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Montrose Voice, No. 294, June 13, 1986
File 018
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Montrose Voice, No. 294, June 13, 1986 - File 018. 1986-06-13. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1379/show/1367.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-06-13). Montrose Voice, No. 294, June 13, 1986 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1379/show/1367

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 294, June 13, 1986 - File 018, 1986-06-13, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1379/show/1367.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 294, June 13, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Claude, Ken
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 13, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript JUNE 13, 1986/MONTROSE VOICE 17 Here They Are, 'Best of the Year' By Bill O'Rourke Montroae Voice Theater Critic Welcome to the prestigious second annual Bill O'Rourke's Best ofthe Year Awards. "If the critics were always right we should be in deep trouble."— Robert Morley. The final say in this column belongs to one fallible man. This season, however, richly deserves a look back. This is a time-honored way to do it. My pick for Best Musical this year is Pacific Overtures (Stages). The other nominees: Company (Main Street), Guys and Dolls, and Carousel (both at TUTS), and Doones bury (Stages). The revue sensation of the year was A ... My Name is Alice (at the Alley). Not only did it get extended extensively here, it also had good luck in San Francisco. Also: Risky Business and non-musical revues at Radio Music Theatre and the Comedy Workshop. "There has been a dearth of really sparkling bright comedies this year. We need more."—Me, last year's B.O.T.Y. column, 5/21/85, VOICE. Well, it's been a bit better this year. But I still think we need more successful comedies. This year's Best Comedy, The Foreigner (Alley), is still playing. Also: The Ladies at the Alamo Bootie and Bev discuss their lives in Ellen Byron's "Graceland," Stages, thru June 22 (Theater Suburbia), Isn'. It Romantic? (Stages), Painting Churches (Alley) and Twelfth Night (Main Street). The competition among dramas was so intense that I'm declaring a tie between Marat/Sade (Main Street) and Balm in Gilead (Alley). Also: Under Heaven's Eye till Cockcrow (Ensemble), Traveller in the Dark (Stages), Orphans and Execu tion of Justice (both Alley). The Best One-Person Show was A Woman of Independent Means starring Barbara Rush at the Heinen. There are two directors, each of whom has one winner and one nominee to his credit: George Anderson and Ted Swindley. George has a lively, witty hand at drama (Balm and Orphans). Ted has curbed some of his past excesses and let his strong point—simple human emotions—shine through again (Traveller and Overtures). And now for a word from our sponsor: The Tap Dance Kid had a lot of things going for it opening night— four show-stopping numbers, men tap dancing in roller skates, women tapping en pointe and a reviewer in the third row who thought it was gonna be in town two weeks, among other things. (Wrong. Just one. When am I gonna learn?) All's for the best. I would have told you not to miss it. You might have listened to me. More money would have left the local economy headed northeast. Shakespeare's Twelfth Night Franny, The Queen of Provincetown, Kindred Spirits, June 24th The acting awards are given for bodies of work, not single performances. Houston's theater scene is based upon short runs in repertory theaters. There is no theater an independent producer could rent for an open-ended run. (Well, maybe the Tower.) Since I cannot recommend with these awards that you go see a specific role, I recommend names whose consistently fine work should help convince you to buy a ticket to whatever they are in. Since I want the actors to become as important as the producers, I reward those who act in more than one theater. Since this should be a lucrative business, not just an art, I give the nod to those working in theaters where pay is nominally available. To spread the "glory," no one can win the same category two years in a row. If you look hard, you'll see where I've bent these rules a little. Musical Actress of the Year has got to be Janet Williams Adderly (A .... Kiss Me Kate). That's by reader acclamation as well as my own. Also: Marsha Calton, Carrie Woliver and Debby Boiley. Musical Actor Jerry Miller played the samurai's wife in the basically all-male Pacific Overtures, as well as Zonker in Doonesbury. also: Randy Jobe. Generally, the same talented peole do both drama and comedy. Actor of the Year Kent Johnson started off the season as a person with AIDS in One (The Group). Then went to Main Street in Twelfth Night and as a haunting, gaunt Marat in Marat, Sade. Then, though less successfully, he did Roland Hedley in Doonesbury. What a great variety of superb work by a fine actor! And of all this year's winners he most perfectly embodies what I'm looking for in my rules. So does James Black, but he won last year. Harry Brewer, Charles Krohn and Jeff Bennett stay with their home theaters. Jeff, now firmly established, was Best Adult Newcomer last year. Can I pick them, or what? Actress of the year Vicki Luman stayed put, too, but her roles ranged widely. They varied from courtly (Twelfth Night) to frighteningly vacant (Marat/Sade) to hilariously spaced out on grass (Company). Jean Proctor wasn't afraid to fail (Learned Ladies) and that courage brought her excellent performances in Isn't It Romantic?, Sister Mary Ignatius, and the latest Talley play. Chutzpah of the Year goes to Stages Theater. In March they sent out a bevy of letters. Mine said that they finally acknowledged that they owed me for three months of work I did for them January— March '83 and would be ready to pay me in May '87. Unless, of course, I wanted to donate all or part of that money to help them meet a matching grant. If they didn't hear from me within a month, they'd assume I wanted to donate all of it to them. Or maybe they win it for telling me in early December that I could automatically become a member of their auxiliary company, that there was no limit to the number of people who would be in it. Then in January they told me that they had had to limit the number of people in that company and that I wasn't one of about 40 chosen. Of course, I could still try out any Monday for acceptance to that group. Was it full or wasn't it? Was I expected to remember this slight and turn Rex Reed on their next efforts? Of course not. Or perhaps I should win the chutzpah award myself for even mentioning their high-handedness in print. Newcomber of the Year: Trent Tellepson (Travellerin theDark)for his amazingly mature, realistic pro- trayl. although Josh Goldberg's scene-stealing shenanigans in Member of the Wedding were awfully cute.
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