goes deeper than that.” SEPTEMBER 20-26,1991 / THE NEW VOICE 15 NEW ART BY LARRY CRAWFORD ARTIST’S RECEPTION SUNDAY, SEPT. 22,4PM FRIDAY, SEPT. 20, ‘BACK TWOS COOL,’ CHUCK, DJ Your Stars September 20-26, 1991 HOROSCOPE FOR THE NEW VOICE Aries You are moving in the direction of a locked door. You will find the key, but not without some searching. The opening of that door begins a journey where the sign posts all speak of a knowledge based on a greater understanding of a relationship. CELEBRATING THE AUTUMNAL-EQUINOX-OPENING-OF- THE-GAY-HIGH-HOLIDAY-HOLIDAY-SEASON IN WHACKO CITY (FINGER FOODS AND SCHOOL COLORSRAH!) Taurus Seeing two sides to the story can be helpful; but being several different people for the most important person in your life can drive them away. Beneath the disguises, you need to reveal the YOU underneath, or face the consequences. Gemini SATURDAY, CASH POOL SUNDAY, BURGS & DAWGS AND BLUE LIGHT SPECIALS Looking in the mirror and seeing someone you don’t recognize? Older and wiser, perhaps, but there’s something else, too, that you’re just beginning to understand. Your image reflects your mind. Fill these days with new and fascinating ideas. MONDAY, SEPT. 23, ‘FULL MOON MADNESS’ FROM 8PM WITH TEXAS Cancer Brothers and sisters can best help you work out the problems you’re faced with. You’re reaching out for acceptance; if you didn’t want it so much, things might be a lot easier, but RIDERS GUEST BARTENDERS certainly a lot less interesting. Be able to reach in for acceptance. Leo WEDNESDAY BARECHEST NIGHT THURSDAY SKATE NIGHT FRIDAY, SEPT. 27, ‘UNIFORM PARTY’—VN COMING UP: FRIDAY, SEPT. 27, ‘UNIFORM PARTY’—VN SEPT. 29—NAT’L COMING OUT DAY AT DIVERSE WORKS OCT. 11TH WEEKEND—OKTOBERFEST AT VENTURE-N OCT. 18—SHADES OF GRAY PARTY ON POLK STREET OCT. 19—WIGS ON FIRE AT HEIGHTS THEATER OCT. 20—THE GRAY PARTY AT DV8 OCT. 26—THE FANTASY BALL AT MAGNOLIA BALLROOM OCT. 27—A NIGHT OF MAGIC AT METRO MAJESTIC OCT. 31— FREAKERS’ BALL AT VENTURE-N NEVER A COVER. UNLIMITED PRIVATE PARKING ACROSS THE STREET AND ALWAYS GOOD VIBES . . . LANCERS M.C. HOUSTON NATIONAL ASSOCIATION HOUSTON COMMERCIAL MEMBER What belongs to you and what belongs to another may come into question. Do not get involved in any kind of legal entanglement. Let your quarrel remain a personal matter, and treat the situation fairly. Selfishness ain’t gonna get you nowhere with this one. Virgo If you’re not a student, you should be. If you’re not involved in some concrete application of what you know, you’re missing the boat. Don’t be lazy with your intelligence. Tap in on your mental resources and use them. Be smart. Libra It is possible that recently you have experienced some sort of psychic phemomena. Although it may be exciting, be careful not to confuse coincidence with the supernatural. Have fun with your experiences but don’t allow them to control your ability to make wise decisions. Scorpio The mystery that was inherent in this new relationship is now unfolding, and you may have figured out what it is. You’re discovering things this time that you once only dreamed to be possible. Into the mystic and all that it entails. Sagittarius Direction continues to be the key word in your life. You want to know where you’re going. You want to direct the progress of your life and not be at the mercy of whatever turns you on. There’s a sense of purposefulness to you that’s sensible and appealing. Capricorn Making things right with your “significant other” may not be as easy as you thought. It looks like this is a process that’s going to take some time and outside help—a trusted friend perhaps. Look to the larger and long-run picture. Aquarius Deeper questions of existence occupy your mind. You feel cleansed with the fire of passion, and your mind is clear now. You observe, as if an outsider, the wonderful world you live in. With your new-found love, you’ll discover more and have more questions. Pisces A woman whom you trust and admire could be the guide that leads you out of the confused funk you've been in lately. Pay attention to what she says and does. Be as receptive as she is, so that you can prowl and growl once again. 16 THE NEW VOICE / SEPTEMBER 20-26, 1991 New Orleans Greater French Quarter <CANAL - ELDS Tortilla Flatsp Central Austin Zlamar SAN -JACINTO Fifteenth GUADALUPE1 S.FIRST Central San Antonio B. J. SOMMERS PATSY CLINE SANDRA DARLENE <McCULLOUGH BB'sb <SAN PEDRO <EREDRICKSBURG ar MCCUL .OUGH ST.MARYS AVARRO/ nham .Exchange <alamo ST, I.- 35 & I -io> BENEFITING THE COLT 45*s STONE SOUP FUND COME EARLY FOR STEAK-N-TATER AT 5 PM TUESDAY PIZZA PARTY 6 PM HORS D’OEUVRES BUFFET AT 6 PM 2303 RICHMOND 520-1861 /SUGAR KANE TOMMY’’ NEXT FRIDAY 9/27 JOIN JAMES PREUSS FOR THE OPENING OF HIS NEW COLLECTION OF ART WORKS. MONDAY MALE STRIP WITH MAUDE AT 10:30 off Broadway PERSHJNG WET JOCKEYS CONTEST 1O PM WEDNESDAY WITH MAUDE Here are some of our favorite places CLUB BODY CENTER Houston 2205 FANNIN (713) 659-4998 2 015B PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS PLEASE call us with any corrections at the phone number listed for your city on the front page of The New Voice. Thank you. =MAIN ASIB THIS SUNDAY 8:00 P.M. TURNABOUT DRAG SHOW FEATURING THE GENTRY STAFF ■Noo Zoo COACHLIGHT Memories. LOOP 410 HILDEBRAND ' ■Circle J New PdndarosaB^Las Gueras NO COVER HOUSTON FLORES ■El J din RED RIVE MARTI AVACA ■W1 esternair $&ROOK <1-10 out Time CALL) GHA —clna st <ESPLANADE ♦i. RAMPART BURGUNDY '' .. • .} *7 • •• Fdlf€ ndalezs Corner Pocket! V At ,w <awh rde DAUPHINE . - ’ Bourbc IIS n Pu a ■ rade Jood ■ Fri ■Laf =nds . itte's , BOURBON •. ‘ * ? •*> '• : • ROYAL Go iden Lanterns . ■ ST LOUIS1 T0 CHARTRES House> . . PETER> • " • ’*z.’* ’* V j ; - *• * * .< DECATUR ' . ■ ■ T.ANN*. & IMAINE* .ST 1 •H I L I P> ■Miss. River I Jewel s» ■ ■*: Iptt ’he SEPTEMBER 20-26,1991 / THE NEW VOICE 17 SPECIALS: Monday—Beer Bust; Bpm-11 pm. All domestic longnecks $1 .OO Tuesday—Well Specials. Any well drink mixed the way you like it. Wednesday—Schnapps Bpm-1*1 pm. 75<f all shots of schnapps. Open daily Bam Sunday Noon 3O2TUAM(1 block west of Bagby] Houston 522-9493 Illustration: David Lozano gOTTSTOl Coming Sunday, Sept. 29 The TGRA Candidates present A Casino Hight & Variety Show 3pm A MAH’S Country Bar!! 2400 Brazos 528-9192 Friday, Sept. 20 Little Bit of Texas 9:30pm * * * Sunday, Sept. 22 Yogi Baird A the Texas Cajuns tens Presents: L Friday, Sept. 20 Viols Wills performing her hits0 "If You Could Peed My Mind." ° "Stormy Weether"0 "Up on the Poof "end more "High Energy" hits! with PPG (Prompt Performance Guarantee, 50* well drinks till showtime) Tuesday Nights ate Steak Nights 6pm: *4.75 for 10 oz. sirloin strip with poteto end seled her ££ ££ £££$£ ££J$£ ££ ;{brazos rx £■£i Is$ ££$£J $ 523-0 23 18 THE NEW VOICE / SEPTEMBER 20-26,1991 "New- O'deatvi. "in the tep coanea irnaqe pjuhoqiwm/ "I$G4ViJm341 & t / <t,^rr name at the bottom jo^i only $15. Mail Mjdea ix leonaMl £a/d jokaiion, PO Paa. 72002, New- O'deani, 2A 70172 title 'doaolnn^iaeet #13" andtheaatuil Name: AddneU: Qiitf, itate, yip: 1022 WESTHEIMER 527'9669 HOUSTON The Tradition Lives On ... Naturally Home of Sundance Cattle Company Where the Bartenders Come to Party Slop Shot Pool Tourney Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:30am Burgers & BBQ on the Patio Thursdays noon-3pm Boot Black by Chris Friday Nights 6-12 Sunday Afternoon 1-6 Steak Night Sunday 5pm Steak and all the Fixin’s HAPPY HOURS Morning: 7am-Noon Afternoon: 5-9pm POOL TOURNAMENTS 11:30AM MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS, FRIDAYS AFTER HOURS Friday & Saturday 2am-? with coffee, juices, sodas SUNDANCE CATTLE COMPANY HOUSTON,TEXAS The New Voice recommends in Houston ... •FRIDAY, SEPT. 20 $1.50 vodka 7am-noon, slop shot pool tourney 11:30am, Mary’s Hors d’oeuvres 6pm, Gentry Gents dancers 10pm, Gentry “Taggots” upstairs 9pm, “Back Twos Cool” autumnal equinox party, Venture-N Piano bar 9pm-1am, Charlie’s Viola Wills live, Miss Kitty’s Little Bit of Texas Band 9:30pm, BRB Muscles in Action dancers, Montrose Mining Co. All Male Revue 11pm, MC Rainbo de Klown, E/J’s After-hours Mary’s, Ripcord, Club Body Center •SATURDAY, SEPT. 21 Mug club 9am-noon, E/J’s Theme party with Rita noon-8pm, Gentry Beer bust 1-6pm, Mary’s Poolside BBQ 1-3pm, Club Body Center Well drinks $1.25 4-7pm, Mug Club 4-10pm, E/J’s Cash pool tourney 5pm, Venture-N Torn Levi Party, Montrose Mining Co. 9-ball tourney 8pm, Past Time Piano bar 9pm-1am, Charlie’s Gentry Gents dancers 10pm, Gentry Super Saturday Show 11pm, E/J’s After-hours Mary’s, Ripcord, Club Body Center •SUNDAY, SEPT. 22 $3.00 pitchers, $1 mugs all day, E/J’s Poolside BBQ 1-3pm, Club Body Center Beer bust on patio 1-6pm, steak night 5pm, Mary’s Beer bust from 4pm, Montrose Mine Leather day on the patio, Mary’s Reception for artist Larry Crawford 4pm, Burgs & Dawgs 5pm, blue light specials, Venture-N . Pool tourney 5pm, steak-n-taters 6pm, Turnabout Drag Show 8pm, Gentry Steak night from 5pm, then Yogi Baird & the Texas Cajuns, BRB Cash & prizes 11pm, E/J’s Piano bar 9pm-1am, Charlie’s Super Show 10pm, Miss Kitty’s After-hours Club Body Center •MONDAY, SEPT. 23 Slop shot pool tourney 11:30am, Mary’s Beer bust 6pm-11pm, Oasis “Brief Encounters” strip contest 10:30pm, MC Maude, Gentry Half price admission with Stone Soup donation, Midtowne Spa Full Moon Madness, Montrose Mining Co. Full Moon Madness with Texas Riders 8pm, Venture-N Live concert by Nevada 11pm, E/J’s After-hours Club Body Center •TUESDAY, SEPT. 24 Half price lockers 6am-6pm, Midtowne Spa SEPTEMBER 20-26,1991 / THE NEW VOICE 19 News & Video Looking for that hard-to-find movie? We’ll get it for you!! 2517 Ralph at Westheimer 527-9071 MONDAY TUESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY All New! * WEDNESDAY Showtime 11pm ☆ ☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ COMMCRCIAL MEMBER $1.50 well & longnecks 4-8pm, Montrose Mining Co. Pizza Party with Rita Boulevard 6pm, Gentry Well special 6pm-11pm, Oasis Steak night 6pm, Miss Kitty’s C&W dance lessons, 10pm BRB Muscles in Action dancers, Montrose Mining Co. Talent contest 10:30pm, MC Giovanni, E/J’s After-hours Club Body Center The New Voice recommends in San Antonio ... •FRIDAY, SEPT. 20 504 draft all the time, Pump House Free buffet 4-7pm, Rosario’s Buffet, Stallion Dance 9pm, strippers 11pm, no cover to 1am, after hours, Wild Club Female strippers 11pm, New Ponderosa Male strippers 11pm, Club Stephanie’s Friday night specials, free breakfast tacos 12:30-1:30am, Memories Dancing, dash for cash midnight, Las Gueras Rosario’s serves Mexican food to 2am •SATURDAY, SEPT. 21 504 draft all the time, Pump House Wild West Night 9pm, “High Lonesome” concert, after hours with male dancers, Wild Club Brittany Paige & Co. 10:30 pm SPECIAL GUESTS Erica Lane Derrick Victoria Denea For Those Who Like the Best MAJOR CREDIT CARDS & PERSONAL CHECKS WELCOME •WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 25 $1.50 vodka 7am-noon, slop shot pool tourney 11:30am, Mary’s $1.50 well & longnecks 4-8pm, Montrose Mining Co. 754 schnapps 6pm-11pm, Oasis Wet Jockeys Contest 10pm, MC Maude, Gentry Steak night 6pm, talent show with Lee Chardon 10:30pm, E/J’s Bare Chest Night, Venture-N After-hours Club Body Center •THURSDAY, SEPT. 26 Half price lockers 6am-6pm, Midtowne Spa Burgers & BBQ noon-3pm, Mary’s Room & locker specials noon-midnight, Club Body Center $1.50 well & longnecks 4-8pm, Montrose Mining Co. 504 hamburgers 6pm, dance lessons 7:30pm, BRB Dart tourney 8pm, Past Time Skate Night Special, Venture-N Video classics 9pm, Gentry Piano bar 9pm-1am, Charlie’s Brittany Paige & Co. show 10:30pm, E/J’s After-hours Club Body Center •FRIDAY, SEPT. 27 Slop shot pool tourney 11:30am, Mary’s $1.50 well & longnecks 4-8pm, Montrose Mining Co. Artist James Preuss art works opening with hors d’oeuvres 6pm, Gentry Gents 10pm, Gentry Movie and pizza night 7pm, Midtowne Spa “Taggots" upstairs 8pm, Uniform Party downstairs, Venture-N Piano bar 9pm-1am, Charlie’s Muscles in Action dancers, Montrose Mining Co. Male review 11pm, E/J's After-hours Mary’s, Ripcord, Club Body Center •LATER TGRA candidates Casino Night & Variety Show 3pm Sept. 29, BRB Nat. Gay/Lesbian Band Concert, Jones Hall, Sept. 29 Octoberfest Oct. 11-13, Venture-N Wigs on Fire, Oct. 19, Heights Theater Gray Party, Oct. 20 Fantasy Ball, Oct. 26. Magnolia Ballroom Night of Magic, Oct. 27, Metro Majestic Freakers’ Ball, Oct. 31, Venture-N We list here events being staged by our advertisers. To advertise in The New Voice, call (713) 529-8490. Male Review 11 pm WITH Anthony, Mitch, Nester Steak Night 6 pm then at 10:30 Talent Night II Cash Prize & Show Booking MC Lee Chardon • Hot New Movies for Sale & Rent • Magazines & Novelties • 10 Private Mini Theatres 4330 Richmond Ave. Houston’s Newest in Adult Entertainment 24 Hours a Day • Happy Hour 7am-9pm weekdays • $1.50 Vodka 7am-6pm • $1.50 Well 4-7pm Saturday • Mug Club 7am-10pm Talent Night 10:30 pm Cash Prize MC Giovanni Live In Concert OPENING SOON Fondren News & Video 2841 Fondren CUSTOMER APPRECIATION NIGHTS Sunday, Monday & Tuesday, midnite-8am, 1 free “Wet Lube’ with theater purchase (for limited time) with the Vocal Talents of NEVADA CRAZY SUNDAYS $3 Pitchers & $1 Mugs All Day/AII Night with Cash and Prizes 11 pm till ? Looking for Fun Labor Day Weekend? Richmond SUPER SATURDAY SHOW Mr. & Miss E/J’s 1991 Lee Chardon & B.J. Williams and very special guests Jill Jordan, Christen Conture and Miss Montrose 1991 “Ms. Arispe” “SAFEST PLACE TO MEET MEN" Open 24 Hours a Day—Every Day Heated Indoor Pool 10-Man Jacuzzi • Nude Sundeck Weight Room Private Rooms with Adult Videos Friendly Staff Secured Parking 522-2379 3100 FANNIN HOUSTON Mondays—1/2 price admission with Stone Soup donation Tues. & Thurs.—1/2 price lockers 6am-6pm Fridays—Movie & Pizza Night begins 7pm Free HIV screenings 3rd Friday of each month Tours 7am-5pm daily, ask for Larry 6 IO 20 THE NEW VOICE / SEPTEMBER 20-26,1991 Houston’s Inner Montrose <VAUGH ■611 Hyde ?ae?*■ MMiss Kitty CQMMOHWEALTH: ' ’he lAtriiim Bacchus Charli|e's <wi»roso« <RALPH ■E./.J ' s ■Ld yoakum> <MONTRQSt BLVD. WESTHEIMER iPbt P16 Cc us in sb • •feast T ime Kipcord Mother^ii LOVETT C R'e/Sar! ' MISSU RI HYDE PARK ' ■ Park Pub ■Montrose Min Lng pacific- : •Street sta. AVONDAL: I New Voi.ceB . <GRAHT’ '< ■QT's FAIRVI WESTHEI^ER/ELGIN Houston’s Greater Montrose Liquor rush 7-11pm, male strippers 11pm, Club Stephanie’s Rosario’s serves Mexican food to 2am •SUNDAY, SEPT. 22 50C draft all the time, Denise’s Buck Burgers, Pump House $1 Beer noon-2am, Club Basse West Free pool tourney, Ab’s Westernaire Liquor Rush 8-11pm, male dancers 11pm, no cover, Wild Club No cover after 11pm, Bonham Exchange Male strippers 11pm, Club Stephanie’s Female strippers 11:30pm, Las Gueras •MONDAY, SEPT. 23 50C draft all the time, Denise’s Steak Night, Pump House Social Hour all day. all night, doubles pool tourney 8pm, Ab’s Westernaire Mad Money Mondays, Wild Club Talent Night, Bonham Exchange Free pool, 754 draft, Club Stephanie’s Free pool, 25C draft to 11pm, Stallion •TUESDAY, SEPT. 24 10<C draft, $1 longnecks, Las Gueras Social Hour all day, all night, Ab’s Westernaire Beer bust, buffet, Stallion Wild Wheel drink specials, Wild Club Steak night 6-9pm, Memories •WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 25 50C draft all the time. Pump House 10C draft, $1 longnecks, Las Gueras Free pool tourney, Ab’s Westernaire Beer bust, buffet, Stallion Male strippers 11pm, Wild Club Rosario’s serves Mexican food to 2am •THURSDAY, SEPT. 26 50C draft all the time, Pump House 254 draft, Las Gueras Free pool, Stallion River City Pool League, Ab’s Westernaire $1.25 drinks 8-11pm, no cover after 11 pm, “Stud Night" amateur strip off 11pm, Bonham Exchange Amateur strip, Wild Club Rosario’s serves Mexican food to 2am •FRIDAY, SEPT. 27 504 draft all the time, Pump House Free buffet 4-7pm, Rosario’s Buffet, Stallion Dance 9pm, strippers 11pm, no cover to 1am, after hours, Wild Club Female strippers 11pm, New Ponderosa Male strippers 11pm, Club Stephanie’s Friday night specials, free breakfast tacos 12:30-1:30am, Memories Dancing, dash for cash midnight, Las Gueras Rosario’s serves Mexican food to 2am •SATURDAY, SEPT. 28 504 draft all the time, Pump House Buffet, Stallion Austin THE PER­SONALS 2220 (INDIVID­UAL) Personals SEEKING VALUE FOR VALUE Genuine GWM, College Station/Brenham area, early 40s, youthful, pro­fessional, romantic, successful, with healthy mind, body, spirit. In­terests: country living, antiques, old houses, flea markets, garden­ing- vegetable and flower, fine arts, travel, outdoors and old mov­ies. Seeking friendship, possible relationship, with masculine guy who may share some interests and who is honest, outgoing, non-promiscuous, intelli­gent, tender & eager lover, expressive, stable emotionally, responsi­ble & country for bal­anced love equation. AD 25158 VERY HEAVY SET GUY SEEKS FRIENDS and more to share lots of interests. Although big in size, I am health-y, neat, energetic, and my clothes fit. I am GWM, 28, clean shaven and only lightly hairy. Love to dance, do the malls, travel, watch ten­nis, etc. To find out everything, listen to my ad in Voice Mail. AD 25912. Houston EM­PLOYMENT AVAILABLE 650 GENERAL HELP WANTED Charlie's Coffee Shop now taking applica­tions. Apply in person. 1100 Westheimer Drivers and Maids needed immediately. 680-9543_____________ Legal clerk/ secretary, computer and word processing skill re­quired. 521-0867. Mr. Stanley. Midtowne Spa seeking maintenance person. Mon - Fri (30 hrs per week) Must have refer­ences and experience in general maintenance, plumbing, electrical and PVC work. No phone calls. Apply in person only SAT 10am. 3100 Fannin. Montrose Area Book­store now accepting applications for a full-time clerk. If you’re honest, personable and need a job. Call 528- 1363 Weekdays from 9am - 3pm. Young man wanted for Assistant Housekeeper in stable home. Room, board, salary. Write Oc­cupant, P.O. Box 606058, Cleveland Ohio 44106. A SALES PER­SON’S DREAM Looking for persons in­volved or previously in­volved with multi-level marketing. Ground floor opportunity with Japanese Health Care Company now entering U.S. market. Call 524- 3620. Houston IN­STRUC­TIONS 754 MUSIC PIANO/ VOICE LESSONS Beginners or advanced. Teacher has degrees and national certifica­tion. 723-3254. Houston MERCHAN­DISE 1003 ANTIQUES 1948 Sears Wire Re­corder. Also has 78 phono & radio. All in one table top walnut case. Works! With origi­nal wire spools and mi­crophone. $175 or best offer. Robert 529-5245 after 6:30 pm. Houston MERCHAN­DISE 1010 BOOKS LOBO See our display ad on page 2 of the Main News section RICHMOND NEWS & VIDEO Videos, magazines & more. See our display ad in this weeks Voice. Houston MERCHAN­DISE 1056 NEWSPA­PERS, MAGA­ZINES ADULT MAGAZINES 1/ 2 price and less 270- 9787 Houston MERCHAN­DISE 1060 PLANTS AMAZING PORT­ABLE HYDROPONIC GARDENS Grow most anything year 'round. $75.00 ea or 2 for $100.00. 270- 9787 or 777-9787 Houston MERCHAN­DISE 1088 VIDEO LOBO See our display ad on page 2 of the Main News section Houston RENTALS 1405 APART­MENTS_______ Houston, MONTROSE, 1/ 1 from $320. + bills, $150. deposit. Free ba­sic cable, skylights, pool, access gates and covered parking. Westmoreland Square, 219 Marshall (713) 528- 5218 GARAGE APT. 1 bedroom garage apt. Many windows. Porch. $275+ w/ dep. West Gray @ Taft. Larry 522- 2478. Houston RENTALS 1440 TOWNHOMES & CONDOS____ Montrose: completely furnished luxury 1 bed­room townhouse, pool/ patio. Bills paid. No pets. References/ de­posit. $500 528-0037 MONTROSE: Com­pletely furnished luxury 1 bedroom Townhouse. No Pets. References. Deposit. 528-0037 Houston RENTALS 1460 ROOM­MATES WANT­ED Wanted - Room to rent in Montrose (private home or small apt) GBM, 29, quiet and em­ployed. Seeking room­mate. Considerate. 522- 3067 Larry_______ _ NEAR MONTROSE GWM to share 2/ 1 close to Montrose. $240 utilities included - de­posit required. 528-5196 Houston NO­TICES 1740 NON­PROFIT AN­NOUNCE­MENTS MARIA, PLEASE CONTACT THE FUTURE GAY PARENTS NET­WORK Maria, the Future Gay Parents Network re­ceived your letter. We would really like to meet you, but you did not give your address or phone number. Please write us again! Respond to AD 25921. We look forward to hearing from you! Houston SERVICES 2123 CON­STRUCTION & REPAIR Home repairs, roof leak specialist. Bill 668-0991 Houston SERVICES 2189.4 RECY­CLING SERVIC­ES MICHAEL’S EX­PRESS COMPA­NY 680-9543 Houston SERVICES 2140 LAWN CARE, LAND­SCAPING BETTER LAWNS & GARDENS Please see our display ad in the main news section of The New Voice Houston SERVICES 2145 MASSAGE (LICENSED) Ads in this category (massage) are intended to be from licensed masseurs and mas­seuses. Advertisers: please include your li­cense number in the ad Great non-sexual mas­sage, extraordinarily ef­fective. Holistic, caring. John Aldridge (MT# 0638) (713) 522-3197 Tense? In pain? Call Mike for relief. (MT# 3876) 439-1825 Therapeutic Swedish Massage. Relieves stress and tension. I re­proves circulation. Of­fice at 290/ Antoine or will travel to your home or office. JODY (MT# 3005) (713) 591-8940 Houston SERVICES 2155 MEDICAL CARE STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D., 3400 Montrose Blvd., suite 200, 521- 9444 Houston SERVICES 2160 MOVERS AMERICAN MOV­ERS Professional moving service for your fine furniture: Our 7th year in business. AMEX Wel­come 522-1717 Houston SERVICES 2180 PICTURE FRAMING PICTURE FRAM­ING From chic to traditional, AROUND ART CUS­TOM FRAMING fills all your picture and poster display needs. Person­alized service. 1304 Willard 523-3755 Houston SERVICES 2184 POSTAL BOXES P.O. Boxes Plus, 3729- B W. Alabama, Hous­ton, Tx. 77027. (713) 961-4020 Houston THE PER­SONALS 2220 (INDIVIDU­AL) PERSON­ALS 38, GWF outgoing, friendly, attractive. Looking for GWF with similar interests for friendship and more with right individual. I enjoy sailing, wind surfing, golf, camping and photography, i like eating out and movie going. NO DRUGS, smokers or heavy drinkers. AD 25201 All ads in this category should be strictly indi­vidual to individual. No commercial offerings. Nothing for sale. No promotions. Nothing to give away Almost 40 GWF seeks GF for friendship and/ or romance. I am a real homebody and enjoy gardening and love ani­mals. I like eating out occasionally, going to movies, baseball games and spending time with my friends. I drink very little and don't smoke, do drugs or casual sex. I would like to meet someone with similar interests but I’m open to sharing new experi­ences with someone SEPTEMBER 20-26, 1991 / THE NEW VOICE 21 LIVING ON THE Choose your category... get the low-down on those who interest you plus private phone numbers for FAST direct Contact! $1.69 per minute • Callers must be 18 or over LIVE OPERATOR ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE FOR ROTARY CALLERS PHOM Zon«, 322 Mill Bird, #I66. Monrowllli, Pk 15146 ALL-MALE VIDEO STAR JEFF STRYKER HOTLINE Behind the scenes and under the covers 1-900-884-6664 $2/min. • Adults Only • Touchtone Req. JHP, 15127 Califa St., Van Nuy$, CA 91411 LIVE One-on-One Get advice os almost ANY topic from your professional psychic 1-900-370-4377 <2.95 per mln. REALLY CHEAP . UNCENSORED 'gay or lesbian ► XXX < Phone Fantasies EASY PAY... 412-243*1170 CREDIT CARD... 303-595*0051 special. Photo would be nice but not essential. Reply with phone # to Box 25177. Attractive GBM, 6’3, slim build, 34, mascu­line, very well equipped, would like to meet GWM, ages 30-45 for romantic sensual passionate discreet en­counters. Natural men a plus, versatility and safe-fun a must. Re­turnable photo appreci­ated. Ad 25888 Creative Pisces, attrac­tive GWM, 5’11", 165 lbs., forty-something, in good shape, mentally and physically. My in­terests run the gamut. Fantasy/ security, inde­pendence/ support, laughter/ tears. Desires attractive GWM, 28-45, mature, but capable of boyish charm, to ex­plore and cherish the wonders of living and loving. Reply with phone # , photo a must! to Ad 25093 Dringend ersucht! Junger Bursch—schon, schmachtig, und erhaben—von einem alteren Herrn mit Genuss und Verstand, der will-grundlich-deutsch lernen. AD 25923. For the best in laid-back, hassle-free French service, write to this 6’1". 173#, br/ br, gdlkng, 39 y.o. GWM. Ad 25133____________ Former college ball player dark hair, hazel eyes, 5'8, weight pro­portionate to size, 24 year old, GWM, fairly new to city, looking for friendship & possible relationship. College degreed, law student, and statistical consult­ant. I like sports, espe­cially football, movies, suspense and work. Looks are no major fac­tor by NO DRUGS. Write or leave Voice Message. AD 25906 GM couple, early 30s, for hot and wild safe sex 3 ways. Looking for GM 18 to early 30s, masculine looks and manners, weight in pro­portion to height. Please respond with photo & phone. Ad 25109 _____________ Grn/Brn/Olv Hispanic. Euro/Medit looks, 33, 5’10", 160. healthy, fit, masculine, sensitive, fun-loving, traditional values. Seeks consort with Caucasian, 40-, proportioned frame, chest hair a plus (not required), similar dispo sition, smoke/chem. free, knows/able to exe cute relationship's es­sentials. likes outdoor activities, sports, music arts, life's simple pleas­ures. Ad 25128 say so. Win a bonus if you’re: intelligent, ener­getic, attractive, sensu­ous, have warm smile and good sense of hu­mor. AD 25213. CONNECTION OF A DEEPER KIND! You are GM, slender to medium build, slightly introverted; you find enjoyable times with GM in early 50’s, good shape physically, men­tally. emotionally, spiri­tually. Bonding at a lev­el of personal growth and mutual support is important. Call or write AD 25917 COUNTRY BOY FROM KENTUCK-Y GWM. 44. 6’, 185, brown curly hair, hazel eyes, masculine, attrac­tive. open minded, have many interests, seeks bottom but can be ver­satile. Looking for close friendship. Someone caring, honest, sincere, 25-45, Letter w/ photo and phone gets reply. AD 25229. CUTE ROMANTIC SOFT BUTCH GWF, 40+, professional, sensitive and honest with a great sense of humor. I don't smoke, drink or do drugs. I en­joy the bar scene on occasion and have var­ied interests from grand GWF - Attractive Blonde (30's) looking for sensual pleasures without relationship. Can be very creative. AD 25814 opera to camping. Am seeking women with similar interests for friendship but will not close the door to possi ble relationship. AD 25225 GWF, 33, seeks GWF, 30-40, for a serious friendship/ lover and doesn't play mind games. I enjoy sports, dancing, quiet times and romance. No heav; drinking or drugs please. If you're seriou about life and relation­ships please write. Pho to is appreciated. I'm stable and know what1 want out of life; hope you do too. AD 25205. ATTENTION BI-~ DARE TO DARE 28. 6'. 195, blk/ green/ brown eyes. Intelligent, well educated, attrac­tive. financially secure professional. I like to run, bike, read and dance. A gourmet cook. I also volunteer with PWAs. I'm healthy, non drug and/ or smoker. Seeking GWM 20-30 with similar taste. Sound to good to be true? You'll never know unless ... AD 25247. SEXUAL AND STRAIGHT MEN Fr. active master plumber. Will work on you faucet. BYOP. AD 25233 ATTENTION PER SONAL ADVER­TISERS Have you recorded your personal ad? There's NO CHARGE 1 get your personal ad recorded in your actus voice. Call The New Voice at 529-8490 and get your password. Even if don't record DISCRIMINA­TION, PROFESSION Bl BOTTOM New to the bi scene, very good looking, late 40's, 6'0. 175#. No facial hair. Fun loving person­ality. enjoys parties, rubdowns, fishing trips, travel or just watching T.V. Casual and relaxed guy, looking for the same qualities in attrac­tive. discreet tops AD 25902______________ _ DO IT ALL AND ENJOY IT! GWM HIV-, mid 40's. your personal, you ma still have verbal re­sponses waiting to be retrieved. But you'll need your 4-digit pass word to get them CHUBBY SEEKS CHASER GWM, 50, 6'. 300+. blonde/ blue, HIV-, vei satile, honest, sincere, romantic, no drugs
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