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Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998
File 010
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Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998 - File 010. 1998-02-13. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1305/show/1277.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1998-02-13). Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998 - File 010. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1305/show/1277

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998 - File 010, 1998-02-13, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1305/show/1277.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 903, February 13, 1998
Contributor
  • Michelak, J. C.
  • Murphy, Terry
Publisher Window Media
Date February 13, 1998
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript ii NATL/, NATIONAL from page 6 Opponents of the issue were upset that the city would consider changing the anti-discrimination ordinance less than four years after county voters overturned a similar ordinance to protect homosexuals. Three arrested for attacking gay Ore. teen CORVALLIS, Ore. (AP)—Police have arrested three teen-age boys suspected of beating a gay student two weeks ago. Lasl week, police arrested Robert P. Huffaker, 16. of Corvallis; Cyle A. Schroeder, 15. of Albany: and Michael B. Nash, 16. of Corvallis. All were charged with intimidation and assault in the incident. Paul Miller. 17. reported a group of four boys followed him. taunting him with slurs like "queer" and "faggot." police said. Miller said when he responded lo one of the boys making the taunts, the boy slugged him in the mouth, knocking oul two teeth. Miller, a senior at Corvallis High School who leads a support group for gay students, said two adults walked by as the name-calling was taking place, bul did nothing. The attack prompted support from residents of the community. Connie Onslad. Miller's grandmother, said a woman stopped by with money to pay for Miller's dentist bill. Onstad said others had called or dropped off supportive messages. "Paul, I was so sorry to see your face on the front page today." Onstad read from one note. "It sickens me lo think lhal a lown with a generally higher level than average of educated tolk could harbor such idiots as those who attacked you." Some residents had organized rallies against hate crimes at the Benton County Courthouse and at Corvallis High. Miller said he doesn't wanl the suspects lo go to jail, and lhat he isn't seeking revenge. "11 just all seems so poiutkss," Miller said of the incident. There was so much anger, as if I'd done something horrible to Ihese peo pie and 1 haven't. I think it's really siid. I hope these people get whatever help they need. If it ends up being mental health or therapy or whatever, I hope they get it." Gay church founder confronts Myrtle Beach opposition MYRTLE BEACH. S.C. (AP)—The founder of the world's largest predominantly gay Protestant denomination says fear is behind Myrtle Beach opposition to this spring's gay-rights festival. "We don't have horns growing out of the top of our heads. We're patriotic. We're part of the community. Ever since this community's been here, we've been a part of it," said Rev. Troy Perry, moderator of the Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Chinches. He traveled to Myrtle Beach to speak at a fund raiser for an expansion project at MCC headquarters in Los Angeles. "We're only lour years old here." local MCC Pastor Barbara Garrison said. "For him to come to a church this small says a lot about what's hap- penlng here tlol only lo our congregation, bul to our community.* Perry said he heard aboul local developer Burroughs & Chapin's opposition to the upcoming gay pride festival. "I'm very disappointed, bul that's not our problem," he said. "It's time for us to be seen. To know us is to love us. and the way to be known is to be seen." Perry founded lhe first MCC congregation in 1968. Now the church has about 52,000 members and welcomes a quarter-million visitors each year to congregations in 15 countries. Myrtle Beach is just another place where fear and ignorance need to be overcome, Perry said. "People respond oul of fear," he said. "People fear what they don't know. So we need to get known." Chicago cuts ties with Boy Scouts over gay ban CHICAGO (AP)—The city of Chicago has agreed to sever ties to Boy Scouts of America programs until thc group accepts gays and stops requiring a religious oath. The agreement last week settles a federal lawsuit filed against Chicago by the American Civil Liberties Union. In agreeing to settle, the city avoided accepting blame. The ACLU sued last April seeking lo end lhe city's sponsorship of 28 Scout programs. The lawsuit alleged the city's involvement violated the separation of church and state principle and that the Scouts' ban on admitting gays is discriminatory. The ACLU called the settlement a victory and urged other cities to "take a cue from Chicago's action and end their sponsorship of these discriminatory programs." Tlie city agreed to pay S 20.000 In court costs, said ACLU attorney Roger Leishman. Rebecca Fields, an executive with the Scouts' Chicago area council, did not say whether the Scouts are considering changing Iheir policies. She said private sponsors have helped fill the void left by Chicago's disassociation with the group. S.D. high school squashes gay play SPEARFISH, S.D. (AP)—The show won't go on for a group of high school students who wanled to perform a pro-gay play, and South Dakota activists are claiming censorship. The Spearfish High School drama leam planned to present the one-act play called "Removing the Glove," which is aboul discrimination against homosexuals, at a state competition lasl week in Vermillion. Because a group of parents was upset about the play, which was written by a college student, some school officials had changed parts of it to make it about discrimination against lefl- handedness. But the play's publisher hadn't authori?,ed the editing and said the students couldn't perform it lhal way. That knocked the school from the state contest. Although the publisher gave permission for Spearfish to put on the play in its original form, the Spearfish Board of Education only would allow the edited version. The situation smacks of censorship, according to Free Americans Creating Equal Status (FACES) of South Dakota, a gay and lesbian activists group. Barry Wick, the group's executive director and board president, said not allowing students to perform the play the way it was written violates their right lo free speech. The mere suggestion of homosexuality sends chills down the yellow spines of minister bigots and legislator-loonies In the stale of South Dakota," Wick said in a press release. Others agreed. Suzanne Alger, whose son was a cast member, said she fell her authority as a parent was being questioned by the school board because she already signed a permission slip allowing her son to be in the play. shop online at our website: www.basicbrothers.com 1232 WESTHEIMER • HOUSTON • 713.5221626 MON-SAT 10AM-9PM-SUN 12-6 GHGLCC RAGE FEBRUARY 13 1 9 S
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