Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 294, June 13, 1986
File 007
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 294, June 13, 1986 - File 007. 1986-06-13. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1379/show/1356.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-06-13). Montrose Voice, No. 294, June 13, 1986 - File 007. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1379/show/1356

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 294, June 13, 1986 - File 007, 1986-06-13, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1379/show/1356.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 294, June 13, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Claude, Ken
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 13, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript 6 MONTROSE VOICE/JUNE 13, 1986 ^n_M emortam BRANDON ZAHN In Loving Memory of Brandon J Zahn October 26. 1954—June 13, 1985 It has been a year since Brandon departed the earth and he is still mourned and missed by family and friends But at least it is easier now to smile and even laugh at the countless memories he left behind May we all be so fortunate. ROBERT JASON LATIMER Robert Jasen Latimer entered into eternal rest following an automobile accident on Friday, June 6, 1986. at the age of 21. A native of New York. Robert lived in Houston for 8 years On Monday, June 1. Robert left Houston to embark on a world tour. Those of us who knew him will miss his travel and nightclub reviews. Many people will remember his sense of humor and kind words for all His life will serve as an enduring example of how much can be accomplished with a constructive and positive approach to life's challenges. He will remain in our hearts and our minds as he was in life, avital. bright, articulate and witty loving man His exuberance and wisdom deeply enriched the lives of those fortunate to have known him Your actual presence will be deeply missed Robert, but the richness we gained from knowing you will nurture us throughout the remainder of our lives. Rest, dear Robert, until we are together again, our love still lives In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the charity of your choice. —Tyler York JACK LOLLAR Jack Lollar. born April 25. 1964, passed away June 5, 1986 A native of Houston, he graduated from the Kinkaid School and attended Southwestern University in Georgetown. Texas He is survived by his parents, Klinka And John Lollar: sisters, Carolyn and Knsten Lollar; grandparents. Jerry Lollar York of Houston and Mary and Jack Garrett of Danbury; aunts and uncles. Bob Garrett and Jacko and Nancy Garrett of Danbury: Susan and Jim Baker of Washington. D.C, Jerry and Raymond Hill of Houston, and many cousins. A funeral service was held Saturday June 7. at at the Church of St. John the Divine, with the Rev Laurens A, Hall and Father Francis Monahan officiating interment followed at Glenwood Cemetery Pallbearers were to be Bodie and Will Winston, Jacko and Bob Garrett, Raymond and Ben Hill, Mike and Graham Guernro. Bob Rayford, Holly Kinsinger, and Fay Monsen In lieu of other remembrances the family suggests a gift in care of Dr Adam Rios. University of Texas Cancer Center, M.D. Anderson Cancer and Tumor Institute. Department of Clinical Immunology and Biological Therapy. Box 41, 6723 Bertner Ave., Houston. Texas, 77030. Geo H Lewis & Sons, 1010 Bering Drive. 789-3005 OUR POLICY The Monlrose Voice will commemorale me passing ot Montrose residents and Houston gay community members with an announcement Friends or relatives ot the deceased may provide us with lacts about the person's lite, names ol the closest survivors and Burial arrangements Prose or verse can be included Pictures are appreciated and will be rel_rned Name ot the deceased should Be altacned to the photo Information should be provided to the Montrose Voice at the earliest possible date and will be published m the next available edition There is no charge for this service Women with AIDS Disease's Pathway into Heterosexual Population is Slowly Widening Editor's Note: Statistics and interviews with health officials show that AIDS in heterosexual women is of growing concern—to their sexual partners as well as to their children. In New York City, for example, AIDS is the leading killer of women aged 25-29. Though the fatal disease is not easily transmitted sexually, doctors see an AIDS epdemic among non- drug using heterosexuals slowly developing. By Scott Aiges Pacific News Serivce Special to the Montrose Voice Cheryl stares down at her crimson fingernails as she remembers being told she had HTLV-3/LAV, the virus that can lead to AIDS. "You definitely have this virus," she recalls her doctor saying last February. "And I said, 'I'm not going to deal with it. No thank you."' "I don't want to say it out loud because that makes it more real," she says. "What have I ever done in my life so terrible that this should happen to me?" A growing number of women share Cheryl's situation. They caught the virus through heterosexual contact, and public health officials see signs that AIDS, or acquired immune deficiency syndrome, is slowly spreading beyond the established risk groups of homosexual men, intravenous drug abusers, Haitians and hemophiliacs. Although relatively few women have manifested AIDS, which destroys the body's immune system, for every victim there are perhaps 50 to 100 carriers of the HTLV-3/LAV virus, and as many as 50,000 female carriers in New York City alone, states Dr. Charles Rabkin, an epidemiologist with the New York City Department of Health. In New York City AIDS has now replaced cancer as the biggest killer of women aged 25 to 29, according to the city's health department. Cheryl's case illustrates the threat of the disease's spread to heterosexuals. She was infected by sexual contact with her husband, who contracted the virus by using intravenous drugs. Cheryl, who asked that her real name not be used, is 26 years old and black. She has AIDS-related complex (ARC), which means she has tested postivie for the virus. It is not known how many of the estimated 1 to 2 million virus carriers in the United States will develop AIDS. But if Cheryl gets an "opportunistic" disease, that could be her fate. An opportunistic disease, such as Kaposi's sarcoma, takes advantage of the weakened immune sys tem. In this country, the number of women with full-block AIDS remains small compared to men: women account for 1341, or only 6.5 percent of all the 20,531 cases reportd to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta. Most of the those women—63 percent in New York City and 52 percent nationwide—contract the disease by using intravenous drugs with AIDS-tainted needles. But CDC statistics show that the proportion of women who contracted AIDS from heterosexual contact— and not from needles—has jumped from 11.1 percent, or 48 women, in November 1984, to 18.2 percent, or 244 women, in May 1986. Nevertheless, some doctors downplay the assumption that AIDS could spread widely throughout the heterosexual population. "The risk to women is more because of their drug use than because of their sexual practices," says Dr. Stephen Shultz of New York City's health department. In New York City, AIDS has now replaced cancer as the biggest killer of women aged 25 to 29 But other specialists argue that more women will be affected. "We're talking about a sexually transmitted disease," says Dr. Harold Jaffe, chief of the epidemiology branch of the AIDS program at the CDC. "So, in theory, anybody who is sexually active is at risk. But the risk varies depending on the number and type of partners they have." Several ongoing studies, for example, have shown that heterosexual vaginal intercourse is the dominant route of AIDS transmission in central Africa. "Unless the virus is quite different in Africa biologically, there is every reaosn to believe that it's possible the same situation could occur in the United States—men and women being equally affected," says Dr. David Archibald, an AIDS researcher at Harvard. The unraveling of Cheryl's life began when, after two years of marriage, her husband took up using intravenous drugs. He was working around the clock with a construction company and started snorting cocaine to stay awake. "And then he found it worked better if he shot it," Cheryl says. "There are a number of very, very sad instances where a woman had no idea that she had a drug-using boyfriend, and in many respects was an innocent bystander," says Dr. Shultz. 'He was going to work every day," Cheryl says of her husband. "He was bringing home a paycheck every Friday." When her friends told her about her husband's drug problem, "I didn't believe them." But the paychecks began going for drugs and "then he used to beat me up. Here I am this wonderful, faithful wife and look what I get," she says staring at the one window in her tiny apartment. "It's not fair." Cheryl, who said she has not used IV drugs, has separated from her husband, but not before spending six straight months in the hospital this year for AIDS-related treatments. Now, living with the knowledge that she is an AIDS carrier has made Cheryl feel like a pariah in society. "I don't tell anyone. No one. Ever." While female-to-male transmission of AIDS is still rare in this country, a recent survey by the CDC indicates it is possible. Of 57 men with AIDS interviewed, 15 of those would admit to no risk group but sex with female prostitutes. But there is a greater chance a woman with AIDS will pass the disease onto her children. "The infected female is more of a risk to the unborn than to her male sex partner," says Dr. Shutlz. Only 241 pediatric AIDS cases, or 1.4 percent of the total, have been reported to the CDC, but the risk to children is proven. Traces of the HTLV-3/LAV have been found in menstrual blood, vaginal secretions, tears—and even breast milk. "I think the transmission of the virus to the unborn is a major concern. The risk is proven," Dr. Shultz says. "We have some 122 cases of congenitally acquired AIDS. So there is a spread of the infection to the fetus." Until women with AIDS attact the kind of headlines that have been mainly reserved for male homosexuals, many are left to suffer in loneliness. "Women who have AIDS are more isolated and alienated and without support systems," says Anastasia Lekatsas, who interviews women with AIDS for the New York City health department. "Women really don't have a place to go." Chery, who lives alone in one small room, says, "Everything is so important to me. The reds are redder, the blues are bluer. Time- time is so important to me." Then she adds with an ironic smile, "I'm tainted love, you know."
File Name uhlib_22329406_n294_006.jpg