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Montrose Voice, No. 529, December 14, 1990
File 005
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Montrose Voice, No. 529, December 14, 1990 - File 005. 1990-12-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 1, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1349/show/1336.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-12-14). Montrose Voice, No. 529, December 14, 1990 - File 005. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1349/show/1336

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 529, December 14, 1990 - File 005, 1990-12-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 1, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1349/show/1336.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 529, December 14, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 14, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript MONTROSE VOICE / FRIDAY, DECEMBER M Cuban novelist Reinaldo Arenas commits suicide NEW YORK (AP)-Reinaldo Arenas, a novelist who spent several years in prison in Castro's Cuba and was suffering MDS, commil Charles Dickens classic A Christmas Carol' at the Alley s 4? ant Friday, who had been id Sgt. Ed Dec. 7. by a nurs taking care Of hit Burns, a police spokesperson. Burns said there were no obvious wounds on the body and that the medical examiner would determine the precise cause of death, but that police had speculated he had overdosed. He said Arenas left a note but he did not know what was in it. Arenas was born in the rural Oriente province Of Cuba. He joined the revolution of Fidel Castro as a teen-ager and worked as a researcher in the Jose Marti National Library from 1963 to 1968. His first novel "Singing From the Well" won the Prix Medici in France for the best foreign novel of 1969. Arenas said he was branded a social misfit for his homosexuality. He spent time in a labor eamp. cutting sugar cane, and was imprisoned from 1974 to 1976 after he was accused of being a counterrevolutionary. Noisy but peaceful protest at St. Patrick's Cathedral NEW YORK (AP}—Hundreds of demonstrators opposed to the Roman Catholic Church's stand on abortion and AIDS education protested outside St. Patrick's Cathedral, but obeyed a court order not lo disrupt Mass. The Dec. 9 rowdy but peaceful demonstration came a year after the pandemonium in which 113 activists were arrested. On Dec. 10, 1989. about 4500 protesters gathered to dispute the church's teachings. Forty- three were arrested for chanting, lying down and chaining themselves to pews during the service. Seventy more were arrested outside. Review by SKIP FELKNER The Montrose Voice Charles Dickens' timeless Christ mas classic. "A Christmas Carol—A Ghost story of Christmas" has been wonderfully adapted for the Alley Theatre's Large Stage by Michael Wilson, the Alley's new associa tedi- rector. Wilson, ably assisted by his design staff, Jay Michael Jagim, sets; Howell Binkley. lighting; Joe Pino, sound; Jeni Breen, choreography, and most enjoyably, John Dickson, music director/composer, has achieved his goal of reinforcing the ghost story theme of this holiday classic "With the intent not to scare, but rather to lure the audience into the extraordinary mystery and supernatural dimension ofthe The play opens, as the audience U still settling in, with Ebenezer Scrooge sitting at his desk—apparently all night, going over "eums and figures" at home. He tires and doies for a few moments, obviously having some kind of bad dream. Ghostly figures rise from the covered furniture and boxes that are sitting around the room, overlooked by a sinister portrait of a sinister-look ing man. The man in the portrait, we learn, is Marley, Scrooge's partner. The ghostly figures dance around the room and Scrooge, flinging papers from his desk. Scrooge starts, looks around, settles again and doz- Enter Mrs. Dilber, Scrooge's housekeeper, with his breakfast of barley broth. She putters around the room, picking up the scattered papers, then awakens Scrooge by softly calling his name, then loudly announcing, "Your barley'* He jumps awake, echoing his housekeeper with "Marley, Marley!" Thus the story is set: the well- known story of a life wasted on greed and miserliness, of Scrooge's uncaring attitude toward those who cross his path, and ofthe changes he goes through after four ghostly vis- Fezzi wig/ Laundress), Noble Shropshire (Undertaker! and lastly, Gerald Hiken (Scrooge). Allore, Black and Kite pa trick's characters are essential to this production. Their "contemporary" parts are symbolic of their spiritual parts, and each played them well. Allore's hurried mannerisms and cockney accent helped us to imagine a hustle-bustle future, with London's working class folk bearing the brunt ofthe burden to produce more, produce quicker, produce everything. Although he has no speaking part as the Spirit of Christmas Future he had to know the dimly lit stage well The Spirit of Christmas Past (Bettye Fitzpatrick/ and Scrooge (Gerald Hiken) share a dance in the Alley Theatre's production of "A Christmas C ol—A Ghost Story of Christmas" directed by Michael Wilson Jay Michael Jagim's set is spare. Cloth covered boxes, chairs, tables and benches provide a bareness that helps create the look and feel of Scrooge's miserliness. The town of London and Scrooge's business are a series of ramps and catwalks which are at times awkward in accommodating several actors in the area. However, their use around the sides and back of the stage give a feeling of a large, dark, precarious and sinister London. Howell Binkley's lighting works very well to set the mood of each scene, whether it be dim, ghostly shadows or bright reflections of Christmases past and present. Joe Pino's sound effects—thunder, creaking doors, heavy, blowing winds or rain—leave the viewer feeling a need to sink deeper into the seat and, perhaps, wrap Mr. Scrooge's blanket tightly around himself. Jeni Breen's choreography—especially the wandering, devilish spirits—is wonderfully dramatic and ee rie. At times one believes these grey, flowing shapes are actually floating or flying in mid-air. The dance sequence of Fezziwig's Ball does indeed put one in a festive mood, John Dickson's Edwardian-esque music, his country folk dancers and the lovely English ballad "'Barbara Allen give the play the needed boost to send us back to Dickens' London. Whether it is Dickson's or Wilson's idea to use "Barbara Allen" as a sort of theme song for Scrooge's sister Fan, it effectively relates the melancholy life she led and the sentimental feelings Scrooge has for his beloved fiance, Belle. Bravo, Maestro! Several principal players as well as supporting cast merit recogni- Notably, Jonathan Allore (Watch works Vendor/Spirit of Christmas Future), James Black (Fruit and Cider Vendor/Spirit of Christmas Present), Bettye Fitzpatrick (Doll Vendor-Spirit of Christmas Past), Christiane McKenna (Mrs. Cratchit/Mrs. Black's beaming, cherubic face and jolly laugh heighten the excitement and enjoyment of Christmas time. His presentation of the Spirit of Christmas Present allows us to realize our current happiness, as well as revealing that there are those who know nothing of happiness, and those whodon't know how to attain that bliss. Fitzpatrick's Doll Vendor's easygoing way and sentimentality remind one of earlier Christmases, in a less hurried and more peaceful McKenna is at her beat as Mrs. Cratchit. One can easily sympathize with her dislike of Scrooge and the love she holds for her family. Her Mrs. Fezziwig was of course delightful and jolly, as she should be with a husband like Mr. Fezziwig (Paul Thomas). Noble Shropshire shines as Mrs. Dilber, Scrooge's housekeeper. The slapstick comedy lends itself well here with Mrs, Dilber's contradictory fear and "he'll get his" attitude toward Scrooge. As Jacob Marley, Shropshire plays the comedy too much. Supposedly, Marley (in life) was as stingy but not quite as mean as Scrooge, Maybe Marley was trying to make up for that? Due to the comedy element ofthe Marley character, no wonder in this performance Study: New compound blocks spread in test tube Scrooge (Hiken) got the Dilber and Marley characters confused. (Due to identical pratfalls by Shropshire)? William Preston, as the Undertaker, has a wonderfully sinister laugh and voice that surely would make anyone afraid to die. Gerald Hiken as Scrooge seemed to be generally confused, forgetful and not all there (which at times worked). Maybe the anticipation of the three spectral visits had something to do with it? His scenes in the counting house (preoccupied with business); with Mrs. Dilber (after waking the last time), and the final scenes with Mrs Dilber (he had horrific nightmares), used these elements very well, but left doubts about whether they were really part of the character or the actor. Hiken did have his moments, though: his scenes at Scrooge's alma mater, Fezziwig's ball and especially with the Spirit of Christmas Present at nephew Fred's party. He was funny, witty and, due to the "Christmas cheer;' enjoying himself. "A Christmas Carol—A Ghost Story of Christmas" also features John Feltch, Peter Webster, Paul C. Thomas, Alex Allen Morris, Robert PerkinB, Joshua Pop, Jennifer de Weese, Gabrielle Turner, Ronald Sendrock, Matthew Stokes, Lawrence Ruffo, Monique Maley, Emily York, Gage Tarrant, John Hawkins, Patrick Ferguson, Lisa McEwen, Tiffany Hall, Rheva Henry, Greg Gondek, Devon Jackson, Samuel Jackson, Cynthia Camacho, Christine Davis, Kara Davis, Demetrius Coakienos and Andrew Rothschild. Overall, Michael Wilson and the Alley Theatre's production of "A Christmas Carol—A Ghost Story of Christmas" is a charming, funny eerie tale sure to be a Houston holiday favorite. "Carol" opened Nov. 30 and runs until Sunday. Dec. 23. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; 2:30 p.m. and7:30 p.m. Sunday. For ticket information, call the Alley Theatre Box Office at 228-8421. Curtain-Call WASHINGTON (AP)-A Connecticut pharmaceutical firm reports that in laboratory experiments a new anti-viral compound was able to keep the AIDS virua from reproducing without the toxic effects of drugs now in use. The compound, called BI-RG- 587, was developed by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Ridgefield, Conn., and will be placed into human clinical trials next year, said Vincent J, Merluzzi, a company scientist. In a report published Friday, Dec. 7, in the journal Science, Merluzzi said thecompound works by blocking a key enzyme in the replication of the humi deficiency virus, or HIV, which causes AIDS. The enzyme, called reverse transcriptase, is used by the HIV virus to turn its genetic material into a form that can be incorporated into the genetic arrangement of a human cell. Without the enzyme, the virus cannot force the cell to produce more viruses. Merluzzi said that BI-RG-587 blocks HIV from activating the enzyme, but appeared in laboratory tests on rodents and monkeys to have no other effects on healthy- cells. "There are apparently no effects on other viruses or on host cell biology" said the researcher. "This means that it is very specific for HIV1." Merluzzi said BI-RG-587 has such a specific action that it did not affect a series of other viruses that were tested against it. These included monkey and cat viruses commonly used in laboratory tests. Nor, said Merluzzi, did the compound block the replication of HIV2, a form of the AIDS virua that is most common in Africa. "We don't know as yet why it does not affect other viruses," he said. "We are looking into that now to try to understand it." The experimental compound appears in laboratory tests not to have some of the toxic effects that have created problems for AZT, or zidovudine, the only anti-virai drug now approved for use against AIDS. Long term use of AZT has been shown in some patients lead to damage of the kidneys or liver. "It is structurally different than AZT;' said Merluzzi. "We don't expect it will have the same side ef- Toxicity of BI-RG-587 will be among the effects tested in clinical trials that are expected to begin early in 1991, he said. In addition to Boehringer Ingelheim scientists, the study of BI-RG-587 was also monitored by R.A. Koup and John L. Sullivan of the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, Mass. They also will help monitor the clinical trials. Science, which reviewed and published the study, is the journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Here are eight carefully crafted stories of mystery and suspense by both well-known authors and new-found talent. FINALE by Michael Nava, ed. SS.OOin bookstores, or clip this ad and return with your check for S10.00 (postpaid) to order. 'Waiting for the Light' one of this year's best comedies Film reviews by JAVIER TAMEZ The Montrose Voice One of the secrets to a good comedy is the successful combination of an unlikely set of circumstances to produce a situation which, as a natural outcome, is inherently funny. It is exactly this which makes "Waiting for the Light" one ofthe year' endearing and irresistible Set in the early 60's, the story is centered around Aunt Zena [Shirley MacLaine), a capricious ex- Vaudevillian who enjoys nothing more than using one ofthe tricks of her trade in a prank. Unfortunately her shenanigans tend to add chaos to the already beleaguered life of her niece, Kay (Teri Garr). Kay is a single mother struggling to raise her children as she manages to eke out an existence from her job at the local movie theater. This is made all the more difficult because her kids, Emily (Hilary Wolf) and Eddie (Colin Baumgarten), are always getting into trouble at school for pulling practical jokes they picked up from Zena. Zena and the kids try to help out be performing magic shows, but their performances are outrageous and gory and don't attract a follow ing. On top of all this. Kay is involved in a frustrating love affair with a man who keeps intending to get a divorce but just hasn't gotten around to it. All of this changes when Kay inherits a diner in a small town in rural Washington state. Seeingthis as a chance to start over, she packs up her family and heads west to become the owner and operator of Henry's Grill, As fate would have it, though, Henry's Grill is run-down and deserted. Kay and Zena realize the potential, however, and with a little elbow grease get the place down to business. Emily and Eddie, meanwhile, have spent time getting m0 know thelr new surroundings. They discover that next door to the diner is a ramshackle old house owned by are- clusive. crotchety old man. Mullins . (Vincent Schiavelli). Mullins warns the children to stay away from his house, and when he catches them Business is boarru. (Jack McGee, left) the Light" taking apples from his tree, he charges at them with a belt. Zena discovers the welts, and they plot their revenge. The conspiring trio decide they'll make Mullins think he's seen a ghost, but the plan goes awry, and instead of a ghost, Mullins is convinced he's seen an angel sent from the Lord. Already gripped by the mounting tensions of the Cuban missile crisis, just about everyone in the small town gets a bad case of miracle fever. The media, from Moscow to Havana, picks upon the story of the vision, and pretty soon business is booming at Henry's Grill Things take a downward turn, however, when Zena has a stroke and the children begin to feel guilty for what they've done. Added to this is the arrival of Slim Slater (Jack McGee), a disbelieving, muckraking journalist who has come to town to expose the fraud. It all makes for a delightfully whimsical story that lightly touches ^J li SWEEPIWC Lj* mil NATION nf on human faith and hope and the willingness of people I o cling to the idea of a miracle. There are no standout performances, per se. from anyone in the cast, but rather a strong ensemble showing. The film combines good, solid directing with an imaginative story and great casting to result in a movie that's simply good all-around. Director Christopher Monger, who is making his American directorial debut with this outing, has premiered with an irrepressible style, '•'Waiting for the Light" is a charmer. I give it three stars. —"Jacob's Ladder" We all know from grisly headlines that a drug-induced hallucination can be dangerously real for the person hallucinating, as well as those around him. We're also aware that during the Vietnam War, the U.S. Army performed tests on soldiers, to gauge their reaction and behavior when given certain drugs, without their knowledge. These two staples of the thriller—incipient fantasy and government evil—come together in the strange and convoluted movie "Jacob's Ladder." This is a puzzling movie, with twists and turns that will leave you baffled and an ending that will leave you disgruntled. It's all about Jacob Singer (Tim Robbins), a fairly ordinary sort of guy who is walking down the street one day when something strange happens. He starts to see things. AtfirBt these apparitions are merely disquieting, but they quickly degenerate into life-threatening experiences, and Jacob begins to wonder what is reality and what is illusion. He tries to explain what's happening to him to his wife, Jezzie (Elizabeth Pena); although compassionate initially, she becomes frustrated with the changes she sees occurring in Jacob. Determined to find out what's happening to him, he searches for an explanation, which leads him to his physician (who has mysterious ly disappeared), his chiropractor and eventually his war buddies. Each lead, however, proves fruitless. His mental anguish grows more agonizing, and it is only through the kind and gentle words of his chiropractor and confidant Louis (Danny Aiello) that he finds the peace he so desperately seeks, and the audience discovers the answer behind the Biblical metaphor that serves as the title. "Jacob's Ladder" has momentsof extreme tension. These are enhanced by the use of a throbbing musical score that explodes with breakaway, lightning scene changes. But the movie is just too weird for its own good. Director Adrian l.yne hasmadesomeincred- ible films such as the high-powered "Flashdance," the sexually obsessive "9 1/2 Weeks" and the engag ing "Fatal Attraction," In this instance, however, he became bogged down with the idea of his film; that ia, in trying to convey the sense of mounting panic in Jacob. While he did succeed in capturing the glazed mania of the central character, he did not generate in me a genuine interest in or concern for Jacob. Rather it evoked a clinical curiosity. Lyne's directing is. of course, limited by the story, so a good deal of the blame for this movie must be laid on writer Bruce Joel Rubin. Without divulging the ending (which I really ing this movie to anyone), I can't explain how Rubin papered over the gaps in the plot or chose to ignore them completely. Suffice it to say there aren't any people in the world who could legitimately take issue with his speculation on what this type of situation would actually be like. As in his previous film this year. "Ghost," Rubin can let his plot move freely because he's not constrained by the limits of the "real" world. However, unlike "Ghost," this movie does not have the benefit of a touching story. "Jacob's Ladder" is an uninteresting look at what this uninteresting situation might be like for an unin- tereating individual. Oh, what the hell, it all turns out to bethemoment of death experience for Jacob. 1 give ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. P-5; 40 Plympton St. Boston, MA 02118 Somewhere in the Night.. $£L ...Andrew is waiting Andrew, with his lust for life and his thirst for blood. Andrew whose quest for love issometimes hampered by a troubled conscience. Andrew—he's really not like other vampires, you know. "Horrifyingly entertaining. Thest gripping tales arc the Stuff of dream ana nightmare. Somewhere in Ihe NigJu marks Ihedebut of a fine writer, a striking new voice in imaginative fiction," write. Katherine Forrest. SOMEWHERE IN THE NIGHT Stories by Jetf McMahan check tor SB.50 (postpaic ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. P-5; 40 Plympton St. Boston, MA 02118
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