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Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998
File 012
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Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998 - File 012. 1998-02-13. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1305/show/1279.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1998-02-13). Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1305/show/1279

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998 - File 012, 1998-02-13, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1305/show/1279.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998
Contributor
  • Michelak, J. C.
  • Murphy, Terry
Publisher Window Media
Date February 13, 1998
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript E C H O S ESSAY CONTEST WINNERS fn celebration of the Houston nui of a new, wondetfuUy tuorm and sensitt'oe coming out film—"Ma Vie en Rose" (My Life in Pink)— Houston Voice and Landmark Theatre Corp. sponsored an essay contest. We invited Voice readers to send in their own stories of coming out. Intending to pick two winners, we were impressed with the volume of submissions ai\d ultimately could not narrow our choices to just two. So. below we present the three winning essays. Houston Voice and the Landmark Theatres would like to thank every one wlio took tlie lime to participate in the contest. Everyone who wrote an essay did a wonderfuljob. We were touched and moved by each one: we only wish we could have reprinted them alL Meanwhile, we invite you to enjoy these tltree stories, and to stop by and see "Ma Vic en Rose." winner of the Goiden Globe award for Best Foreign Language Film It opens for an exclusive Houston nm Feb. 20 at Landmark's Greenway Ttieatre. (Our winners, who received tickets to the advance screening and passes for fiiture Landmark JUms, were notified by telephone how to pick up their prizes.) Joy at "Wedding Banquet" by KHOI NGUYEN My love for the cinema has helped me to cope with my sexuality and my coming oul to my family and friends. I (along wilh other numerous closeted homosexuals) would always envision the perfect day when I would reveal my sexuality without any complications (like rejection or outcast) just like in those classic hetero movies. Coming from a religious-oriented family, my parents and friends would never even discuss the topic. During the college years, 1 made one resolution to myself. That resolution would be to find one or two movies lhat could be a catalyst to discuss homosexuality and my "coming out". Then the new Queer Cinema arrived in the late 1980s. I was excited lhal the entertainment industry would set lhe tone to my coming out. However, movies like "Longtime Companion." "Living End" and "Philadelphia" were AIDS-related movies that I did not undersland and were seemingly inappropriate. I revised my resolution to look for "relationship movies" with gay lovers. The following year, two superb movies were released. "Sum of Us" and "Wedding Banquet." Since I am in a steady relationship with a Caucasian lover, I was prejudiced toward "Wedding Banquet." I had to wait a whole year until the following Thanksgiving to plan my coming oul. I invited my family members and friends lo have a nice holiday meal. During lhe evening, I requested Ihem to view a wonderful "new" video. Some of my friends had heard of the movie, and my family members had not. My lover and I told them after the movie finished. I was stunned that my mother (who is a devout Buddhist) did not have strong objections. She smiled and reached out to hug me. Mothers do always know. Later, she would tell me that she would support me whole heart cdly. Even though 1 did not plan this, my parents invited me to see a new movie—"Home for the Holidays". I am blessed to live in a decade—the 1990s—wherein some courageous movie makers would envision my dreams and would support the gay communily. Without independenl movies and the independent movie venues. 1 would be among the deadly statistics. My gay community, my gay social environments (like Asian and Friends of Houston), and my gay lover are my entire life. I've never" by HOLLY WHILOCK Two years after my first kiss with another girl, I told my besl friends from high school that I was gay. This simple statement, though, does not even begin to tell the slory! There were five of us that hung oul together, all very different and yet so similar. I was the ultra-jock, Casey belonged to the drill team. Amy belonged to everything, Jessica was plagued wilh boy troubles, and Brenda was just boy-crazy. Suffering from major senior-itis and needing a break from Ihe real world, we decided to have a girls-only get- together: my mother was out of town, so it was easy deciding where to party ■After a food, cigarette, and alcohol run (not necessarily in that order), we got down to gossiping and consuming our bought goods. Alter a slight amount of alcohol consumption and a semi skinny dip in the apartment pool (In the middle of February), we settled in for some seri ous drinking. We decided to play a game. For those of you who undersland the game of "I've Never", you will immediately know how the first statement In this story happened. For those fortunate to have never been introduced to the game. 1 will explain. Everybody has something to drink, preferabl alcoholic In nature. Someone then starts the game off by making a statement of something that they have never done. For instance. "I've never been snow-skiing." If you have been snow-skiing, you have to take a drink. The only point of this game is to find out inleresling/embarrassing things about your friends. Little did they know just what they would find out about me! Our game was beginning lo hit a slow point, and quite a bit of alcohol had been consumed. We'd already covered all the bases in a lot of differ ent areas (yes. I used that word for a reason!) and were running low on topics. Well. .Amy. who was. how shall I say. the least experienced of us, suddenly got excited and said she had the perfect "I've never" to use. Even though it was my turn, ironically. I couldn't think of anything to say, so I let her go. "I've never kissed a girl." said Amy I drank. Casey, who was next, volunteered. "I've never French-kissed a girl." 1 drank. A couple of more "I've never" statements later, just to clarify things, pretty much everyone had sobered up. Al the beginning of the game, we had declared no questions /explanations necessary. We threw lhal rule oul lhe window, as well as the game, and I've been outrageously oul ever since. Those four friends are still great friends. And. as far as I know, none of us has played the game since! "Born Out"... of Pearls and Swine by MC. JENYFER Clutching my strand of June Cleaver Pearls, 1 stared at a black computer screen, trying lo recall "coming out." 1 was comfortable being gay ^before 1 knew what "gay" meant. Before 1 turned four. I knew I was different because I wanted lo grow up, marry a nice man some day and become a housewife. I never mentioned this to any grownups because I felt secure in my self-knowledge. There was no one to discourage me. My mother reinforced my beliefs by giving me a strand of pearls to play with. She said it kept me quiet. I learned how the world viewed my aspirations when I was six. My new step-father took one look at me and knew. He was an alcoholic, who did his besl over the next few years lo take advantage of my being gay while never letting me forget that he hated me. I tried to tell my father what was happening, bul he said ] was making it up, Life in my mother's house was none of his business. This was 1962, and people did not talk about these Ihings. Television talk shows did nol find child abuse an attractive subject. Those years were horrible, but 1 learned a valuable lesson. It was easier to forgive my stepfather for his actions than il was to keep carrying all that resentment- filled luggage. The experience did nol make me ashamed of being gay. I knew it was my step-father who was sick, not me. At the age of 12, sanity entered my life in the person of George E. He not only understood me, but also was the fist person lo call us "gay." With George E. around, I learned we were not alone. There was a whole world out there wailing for us. No matter whai we learn aboul homosexuality. I'm grateful that I learned this early in life. It reinforced my belief that I was OK. George E. and 1 learned to put being gay into perspective. By the time we were 14, I understood that being gay was part of who we were, bul did not define us itself. Many people lake years coming to terms wilh being gay. George E. and I entered adulthood with health self-esteem. Over the years. I survived leukemia, depression, the death of friends, widowhood from AIDS and the last of childhood nightmares. 1 believe that coming to terms with my own homosexuality early on helped make the experiences that followed less frightening. Today 1 am a gay male housewife. My dream came true. My spouse says I should write about my experiences. He thinks I have a unique perspective on life. Most cancer survivors do. ] could write a book about my life: 111 call it "The Housewife from Hell." A simple strand of pearls led me to become who I am today: a child wilh a keen self-awareness became a strong gay man who loves his life.
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