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Montrose Voice, No. 153, September 30, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 153, September 30, 1983 - File 001. 1983-09-30. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1215/show/1186.

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(1983-09-30). Montrose Voice, No. 153, September 30, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1215/show/1186

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 153, September 30, 1983 - File 001, 1983-09-30, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1215/show/1186.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 153, September 30, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 30, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Changes at the Clinic Robert Hyde, p.3 The Latest AIDS Update Dr. Harvey Thompson, p.12 MONTROSE V 0 I C E The Newspaper of Montrose Sept. 30, 1983 Issue ••153 Published Every Friday Gays are Everywhere, from Ultra Right to Ultra Left Arthur Lazere, p.16 Art League: 'Contem­porary Views of Houston' Jeff Bray, p.14 Major Montrose Event: Annual Greek Fest Starts Next Week By Robert Hyde Once again it ia time for many Houstoni· ans to focus on a small area in Montrose dominated by the Greek Orthodox Cathed· ral. Next weekend (Thurwday, October 6 through Saturday, October 8) will mark the 17th year of the Greek Festival, and, if people are as interested this year as last, over 40,000 will converge on the 3500 blO<."k of Yoakum Boulevard to indulge their aes­thetic taetes in Gref'k culture and their appetites in Greek food For over four month&, citizens of Hooe· ton's sprawling Greek community and members of the only Greek Orthodox church in the city have been donating countless hours preparing exotic Greek cuisint, putting final touches on authentic traditional costumes, practicing ancient Greek dances and generally whipping the church complex into shape for the crowds that will wander through the cathedral's Byzantine eplendor. For three days, the festival will begin at lLOO a.m., just in time for lunch at one of the tables in the roped-off area of Yoakum designed to give the visitor the flavor ofa aidewalk cafe in Athena. Food such as pa•· titaio (baked macaroni with beef filling and romano cheese topped with Bechamel aauce) or loukouma.dea (hot pastries pre· pared on the apot dripping with honey) will be available, ae will aouulaki (a Greek 1hi1h kebab of tender seasoned, mari· natecl sirloin cubes prepared over burning coa]s). There will also be an a88ortment of Greek wines, from the naturally sweet Maurodaphne to the popular white, Ret­sina. Lunch will be served until 3:00 p.m. Thuraday and Friday and until 4:00 p.m. Saturday. The festival's evening hours will be from 5:00 p.m. until 10:00 p.m. Thursday and until 11:00 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. In addition to the food , visitors to the festival may watch dancers perform the Juuapiko, the popular ioZorba" d&n:~com · mon to the taverna of Athens, visit the Agora, a marketplace of imported foods and wines, view travel films of modern Greece and the Greek islands or tour the gift shop for antique bra88 and copper ware or for one of this year's festival poatera-a "first" to commemorate this annual event. Designed by Brad Gaber, 500 •i!k acreen, signed and numbered poaten will be available at $20 each. The poster fea ­turee three Greek dancer& depicted in var· ying ahadee of blue. ''We have the best and largest Church festival in North and South Americb.," Pather Charles Anaataaa:Ou said. •·People =· •• Greek Orthodox Church on Yoakum, •ite of next week's annual Greek Festival come from all over the United States just to see how we do it." "Then we love to serve," Father Charles added. "Greek hospitality ie known all over the world." The currentfeatival originated when the community celebrated it.a 50th anniver· eary in 1967 and included a "Greek Night." By then, it waa becoming appar­ent that Houston's Greek community needed to preserve its heritage-its approximately 10,000 members were scat­tered (only 1300 belonged to the church)­the uae of the Greek language within the community aa well as the church was alowly waning. Father Charles mentioned that the Greek community also wanted the citizen& of Houston to benefit from this cultural preservation aa well. "We wanted to share our customs and traditions," he said. Profits from the festivals not only benefit the administration of the church, but also help the church community expand it.a charitable ministries, which are numerous. "We partidpate- in every area of life."' Father Charleii anid , "in everything that moves in Houaton." He mentioned that the church's philan· thropic women'• organization, the Philop· tochoa Society, spends moet of its time viaiting heart patients at the Medical Cen· ter and assisting Greek patients who come to Houston for heart surgery. "We must help all we can with all our hearts and soula because we do not know what the fut~ holds for us," is an expression of their philosophy. The church also helps "at least four peo­ple a day who come to us without food or ahelter," said Father Charles. "Nothing means more to me than my fellow man." Greeks began arriving in Houston in the late 19th century because of poor economic conditions in their homeland and because of oppression under the declining Otto· man Empire. Once having paued through New York'• Ellia !eland, called by some ''the isle of tears," the more adventurous of the lucky, who were not forced to retu~ to Greece because of poor health, made 1t to Houaton by 1889. The first Polemanakoa brothers, sensing even then Houston's potential as e gnat city, began to devo~ tholllB(>Jveo totally to acquiring real estate. For 11 years, Houston's Greek popula· tion waa totally male, since Tes.BB wu a ''wild and dangerous place,'' according to moet Greek immigranta. But in 1903, Kal­liope Vlahos became Houston's first Greek woman when she left her homeland in search of her lost father and found him here. Then there began the era of mail order brides, and many Greek women were chosen from photographs. since the men, forever upholding tradition, did not wish to marry outside their nationality. Alao, it wa a time or pre1od1ce, aILhvo.i.H:h Tex_,, citizens were generally more kind to the new Houstonians than people in other areas of the country. For years, the nearest Greek Orthodox church to Houston was in Galveston, served by a Russian priest appointed by RU88ia'a last Czar, Nicholas. Early resi· denta tell of all-d&)" affairw journeying to and from the ialand and of picnica on the beach after worship. Finally, in 1917, a church wao ..tabliahed in an old house at 509 Walker Avenue. and Father John Papadopoulos became the community's fir&t prieet. For 35 yean, members of Houston'• Greek society worshipped in the small "house," until their present cathedral was completed in 1952 . .. Now we have more problems," Father Charles said, eh rugging hi88houl?erw and smiling. "On Sunday&, every seat1s taken; people stand in the aiales." Father Charles shook hie head and said it would be up to the Board of Directors to decide what to do about it. The years brought many changes. Houston's Greek community now spans a 50-mile radius, English ia now integrated into church aervice8, young immigrant.a open gaaoline stations instead of reatau· rant.a, and Greek Americana no longer marry exclusively other Greek.a. Yet the community still congregates at the only church it has in the Houaton area. Speaking of the 8000 or eo Greeks not members of the church, Father Charles said, "They drift in and out. During Holy Week we see moet of them. They come to the Resun-ection Service and hear the same word.a that have been uttered for over a thousand years." And eo a visit to the Greek Festival would be remisa without a tour through ita Byzantine cathedral-a place of bril· liantly colored icona of saints and martyrs-a place that calls the com.mun· ity home-a place thatremindaita faithful of a rich heritage begun in 1054 when Emperor Constantine established an Eu tern church away from Rome-a place that makee an outsider appreciate cultural values he has always sha.ttd with a people whooe proud heritage they refuse to let die. 2 MONTROSE VOICE/ SEPT 30, 1983 • Tickets Available From Ticketmaster and Record Rack saturday october "I Guest DJ from the Saint-NV & Fire Island-Robbie Leslie Court Decision Favorable for Gay Visitors International Gay New• Acency SAN FRANCISCO-The U.S. Court of Appeals has affirmed that foreigners can­not be barred from this country just because they are homosexuals. The three-judge appellate court in San Francisco ruled that Congress requires a medical examination before excluding homosexuRls. Because Public Health Service doctors refuse to conduct such examinations any longer, the Immigration and Naturaliza­tion Service is effectively barred from for­bidding gay visitors from entering. The recent ruling upheld a decision by U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar in April 1982 that British journalist Carl Hill could not be excluded from coming to a Lesbian and Gay Freedom Day Parade in San Francisco. That ruling was expanded into a nation­wide injunction, and homosexuals have been admitted since then. David Ilchert, chief of the INS in San Francisco, said, "We will continue to adhere to the court mandate." The winner in the case was Gay Rights Advocates, which sued for Hill. Legal Director Leonard Graff said, "This is fabu­lous. It means that the INS can no longer bar gay visitors to this country just because they are gay.'' The court decided that Congress intended the INS to get a medical ruling that a person is homosexual before the service could exclude him or her. Just an admission from the person would not be sufficient. Before 1979, Public Health Service doc­tors routinely gave such medical exam in a· lions. But the service discontinued the policy, saying that it no longer considered homo· sexuality a mental disorder. 'T'he ruling cloBes a chapter in the gay righta movement, the effort to obtain equal access for gay foreign visitors. How­ever, groups have been petitioning for qua­rantines and other medical surveillance of gaya because of AIDS, and the Public Health Service retains the right to exam­me people for diseases considered to be a threat to the public. SEPT 30, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Montrose Clinic Seeks to Establish Better Image By Robert Hyde Following an internal shakeup that prompted the Montrose Clinic to once again operate on an all-volunteer basis, its current direct.on are concerned with the image the clinic garnered during it.a late summer crisis and with the effect those actions had on members of the commun­ity. "We have never been a publicity seeking organization or part of the political com· munity," Craig Litton, corporate treasurer and trustee, said recently. "And we want the community to know that we are func· tioning now better than we have in a long while," Litton said, wanting to dispel any rumors to the contrary. The Montrose Clinic is the third largest clinic of its kind in the country, specializ­ing in the diagnosis and treatment of sexu­ally transmitted diseases. Also, the clinic provided the only gay representation in the state to the recent Texas Conference on Disease Prevention and Health Promo· ti on. In May of this year, Texas representa­tive Debra Danburg introduced a resolu­tion to the Texas House (H.R. 482) wherein the clinic was recognized for 0 the out­standing service it has provided to the citi­zens of its community .... " It was also mentioned in the resolution that representatives of the Texas Depart· ment of Health, the Houston Health Department and the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta all voiced approval of the clinic's operations. "There is a syphilis and gonorrhea epi­demic in Texas," Acting Director Alan Pierce said. "This could account for the 16,000 viaita from over 7500 patients we have seen during our past year and a half in operation." Pierce mentioned that although the clinic ie now screening for hepatitis-B, the major concern of moat of it.8 patient.8 involves AJDS, which despite it threat, is only being given a medium priority by state health officials. 110nce you can cure it," Pierce eaid, "it will be given a higher priority. Right now, people are talking about a state conference on the disease so that everyone will be brought up to date on just what can be done." Pierce said that he hopes that within the near future, some form of testing will be available for pre-AIDS diagnosis. "An AIDS screening program is under development," he said. "We're looking for a basic immune system response, but, as yet, there is no test." The Montrose Clinic will be celebrating ita second anni­versary on Sunday, October 23, with an open house to which the public is invited. In fact, the public is encouraged to partici­pate in the operation of the dinic, Pierce said. "Our only real shortage now is with doc­tors to volunteer their time," Pierce said. "Already we have volunteer nurses and those interested in doing lab work for us. "But what we really need are people who will work on projects out.aide the clinic's hours (6:00-10:00 p.m. Monday-Friday). We need artists and writers and people who wi11 work on committees for fundraia· ing, education and public rE:lations!' For those interested in becoming a part of this community effort, call Pierceat5is. 5535. New Games Joust with 'Dragon's Lair' "Dragon's Lair," that much-hyped ani­mated video game, has made it to the top of the charts in arcadeland, but new rivaJs are appearing to joust for the title. The toughest-looking contender is the super-sophisticated "Mach 3," which com­bines computer graphics with laser disc images of real terrain. Then there's "Bouncer," where the idea is to throw disreputable characters out of a bar so the waitress can serve drinks­that'a a good one for the kiddies. "Bouncer," like "Dragon's Lair,'" is ani· mated by a former Disney artisl Meanwhile, Starcom, the company that dreamed up "Dragon's Lair," is working on "Space Ace," based on the adventure& of an intergalactic weakling who occa· sionally turns into a superman, reports USA Today. Montrose Mouth The Greek Fest There are five major community events in Montrose each year and next week we have one of them. It's the annual Greek Festival 1n the 3500 block of Yoakum (See story page 1.) By "major events," we mean big enough to draw people out into the streets. Our other major events are the spring and fall Westhe1mer Colony Art Festivals, the Gay Pride Week Parade and (are you ready?) Halloween. Is it that time already? Yes. One month. Start working on those costumes. -o- Houston socialite Carolyn Farb knows just who are her city's movers and shak· ors She told W Magazine about her plans to host a television talk show. saying, '"I want to interview the people who are shaping Houston; the artists, the archi­tects and , . the great divorce lawyers!'" She should know. Thanks to her own divorce lawyer, she's sitting on a cool $20 million settlement -o- The Peaches Memorial Drag Show and Auction held at Mary's Lounge two weeks back netted $461.50 for the KStAIDS Foundation of Houston. -o- Houston North Professionals. an active social and educational organization for professional lesbians and gay men living in the area from Greenspoint north to FM 1960 east and west, now has a few open­ings for new members. For further infor­mation, contact Bill at 821·7126 or write HNPRO, Box 3840, Humble, TX 77338 -o- Marilyn Monroe fans will have a chance to remember the glamorous star when the Marilyn Monroe Foundation for Children sponsors its Marilyn Monroe look-alike contest to held October 23 at Annabelle's atop the Westin Galleria Grand prizew1ll be a trip for two to New York City, courtesy good or Eastern Air­lines For add1t1onal information. call 552- 0427. -o- The Comedy Workshop Tour Company is looking for a male comedy actor Aud•· lions will be this Sunday, October 2, in the Comedy Workshop Cabaret Theater at 3:30 p.m. For more information, call 524-7333. -o- Houston choreographer Glen Hunsucker will present his versatile dance troupe in a cabaret performance at Rockefeller"s next Thursday evening at 8. A graduate of the University of Houston, Hunsucker studied professionally in England and the United States and has danced with Rita Moreno, Giselle McKens1e. Van Johnson and Carol Lawrence. For information and reservations. call Rockefeller's at 861-8925 Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston. TX 77006 About The New Downtown Convention Center. FACT. Three independent studies and a blue ribbon committee of Houston citizens all agree: we need a new convention center downtown now if we are to compete for the mil ­lions of dollars in convention business Houston needs to get on the go again. FACT. Today, 49 major conventions worth over S233 million will come to Houston only if we have a new convention center. FACT. The Astrodomain is not a con­vention facility It was built for sports and livestock shows. For example, these kinds of events tied up the Astrodo­main 207 days last year alone. FACT. The Albert Thomas Hall is too small for most conventions and cannot be expanded. FACT. A new center will create 9,900 permanent jobs and 1,200 construction jobs. FACT. A new center will stimulate Houston's economic recovery by pumping over S4 30 million into our city every year and generating millions of dollars in new tax revenue. FACT. The new center will not add to Houston's traffic congestion because most delegates will fly to Houston, then take taxis or shuttle buses to get around town. FACT. Under Proposition A, the center would be built and op­erated at no cost to Houston taxpayers. By law, no property taxes, sales taxes or any other taxes which go into the gen­eral fund could ever be used. FACT. Under Proposition A, the Hotel Occupancy Tax (ex­cluding the I% committed to the arts) and money generated by the convention center itself could be used to build or oper­ate the building. FACT. Once Proposition A becomes law, only the people will be able to change or repeal it through another election. Vote For Proposition A. Houston Gets The Benefits. Visitors Pay The Bills. And That's A Fact. POL AD\ P._JD FOR B't Falt.N.,.. Of THE l)()'il-'NT()'llN (0~'1."(Tl()..., (.ESTER 921 MAJS ST Sl 'IT'E 62S. HOUSTON TEXAS 77002 Heights PAC Endorsements Announced The Heights Area Political Action Com­mittee has elected to endorse the following candidates: Mayor-Kathy Whitmire; City Council District H-Dale Gorc­zynski; City Council District I-Rey Rodriquez; City Coucil At-Large Position I-Anne Wheeler; City Council At-Large Position 4-Anthony Hall and Nikki Van Hightower. Past efforts on the part of the organiza­tion have led to the endorsement of such euccessfuJ candidates as Kathy Whitmire, Dale Gorczynski, Debra Danburg, John Whitmire, Craig Waohington and the Democratic ticket in the general and run­off elections. Additionally, all candidates Heights Area PAC endoroed in the state primary were succeBSful in obtaining the Democratic nomination. Formed in 1981 to fill a political void which existed in the Heights, the Heights Area PAC now coordinates 10 core pre­cincts. Activities offered to those candi­dates the organization elects to endorse include voter registration, identifying likely voters, fundraisers, voter education efforts, telephone banks and newsletters. Should you be interested in participat­ing in general Heights area political activ· ities, please contact Dennis Spencer at 868-33113. Kindergarten Traffic School Brazilian drivers who violate the rules of the road more than once are being sub­jected to a little juvenile justice. The offenders are forced to sit through a lesson on road safety ... surrounded by a cla88 of three- and four-year olds. Apparently the system works. In the past year, no one who's been through the humiliating experience has been caught violating traffice laws again. Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright •1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg publia~1ed•lor Ace!Clark gr.,,nie1 Jeff Bray gr1ph1C.S Sonny D1v1s ~rw119 Robert Hyde rn1n1gmg .clttor Chuck Meredith IPO'I• MJtfor Jon Cheetwood Joe L. Watts contr1bc.ilmQ 11r11t1rs Lyt Hams «NeniclllQ dfr.clor M.,1.r,.k, ,D,.mragg o o1on Cheetwood CIN11l1ed ~aJftfl Fourtdlftg M•~r G•Nler Montrose Buaineu Gutid. G•y Prw1 AMOcilflOfl New.t Servlcff lnt.-naUon.1 Gey New1Agency. P1c1f1c N11Wr1 ...... "' . Austin BurHU C1ptlof New1 Sllrv•U Syndk:•tfd fffture S•rv•ce• & Wrn~•: 1Sen fr1nclseo) Ctironk:•e f .. h.1t• Un•ted featur1 Syndicate. Jellr-v W•llon. A1ndy Allred. Stonew11i f11lurn Syndtcate. Br11n MtNIUQht, Joe Baker POSTMA5TEA Slnd 1ddr .. correcl•on• to 3317 MontroN •JM. Houston, TX 77006 Sub6ctipltOl'l rele in US m JHled MVll~ $49 per yHr (52 iltunl. $21per1111; month• {:le iuue1), 04" SI .25 per week lieu thin l6 IUuNJ BIC::k IMLHll $2 00 each N•toonel ldv9rtiaJng fltJflHflflll\I• Joe 01SabllO. A•~del: M9"1t1ng. 8e6 &th Avll'\VI. New York 10011. 1212) 242-8883 At1Yert/1Jng t!Hdl//11 Tu .. day. S.3Clprn, for i11ue rel .. Md fro· dly9Y•n•ng Nol•U lrJ adv9rt~•ff locll 1dverl•llf'IQ rete 1Chedu11 S111:·A wu llflect•ve July 1, 1913 RNpone/Ofl1ty MontroN Vo.ce" doM not lll.IUl'lll fM90""" b<ltty IOI IOV.r111•ng ClallT>I AHde,. thould ller1 MontrOH Volte .. to 1ny decepl•v• 1dvertlllf'Q Bankrupt Gay Publication Back in Print By Lindsay Taylor Jnt.ernatlonal Gay New• Acency LONDON-Britain's only national gay newspaper, the biweekly Gay News, was relaunched in mid-August. The newspaper had not appeared since its previous owner, Robert Palmer, declared it bankrupt in April after a year of financial problems. A month later, the paper's assets were auctioned. A collective, comprising former staff members, attempted to buy the paper, but were outbid by businessman Nigel Ostrer, who paid around $37,000 for the Gay News offices and equipment. Although Ootrer offered a number of the former staff members their jobs back, all but three declined when it became appar­ent that the new owner was strongly opposed to the leftwing and pro-feminist principles that the paper had promoted. The new paper is much lighter in content, politicaJJy unaligned and aimed at the urban gay men's market. The editorial pol­icy is to emphasize "travel, fashion, gos­sip, entertainment and classified ads." But the content and the format of the new Gay News put it in competition with the monthly magazine Him, oneofseveral glossy publications produced by Millivres, Ltd., another one of the unsuccessful bidders for the assets of Gay News. Competition between Him and Gay News will be intensified by tbe fact that parts of Gay News' former readership have been siphoned off by other newspap­ers. Most popular is the weekly giveaway Capital Gay, now into its third year and generalJy recognized to have the best news coverage of London and the surrounding areas. There have also been new magazines aimed at local audiences in Scotland, Manchester and the East Midlands and a monthly, Outrage, which aimo to cover national newa from a radical socialist point of view. In addition, four former members of the Gay News staff are plan­ning to revive the comprehensive listings that were an important part of the old paper. The listings will be published as a biweekly or monthly that will cover all gay hara, clubs, organizations and events throughout the United Kingdom. -----------.;;;SEPT 30, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 + 11 I A major community event in Montrose each year­the Greek Festival on Yoakum. See story on page one. No Funding for AIDS Research at Yale ~[. ~~ 91~~~~;~etroline" NEW HAVEN, Conn.-Dr. William Sabella of the Connecticut Department of Health Services Office of Public Health has reported that the Yale University con­tract for funding, in regard to AIDS research, from the National Institute of Health has been denied. Dr. Sabella, who is AIDSCoordinator in Connecticut, said, "If more funding for research becomes available, all those who volunteered for the reoearch study will be notified." In June, the National Institute of Health had targeted New Haven as a test· ing center for AIDS research. As a result, in early July, a Yale team of doctoro, two of which were openly gay, had been formed and sought volunteers to participate in the program. Hundreds of gay men in Connecticut signed up for the free regular physical and lab findings. National AIDS Vigil Endorsed Houston'• Committee for Public Health Awarene88 has endorsed the National AIDS Vigil to be held in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, October 8, at 5:00 p.m. The vigil will provide an opportunity for indi­viduals and groups to voice concern about AIDS. "The vigil is • a forum to show persons with AIDS that we care about their lives; that we support their struggle to overcome AIDS, as well as discrimination in health care, housing and jobs; that we demand necessary governmental response for funding of research and patient care servi­ces, said Carl Bohannon, the committee's director. Commenting further, Bohannon urged Houstonians to attend the vigil, but bar­ring that, he said, "Wherever you are on October 8 at 5:00 p.m. (4:00 p.m. Houston time), pause to remember those who need help. Then get involved!" Gay Task Force Seeks Big Labor Support By Larry Bush The National Gay Task Force has sent out queHtionnaires to about 200 major unions surveying their support of gay civil rights and commitment to protections of gay workers. NGTF director Virginia Apuzzo notes in her letter to union leaders that "most (unions) have not formalized or communicated their positions." She adds that "I am confident that results of this survey will show strong support within organized labor for if&yllesbian rights in the 1980's." The survey, which matches ones under­taken by NGTF of major corporation•. io the first to ever que~tion labor leaders about their support for gay rights. Among the labor groups which have previously announced their support for gay rights are the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees; thP Interna­tional Ladies' Garment Workers' Union; Service Employees International Union and the Industrial Union Department of the AFL-CIO. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 30, 1983 No Gay Mags in Prison JntemaUonal Gay New• A&'ency A Kentucky correctional institution has been threatened with a lawsuit by the group National Gay Rights Advocates ifit does not reverse its present policy of refus­ing its inmate& the right to receive gay publications. In August, Robert Morris, the associate editor of TM Gaycon Press, a publication containing gay news, addresses of poten­tial pen pals and uaually one nude male photograph per issue, sent the publication to two inmates at the Luther Luckett Cor­rectional Complell in LaGrange, Ken· lucky, at their request. On August 25, Morris received a notice that the institu­tion would not perm.it the two inmates to receive the newsletter. Morris then wrote to Warden William Seabold to ask what the prison's objection was. On September 6, Steven T. Adwell, procedure officer of the prison, wrote back aaying: "Publications which advocate or legitimize bomoaexuality are rejected, as homosexuality is a documented threat to institutional order and security. All cen­sorship is based solely upon security con­siderations." National Gay Rights Advocates, the San Fraancisco-based organization that auccessfully worked to change the dis­crimination policies of the U.S. Immigra­tion and Naturalization Service, wrote to the prison and requested a statement of its policy on gay publication&, saying that if it refuaea to let prisoners receive them, it is violating the prisoners' civil rights. Leonard Graff. the director of National Gay Rights Advocates. wrote that the legal organization ia "prepared to go to court" if the anti-gay procedures remain in effect. The two prisoners who requested The Gaycon Pre11, Rick Espinoaa and Bruce Roller, wrote to editor Morri• that they were not notified that the publication was denied them, which they considered 0 a double violation of the institution's own regulations." No-Fault Preachers Not content with suing their doctors for malpractice, Americana are now suing their ministers. And aa a result, there's a boom in clergy liability insurance. John Cleary, a lawyer for Church Mui· ual Insurance Company in Wiaconsin, aaya, .. Fifty years ago, nobody would have thought of suing a minister " Church Mutual now insures 26,000 churches in 28 states, at premiums of about S35 a year. The need to cover ministers became apparent five years ago when an Arkan­sas preacher was sued for $1 million by a man who claimed his wife divorced him after hearing sermons against drinking, smoking and gambling, reports the Amer­ican Bar Aasociation Journal. Tuesday & Wednesday's Movie Oct. 4 & 5 "The Lady Kiiiers" starring Alec Gulnne11 Tuesday & Wednesday Special 25¢ KEG BEER BUST ON THE PATIO Wednesday, Oct. 5 Taco Night-6pm Maria's own Special Recipe! Everyday Special 112 price drinks to all arriving at Mary's on a motorcycle' All Day Wednesday & Thursday Special Happy Hour prices to all in Mary's T-Shirtz LINGERIE & PAJAMA PARTY Every Friday, 7am-Noon First drink free to all in proper attire LEATHER NIGHT Every Friday, 8pm-2am 75¢ can beer to all in Leather PARKING IN SIDE LOT 5PM·BAM WEEKDAYS. ALL DAY WEEKENDS (TOW AWAY ZONE OTHER TIMES) AFTER-HOURS NIGHTLY 1022 WESTHEIMER Home of Houston Motorcycle Club 528-8851 Music by Larry Fought MEMBER GREATER MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD SPANISH I FLOWER CanCrusher Co~oration RESTAURANT g COMPLIMENTARY BREAKFAST with puuha"" of br~kfau of fi}ual or lt"ht"T valu(' till IO:!Oam ~ "@ © ~ We Pay Cash for Your Trash*! "Trash by Can Crusher's definition is aluminum cans only. Can Crusher Corporation is a full-service recycling company paying market prices for aluminum cans. Our hours are Barn to 7pm Monday thru Friday and 9am to 2pm on Saturday Free Coffee to Cu1tomera. Help America j 201Jr. Recycle and Make Silver Sprmg Money Too! "' 1 .;; THIS COUPON GOOD THROUGH 11>-2&-83 The .can Crusher Corp also otters a lull-service pickup recycling program for bars ! Wtsh1ngton restaurants & industry Call 864-2223 for details. 5 2011 Sliver St. "' closed Tuesday 10pm; n~open Wed 10em ~~~~~~be~~~ SEPT. 30, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 HOUSTON'S NUMBER 1 805 Pacific Featuring the Best of Top Tunes Daily NEW ON MONDAY-HAPPY HOUR ALL DAY & ALL NIGHT WEDNESDAY-HAPPY HOUR ALL DAY & ALL NIGHT 8 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 30, 1983 ANTHONY -- HALL L.I At the Democratic National Convention in 1980, he supported the inclusion of the Gay Rights Plank to the National Party Platform. Treat yourself once in your life-Be Pampered Like a Queen! CITY WIDE POS·. 4 Fly First Class! 2713 Main, Houston, Texas 77002, J.E. Middleton, S•, Treasurer. Serving the Gay Community Paid for by the Anthony Hall for City Council Committee, Are You Running with Me, Jesus? Evangelical Christians have taken on a healthy glow in Dallas-at least at the Highland Park Presbyterian Chun:h, reports American Health. That's where Billy Graham's brother-in-law presides over a $6. 7 million fitness center which mixea Jesus and jazzercise. The center offers the church's 8000 members a variety of sports: tennis, exer­cise, basketball, roller skating, aerobics and othera. Wrestler Flips Lid Over Lost Toupee "Severe emotional distre88" is what pro­fessional wrestler Steve Grabowski says he 1uffered, and that's why he's fi led a $200,000 lawsuit agains~ a N~w l;lamp-. shire firm he claims promised him his n ew wig would stay on, even in the ring. It didn't during a match in Allentown, Penneylvania . . Grabowelri'a opponent grabbed the harr­piece, tore it off and exhibited it to the laughter and 1COrn of 2500 fane and thou- 1and.a of televi1ion viewers worldwide. Grabow11ri aaya the incident may have permanen Uy damaged his ca reer, reports the Booton Gwbe 'Freeway Killer' Sentenced Jnternatlonal Gay New• A•ency Convicted "Freeway Killer" William Bonin, already facing execution for 10 tor­turee and murders of gay men in Los Angeles, wae given the death penalty again recently for the sex slaying& of four more young men in suburban Orange County. A jury ordered that Bonin die in San Quentin Prison in the gas chamber. After a sU::-week trial, the same jurors had deliberated three daye before convict­ing the former truck driver and ex-Marine of four count.a of tint-degree murder and four counts of robbery. Bonin was found guilty of murdering Lawrenoe Sharp, 17, in November 1979; Glenn Barker. 14. of Huntington Beach, and Ru18ell Rugh, 15, of Garden Grove, both in March 1980; and Frank Fox. 17, of Bellflower, in May 1980. All the victims were hitchhiking when Bonin picked them up. Bonin wa1 convicted last year and sent­enced to die. In arguing for the imposition of a second death penalty, prosecutor Bryan Brown told jurors thathewanl<!d to be sure tha Bonin would not go free should his Loa Angelee conviction be overturned on appeal. Bonin originally was linked to the elay­inga of about 40 boys and young men in five Southern California counties between 1972 and 1980. Authorities now say that many of~ C8N8 will never be aolvod. Take off with Eastern and land on Broadway. Introducing Eastern's lively New York City for less than I Love New York you can imagine. at Night Show Tours. Call your Travel Agent, or (Includes Advance Theatre Ticket Purchase) Eastern Airlines at 738-8615 in From the cozy off-Broadway Houston for complete details. theaters to the shining lights on Then take off for Broadway. the Great White Way, the stars come out every night on stage in New York City. And now you can experience all the excitement of live theater and EASTERN America's famrite way to fly (1) UJ u 6 > UJ Ill 0 a: >z­0 ::e tp~ UJ en TEXAS-OU WEEKEND OCTOBER 7-8-9 DALLAS 528-1004 3923 CEDAR SPRINGS WHERE THE CROSSROADS MEET ~ 3911 CEDAR SPRINGS 526-5590 DALLAS #1 SHOWS 7 NIGHTS A WEEK ~~19/y ~-MriYr~ GCOMPANY er;: :X::: 3°14 Throckmorton i.-.e 5" 4105 WHERE MEN CRUISE MEN 4{()()1 4001 CEDAR SPRINGS DALLAS' UL·TIMATE DANCE BAR THE ACTION IS ON OUR FIELD 10 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 30, 1983 A Good Turn by Hightower From Len Shelton I find the dialogue being expre88ed con­cerning the Van Hightower/ Hall council race to be most interesting. I like both can­didates, but we can vote for only one per­eon. I say this because I, too, have known Dr. Van Hightower to always be most sup­portive of our community's concerns. I am a member of the Metropolitsn Com­munity Church of The Re&urrection. Sev­eral years ago, Nikki accepted my invitation to attend our Fall Festival and draw the winning ticket for the pick-up truck raffle. In August 1981, the Uruversal Fellow­ship of the Metropolitsn Commuruty Churches held ita General Conference here in Houston. I served as the local con­ference coordinator and in that capacity iaeued invitations to several local politi­cians to be platform guests at our Human Righta Rally. Through their secretaries, I received attendance commibnents from five individuals. However only Sissy Farenthold and Nikki Van Hightower showed up. Ms. Farenthold delivered her greetings and asked to be excused for another appointment. l\ikk~ on the other hand. stayed and sat through the entire long and boring pro­gram. The rally was not even well attended by the conventioneers, as we had Just concluded a tough battle over the ieaue of inclusive language usage in wor- 1hip eervices, and no one was in a celebra~ tion mood. I will alwaya be grateful to Nikki for her sup~rt and patience. Incumbent Friend Deserves Continued Support From Neil Isbin I strongly urge all responsible gay voters to serioualy consider supporting and vot­ing for Anthony Hall. Mr. Hall is a remar­k. ably impreuive man with a strong 10-year record of effective political leader­ship. Although the GPC has endorsed other candidatee over Anthony, as a mat­ter of principle, Mr. Hall has always been supporter of gay issues. In 1973 before the GPC existed, Anthony Hall stood together with Craig Washing­ton and 15 others in the Texas Legialature and called for the repeal of Texas Penal Code 21.06. All a member of the State Democratic Executive Committee, Anthony Hall has championed gay partic­ipation and gay issues. As a state legisla­tor and City Councilmember, Anthony Hall as alwaye been with us. Impreesed by Anthony Hall's knowl­edge of the iuuee and long record of prin· cipled and effective leadership, the GPC Screening Committee voted 12 to 7 to endorae Anthony Hall over Nikki Van Hightower. However, two nights later, the Caucus voted 90 to 39 to endorse Nikki. The GPC endorsement should carry a lot of weight in the gay community-but the re880n1 behind the endorsement must stand up to public acrutiny, The endorse­ment should be viewed as a reoom.menda­tion to the gay community-not as an inviolable command. If you are a responsi· hie voter, you make up your own mind. I urge you to listen to both the reasons why the GPC endorsed Nikki and the reasons why a number of gays are supporting Anthony-and then decide for yourself. When you listen to Nikki speak and read her courageoua radio editorials of 1978, one cannot help to be impressed. There can be no doubt of Nikki's concern for gay righta. Like Si .. y Farenthold. Nikki is an eloquent, outspoken advocate of human righta. I think Nikki would make a fine addition to the City Council-BUT NOT AT THE EXPENSE OF LOSING AA"l'HONY HALL. ;A.a a member of City Council, Anthony Hall has developed the knowledge and expertise to do an effective job. The bottom line is that the gay commuruty will be making a grave mistake if we toss out an effective incumbent friend for a challeng­ing friend. Even though Anthony is switching seata, make no doubt about it, he is the incumbent. To argue that he is not the incumbent is to play semantics in a most immature fashion. I have always been an idealist. I have stood up for the "politics of integrity" - which is the politics of courage, honesty and openeas. I have been a vocal critic of the "politics as usual"-which is the polit· ics of fear and deception and the politics of image over 1ubstance. I supported John Anderson over Jimmy Carter and initially supported Judge Al Green over Kathy Whitmire. Given my idealism and my criticism of City Council inaction, I was recently ques-tioned a1 to why I would support a current City Council member over such an out· spoken advocate like Nikki. While I have criticized the lack of City Council action, I have always phrased it as a criticism of our own gay political leadership. I wouldn't support Anthony Hall if he had betrayed us, but I won't betray him by opposing his reelection because he didn't initiate action independent of organized gay requests. Most City Councilmembers have repeatedly asked us what we wanted them to do-and have been given no direc· tion by our gay political leadership. Ern­est McGowen has repeatedly told us, "If you want something, get in there and lobby for it." The lack of City Council action cannot be attributed to the lack of wi.Uingness of City Councilmembers to act on our behalf. Honest and effecting politicians are rare. When they are friends, we should Letters support them. When an incumbent loses, his career i1 usually over; a challenger can lose several times and 1till easily win later. We can wait for a better opportunity to elect Nikki Van Hightower. We need to KEEP Anthony Hall, a PROVEN friend and an EFFECTIVE political leader in the City Council. Rich's Harassed, Says Readers From Beth Childress and Rodney J. Seiler To Mayor Katherine Whitmire We would like to bring to your attention 1omething that happened Saturday night, Sept. 24, at Rich's Disco, 2401 San Jacinto. A friend of ours from San Antonio was visiting us for the weekend. He wanted to (last 2 Nights-This Friday & Saturday Penny Hamilton) -I-I·r I••l•l ••• Appearing Oct. 4-15 SAMANTHA SAMUELS _-!!!!L 2702 Klrby-524-6272 Shows 9:30, 11, 12:30 go out for a few drinks and dancing. He had never been to Rich's and had heard good things about the club, so we took him there. We arrived at about 11:30 p.m. (We paid $5 per person just to get in the door.) At about 12:30 a.m., an announcement was made that the entire club was going to participate in a fire drill by order of the Houston Fire Department. It was also announced that upon reentering the club, everyone would be able to drink free for the remainder of the evening. The club was emptied in a matter of min­utes and in a very orderly manner. Some people were allowed back into the club, but only 150 people. We found out that 150 people would be let into the club free for drinks. The club would then be cleared and 150 more people would get in. We could not have gotten in before 2:00 a.m. SEPT. 30, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 We have been to other clubs throughout the Houston area where there are as many people in a smaller space and no one is hassled. The same thing happened two weeks ago, Sept. 10, but no one was a11owed back in. Why is Rich 's being harassed like this? We realize that there are fire codes and standards in regards to clubs and restau­rants, but unless all are patrolled equa lly, no one club should be singled out. 4\'1 Maple Avenue o1 Men DALLAS 526-9302 Lesbian Becomes Sheriffs Department Lieutenant lntern•tion•I G•y New• Aeency SAN FRANCISCO-Connie O'Connor, a lesbian activist, has been promoted to lieutenant and will become section com­mander of the City Courts of San Fran­cisco. Ms. O'Connor will take charge of secur­ity for the courts, the Hall of Justice and City Hall, a job that entails overseeing 75 dPputiea, sergeants and transportation officers. New Video Game Con trolled by Brain Waves A new generation of video games con­trolled by brain waves is scheduled to hit the stores in time for Christmas. A Calif or· nia firm called Behavioral Engineering says the games will need no joystick, just a galvanic skin sensor hooked up to your home computer. Company founder Robert Dilts says the device allows players to "think" a space, ship up, down, left or right. Three mind· controlled games will be out in October, and Dilts says they're just a start. Future projects include computer programs for the handicapped and software th~t responds to emotions, reports Jnfoworld m a recent issue. For Texas/OU Weekend For High Energy Music For Dancing LO\.~~~~~ HAPPY HOUR DAILY 12·6pm EXPRESS TUESDAY 2327 GRANT AT FAIRVIEW 528-8342 PATIO BAR OPEN FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS 75C Beer, $1 Well Drinks 75C Well Drinks & Beer EXPRESS HOUR NITELY 9-10PM 75C Well Drinks & Beer ~~ . ~<Js? /\'; ROCK 'N' ROLL - ·~, 1E very Day 1.2..p_m...- 2am 12 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 30, 1983 AIDS Update By Harvey Thompson, M.D. One-third of the pages in the August issue of Annals of lnU!mal Medicine were con­cerned with AIDS coverage. The first of two main portions presented the long· awaited Health Department's case· control study of Kaposi's sarcoma and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in homo­sexual men: both their epidemiology and laboratory results. Here are some of the key pointa: Naticmal Case Control Study: Epidemi· ology. I. PWA's !People with AIDS) had a median of 61 partners per year, more than twice the average of 26 per year for the controla (healty gay men). 2. Cases were more likely to have expo­aure to feces during sex (via anal~ral, ano­aenital or fisting>. In fact, it was utounding to find that 52 percent of cases had inserted their hand into a partner's rectum aometime during the year prior to interview. 8. Drug use (marijuana, cocaine, heroin, amphetamines, barbiturates, LSD, Quaa­lude& or MDA) was also more commonly seen among cases, although it was not iso­lated to any one particular drug. 4. There was NO difference between cases and controls in terms of frequency of the receptive role. 5. Amyl nitrite did SOT show up more frequently among AIDS cases than con· trols. However, known lifetime exposure (days of use) for nitrites was greater for cases than controls. 6. Strongly uaociated with cases of AlDS were higher proportions of aex partnera from bathhouses. 1- No differences among cases or con­troh1 were found in levels of income or edu­cation; one-third of AIDS cases were earning more than $20,000 per year, and the median educational level of both cases and control• waa 16 years. B. The conclusion was that AIDS as manifeeted by Kaposi's sarcoma and Pneymocyatie carinii pneumonia was usociated with certain aspects oflifestyle 1een in a eubgroup of the male homosex­ual population. National Ca•e Study: Laboratory I. Cuea had lower numbers of lympho­cyteo, and specifically, the helper type of T-lymphocytes. More than 75 percent of ca.ses had ratios of helper to suppressor (the well-known T-cell ratio) lower than the lowest of healthy homosexual controls (0.6 vs. 1.4 for controls). 2_ The lymphocyte• of cases were less likely to respond to known stimulator• of lymphocytes. 3. Epetein-Barr virus antibodies (t_he cause of mononucleosis) were 11gntfi· candy more often present amonlit cases. 4. Cytomegalovi"1ll (CMVl titers were higher in cases than controls. Also. the virus was more often cultured from urine and throat swabs in cases. 5. Antibody to Hepatitis-A was more commonly seen in cases than controls. Thia was not true for Hepatitis-B. The UCLA Conference The second .. main feature" in the Annala of Internal Medicine was an excel­lent, up-to-date, complete discuBSion of AIDS by the UCLA faculty department of gastroenterology, immunology. epidemi­ology and oncology. This gem is a concise, well-written and sympathetic summary which can be obtained by writing the chief author: Dr. Michael Gottlieb, Department of Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, Loa Angeles. CA 90024. For a complete, state-of-the-art presentation, it can't be beat. Some of the significant data are: 1. KS is more often multi-focal than a single leeion presentation. 2. KS accounts for up to 10 percent of all cancera in Uganda and Kenya. 3. KS can occur in virtually any organ of the body. Fifty percent of cases have large and small intestinal involvement when they are examined for KS legions. 4. Interferon is achieving complete or partial responses in up to 50 percent of cases. These are NOT cures, but instead responses of yet undetermined duration . GastroenteroWgy: 1. Of gastrointestinal pathogens (disease-causing agent.a), the cryptoapori­diosia parasite is the mOBt serious and omi­nous. because it has no treatment. PHOTO M 0 A.NOERSON HOSP IT At. 2. Weight loss is the most striking early clinical feature with AIDS cases in the infectious type of presentation. 3. Generally, overt akin lesions are pres~ ent with GI Kaposi's aarcoma, but there were two of the 25 patient.a who had no skin lesions, despite KS in the bowel. Immune System: l. Antibody responses to immunization were reduced (poHible B-lymphocyte problem?) but ordinary bacterial infec· tione (such as staph, strep) were not pres­ent. 2. Only 50 percent of cases with KS had Health decreased lymphocytes, whereas all patients with the infectious presentation of AIDS had reduced numbers. 3. Either helper T-cell decreases or sup­pressor T-cell increases can make a T-cell ratio low. Susceptibility to AIDS may depend on which is present, rather than merely the ratio of the two. 4. Persistence of immunodeficiency is a major feature of AIDS; only two of 21 patients have had a return to normal immunity. Epidemiology: l. No cases of AIDS existed before 1979; furthermore, complete recovery has not yet occurred in an AIDS person. 2. There are cases of females apparently getting AJDS from a partner who is not a drug abuser, auggesting that transmis· sion can occur through heterosexual con­tact. 3. Only 20 heterosexual patients have KS, compared with 445 cases among homosexual or bisexual men. KS is becom­ing the "gay cancer," like it or not. KS is seen 20 times more often in that high-risk group than in the other three categories (heroin addicts, Haitians and hemophili­acs). 4. Cytomegalovirus seems to be hetero· geneous by gene-typing. Apparently. more than one CMV strain is associated with the AIDS epidemic. 5. By 191!5, 20,000 persons will have AIDS God ble11 Or. Gottlieb for his closing atatement: "Given the exponential rise in the number of cases, and the cruel nature of the disease, we hope that efforta will soon yield important information on causes, therapy and prevention." 1983 Stonewall Features Syndicate * sta.uU1g * ffie Qallgegt 8eddy CBeall CoQQection in u\Aont1toge Come cpfoy wtth CUs 6% <Jlawl~cw - 'J,lou~lo~ <'"fexa~ 77006-529-8299 (')pe• ...Moadag '~" ga1 ... da~ "o" lpi.. C"foda1r- 111 9pm NOW SIHIO lil!G A NIGHT AT THE ADONIS SKIN DEEP THE OFF-BROADWAY SMASH HIT! 4ib!¢' and the TOWER THEATRE Present A se lf-righteous sister encounters four of her alumni who expose just how her teachings have affected their lives TOWER THEATRE OCT 13 - 16 and OCT 20 - 23 T1ekets to all shows available at all TICKETRON and TICKETMASTER . outlets rncludrng all Joske's, Sound Warehouse, and the Tower Theatre ORDER BY PHONE I CALL TELETRON (713) 526-1709 CHARGE TO MASTER CARD OR VISA THE TOWER THEATRE 1201 Westheirner - Secured Parking Available SEPT 30. 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 13 BR EL/PIAF Ruth Hastings & Co. *Back by Popular Demand * 3 Weeks Only Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday Nights thru Oct. 19 reservations requested The Cabaret that Specializes in Musical Revues 14 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 30, 1983 (from kftJ 1. "Green Geta a Grudge," urban hya!J!ria screa.mmg at the uiewer. By Jeff Del~. Third Award .. 2. ·:i;;etting There," wind-blown atrttt acene of people gomg where? By Roy Vmaon T.~maa, ~cond Award. 3. Boomtown Crwaer, an inde~ndent buaineaaman with a full load of gooda. By Frank W1ll1ama, Firat Award. Contemporary Views of Houston By JetfBray We have aeen them before. walking along the streeta. pushing their shopping carts laden with beer can1 and other redeema­ble items. They are a familiar sight in Houaton. Like a crumb of bread on a friend'• moustache, you see them but do not acknowledge their existence in hopes that they'll 110 away. They are not, after all, representative of our hopeful ambition•, and they most certainly do not correlate with the generally euphoric visions of Houston. Yet there is a life.size effigy (made of fibreglass and polyeoter reoin) of an old man pushing an overflowing shopping cart at The Art League of Houston's pres­ent show, "Contemporary Views of Hous­ton."' Indeed, the entire show ia a true ey~ stopper. There are no glittering cowboys waving their hats over the Oz-like skyline. There ie no pristine Chamber of Com· merce vision here! Frank Williams' shopping cart man, "Boomtown Cruiaer," ia a playful, yet rather unnerving representation of street life. "I look upon him aa an independent bus· ineuman," Williama 1ay1, patting hie Fi.rat Award creation. "It's not meant to be depreaing." In fact, Williama says that although he'a never talked to a "Boomtown Cruiser," he hae observed them for some time and actually spent a year executing his ahopping cart creation. He is very up­beat in hie interpretation. "There is 8'!lf.eatisfaction and fulfil· lment," Williama aays, pointing out the skillfully molded face with the hauntingly life-like eyes. "He's got a full load, and he even haa a halfbotUe of acotch in his back pocket." When asked if such a person approp-­riately represent.a contemporary Houston, William• shrugo. "You see them in every big city," he says, smiling. "Only in Houston, they even have their own shopping carts!" Per­haps affluence finds it.a way into the low· eat strata of society. The show ie wonderfully presented in the small room• of the Art League's gallery at 1953 Montrose Blvd. The other works of art show interesting impreseions of what it is like to live in Houston. "Getting There," a painting by Roy Yin· son Thomae, is the much deserved Second Award winner. Again, it focuses on the street scene, only on canvas inatead of in three dimenoions. The people in the paint· ing are being blown by a strong wind at HIGH RISE LIVING IS AFFORDABLE! The EXECUTIVE HOUSE at 230 West Alabama is having its Fall Move-In Special. For this month our prices have dropped: Unfurnished Efficiency Apartments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $375 Unfurnished One Bedroom Apartments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $475 EXECUTIVE HOUSE offers: • Paid Utilities • Security Building • Ory Sauna • Covered Parking Garage • Sun Deck • Gymnasium • Swimming Pool• Free Cable Television• Laundry Facilities EXECUTIVE HOUSE is 2 blocks from Main Street, 3 blocks from West­heimer and 4 blocks from Montrose. We are close to everything in the Montrose area. Call 529-8707 for appointment their backs, and they are walking aa though the wind is taking them aomewhere-but where? The sunlighht is cold-the atmosphere amazingly apooky for daylight. The peo­ple are in a scene that ie really quite nor· mal, yet full of tension and anxiety. The city is hazy around them, and there is an aura of unreality about them. Perhaps the sweeping brush strokes make it so fluid. Another award piece is a huge, light­hearted mixed media called "Green Geta A Grudge" by Jeff Delude. It is a representa· tion of traffic, towers, billboards, twisting freeway&, oil refineries and advertising crowded on an enormous canvas which screams out at the viewer and drags him into it. willing or not. For those with a taste for the bizarre, artist/photographer Mary Benedick has a very revealing photogrpah of Mary's bar at Christmu, complete with motorcycles parked outside and a massive ogr~like Santa with green akin saying, "Ob Noooooo!" It ia the classic Montrose ineti· tu ti on. Benedick is such an unimposing, cas· ual, professional-looking woman, it comes as a shock to see her as the photographer of something so notoriously radical . "They always decorate the placs in the moat colorful ways," she aays. She believea that Mary's ie a work of art, and she ia toying with the idea of creating a serieo of photographa of Mary's changing facade. "I eapecially like the monster Santa ClaU1!" 1he exclaims with satiafaction. Ron Hageman, director for the Art League, saya that the show re~resenta ~e chosen worka from 170 entries. Seemg Houston aa a growing center for the arts, Hageman mailed out 2000 request.a to pos· aible contributing artista. "It'• always been here," he says. "What'• emerging is people'a sense of it." According to Hageman, the Art League has a role in creating greater awareness ~f art and talent in Houston and even m Texas as a whole. The Art Lea~e has been in exiatence for 35 years and ta now looking towards expanaion and encourag­ing talent to enter ex hi bi ta lik• the preaent one. The next ahow ia called "Five Emerg· ing Artiata" and it will beexacUy that; five artiata will be chosen from applicanta, and theo their work• will be shown to the pub­lic. Montrose Art The whole idea of bringing new talent into beingiarefreshing, and thatfeelingof surprise ia certainly shown in "Contem· porary Views of Houaton." But it ia not nece88arily "happy art." Much of it is ner· voua, electric, jagged looking. It is, how­ever, extremely vibrant and fresh. In a way, it capturea the energy and frenetic growth and development of the city. A perfect example is a small box on a pedestal that glistens with tiny jagged chunka of reflective blue glass glued all over it. It stands alone and is called "Hur­ricane Reconatruction," by Jack A. Maas· ing. The glass is from the ahattered window& left on the downtown streets after Hurricane Alicia. That little box reflects an incredible number of images; the artist on his knees picking up the pie­ces, the frailty of our technology in the face of nature, the howl of the wind and the ahat!J!r of glass. And more than any­thing else, the litUe box reflecta a period in time that ia Houston. That is as contem­porary ae art can be. The exhibit will run through October 7. The Cockroach: A Drinker's Friend Scientists in Japan say they may be able to prevent cirrhosis or the liver with • cockroaches. They say extracts from a variety of Asian cockroach has prevented Jiverdam­age in laboratory mice, reports the San Francisco Examiner. Cirrhosis is a leading cause of death among alcohoJics and i1 one of the top four causes of death among older Japanese. Golden Turkeys on Parade A British TV atation is trying to boost ratings by running the worst movies it can get ita hands on , reportathe St. Louio Post· DIBpatch. English viewer• will be subjected to such turkeys as They Savf'd Hitler's Brain and Godzilla uersiu the Smog Monster. And in keeping with the upcoming holi­day apirit, the station plans a Christmas Eve ahowing of Santa Claua Conquer• the Martians. ... •All Brands of Ice Cold KEG BEER • Delivery Service • Everyday Specials: Newport Vodka, 1. 75 liter, $7.69 McCormick Blended American Whiskey 1. 75 liter $9.89 lf'illfi1 759 ML $4.49 l!.;,2:JI Jamie '08 Scotch, 1.75 liter, $11.79 Hallgarten Lieb Fraumilch, 750 ML, 3for$7.00 - VJS4• 140Z Welch at ) Waqh Drive ~ 529-9964 ~ DWI CRIMINAL DEFENSE PERSONAL INJURY FAMILY LAW FREE CONSULTATION JOHN PAUL 8ARNICH ATTORNEY AT LAW 3317 MONTROSE, SUITE 318 (713) !523-!5006 16 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT 30, 1983 We Are Everywhere On the Job By Arthur S. Lazere, CPA It hu been my privilege u an activist and as a journalist to meet a wide variety of gay people who participate in our move­ment in diverse ways. Our diversity is part of our atrength; we are connected every which way with our non ·gay counterparts-someone among us can communicate as a peer with virtually anyone in the non-gay community. HOWARD WALLACE was one of the early pioneers in connecting the labor movement and the gay rights movement. The product of a middle-<lus family in Denver, Colorado, Wallace's early ideal­iam waa, in part, a reaction to the racist and conservative views espoused by his father. During the McCarthy era, Howard, then a high school student, joined the American Civil Liberties Union and the United World Federalist&. He was active in Black civil righta work in the 19508 and in the antiwar movement of the 1960s. Making hie living in warehouse work and truck driving, Howard was involved in organ:zing for the teamsters. In 1971 , Wallace came out and became active in gay right.a iBBues in San Fran­cisco. As early as 1974, he was able to enlist labor support for community picket­ing of ABC-TV, protesting an infamously homophobic episode of Marcus Welby~ M.D. He was a founder of Bay Area Gay Liberation (BAGL) in 1975. In 1976, Wal· lace negotiated an agreement of mutual oupport between BAGL and a group of 22 local union leaders. The agreement called for union support of inclusion of gay rights clauses in union contracts with employ en. In exchange, BAGL offered the unions support in trying to defeat a number of anti-labor propositions on the San Francisco ballot that year. Noting that women, blacks and Latinos all have caucuaea within the labor move-­ment, Wallace was a founder this year and U. pteeently co-ehair of the Lesbian/ Gay Labor Alliance. Seeking members among trade union people in the San Francisco Bay area. the L/GLA is encouraging establishment of gay caucuses within union locale. The Alliance seeks union support of gay righta legislation and gay rights clausee in union contracts, along with enforcement of such clauses through grievance procedures, and openly gay leadership within the union movement. The organization is also committed to helping g'ay work.en organize in the work­place. FOR MANY AMERCIANS, Australia is interesting' becauae it has exported Joan Sutherland and a remarkable number of hunky leathermen. I met recently with Ray Israel who is president of the Gay Bu.iness AsBOciation (New South Wales), a two-year-old Sydney organization with about 50 members, including 10 leobians. Israel, 40, is in the retail carpeting busi· ne88. The goals of the Gay Busineos Asso­ciation are similar to those of our business groups in the United States, although the Sydney group has not yet been involved in gay righta effort&, as have many Ameri· can buaineu groupa. In the Australian otates of South Aus· tralia and Victoria, sexual acts between consenting adulta are legal. In New South Walee, however, homosexual acts between two men are punishable by 14 years in prieon. Deepite that retrograde law, New South Wales also has strong legislation protecting g'ays from discrimination in employment and housing. What an extraordinary contradiction! Israel told me that despite the nondis· crimination law. the closets are as perva­sive in Sydney as they are in the United States. Still, Sydney's Oxford Street is "u busy u Castro Street," and Sydney has three regularly published gay newspap­ers. If you are headed for "down under," your inquiries wiB be weloome: Gay Busi­neu A ociation (NS\\>'), Box 41, Padding· ton, New South Wales, Australia. THE LEsBIA. . RIGHTS PROJECT (CRP) 1s ~ebrating lta ~ anniversafy Attorneys Donna Hitchens and Roberta Achtenberg with their support staff pro­vide a variety of services, principally for the lesbian community. First, LRP provides legal assistance to lesbians who otherwise could not afford attorneys when the issues in the case involve sexual orientation-a specialized sort of legal aid. Secondly, they pursue precedent-setting cases, seeking to establish new law through judicial interpretation. A recent case in this category was that of a lesbian who was seeking a position as a deputy sheriff in Contra Costa County, Cali,for· nia. Having scored well on the examina­tions. the applicant was turned down when, during lie-detector questioning, she admitted to being a lesbian. Although the cue was not in a jurisdic· tion with a gay rights Jaw, the Lesbian Rights Project was able to prevail under the state constitution provisions of equal protection and due process of law. Denise Kreps is now serving as a deputy sheriff. A third area of activity for the Project is the filing of amicus briefs-"friends of the court." In this capacity, LRP has contrib· uted to the legal effort& of the Gay Free­dom Day Parade Committee on immigration issues. While usually representing women, LRP will make exception to that rule when a man presents an ideal case for establish­ing a precedent of value to gay men and lesbians. They are currently Jitigating such a case for an employee of an agency of the State of California who is seeking spousal benefit.a for his lover. This case is testing the legal standing of Gov. Jerry Brown's executive order banning discrim­ination by the i.tate on the basis of sexual orientation. It also falls under the "equal protection" clause of California's constitu­tion. The Project has also published books for lawyers dealing with righta of lesbian mothers and gay fathers, as well as a man­ual for lay people on lesbian righta. They provide advisory and referral services nationwide. The Lesbian Rights Project is funded both by foundations and by community contributions . Lesbian Righta Project, 1370 Mission Street, Fourth Floor, San Francisco, CA 94131 Lazere is on the board of the San Fr;;_ ciaco Industrial Deuelapment Authority. His column originates at the "Bay Area RepQrter," a San Francisco gay newa· paper. Luncheon Menu Fried Zucchini Chips 2.95 Snacks Nachos Supreme 2.95 Shrimp Cocktail 4.95 ~ Sandwiches AJ=--, 'THE HAMBURGER" - Yi lb. of beef, thick and juicy - served with appropriate garnish. With cheese add .25¢ BAJA BURGER - Ground sirloin, topped with cheese, crisp bacon and sliced onion PA ITY MELT - Cheddar cheese and grilled onion on rye bread THE B.L.T. - bacon, lettuce and tomato; for an added twist try it with avocado or cheese. CLUB SANDWICH - slices of ham, roast beef, swiss cheese served on toasted bread and chips. CHICKEN FILET - topped with canadian bacon, swiss cheese and BBQ sauce REUBEN - Corned beef on rye, sauerkraut and swiss cheese FRENCH DIP - thinly sliced beef on French bread with au jus and chips BBQ Bl!EF - served on a bun with French fries . Soup and Sandwich Du Jour - Ask your waiter. Soup and Salad 3.95 4.75 5.25 3.75 4.95 5.50 4.95 5.50 4.50 5.25 4.50 THE HIDDEN DOOR OPENS W-1-D-E to HOUSTON's Texas & OU Fans Saturday Beer Bust 1 pm-5pm Sunday Beer Bust Noon-7pm 18 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 30, 1983 Montrose Live The Houston Symphony Orchestra: Our Own Little Band CHRISTIAN AND CONTINUING EDUCATION * Pot Lud Supper By Peter Derkaen Saturday, 7:31Jpm, Oct I Serg1u Com1ssiona. Conductor: Emanuel Ax, Pianist Program Smetana "The Moldau": Mozart. Piano Concerto No. 22. K. 482 ~ A Strauss. ··oon Quixote' In their last two concerts, the Houston Symphony and Sergiu Comissiona have set a musical standard which, if sustained for the rest of the season, would equal that available in any city in which I have beard fine music: Los Angeles, Boston, New York, Washington, Chicago, Paris. Conaidering playing technique, Boston and Chicago remain slightly superior, but in the more subjective aesthetics of the epiritual bond between an orchestra, the conductor, the music and the listener, I have not heard better anywhere. Period. Last Saturday evening, Mr. Comissiona led a truly symphonic interpretation of "The Moldau," a piece often scorned as nationalistic schmaltz. The tone painting was perfect: the peppy woodwinds sug­ge9ted the bubbling source; the lush atrings gave the perfect impression of the growing river; the mellow brasses depicted the rolling countryside. His shift­ing of dynamica and tempo kept this often. heard. treasure from seeming humdrum. I have heard only three performances of Mozart I consider perfect in style and tech· nique, two in Boston and this one in Hous­ton. Mr. Comiaaiona reduced the orchestra to 8-8-8-8-4 etringa and winds, as in the 11core. The HSO'e wood.winds' pointed tim­bres and the ever-amooth strings (muted in the andante) suggested period instru· men ts. Mr. Ai played with impeccable taste, drawing out the wit in the first movement, light melancholy in the second and vivac­ity in the finale. His touch was light but always 1ure, blending perfectly with the orchestral accompaniment and never overdone the way Mozart on the concert grand often is. Mr. Comissiona explored every nuance of the concerto in a leisurely and loving performance which went over half an hour, aurely some sort of record for a Mozart concerto. I loved every second of it! In Richard Strausa· masterpiece, first­chair cellist Shirley Trepel and violist Yiz­hak Schotten brilliantly portrayed the curmudgeonly Don Quixote and prosaic Sancho Panza, with more superb support Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston. TX 77006 from the conductor and orchestra. The Don'• madcap adventures with the herd of sheep and two wandering priests were so well done that I sat there laughing, to the surprise of those around me. Ms. Trepel's lovely playing of the sad soliloquy at the end of the piece waa the beet I have heard. Unfortunately, closing the concert with this mueic lowered the audience's energy and dampened well-earned applause. The only quarrel I had with this concert had nothing to do with the music, delayed for 10 minutes by the second in a series of unannounced and unnecessary lec­turetteti. The topic, '"lbree Hundred Yean of German Immigration," did not fit into thereat of the evening. The West German consul-general did not distinguilh himself as a histonan by citing Albert Einstein and Werner von Braun as examples of illustrious German immigrants. (Aa I recall, the former fled here for hio life, while the latter was captured as a pri­soner of war.) The three composers on the program could hardly all be considered German, unleas one 11808 the boundarie8 of 1942. Since the rattling of pageo and dropping of programa attests to the Houston concerl· goer'a avid literacy, these tedious speecheo could be much betterincorporated into the text. • .• Bo\IQm jine: Start the concert&on ti-1. o Improvisational Acting at St. Thomas For members of the community who like a spur-of-the-moment approach to their comedy or drama, the University of St. Thomas is providing free campus perfor­mances from its eight-member improvisa­tional troupe. The weekly symposium will be held at Crooker Center, 3900 M~. Ver­non. For further information or to arrange off-campus bookings, contact John Paul Sturtevant at 522-6455 or the St. Thomas drama department at 522-7911, ext. 305. * Beginning Sign Language "Thursdays, 7:S-Opm, Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27 * Body Magnificent Seminar Saturday. IOam, Oct. 15 * Homosexuality &: the Bible Wednesdays. 6pm, Oct. 12, 19, 26 * Dallas Choir &: Orchestra Sunday Mornmg, 10:-15, Oct. 9 MCCR 1919 Decatur 861-9149 CREWS I HAPPY HOUR Tuesday 4-Spm Daily 4-7pm Sunday-Thursday Midnight-2am DALI.AS' CRUISIEST PARTY SPOT Where it's Texas-OU Weekend Every Weekend, Every Day 3220 N. FITZHUGH-526-9320 SEPT. 30, 1983 I MONTROSE Vorce 19 ----IIYPN"OSIS---- ACQUIRED IMMUNE SUFFICIENCY THERAPY ~~~tt:!1~~ g:rd~f~dft!eir~S::~!!s~:Xc:aeaitY~:i!:d~~a~)~~ reduct.ion of stress, visual imagery and self-hypnoeis, you can live/love longer and bette~ enjoy life more, with fewer worries about di.seases aided by stress. Also, we can help you with the.se other problem.a: •OVERWEIGHT• DEPRESSION •SMOKING• MEMORY •STRESS• MOTIVATION •FEARS•PAINCONTROL • SLEEP DISORDERS THERAPEUTIC & FORENSIC HYPNOSIS INSTITUTE s:====523-3103 ===::a 3400 Montrose (Suite 807) Houston "PETER ALLEN IS A MASTER CRAFTSMAN! ' °!_st•phenHotden N•w YorkT1mes KRBE lfajfHOUSTON- 1070 AM FM 104 WELCOMES "THE CONSUMMATE ENTERTAINER!" -Ira Mayer. New Yorll" Post THE TOWE THEATRE OCT 10 & 11 8:00PM 2sHOWS oNIX! TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ALL TICKETRON AND TICKETMASTER OUTLETS INCLUDING SOUND WAREHOUSE AND ALL JOSKE'S STORES! Produced by PACE Concerts and the Tower Theatre THE TOWER THEATRE, 1201 Westheimer 20 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT 30, 1983 One visit to the Rice Catholic Student Center on • Saturday night at 7:30 Is all II !ak!s to realize why DIGNITY/HOUSTON has .•. MASS APP EA ;IOrrel!eWansh • men-----4 vAcAr10N cLue If you want to swing in New Orleans' French Quarter, call Linda Light for our $79 Weekend Special: Two days' stay in a luxury French Quar­ter Inn, Dinner for two at the Imperial Regency Restaurant, Cruise tickets on a Mississippi River­boat, a bottle of champagne, and round trip air fare from Houston to New Orleans and return. Frenchmen Orleans Travel Club For reservations, call Linda collect at (504) 943-3100 between IOam and 5pm j I I N 1E op1nn1 1N I I'' I LI WI I 1rJ:A I•IO' R1•1-..:ILC ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY -- In Appreciation of the Community and Support of Friends, We Offer These Specials October 3rd through October 7th: FREE Oil Change & Lube with Tune-Up. Includes Tire Rotation, Check and Charge AC. $6.95 Gay Owned A Operated Servicing the Montrose for over 1/100th of a Century 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER)-523-2794 The men & women of DIGNITY/HOUSTON celebrate mass on Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. at Rice Catholic Student Center, 1703 Bol1over, with a social hour afterward. For more Info, call 523-7644 or 528-7644. SEPT 30, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 21 Monday Bowlers Winter League Underway Sports By Chuck Meredith The M.S.A. Monday Night Bowling League opened ita tenth season Sept. 19 with 56 teame at Stadium Lanee, 1900 Main. The season opened smoothly and fea· tured outstanding performances by Mark Hall (234 game high, 594 eeriee) and Louie Vander Porter (226, 570). Dick Griffin'• 224 was the third highest game, while M.S.A. Director Steve McConaughy'e 583 series gave him the new season's second higheet total. An election for president of Monday Night Bowling will be held thio coming Monday to fill the term ofM.S.A. Director McConaughy. Two highly qualified candi­dates, Larry Brown and Sonny Davis, are vying for the position. Individual bowlere are etill needed to complete several teams. Those interested ehould call Sam Immardino at 528-4576 for information. o Tennis Championships Move into Quarterfinals By Rich Corder After two weeks of preliminary matches, the line-ups are almost complete except for several matches being played this week. No. 1 seed io Tim Calhoun. No. 2 eeed Jan Mauldin moved easily into the quarterfi· nalo of the Championship Flight. Calhoun dropped only one game to Danny Caeillae, while Jan let Rich Cotder win one game before running into a more interesting match with Randy Dickerson, who was able to take four games from the top woman player in the Montrose Tennis Club. The Championship Flight is rounded out by Jon Colbert, Victor Chapman from Wharton, No. 3 eeed Ron Landrum, No. 4 eeed Jim Kitch and winners of the Mike Green/Tom Cardinale and Lester Vela/ Don Smith matches. Flight 1 !iota No. 1 seed Donny Kelley and No. 2 seed Randy Dickerson favored to meet in the finals. Rounding out this flight are Armi Alabanza, Robert Arriaga (recent MVP winner of MSA Softball League), David Garza, Harold Hope of Beaumont and the loser of Green/ Cardinale and Vela/ Smith. Flight 2 is on schedule for No. 1 Danny Caeillae to meet No. 2 Rich Corder, bar­ring no upsets. Others completing this flight are Jim Flanagan of Beaumont, Thomae Cortez, Mark Dingman, Richard Pregeant and the winners of matches between Terry Rich and Kim Holmquiet (Beaumont) and Mario Durham and Larry Barton. Flight 3 completee the four levele of play, with No. 1 seed Eddie Chavez and No. 2Jerry Robineon favored to fightitout for the championehip. They will have to win over Manuel Murillo, Rick Martinez, Julia Collier, Sandra Givens and the Joe· era of the Rich/ Holmquist and Durham / Barton matches. Except as opponents agree to play dur· ing the week before or after their sche­duled match times, all matchee are played at the Homer Ford Tennis Center {Mac­Gregor Park, just southeast of the Univer­sity of Houston) from 9 a.m. Sunday until noon. Semi-finals are acheduled for October 9 and the finals for October 16. Other courts are rented for members ($10 monthly duee) and gueste ($3 per week) from 9 a.m. until noon, so spectators and players are invited to come participate and /or watch some really fine tennis. Call Vice President Jim Kitch at 923-4168 for more information o Montrose Tennis Challenge Ladders By Rich Cprder Jim Kitch is returning-to form after drop· ping out aa No. 2 because of an ankle injury, taking over No. 4 on the ~op Ten Ladder with a long, tough match with Ron Landrum 6-4, 3-6, 6-4. The B Ladder welcomed Harold Hope from Beaumont as he earned No. 2 from David Garza ~. 6-4. Don Smith cracked the ladder again ae he humped on Rich Corder6-2, 6-1 and then ekipped up to No. 5 with a victory over Ron Bell 6-2, 2-6, 7-6 (8-6). The C Ladder welcomed another Beau­mont member as Jim Flanagan took over No. 3 from Thomae Cortez 6-4, 7-6 (9-7). Mark Dingman defended hie No. 6 rank 6-1, 6-0 over Julie Collier. Richard Pregeant is making his move, taking over No. 1 on the D Ladder with a ~. ~ match with Sandra Givene. Double• Ladder had no changee, ae Kel­ley/ Corder defended against new team Cortez/ Martinez while Arriaga/ Caeillas otayed ahead of Garza/T. Rich in hard­fought split seta with tie-breakere 6-3, 5-7, 7-6 (7-4 ). Whew! The following ie a breakdown of all Laddere through September 25: Doublet L•dder. 1-Kitch/Colbert, 2-Landrum/Vela, 3-Kelley/Corder (6-0, 6-0 over Cortez/Martinez), 4-Arriaga/Casillas (6-3, 5-7, 7-6 (7-4) over Garza/Rich), 5- Garza/T Rich, 6-Coller/ Scott, 7- Cortez/Martinez, 8-Hope/Holmquist Top Ten Ladder. 1-Rich Ryan, 2-Tim Calhoun, 3-Jan Mauldin, 4-Jlm Kitch (6-4. 3-6. 6-4 over Landrum). 5-Ron Landrum, 6-Jon Colbert, 7- lester Vela, 8-Victor Chapman, 9-Mlke Green, 10-Donny Kelley B Lodder: 1-D.C. 2-Harold Hope (6-0, 6-• over Garza), 3-David Garza. 4-Armi Alabanza, 5-Don Smith (6-2, 6-1 over Corder and 6-2. 2-6, 7-6 (8-6) over Bell), 6-Ron Bell, 7-Randy Dickerson, 8-Tom Cardinale, 9-Robert Arriaga, 10-Rich Corder C L.cfder. 1- Terry Rich. 2-Mario Durham. 3-Jim Flanagan (S-., 7-6 (9-7) over Cortez), 4- Thomes Cortez. 5- Eddie Chavez. 6--Mark Dingman (6-1 . 6-0 over Collier). 7-Manuel Murillo, 8-Julie Collier, 9-Rick Martinez. 1o-J.O. D L.cfder: 1-R ichard Pregeant (6-0, 6-0 over Givens), 2-Sandra Givens. 3-Jo W o Texas Impresses Kansas City Kansae City'a Heart of America Softball Tournament turned into a Texas affair thio paet weekend (Sept. 25-26), but before it was over, the Kansas City Cabaret team kept the championship trophy. Houston waa represented by the Mont­rose Voice and the Barn, while Dallas Steel traveled north to play in thio all­central American event. 5.27• 9866 22 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 30, 1983 The Barn opened the tournamentbylos- r------------------------------ ~·GENERAL REPAIR• AUTO ing to a coed Topeka Lambda team, but then reeled off four straight wins in the consolation bracket. the fourth win over Dallas Steel, putting Dallas in fourth place. The Barn then lost to the Voice, ending the tournament in third. Then the Voice played with a ven­geance, destroying Cabaret 20-2, r.etting up a winner-take-all game which was won by Cabaret 11-8 when they scored six runs in the sixth inning. The three Texas teams dominated the tournament's best player selections, plac­ing seven on the IO-member all-star team. Voice players Mike Linder, Bill Sansom, Bob James and Pete Housos joined the Barn's Bill Schmidt and Herb Muenchow as Houston's representatives, with Eugene Croes from Dallas Steel also mak­ing the list. o Women's Softball Meeting Changed The site and time of the monthly meeting jjjl.tttA al ~~ ..-·-·~ "THE ULTIMATE BAKED POT.A TO 520-0554 416 Westheimer Houston, TX 77006 OUR SPUDS ARE OUT OF THIS WORLD! m () -i :D 0 z Ci -i c z ~ F al pecials ~ * Oil Change & Lube ~ $1995 8 * Tune Up from $3995 5 * Air Conditioning =t Check & Charge $21so ~ 1411 TAFT z 0 ieini e~n z <( a: f- 0 ~ ::; 0 ti 522-2190 ~ •AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION • <I: ohaftsh beeMen.S c.hAa.nWgeodm teon t'hsSe oMftCbCalRl LFeeallgouwe- CLUB HOUSTON IS ~fu~:1J. :: .,1~1!.Decatur on Monday, : MSA Women's Softball League Renegades River Rats scu River rats Rage RESULTS Sunday. S•pt. 25 7 scu 8 M&L's .C Rage High Hopes Votce Double R 11 Voice .C Double A 7 Cyanide H1g~ Hopes Kindred Spmts MCCR Kindred Spn1ts MCCR Special Blend STANDINGS tonow ng Sepl 25 ... G8 D1v1st0n I R- 3 750 Kindred Spirits 2 ' 667 Renegadet 2 1 667 " .. scu ,,. ,.. 500 Cyanide 1 2 .333 ' , .. Montro.e Voice .. 3'• .125 , .. ONt!ion /J MCCR 3 UlOO River Rats 2 1 000 .. Spec1aJ Blend 2 667 1 High Hopee 2 500 , .. Double A 0 000 , .. Marion & Lynn·a 0 000 3 o Tennis Club Events The following events have been scheduled for the Montroae Tennis Club: October 11-Monthly party/meeting, 7:30 p.m. Call Rich Corder for informa­tion, 524-2151. October 16--FinalB.1983SinglesCham­pionahi pa. MacGregor Park 9 a.m.-noon. November 1>-6-Third Annual Hou-Tex Tennie Tournament, Macgregor Park, hosted by Montrose Tenise Club. For more information, call Eddie Chavez, tourna­ment director, at 961-4696. November 8-Monthly party/meeting. Attention, Ray Kroc! This month 11 not a happy one for Louisia¥ na's alligators. For the third straight year, it'a open season on the once-endangered swamp creaturee, reports the Kansas City Star. And now they're so numerous Louisiana is encouraging people to eat them aa well as akin them. I.SU nutrition professor Stanley Biede says, "Gator meat has Jess calories than chicken and as much protein as beef and ia delicious when cooked in Cajun sauce." State officials are also trying to drum up in tereat in another denizen of the bayou: the nutria, a large South American rodent normally cultivated for its hide. A spokesman for the State Wildlife Department admits the nutria has one drawback. '"lt"s basically a big rat." Still, he saya, "A guy whocanawallow a raw oyewr ought lo ~ able to eat a nuw .. •• CLUB HOUSTON 2205 FANNIN 659-4998 llEMBER CLUB BAIH CllAl)I 4144 BUENA VISTA 559-2966 ANNOUNCING ... THE LAST LORETTA & GOOD LUCK ·MADGE PARTY Mary's wishes Al good luck and a fond farewell to Larry Fought Sunday, Oct. 2, 2pm till ... $1 Saronno plus all our regular specials l 022 Westheimer 528-8851 • SEPT. 30, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 24 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT. 30, 1963 Linda "Lulu" Slmpeon announces tr(Q)[p) ©!? tr[F{]~ [F{](Q)[b~ o~ ~©o/M ©~~~ 3 Plus 2 Revue Featuring Show Director Ron Sioux with Robbie Roberts & Tracey starring 2 special guests Sunday, Oct. 4, 4pm Don't forget Saturday is Linda's Birthday Bash!! MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL WEDNESDAY w.&1~....__. Steak Night, $3.50 THURSDAY Jock Strap Contest, 9pm HOURS Mon-Fri 10-2 Saturday 7-2 Sunday 12-2 HAPPY HOURS Mon-Fri 10-7 Saturday 7-7 CHILI COOKOFF COMING SOON Happy Hour Prices 10am-7pm Mon.-Sat. 75<: Well Drinks, $1 Beer DA.ILV" SPEC:IA.LS SUNDAY H•PPY Hour Prtcn Noon-4pm, S1 ...... 75C W.llDMnb S1 ._,.Bust 4-apm, •II you can dMnlr. TUESDAY Leather Night. 9pm- 2•m-l.Mt:Mrmen drink for !:fi':T,.r:1r.~ ::=: on WEDNESDAY C£W Ni11ht. 10pm-2om, H=r _;',.~~~:~··.:.~" Pool Tournament THURSDAY S1 Boer Bust. •II you can drink, 9pm-11pm FRIDAY Club Colo,.. Night.: Club Mombers In Colors Drink for Hoppy Houf" Prices 7-10pm Gu•I DJ Matte Rltey 1318 W.stheimer-521-3479 Open doily 10.m-hm t@.MEXICAN ~REPRESENTATIVES, INC. Pf?f~FNTS SU MM ER FALL 1983 AIR TOUR PACKAGES DAILY HOUSTON OEPARTURES VIA aeromexico tf/i FROM CANCUN .. . . . s229 IXTAPA .... .. COZUMEL . . . . 1245 MAZATLAN .. . 'lJ PTO. VALLARTA 1249 GUADALAJARA ACAPULCO . . . s249 MERIDA ..... . MEXICO CITY . 1239 INCLUDES • ROUND TRIP AIR • 3 NIGHTS AT HOTEL, EP •ROOM TAX & TRANSFERS IA TES AH 1'£1 l'EISON. OOUlllE OCCUPANCY 7£~ cJ iv,~ ~ ~ ~ 1239 ;:@ 1259 b 1229 ~ 1219 -~ ~ ~ ~ Call Bruce Woolley at (713) 529-8464 or I ~ Toll Free at 1-800-392-5193 C ~ 2029 Southwest Freeway, Houston 8-9 Thriller. $2.00 and your drinks are on the house. Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat OCT. OCT. OCT. 2 3 4 Selected Events through 7 Days rlFRIDAY: Committee for Pub­lic Health Awareness's "Shar­ing Group for the Worried Well," 7-8pm, Montrose Coun­seling Center, 900 Lovett II.SATURDAY & SUNDAY: Texas Renaissance Festival opens near Plantersville, also running Ocl 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23, 29, 30 & Nov. 5 & 6 II.SA TU RDA Y: Choice's Les­bian Mothers' Group meets 6:30pm, 210 Fairview, apt. I II.SATURDAY: Lesbians & Gay People in Medicine meet 7:30pm II.SATURDAY: "World's Toughest Rodeo," benefit for Gay Men's Health Crisis, Madi­son Square Garden, New York -SUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays 9am-noon, MacGre­gor Park mMONDA Y: AIDS victim sup­port group meets 6:30pm, Mont­,..,.. Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 • TUESDAY: Montrose Sym­phonic Band meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm •TUESDA Y: Greater Mont­rose BusineH Guild meets 7:30pm, Liberty Banlr. commun­ity room, 1001 Weatheimer •WEDNESDAY: Montrose Chorale rehearaal at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30-!0pm •WEDNESDAY: Gay Political Caucus meets 4600 Main #217, 7:30pm • THURSDAY: Greek Festival, Greek Orthodox Church, 3511 Yoakum, opens, lasting w Oct. 8 • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n SU?in gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFT Radio, FM-90 • THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN 1 WEEK: Family & Friends international conven­tion, Ocl 7-10, New York m/N 1 WEEK : National AIDS vigil, Oct. 8, WaahingU>n, D.C. •IN l WEEK: Dallas Invita­tional Columbus Day Bowling Tournament, Oct. 8-10 U N 1 WEEK: Ocl 8 deadline to register to vote in Texas November elections U N l WEEK: Columbus Day, Oct. 10 • IN 1 WEEK: Lutherans Con­cerned meet.A Oct. 11, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh JN l WEEK: Citizens for Human Equality (CHE) meets Oct. II • IN l WEEK: Houston Data Professionals meet 7:30pm Oct. II , East Room, Holiday Inn Central, 4640 South Main • IN 2 WEEKS: Westheimer Colony Art Festival, 100 w 1100 blocks Westheimer, Oct. 15-16 U N 2 WEEKS: Choices meets !2:30pm Oct. 16, YWCA, 3615 SEPT. OCT. 30 1 OCT. OCT. 5 6 Willia •IN 2 WEEKS: Unitarian/ Universalist Gay Caucus meets Oct. 16, !st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin UN 2 WEEKS: Families & Friends of Gays meets 2pm Oct. 16, Presbyterian Center behind !st Presbyterian Church, 5300 Main • INS WEEKS: Full moon, 4:45pm, Ocl 21 • INS WEEKS: Montrose Clinic open house, 104 Westhei­mer, Oct. 23 U N S WEEKS: "Zap Clap Revue Two, Too" benefit for Montrose Clinic & KS/ AIDS Foundation Oct 24 & 25, Numbers, 300 Westheimer U N S WEEKS: Houswn Area Gay & Lesbian Engineero & Scientists meet 7pm Oct. 25 • INS WEEKS: Montrose Civic Club (NearU>wn) meets 7pm Ocl 25, Bering Church, 1440 Harold m/N 4 WEEKS: Capital Hallo­ween Invitational Bowling Tournament, Oct. 29-30, WaahingU>n, D.C. mIN 4 WEEKS: Halloween, Ocl31 •IN 4 WEEKS: National Aaao­ciation of Buaineu Counci.11 3rd annual national conven­tion, 11Future Links/' opens Loe Angelee Nov. 3, to Nov. 6 • IN 6 WEEKS: Election Day in Texas, Nov. 8 • IN 6 WEEKS: Veterans Day, Nov. 11 U N 7 WEEKS: Thanksgiving, Nov. 24 • IN 8 WEEKS: Gay Academic Union 9th National Conference, "The Challenge of 1984: Together We Can Make a Dif­ference," San Diego, Nov. 25-27 •IN 12 WEEKS: Christmas, Dec. 25 • IN 17 WEEKS: Gay Preas Association Southern Regional Convention, Jan. 27-29, Hous­wn •IN Sl WEEKS: First primary party elections in Texas and party precinct conventions, May5 U N S2 WEEKS: World's Fair opens in New Orleans, May 12, lasting w Nov. 11 •IN SS WEEKS: Texas Sena­wrial District Party Conven­tions, May 19 • IN S6 WEEKS: Run-off party elections in Texas, June 2 •IN S7 WEEKS: Texaa Demo­cra tic Party Convention, June 15-17, tentatively Houawn • IN S7 WEEKS: 1984 Gay Pride Week begins, 15th anni­versary of Stonewall uprising, June 15-24 • IN 42 WEEKS: Democratic National Convention San Francisco, July 16-19' • IN 46 WEEKS: Castro Street Fair, Aug. 19, San Francisco U N 47 WEEKS: Gay World Series Softball Tournament opens in Houston Aug. 28, last­ing w Sept. 2 NOTICE BUSINESS OWNERS The MonltOM V0tc• list• fr .. Nch ... In the MontrOM Cl .. 11!'9<1 bus.. nfll.I .. t•bl••11,tentl Nrv•ng H d11tribulion points fof" the Voice •nd community orgWlil.1- "°"' e lndkatiM thll llllln9 le 1 Monll'OM Vok:e dlltrf.­budon po6nl Randy Alfred's 'Dateline S.F.,' twice a month DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES LARGE EASTWOOO DUPLEX 2/1 upper unit with terrace. Super value reduced to $395. Also availa­ble spac ious Montrose stud io duplex with lots of charm at 1947 Richmond. Rent negotiable at $600. Must see to appreciate. Both units have hardwoods and lots of win­dows Rent + utilities. 960-9759. U OF H AREA Renovated one bedroom. Great for single students. After 6 pm. 924- 5921 . ROOMMATE/U OF H AREA Needed to share house. $200+. 524- 7978. ROOMMATE NEEDED To share house in southwest area. $200 includes utilities. 995-4604. SHARPSTOWN ROOMMATE NEEDED Share most unusual hi-tech house with 3 males. Many extras. $250 +deposit. 981-9209. ROOMS FOR RENT 2 very large rooms available in pri­vate home just 3 blocks west of M•in St, near Richmond. Completely fur­nished (bed, dresser, stuffed velvet sofa, table, etc., in each room). A/C. All bills paid. Kitchen not available but a refrlg. Is provided. Couple will rent to setect tingles, couples or roommates. No children please. Call 524-9092. SEPT 30, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 25 Montrose Classified GRAND CENTRAL PIPELINE {A gay roommate service.) The best business deal you will make this year. 523-3223 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED EXCITING FASHION WORLD Salesperson needed for dress shop. Excellent opportun ity. 84~01 4 7 CLERICAL/BOOKKEEPING EXPERIENCE Man Friday/ household repairs, salary. Polygraph requi red. Send resume to: Box 52203, Houston, TX 77052 or call 529-8369 ACCOUNTING CLERK NEEDED Male, non-smoker, neat appear­ance, some experience required. For appointment call 266-6511 TELEPHONE SALES PEOPLE Earn $6-$10 per hour We desper­ately need many ambitious people for telephone sales work. No ex~ rience necessary. We train men, women and students are welcome if qualified. Full-part time. Days and evenings For immediate work, call Mr. Towers, 953-0201 GAY BARS HOUSTON- = ·s-<402 1.oof9'1:--"7-teel diniftSI. .... e awn-710 P8cd1e--621..e'27· CCM.wllry e Brvot R~ Bonom-2400 Bruoe-5n- 1112: country Gary Larson's Cartoons­Exclusive in Houston in the Voice • Bnar Pllcl'l-22i4 W Holcom~DIS78 :.~~t Otteo-4965 Mlr!Jn Luther King- ~535 W•thelff'ler-526-2240 e Copli-2131 Rochmond-529-2250 d19e0wrth ..._ • D•rty s.u;-.-=.-z20A-~•.:;....~­• ~ble A Seloon-5731 K1rby-52H'44 e E/J'1-1213 R.chrnond-527-9071 -- - • Ex•..--1011 eti~9-<MS3 couritry The Voice has more news, more Houston readers, more Houston advertising • G••*>n-2303 Aichmond-522-7818 e Hoi.-108 TulfTl-52&-9128 e Juat Marion I Lynn·•--e17 F11rview-52&- 911<1" INbtll'I e Lol ... Depot 2327 Gr11nt 521-«W2 e Mary"• 1022 W•l'*"'*-52&-U51 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment e M.. Cher1ott.-. 111 W Dr..,-52&-IMO country e MonltOM M1n1ng Co.-805 P.citic-529-7.itee -e Numben 2-300 W•lheimer-52&-8551 e Ottlcet'1 Club-2700 Alban)'-523-40M eON on ~101 8 W Or.y- 52e-8503 elhe Outs.we-1411 R~ e...P..in..k E!ephant t211LMI~ with eRWr:y ..,__2700 Aft.ny-52&-3111 • T•u ~1s11 w....,,,_ szi- 3475 Who says you can't buy butchness. 26 M ONTROSE VOICE I SEPT 30, 1983 " MY reflection? Look at YOURS, Randy ... You look like some big fat swamp thing." Beware the elephant in tall grass Charles wanders into a herd of dirt buffaloes The Far Side by Gary Larson " Say ... YOU' RE not Bob! ... You look like him, but you 're certainty not him!" Darrell suspected someone had once again slipped him a trick spoon with the concave side reversed. " Tick-tock, tick-tock, tick-tock, tick-tock ... " i T'tllrl'on1_:535- WMlhe1m«· ·520-02« l•bo•n ''""° . ve,,1u~N~2923 ... a.n-s22.()()00 e W~t ~·~~11ni!:~!!_ M•~!1:~ ~-­AifKANOR/ A = -- iSii,Y-$811y·1-92-4 .hckton__.:~1M __ _:_- ·_::__ .:J BEAUMONT- • Copa .3().i OrlHnl-832·4206 e s~~-~:-=.~ Crockeu:~~-=­GALvfSiON- 9Fty-21016•+. 763-98'2- e M&ry'i"tt~2so20i=183-9435 - . -R-oben·ILiii1l1e-2i3-K9mPo9f-=785-6896 ·~mm_Ri~_f~ni.=1~12"47 · - -­LAFA YETrE-e FlmUYf:-.408 M1ur!Ce-(W~ing <2,!r_!_-232+0338 LAKE "CHARLES~ 9Plrigon. ·1501 Br"Oad-433-9389 ORGANIZATIONS SELECTED NATIONAL OAOANIZATIONS- 01y Pr ... "-hon-PCB 33806. Wut11ngton DC20033--1202J387-2'31:> Oar RoghU N1t11KW1l Lobby--P081892. Walliongton DC 20013-l2021 $46-1801 Human R.gM:t c.mlMl•Qft fund-POB 1JIMI WMft­lng! Oft. OC20013-1202J s.4&-2025 ~Leg.i o.i--132 W 4J•d. N-York. NY 10030-1212) 94'-IMU J.'ff•• furid lor Hum1n Righi• (G•y Pr•H AHOC••t1ot1J-POB )3110S, W••h•ogton DC 200»- !202)387-1430 NllllOfl•I Auoc:••l•OO ol Bu••oeM Coul'lcUe--Box 151-45. S.. Fr•l'ICIKO. CA IM11S--(-415) ~ Nllhon•I AMoeo.i•on of G•y & L•b•VI o.mocr111c Clubl-17-42 M ... Av SE. w .. hmgton. DC 20003-(202) 547-3104 Netoon•I Gey Atgllll Advoc.t•-5'0 C••lro. S.n Fr•ncieco.CAIM11-4--(-415) 983-362-4 NllllOl'lei Gey TNk For~ 5th Av. N-York. NY 10011-(212)7-41-5800 NGTF"1 Cr,.•thl'l9-(800) 221-71)4.4 (outside NII• York Sllte) T1xM Qay1L•b11n TQk For09--POB 11.K. Denton 76201-1117)317-8218 AC.p;j".;--c~rUS: -(MontroM) CiiWcti 01 Chn11-1n--eiee A P1ac.-;;,-lh• Sun---c10 GracMyn... Books. 70-4 F•1rv1ew-52'2-7e95 subgroup of l/H ll'IC; con­certs 7pm Tues Acw...:123iiWGray-5"24-5m- - AloSH0111M---c:10 G.;s,,.,1chbo.r(i:..5"~3211 Amenceri-G•r Atne.1tt.-4s1-6680 - - Ame,icii~eith91-m;;.t (IOc,91 cklbf -me.ii ,'j Oitt..-ef'lt On.im. 1732 W•thellT!er-sn-3528 c:'Vb111g~~ed Mtro A••ribow All11nce---52():"9451(..,()j0ii. 520= ~521TT'1 B1you e·1u ... MoritrOM Chor11e ~~~.~.':°6'2I~o";~ed~e~~11~C,!:~~~· Btack & Wh.11 M9rlTOge1her (BwMT) .. dOG•r Switchboard. 529-3211 ~:105~0 ~t:~~~:o~:~,: f:~ 5;9d Sun. allO - Lnbl•n Mothen Chr11t;1f1Cnurch 01 l~-GOOd-st1ephefd-1101 MonlrOM Mnl•CM 1pm Sun. Bible •ludy 7 3J9m Thurs (MontrOM) Church Oi Chrl1t- -1700 Mont;O;;- - 7n-9296 MrV•cn 11am Sun Church ol Chr1t11anflutti-211 F•irYIH -529- 8006 Mrvice910 -4S.m Sun & 7 15prnWed. Bible study 7 15pm T°" & Suo. chofr pt"actN:e Wed •l1wHrv1C• Oiurch-ot ~l9C091al Unity:: 1217 Richmond .M..C,,> 1288. 520-5M Service. 7 l()pm Fn 1 lam C111zen1 for Human EQtJ•hty (CHEl-609 f•onm •1301 -236-aeM boerd meet 2nd T~ Cott ,5., 1.0C:----;;lciUb)_:mMii-11 Btaz:O. R,.,,.,. Bottom 2-400 Braz:01-52&-g192 Comm•ttee iOi PVbkC: .... 1thA,,.., ........ -roe 3CMS. 77253-529-&33. 522-5084 "Sh.,1119 Group for 1he Womad W•lr meet Fri, 7-8pm. MOl'\lrote COuolellog Cef'ltar Commu;;ity Goapet C8oter · 1100 Mootrow- 523-6018 Cong -Artz Ch1y1m- '""'' 11 CcF. 2t7 Fairview -Mtl-8997 Mf'llCS & soc I 8pm 211d & -4tl'!FF1 Cn11s Hot11ne- 228-1505 Oia-1-1-G9Y-Atn.1i1- -457-Meo American Gay Alhe11ll 01an1 F~dat•on--2700 Matoo-!>24-5791 ~c~~-~:~~- ~d~~~:·• ~~ 7 )0pm Slit 0.1oa foun<11t•on- -2700 Muon----524-5791 ~c~~r::.~ -~7~ ~:·r ~~ 130pm S.1 famih .. --, -FrtencM of a.rs·- ~eei3 meet 2pt113rd Suo 11 Pretby1erien C•oter. 41 O•kdal•. behind F•rll Prnby1an111 Church. 5300 Maio l11U-M.,-;ao ChUrch-5210 F1M;n::.:-~15°i1 !Mh>ea 11 151m Sun Frontrvrenen--529=1iiii G1y & All.,. Shar1ng'EXl)er1ence iGASEJ ~528· 1311, 528-0891 G1Y' & L•b1•n Arch•v• otTe.ic" •tt11;;te-Of11H '"" O.r At••n Ciub--:M15 w~Qh 112477~ - GiY Hitp,;;iCC&OCul-=2122Newm•';;' •1W21- 0031 meet lrd Thurs Oi'; llalia"; OrouP-52&-ga« ___ - GiY Nu,..-;. Al1i1re"ce--~948&~ - - Giv pc)i;11cai Caucu1 (GPC>=PQe ~ 77298-521-1000· mM1 -4800 Mlin #217 7 30pm 111 & 3rd Wed ~.:!'~~~;'l,~~lih~~a::::: 523-2521 0.y-Sw•ttht>oerd-POB 3924'-::s2i3211 inlor· mation. COUF\Mllng. ref9"all. TTY. AIOSHothne Graa1..- MontrC* - eusm•• -GU1id=cofl1Kt lht"ough MonlrOM Voice meets 7 30pm 1s1 Tun. conimun•ty room. LlbattyBank. 1001 W•- "'°'""'' Q;M,,.~f,FM1eecl Af9a Far-Awi;-F~,-- 121-1111 .~.1..e..l.n..t erf•1th All••nc-729 M•nOI" ~~\~~~~~~ ~~:~ 4~~~=- -& Hou11on -eommurl·tY c1oWnl~-=illi - Hou1IOn "Oi'ia'"" PrQf.;;;on~ 1n EHt Room. Holtd•y Inn C.ntr•L '640 S M•in-523- 8922 meet 7 30pm 2nd Tue. Hou110n Motorcy~{.OC;;i ciub)-c/o M11y·1. 1022 We.tn.•rner-528-3651 Houlion N0rihProl~POB3MO. Hum· ble 77338-8111 •I 821·7126 i/H 1nc-P01f ~1'.°"7722~-1132. 529. 701' all1liated grou1>1 •re lntfH'act Gracielynn Gatlery'1 A Place 1n tn. Sun. Montrose Ar1 ~~11~~~6;!,7 ~;~t~~ns~~~~~.~1e~~~M~1~ ron Cloggeu. board m"t 7 30pm 111 Thur1 (Yar1ed loca1ton1). educational forum 7 .JOpm 3'd Thurs 1i1Q9rlo11 spii.lkeri·-Bureau::PQe 391. "S.iiiiure 7_7.C01-fl69..4()6.4 i~1~~~:o;~5 l!:::°r~~-:n~er~~ Autry HouH. 8255 Main. & 4th Tues at Yaned loc•hona 9"1;rac1. eciuea,;on.1 •ubgrouP orl~POB 180'1. 77222-521H014. &SM-1732 91ePF·{ Aid;o. FM-90=i1iL"Mtt-e1;(i-=5-~ 4000- ·w,ioe ·n Stem· gay redlO •how Thurs. 730-900pm i<s/Ai(is Founda!ion-1001 W•ttW11nert193- 524-AtOS -zap Clap Revu. Two, Too" beneM ~~!:'a258~;~~:o:·=;~'"'';,"'-.".'". '. ~.. ~""~'~., 521-4175 5~':=5;~.~;~AlcoholiCl&Alanon 1214 ~~~~.G~Rt':~n.s::x;u;;~'t4~ 1253 L•blant & Gay People In Mediclne-181>9488 meet 7·30pm 111 Set L•blan Motltetl aubgroup ol Cl'lolcet; meet• 111 end 3fd Sal, 6:30pm, 210 Fairview, apt 1 Lutherant Concerned ma.ti at Grace Luth .. ren Church, 2515 Waugh-521-0963, 453-1143 me.I 2nd & 4th TUM .... en1ng1 i"Metropohlan Com-m -,-,~ny~C,_h,-"~.~.,~,,,.~..~- .,- ,_ rect1on (MCCR)-19111 O.C•tur-a&1·9149'. pot­IUck dinner 7 30pm hi Sal rnoolhly. Ml'ViCM 1045tim & 7•159f'!Sun & 715pmWed, membef'- ::.!'\':"a ~!::,..'JO pm Tu.. «lucation Want to talk? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 Montro .. Art Al ~anc.-521-2481 atl•h•I• llH Inc. meet 2nd Thurs =~.o:~-~~~ ,::::r,u~ ~J~O..C:-!: Bering Church. 1440 Ha•Old =1=n~~11:c·~ ~:::~t!1 ~~~n~~~r; "'"' MootroH Ci"c CiUb SM NffrtoWn fuOc1at10n 9Moniro .. Cl1n.C-1~wMihe.~ open w"knoght1 &-10pm. women'• emphasis PIOOram 1-5pm Sun. open houM Oct 23. ,.Z•P Clap RevtJe Two. Too· benef•I Oct 24-25 Numbers. 300 WHthe1mer MontroH ·cOun1el1FiQCe~r--900 Lovett •203-5~7 AIDS YICl•m •uppor1 group "'"" e·30pm Mon MontroH 5."nger1..:C.r1-lawre"nC. 774-J591 alter epm rehHtNI Mon evft. Beong Church 1440 Harold Mor>troH Ten~ub= A1Ch at 524-2151 · p1ay Sun, 9em MacGret;tor Park =~r:!:.~C~~~S~ai::;m Bow1 ~~=m~~i.·!~ed~=~-~1~~~23 MSA·GrNter -Houston (Men's "&ttb111-523- e802 day. 523-0413..,. MSA w"Gmen·1 Sottba'iTLHQ1.1e-:r2&:93f1 MsA1vo11erbai1 -aao:2113Q ·g;met-730pm Tu.. Gregory-Lincoln IC'1ool. 1101 Tatt ~~Binct-:"mee11 It S.ing Church. 1440 Harold-527·De69 meet 730pm Tuet. allil•ate l/H ll'IC M<.n1ro ..- Wi!Ch .~bg·,o;_,P N. .n own ~ MU.llngl(.OC1iiCi'Ub)-iM9tlSlth;e.fn.710 Pec1,ic--521J."427 club night Thun NMrtOWtl Auoc1a1ion(MOO'ir'OH Crvic Club!· me.ta at Bering Church. 1440 Hirold-522· 1000 me.I 7pm 4th Tues N.W Fr..doFnCtl,.it;.-rictrurdi-a12 w 1 iih- 5111-1342 MfViCtia 10.m Sun. 7 30pm Wed Park" Peopte:.:.C/O NeUtO..;n- co·mmU-n1ty FirehouM-741-2524 Pa.z y u~C.Ot.-P6e ei:iOOel. nzeo--523. ""'' Reerfil.110ni!land FundCOmm1ttff-.t.A";;,1•ng Club pro1ec1 ~~~ ul11Y-G.y"/Le1b1in-S~ppO;; Group-524- T."•a• e.iY Area Gar•_.:_332-3137· meet ThU~ ...,emng Telal· Bay Arei Ga'YYOUth-332=3131 meet bt­wee11.1y r;;.-. "Human "A1gh11 FOund111on- -11115 CommonWMlth-~-2e24 TDQ-R;c....1-c10 Mlf)'·i:° ,-022 W•ln.<mer- 52&.ee.51 Unil•l1arVUn1~1i.1 0.y "C;uc:ua:::ciO 111 Unitenan Church. 5210 Fannin-5~9767. 52e- 5&42 meel 3rd Sun ehfH'noon1 Weal.Yan Feil0w.h7p.:e64-ia911---­WM! he<mer ~y- -Ml .....oCiat.an=100i W91the<mer •187 F911JV•L 100-1100 block1 WMlheifn9'1'. Oct 15-16 ~bl).iAlha~Che~ CONROE­~':~': a~a=)a~7'1n1tf409)75&­Conroe ArM l•blane-Klthy It (409) 75&-IOet "'"' 8pm 2_nd & 4th Frl LAKE CHAALES-Oignftr- Rt 1, Bo• 21flC, Longville, LA 70652 PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS GARAGE/SAMPLE SALE Saturday, October 1, 10 am, 1608 Kipling_ Cash sales only LIKE FINANCIAL RELIEF? W/UF seeks platonic relationship with medically oriented 50s-60s? Geminlan-Saggitarian or Moon in Gemini? 790-0303 BUYING GAY BOOKS Also "Honchos," paperbacks. Hard­core preferred. Daniel. (713)526- 9112. VIOEOCASETIES WANTED Rocky Horror, E.T, offbeat films Erotica. Gay parades. Will pay, duplicate, return same day Daniel. (713)52&-9112. SLEEPING ALONE UN·BEAR-ABLE? Cuddily "Teddy Bear·· s.eeks same for friendship/relat1onsh1p. G/WIM, 30's. varied interests Artistic, affec· tfonate. sensitive, monogamous, sensual?? Serious replles only Please reply Box 153-A c/o Mont­rose Voice BODY MASSAGE In or out, Bruce. 521-2009 MONTROSE VOICE CLASSIFIED RATES Advertising rate: o $2 for up to three bold capital words and o 30¢ for each remaining regular t.ype word. Total minimum charge per ad $3. There are no other rates Advertisers who wish somethmg different should consider run­ning a dlsplay advertisement. c Oeadlin~ for all advertising is 5:30pm Tues­day for newspaper released mld.-day Fnday_ o Bhnd box numbers can be assigned for $3 each week the ad is run and all responses wlll be forwarded to you by mail or picked up at our office. o Deduct 15'9 if you runthesan:iead4 weeks or more and pay for the full run m advance. o Bring or mail your Montrose Voice Classified to: Addt•U 3317 Montrose #204, Houston, TX 77006 Use this form or blank sheet of paper N1.1'""9r of •Hkl «I 11 to run - Amount ~IOled D Check o MQney Order 0 C.uh (not by mail) O VISA ch•ro• c MesterC1rd C/'large Q'N•f r;enJ. - erpd1te __ $1 GAY BOOK SALE Up to $12 values. Magazines and hardcore paperbacks 50¢ XXX­rated video casettes $25. Collectors' records $1. 2711 Yupon (near 1400 Westheimer). Sat & Sun. 3-7pm EROTIC HANDS Videocasette, $35, other titles $25 or less. Both formats. Oanlel, 526-9112 UNCUT? INTERESTED? Information. Correspondence club TB Enterprises, POB 72010. Corpus Christi, TX 78472. CHUBBY WANTED Businessman, white male, attractive, 35, 5'10", 170 lbs., black hair, brown eyes_ Would like to meet white, chubby straight-looking male. 250 lbs_ or more. For friendship and fun Please no fems. beards or long hair Visit Houston occasionally. Inter­ests include open variety. I'm open­minded, sincere and give a lot of myself. You won't regret you met me. My home Is your home in New Orleans Write ad 151-C, c/o Mont­rose Voice. Will answer all HAPPINESS IS ••• a handsome, healthy, humorous, happy hunk as your escort or model from ... TexEscort. 524-9511. Major credit cards honored. Security and discretion assured. PRIVATE GAY CLUBS e Club Hou11on eath1-2206Fi.nn1n-&51M9"8 e Freoch Ouwter ThMl«-3201 L,O;.l,an:;- 527-0792 • M•dtOW"ne Spa 3100 F1nn1n 522·2379 e 2306 Club-2308 Ge,,......_ -52°M235 RESTAURANTS • Ba,a·1-402 Lovett 527·1ilee6- • Chaputt•pec~13 AICl'tmond-·522-2365 ~,... .: :·M~1W.iih91mer-529· •Gyro Gyro1 Sandwich Shop 153& W911he•mer-!S2MM5 i'HOUM'Oif;ift:~rt1y--s2e-Je1e .9, H ..o uH OiStuih KabOb-2042 Mailh.11:.m e 9'en-1Jo3 W•the1rMr-5°2Hi2J. eotd Ho1.11tOn-Olnfif-"i14-W-Aieb.ma-524 23t0 e Perky'1-Richmond atK;iby-524-0075 9 AUC.i•-2702 1<1.bY ~ii-8212 • $9uo-U-L1u-ile-wei1r1uner 520-0S54 9·Sl•r P1u1-=2111" NOCfQfk..:523--0l!IOO •St.:. .. ~n: eo0--4231 ~orttl'CM- &:ze-81~ 9T.m·1 CoffM ShOP-. 1625 Wnltlelmer-529-- 2289 9 T-;.Op~C:aO.-Sw•~ Ci~ 2114 ?Kknam SERVICES, ETC. CARPET CLEANING 524-2442. MASSAGE Chuck. 521-3496 PATRICIA ANNE O'KANE Attorney at law. 526-7911 DENTIST Ron Peters, DOS. Exam, X·ray, cleaning $25. Open evenings & Sat­urday. 523-2211 Offer expires 11.1/83 TEXESCORT-524-9511 Models, escorts & masseurs "We do care enough to send the very best." Ma1or credit cards honored_ Monthly medical certificate Have a real fun time with the right guy for you SALON CHRIS 3913 Kirby. Men's & women's hair. Also wigs 524-0352 FREE FREE FREE All of the services of River Oaks Air­line Ticket Center. Bargain fares to "most" everywhere. NYC/OW $69; Yucatan, Acapulco, Nassau, Jamaica $199; Las Vegas $149 Including air and hotel. Houston to London $218 confirmed Automo­bile & hotel reservations worldwlde All gay travel services are available 3937 Richmond at Wesleyan. 629- 1100. MOVEMASTERS Hauling, packing. supplfes. too 1925 Westheiner, 521·3155 SEPT 30, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 ------- ~Mutt Booutor.-1201 Richmond TRAVEL CONSULTANTS e e.u Plrti: Mutt BoollltQt-.1830W A .. twna Complete travel arrangements All •Cobweb 1.1quor1-2036 w .. 1he1mer 526- services are free. 2029 Southwest za. Fwy 529-8464 9eut FiOW9f'S 5015 hlontro,._~.1n5 LICENSED MASTER MASSEUR Full body massage. In or out. Chase 527-0S76 e- Diner"I Acirt1 News 240 WH!hettnef 521J. eOoubreva-JOf'191, tt'le Mal'\holedOthlf"0-1913 :=~522";;_:::000=.,.=--=21'°'1,.-7 ~R"°<h:::..,,..,_=,---,523-..- 8348 eFrane1aco'1 Hair Onign-901 Rtdlm<>NJ- i'[);l.r;a1;11e 91tll-3224 Yoekum 528-5457 523-0438 • Goog,.·1 1004 c.111om1a 524-5555 :.~~~areur1 Ho.i .. lo6g•ng-1oe AYr>n· 9Grk;efynr; Books=-704 Fa•nr•ew-522-1695 e lc.nhowef Sffuty School-327 W•lheimer- • Gree1";",;glPIUl~l411WeSthe-;me..~ !~.;.:•:.::.::_•, ,.,.".-.- ,e e..-.-,_~906-WHIM•mer-527. f~ffet~~~~~~~5=:mer- ~t'".e." ,,-,,, H,,.,-,,~o..g--,_~,=220 Yoekum..:5z&:449' ;2<5i~~g1o.h Turm1u,.._113iWGr•y- -521· ;i::;"troee Heir O.ign-t004 Cal;tOffl~a-"'522. :~!cord Aacit mu.;c-~109 S Shephercl-S24· • Montroee VOic• newspeper-3317 MontroH 3802 t30&-52i-M90 e Studl: AcfUn News-1132 W Alabama e Neenown Ge~1901 T1h~~ iTLC=«i2W Alabama-524-5ae0 :=~~~~ems med bo•• 1713 t~~· Baftler SN>p-2154 Ponamooi~­e Tr.....i Contultents-2029 SW Fwy~ e Tra~.i lnnoYahOM 1508 W Alabama Montroee Travel Club ~1. cornmerc .. 1 accounts 523-&835 SHOPS & STORES ADULT MOVIE ARCADES Mags, films, novelt ies, video. 4330 Richmond, 877-0244. 5200 Tele­phone, 649-9322. 76371; Longpolnt. 957-9148. 9927 Irvington. 691-8232. All locations open 2• hours e..A.H. -Star Adult New9-1.C07 A>Chmond-528- By Tycho • Taft Auton'lol•....-1""1 Taft-522·2190 .~ .. Plec9-1307 Fa1nr1--529-1414 e unionJeck~ 1212W•the•mer-52&­tl000 9 Up One WHtern./Luther-BAB. 2400 aruoe-524-5737 eW911helmef' FIM Merttet 1733 Wtllthetmef • W•1ht11rnef lntenon 1727 w .. 1hein>eir 520-1357 e Wllde & Steon bocH1 ttore-«:12 Weetheitn9f 521-7014 TRAVEL TRAVEL KEY WEST Free brochure and map included Accomodations, restaurants, shops, bars_ Write Key West Business Guild. POB 1208-M. Key West. FL ~. (305) 296-7535. Fortunes FtN Fndtty evening. September 30. 1983. through Frtd•y evenmg. Octo• 7, 1983 ARIES-The autumn leaves fly past your window. It's time to withdraw from the flurry of activity and do some serious soul searching. What's important end who's important? And what do they all mean to you? Memories can haunt you or instruct you at this time. TAURUS-You're going to learn something very important about love and romance. Passion end commitment could combine for a very pas­sionate commitment. Along the way, you'll be doing some exploration about roles and the need to define them. And redefine them. And then? GEMINI-If fantasies from the past didn't overwhelm you and leave you stranded wondering about the future. the present could be a fine and lovely place Your friends are nght there and very supportive. but you're lost in fantasyland. Come home! CANCER-The Moon ism your sign until Saturday morning. Gaming from losing is one of life's important lessons. If you don't get lost in a bout of depression. that's just what you can learn_ What's most impor­tant now is gettmg over the hump. Say goodbye to all that. and get on with your life. LEO-The Moon passes through Leo from Saturday morning to Mon­day morning_ Venus. in Leo tor almost 6 weeks. will leave Wednesday afternoon. If you take your friend's wild and crazy ideas and your wild and crazy ideas. 1s it possible to put them together and come out sane and happy? Yes, if each of you shows some consideration and thought­fulness. (But don't be afraid to be wild and crazy!) VIRGO-The Moon passes through Virgo from Monday morning through Wednesday morning. Venus will enter Wednesday afternoon while Mercury and Mars remam m Virgo all week. You've got a lot of love and a lot of energy; the choice is yours as to what to do with them. You can blow a lot of money and a lot of flesh, or you can concentrate _on a future goal that will be sure to bring some great reward. Well, Virgo, what'll it be? LIBRA-In your sign all week. Pluto and the Sun. The Moon enters next Wednesday morning and leaves mid-day Friday, the 7th. The pot of gold at the end of the rainbow may appear to you in a rather unusual disguise. Someone whose intentions may not seem all that wonderful could turn into your fairy godparent. Kick back and let the strange bring an enjoyable time for you SCORPIO-In your sign all week: Saturn. The Moon will enter Scorpio. next Friday. mid-day. the 7th. The ability to stick to it and with it ls yours When the going gets tough, the tough get going. or something to that effect. You're also able to be serious when that's called for and have fun when you want to. Steady as you go. Scorpio SAGITTARIUS-In your sign this week: Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune It's frenzy time. Too much, too s.oon. too bad. too often. Whoa. there' You're going to burn out on this tnp beto:re you barely get started• Take 1t all a day (and a night) at a time, and see 1f that doesn·twork a httlebetter CAPRICORN-Unexpected visitors could be an ah, so welcome relief from your nose-to-the-grindstone routine. Your. work requires a lot of you, and you've got a lot to give it. But a break in your day-to-day will help you get a// your priorities in order AQUARIUS-What great fun life can be when the _right friends are along! Aren't you the lucky one right now, Aquanus1 Fnends-newones and old ones-are all around you You're likely to get inspired along the way_ Do something with that inspiration PISCES-And just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water! Someone or something is causing a problem. and you're feeling a bit helpless Turning to one of your fellow wa~er signs could help. Seek out Scorpios and Cancers for advice and relief. They can help! •1N3 STO~EWALL FEATURES SYNDICATE 28 -MONTROSE VOICE I SEPT 30, 1983 SELECTION A SPECIAL SERVICE FOR SPECIAL PEOPLE VIDEO DATING COMES OF AGE Offices Now Open at 4200 Westheimer suite250 (713) 961-9876
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