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Montrose Voice, No. 320-B, December 12, 1986
File 019
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Montrose Voice, No. 320-B, December 12, 1986 - File 019. 1986-12-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1241/show/1234.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-12-12). Montrose Voice, No. 320-B, December 12, 1986 - File 019. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1241/show/1234

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 320-B, December 12, 1986 - File 019, 1986-12-12, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1241/show/1234.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 320-B, December 12, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 12, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript 18 MONTROSE VOICE/DECEMBER 12. 1986 Why Do We Eat and Splurge This Season? Commentary by Franz Schurmann Pacific News Service The season for eating drinking and splurging is on us again. These holiday festivals once celebrated our emergence from poverty. Now with oceans of food and cash around, the lavishness no longer serves any sensible purpose— besides keeping the consumer economy happy. In fact, the U.S. and other parts ofthe world are in the first stages of a nutritional revolution that is leading people to cut back on red meat, fatty foods and hard liquor. At the same time, a health revolution is zeroing in on modern humanity's greatest enemy—stress. These dual revolutions aim at getting people to lead a simpler lifestyle—one which could make seasonal festivals not only safer but more truly sociable, as they were originally intended to be. The heavy eating is a holdover from the days when food was scarce. A hundred years ago, most people made their living from the soil, and the vast majority were poor and thin. To be fat was a sign of having left poverty behind. A few times in the year, peasants would gorge themselves to celebrate the harvest. So did the Pilgrims, whose daily life was harsh. Now food is so plentiful in the U.S. that hunger is entirely a matter of no money and unjust distribution. A century ago, when new hard wheat varieties were introduced into Kansas, American farmers started producing one cornucopia after another. Today, productivity is so high that only a handful of farms can feed much of the country with most of its staples and, if need be, probably the world as well. The season of splurging also happens to be one of the most stressful of the entire year—"How can I afford all that money for gifts ?" The farming revolution has by now spread to Europe, Asia, parts of I_atin America, and a few spots in Africa. Between 1965 and 1980, the amount of rice and wheat—the world's caloric staples—grown in developing countries increased 75 percent, greatly outstripping population growth. The world,despite great swaths of hunger, now lives in an ocean of food. In the developing countries, people still need calories in big amounts to give them energy and protein to build body size and strength. They have to eat lots of grains and meats. Rut already in many countries recently considered poor, diseases of the "fat life" Americans arc well familiar with are beginning to appear. In the highly individualistic Bociety of the U.S., people do understand that sociability is the real purpose of the merry season. The eating and drinking festivals are gatherings of clans— whether of relatives, friends or coworkers. But while eating and drinking are supposed to be means to the end of reaffirming social ties, for many they are often ways to ease the discomfort of being around so many people. So, too, with gilt giving, where people wanting to be sociable take recourse to something which these days is also present in oceanic quantities—money. The season is a time for lavish gift giving. One third of annual retail sales in the U.S. depend on Christmas shopping. A hundred years ago, cash, like food, was scarce. But splurging was a well- established practice, even dirt poor countries. In India, for example, a poor laborer will still spend thousands of dollars on a daughter's wedding to show he is not poor. Now modern banking spews forth great quantities of money the way modern farming entices great amounts of grain from the soil. The ocean of cash and credit makes the potlatching all the easier. But the season of splurging also happens to be one ofthe most stressful of the entire year—"How can I afford all that money for gifts?" People are constantly reassured by silken smooth commercials that endless easy payments make it all feasible. But the mind says otherwise, so the blood pressure goes up. The nutritional revolution is directed against the hinging and the health revolution against stress. Both point the way to the need for simpler ways of living. Ironically, they are pushing people to go back to a slower rhythm of farm life that existed before consumer capitalism brought us such monumental plenty. PNS editor Franz Shurmann teaches history and sociology at the University ot California. Berkeley Now, an estimated 40,000 Houston readers each week TWT and the Forum do not come close Our main (Friday) edition for several years has had a slightly higher Houston circulation than TWT's and about twice the circulation ot the Forum. But now, with our new Midweek Extra, we've even expanded that lead. If you pick a publication to advertise in for reasons other than our circulations, go ahead and pick any of us. We're all pretty, in different ways. You may like one or another for this feature or that convenience. But if you pick a publication because you want your advertisement to reach the most people in Houston's gay community (for the lowest cost-per-thousand, to boot), pick the Voice. We will put your ad in the hands of about 40,000 prime potential customers weekly. And we will do it for only about $4 per 1000 readers for a typical-size 1/4 tabloid-page ad. The Montrose Voice ADVERTISING SALES DEPT. Jerry Mulholland Monte Hill Ken Boge 529-8490 Estimated Readership assumes a pass-on rate factor of 2 8 CHUTES 1732 Westheimer 523-2213 Merry Christmas & Happy New Year from Our Staff Friday, Dec. 12: First Male Strip Night 10pm $100 Cash Prize $25 Second Prize Gary Podgrtt Birthday Party Sal., Dec. 13 Thrusday, Dec. 18, The Dating Game, 10pm (Prizes Include dinner lor two at The Hunt Room and Steak Ir Ale) Sat., Dec. 20, Christmas Party Home of Eagle Learner
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