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Montrose Voice, No. 529, December 14, 1990
File 002
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Montrose Voice, No. 529, December 14, 1990 - File 002. 1990-12-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 1, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1349/show/1333.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990-12-14). Montrose Voice, No. 529, December 14, 1990 - File 002. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1349/show/1333

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 529, December 14, 1990 - File 002, 1990-12-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 1, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1349/show/1333.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 529, December 14, 1990
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 14, 1990
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript MONTROSE VOICE the newspaper of montrose a Q;ommunttg |JitMiBljmg Campait{jn FRIDAYD£CEMBER,41990DISSIJE529 ~~ 408 AVONDALE, HOUSTON, TX 77006 D (713} 529-8490 Austin district judge rules Section 21.06 is unconstitutional By SHERI COHEN DARBONNE Monlrose Voice Editor Section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code, the stale sodomy statute that criminalizes private, consensual sex between same sex couples and has been used to justify unequal treatment of homosexuals for two decades, was ruled unconstitutional Monday by State District Court Judge Paul Davis in Austin. Texas has had a sodomy statute since the late 19th century, but Section 21.06, which applies only to homosexual sodomy, has been in effect since 1972, Thelaw w js ruled unconstitutional in a U.S. district court in 1981 but that ruling wbb later overturned in a federal appeals court. At about noon Monday, Judge Davis of Travis County, presiding over the first hearing of the Texas Hu man Rights Foundation's challenge to the law under provisions of the slate constitution, returned his decision stating the statute violated the Texas Constitution's guarantee of the right to privacy. The trial of "Morales et al vs. the State of Texas," THRF's second 21.06 challenge, originally scheduled for 2:00 p.m. Monday, was described as basically an "all on paper summary judgment hearing by THRK representatives. The hearing was swiftly conducted and Judge Davis took only about five minutes to reach his decision, according to THRF The foundation had decided to bring the case to trial when the state challenged its motion to summary judgment with the testimony of the highly controversial Dr. Paul Cameron as an "expert witness." The state's relianceon the testimony of Cameron, whose publications include "Homosexuality: Threat to Mankind" "Protect Public: Quarantine Gays" and "Child Molestation and Homosexuality," was widely reported following that challenge. Attorneys for the state had also argued that, if the law had been ruled constitutional under the U.S. Constitution, it should also meet requirements of the state constitution, as the protections were intended to be .ay Do, the si Hou* Skipwith, co-chair of THRF, foundation was prepared for an almost inevitable appeal of the decision, but that hoard members believe "We (THRF) have an excellent chance of victorv" in state appellate court as well. "1 expect that som great state of Texas, appeal (the ruling), but we're ready for round two." said Skipwith. "We feel we have an excellent chance, because of the right to privacy provision of the (Texas) constitution." While it is up to state Attorney General-elect Dan Morales Ino relation to Lindal to decide whether or not the ruling should be forwarded to the state appeals court, or eventually, to the Texas Supreme Court, a county district attorney may also decide to appeal. This was the case with Baker vs. Wade, which was not appealed by then-Attorney General Jim Mattox. Skipwith said THRF believes the challenge will fare better on appeal in a state court than did the first 21.06 case, Baker vs. Wade 11979), which was tried in the federal court. Also, he added, the challenge of a state statute's constitutionality in Texas "didn't really belong in federal court." Skipwith noted that sodomy statutes in two other states, Michigan and Kentucky, were recently overturned through challenges in the "It seems to be the way to go," he THRF has initiated a mail fund raising drive to help finance an expected "long and expensive" battle in the appeals court. Meanwhile, plaintiffs in the case, Linda Morales of Houston, Tom Doyal and Pat Cramer of Austin, and Charlotte Taft and John Thomas of Dallas, along with their attorney, J. Patrick Wiseman, celebrated the lower court victory Mon Attorney general-elect to decide later on appeal of ruling AUSTIN (AP]—Attorney General-elect Dan Morales said he'll decide after he takes office whether to appeal a state judge's ruling that Texas' law against homosexual sodomy is documentation and review the specific case." Morales said Tuesday, Dec. 11. He said he expected to dcide on that and other pending lawsuits soon after taking office. Gay men and women from Austin, Houston and Dallas challenged the 1879 law before District Judge Paul Davis of Austin, who made his ruling Monday, Dec. 10. The .< CI a: Museum premieres exhibit of art from outer Indonesia Montrose Art by LISETTA LAVY The Montrose Voice The world premiere of the first major exhibit of artwork created by the people of Indonesia's Outer Islands is currently on exhibit at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. Organized by the Smithsonian and titled "Beyond the Java Sea: Art of Indonesia's Outer Islands" the exhibit contains over 200 works ranging from large stone sculptures to intricate gold jewelry. The show also includes textiles, household items and architectural pieces. Many of the objects come from the National Museum in Jakarta and other provincial museums throughout Indonesia and have never been seen in the United States, After leaving Houston, the exhibit will travel to the National Museum of Natural History, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. and to the De Young Museum in Indonesia, the fifth largest nation in the world, consists of 13.677 islands. This exhibit journeys beyond the more familiar and more populous inner islands of Java and Bali to feature the art forms of the outer islands where most of Indonesia's 300 linguistic/ethnic groups are scattered. The objects in "Beyond the Java a picture of the rich cultural life and artistic tradition of these outer island peoples. Also included in the exhibit is a short video on In- 'i08 and Clans." donesian culture. ances" and "Spiri The exhibit is divided into three ual Life," which reflect i major themes, "Ancestors, Fami- basic beliefs and cult i_ktt&*&A*/kL MKlfrtllf.l.+lfJtliW 1 IM ieyand the Java Sea Art of Indonesia's Outer Islands" at the Houston Marriage Alii- tions of the outer island people. objects are considered links to the World and Rit- Family heirlooms and clan past which confer spiritual power ofthe treasures are featured in "Ances- upon their owners. Everyday ob- tradi- tors, Families and Clans." These jects too are often decorated with images of ancestors which are thought to protect the living. Marriage rituals often involve the exchange of lavish gifts to symbolize the alliance between two families or clans. Textiles, jewelry and metal work representative of these interfamily exchanges are displayed under the name "Marriage Alliance." Spirit World and Ritual Life" reflects the islanders' belief that human customs, rituals and behav ior can affect the world ofthe gods as well as the natural forces on earth. Ritual objects produced to help maintain harmony in a delicately balanced universe are included under this heading. "Beyond the Java Sea" will be on display through Feb. 17 at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, located in Hermann Park across from Miller Outdoor Theatre. Admission is £2,50 for non- member adulta. The Museum is also presenting other related activities. Among these is a display of seashells found in Indonesia, Compiled from the Museum's own collection, the exhibit includes an example of the rare Epitonium scolarem known as the Precious Wentletrap or Staircase Shell, The shells will be on exhibit at the Strake Hall of Malacology through Feb. 28. Also included is a special planetarium show titled "Stars from East to West" which shows how the ancients used stars to navigate and highlights the Indonesian region. It continues through Feb. 16. misdemeanor, punishable by a $200 fine, for consenting adults of the same gender to have The plaintiffs asserted that the guarantees of privacy, equal protection and due process, as well as the state Equal flights Amendment. Davis' ruling drew a protest Tuesday, Dec. 11, from a small group led by Mark Weaver, head of the American Family Association of Texas, Vaccine to be tested on HIV-infected patients SAN ANTONIO (AP)—Military hospitals are preparing to test an AIDS vaccine that could keep HIV-infected patients healthy indefinitely. have been tested in animals at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research in San Antonio. But the new five-year clinical trial marks the first time an AIDS vaccine has been tested Known as gp160, the vaccine is made from a tiny protein on the outer coat of the AIDS virus. The vaccine does not include the inner portion of the AIDS virus responsible for infection. Because the g the part of the vi into contact with healthy cells before infecting them, made trom gp160 will trigger tt body's defense against the viru before serious infection occurs 0 protein is Set Unv '. it to tr ■ fccti . Jurors deliberating in punishment phase of former lawman's trial CLEBURNE. Texas (AP)-An accomplice in the shooting deathof a Burleson man at a rest stop has testified that a former law officer spent months teaching him how to target homosexuals for crimes. A Johnson County jury Tuesday, Dec. 11, began hearing evidence on punishment for John Yarbrough. He was convicted Monday, Dec. 10, of capital murder Jurors deliberated about five hours before finding Yarbrough, 44, of Decatur guilty of capital murder in the Feb. 27 slaying of Jerry Shaw, 29. Yarbrough is a former Fort Worth police lieutenant and Wise County chief deputy sheriff. Milton Brumfeld, an accomplice testi fying as a prosecution witness, said he and Yarbrough went to the rest stop on Interstate 35W to rob someone while on their way to Austin. Yarbrough spent five months teaching Brumfeld how to identify and victimize gay people, testimony showed. As chief deputy in Wise County, Yarbrough supervised operation at a roadside park that resulted in the arrest of about 400 men on questionable indecency charges, according to testimony. Most of those arrested were believed to be homosexual. Various agencies have conducted investigations into the Wise County roadside park operation. The defendant had no reaction when the verdict was read. But Jerry and Eula Shaw, the victim's parents, and Elizabeth Mayfield, sister of the victim, embraced Johnson County prosecutor Lisa Maddux. "I'm well pleased. We're just happy that it turned out the way it did|' said Shaw. "I expect the death penalty. It won't bring my son back, but it is the right penalty charge of testing at Wilford Hall Air Force Medical Tests will be conducted in San Antonio at Wilford Hall and Brooke Army Medical Center; at Fort Hood in Kilieen, at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Washington, D.C; and at Bethesda (Md.) Naval Hospital. The vaccine is to be tested on people who already test positive for HIV in an attempt to keep them trom developing fatal infections associated with AIDS Woman begs for guardianship of her lesbian lover MINNEAPOLIS (AP)-A longtime friend of Sharon Kowalski, left extremely brain-damaged trom a 1983 traffic accident, said Kowalski s lesbian lover seeking her guardianship is manipulative, possessive and domineering. But several other witnesses portrayed Karen Thompson as extremely caring and devoted to Kowalski. visiting her several times a week and taking her home on weekends. Testimony concluded Friday, Dec. 7, and a judge took the case under advisement His decision could cap a five-year legal struggle that has pitted Thompson against the woman's AIDS Alliance adopts working budget for 1991 Gay Minnesota man awarded $44,749 for unlawful firing By SHERI COHEN DARBONNE Afontrose Voice Editor The Greater Houston AIDS Alliance adopted a $303,000 "tentative working budget" for 1991 at its monthly board meeting Wednesday. Board members were also informed that the Alliance would take over the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grant from the Harris County Hospital District The budget, which projects $303,000 in grant income from Texas Department of health, United Way, the Ryan White CARE Act, Partnership Grant, corporate and foundation gifts and interest, allots 1202,800 for wages and salaries; $30,000 for payroll expenses; $8,000 for travel expenses; $22,000 for equipment and supplies and $4,000 for public relations/public affairs. The remainder is itemized as "other" expenses including postage, insurance and $16,500 for an audit For 1991, the Alliance is increasing its staff by two positions, an ac- sistant. The full proposed staff rep- Sue Cooper, executive director, discussed the Greater Houston AIDS Alliance's 1991 budget Wednesday resented by the above salary figure includes the executive director and an administrative assistant, accountant, systems manager and secretary /receptionist The HRSA grant, previously administered by the hospital district, will become the Alliance's responsibility sometime in February or March, 1991. King Hillier. HIV programs administrator for the HCHD, said the district would work with all of the grant's subcontractors and the lead agency "to make the transition as smooth as possible." The board meeting was preceded by a lengthy discussion of the board's committee structure, which delayed the meeting for about an hour. Board members said later that, while the committee structure was reorganized to focue priorities to the most appropriate department, the committees' services remained the following the meeting, both Hillier and Alliance executive director Sue Cooper said the shifting of the grant was due mainly to "new initiatives" and responsibilities for the hospital district with Houston's Ryan White CARE Act funding. The district, explained Hillier, is responsible for programs in- volving direct patient care and services. The HRSA grant, which funds largely educational and psychosocial services, is more appropriate for the Alliance, whose board is largely made up of representatives of organizations provid ing such services, he said. Cooper said that by assuming the responsibility for the HRSA and oth er grants, the Alliance is fulfilling Houston and coordinate the area's AIDS response. Cooper said the Alliance staff would also be used by Judge Jon Lindsey and the panel he has organized under provisions of the Ryan White Act to administer those funds. "(Judge Lindsay) will probably use my staff to do a lot of the work that needs to be done," she said. In the interview, Cooper declined to comment specifically on AIDS funding by the City of Houston, the topic of much discussion among city officials and AIDS service providers this week. Instead, she commented generally that "the Alliance certainly welcomes support from any sectoif "My vision of the role of the Alliance is to bring resources to Houston to accomplish our needs in any Continued page 2 n. (AP)-A gay St. s awarded $44,749 ) called his firing ST. PAUL, IV by a judge v. "intentional discrimination by an employer carried out in the most Offensive manner.' Administrative Law Judge George A Beck on Friday. Dec. 7, awarded Lyle J. Pierce, former manager of the Di Ma Corp. bookstore in St Cloud, $27,749 in compensatory damages and interest and $17,000 in punitive damages "It's an important decision." said state Human Rights Commissioner Stephen Cooper, whose department prosecuted the case The amount of money awarded is a stiff deterrent to Beck also ordered Di Ma and its president, Richard Carriveau, to pay a civil penalty of $25,000 to the state's general fund. Further, he ordered that Pierce be immediately reinstated to his position as Di Ma manager.
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