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Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998
File 020
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Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998 - File 020. 1998-02-13. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 16, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1305/show/1287.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1998-02-13). Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998 - File 020. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1305/show/1287

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998 - File 020, 1998-02-13, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 16, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1305/show/1287.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998
Contributor
  • Michelak, J. C.
  • Murphy, Terry
Publisher Window Media
Date February 13, 1998
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript NTERTAIIMMEIMT Rauschenberg exhibit takes over Houston museums Internationally acclaimed artist returns home for massive retrospective show by STEPHEN R. UNDERWOOD In the largest showing of a single artist in the history of Houston, The Menil Collection, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Contemporary Arts Museum open today wilh almost 300 works which comprise the unprecedented exhibition "Robert Rauschenberg: A Retrospective." A Texas native born in Port Arthur in 1925, Rauschenberg has achieved international fame and recognition for his works—his long list of awards including a Grammy and the Jerusalem Prize for Arts and Letters, exposed a gay disposition by creatively transcending homophobia and McCarthyism ihrough his art. Jonathan Katz, author of "The .Art: of Code: Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg," researched Rauschenberg's history and concluded lhat Rauschenberg involved himself in a homosexual relationship with Jasper Johns in the 1950s. Alter flirting with several art schools in the United States and France, Rauschenberg met Johns al Black Mountain College in North Carolina and their affection evolved into what could best be described as an early form of domestic partnership. The paramours moved into an apartment together on Front Street in New York and Katz notes that "after meel ing Johns, Rauschenberg turned away from painting as an Abstract Expressionist drama of selfhood and started bringing culture—history, politics, Judy Garland and Abraham Lincoln—back into art. In turn, Johns, after meeting Rauschenberg. finally became a painter." For gay men of the Cold War era. Garlandian adoration became an implicit device for identifying one's sexual orientation—without explicitly confirming the identification. Rauschenberg. no doubt, was fully conscious that Garland was the epi- Each museum will present works reflecting different eras of artistic development of Rauschenberg. who has only ever obliquely acknowledged his homosexuality. The Menil Collection features works from the 1940s through the 1980s, lhe mosi notable of which are Iwo famous Rauschenberg pieces, "Bed" (1955) and "Odalfsk" (1955/58), The Contemporary Ails Museum hosts Rauschenberg's experiments with interactive technology. "Oracle" (1962- 65), for instance, allows spectators to manipulate radio signals on a live part assemblage. The largest single panoply, "The 1/4-Mile or 2 Furlong Piece," will be housed at The Museum of Fine Arts. Houston. Since its inauguration In 1981, Rauschenberg has completed all but 320 feet of the one-quarter mile long piece. Comprised of more than 190 paintings and sculptures. "The 1/4-Mlle or 2 Furlong Piece" snakes through Ihe Upper Brown Pavilion, beginning wilh a pane*] from 1981 and ending wilh Ihe latest addition in 1998. Rauschenberg experimented wiih Abstracl Expressionism in thc 1950s while in New York, but lhe method in ils purest sense limited his desire lo express meaning. Rather, he* created art which synthesized the genre with various aspects of pop culture in small and large collages ami assemblages. In addition, Rauschenberg cryptically cenier ol 1950s gay urbanity. She was also a focal point in several of his combines. One example is "Bantam" (1954). a work which, Katz wrote, "includes a team portrait of tin- New York Yankees spattered with Abstracl Expressionist paint which is then juxtaposed with delicate fabric swatches, a nineteenth-century nude odalisque staring at herself in a mirror, and (anotherl autographed photo of Jtidy Garland." Katz posits lhal Garland was an enigmatic mechanism that publicly said everything Rauschenberg could not. Throughout his life. Rauschenberg seems to have made only the most strategically dignified public comments regarding his sexuality. On the one hand, his experience wilh Johns is no secret within the artistic coterie. On the olher, Ratisehenberg affirmed his relationship with Johns in an Interview with Katz in which Rauschenberg is quoted as saying "it was soil ol new to the art world that lhe* iwo mosi well-known, up and coming studs were a (let I innately Involved." Noi ice Rauschenberg did not say sexually involved. On thc other hand, Rauschenberg's youthful ambiguity is See ARTISTpage 24 The Epicenter of Graphic Art S^opywriting IN CO] VERY VILVEN VILVEN DESIGN GROUP ' \ 713.526.3212 • • • •• • "Dot by dot building up the image.,.** Your Community Image Inker! House Of Coleman Fine Printins & Graphics 901 WEST ALABAMA 71 3.523.2521 HOUSTON, TX 77006-4693 FAX 713.524.2643 m
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