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Montrose Voice, No. 169, January 20, 1984
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Montrose Voice, No. 169, January 20, 1984 - File 001. 1984-01-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1185/show/1164.

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(1984-01-20). Montrose Voice, No. 169, January 20, 1984 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1185/show/1164

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 169, January 20, 1984 - File 001, 1984-01-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1185/show/1164.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 169, January 20, 1984
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Hyde, Robert
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 20, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Gay Political Caucus Opens Nominations for Elections By Robert Hyde Houston's Gay Political Caucus opened nominations for the February 15 elections for four of its board seats and four of its executive seats at its general meeting Wednesday evening, Jan. 18. Since a second call for nominations will be held at the general meeting Feb. 1, only four persons were recognized as nominees: Jack Valensky will be running for renomi· nation for his expired board seat; Deborah Squires and Dan Pritchett will be compete for position of secretary of the caucus; and Sue Lovell, vacating her board seat, placed her name in nomination for the vice-presidential chair GPC board member Ray Hill called a met>ting to be held at his office on Wednes­day, Feb. 2.5, 7:30 p.m., 2505 N. Shepherd (downstairs), for "anybody who wants to talk about my candidacy" as president of the caucus. Earlier in the evening, GPC President Larry Bagneris introduced Anne Wheeler, an unsuccessful GPC-endorsed City Coun­cil candidate, as a woman who "stood up for us when it was unpopular" and who now needs the help of the GPC in order to settle her $9000 campaign debt. The caucus, in association with the Community Political Action Committee, sports associations and bar owners, has scheduled a benefit performance of the popular Noel Coward play, Private Lives, to be staged at Miss Charlotte's on Feb. 23 with the original Diversity Players cast to help raise the necessary funds to offset the political debt. "I'm very pleased that the gay com mun· ity is organizing this first fundraiser for me," Wheeler said. The benefit, billed as "Private Lives and Public Friends," will offer champagne and hors d'()('uvres. There will also be an auction following the performance. Tickets will be $15; $7 for standing room only. The caucus then moved to other busi· ness. Anni11e Parker reported on the caucuo' board retreat, an eight·hour affair estab­lishing priorities for 1984. She stated one of the most important accomplishments to come from the meeting was moving nomi· nations for GPC elections to December in order to allow new officers to begin at the first of the year. A motion to hire a financial director was adopted by the caucus. continued page 3 Meet Ginny Apuzzo Executive Director of the Nation's Biggest Gay Rights Group Kathy Tepes, p.6 Whitmire Denounced for 'Barhopping in the Gay Community' Robert Hyde, p.7 The Newspaper of Montrose Jan. 20, 1984 l:;sue ... 1&9 Puolished Every F1iday H PD Vice Stages N umerous Raids in M ontrose By Robert Hyde, Hollis Hood and Billie Duncan Forty-six people have been arrested in the past week in bar and bookstore raids, in addition to the recent raid at JR's lost week, ond one OJ was assaulted so badly at the Exile that he required stitches at Ben Taub hospital. Despite GPC's claim that the gay com· munity now has friends in the police department-and a recently passed Sexu­ally Oriented Business Ordinance which specifically excludes bookstores and bars-these "friends" have no control over the vice squad which has been hard at work arresting people from thei;e estab· lishments, while nothing has apparently been done with the Montrose maosagestu­diot1 that serve the non·gay community and pose a threat to neighborhood survi­val. On Jan. 15, vice officers arrested six men at the Ballpark bookstore for public lewdness. A Jan. 16th raid netted three more arrests for indecent exposure at a 24-hour newsstand on the North Freeway. Seven raids took place on Wednesday and early Thursday morning. Vice took in three men at Diner's News, one from Studz, a 19-year·old male in the 2700 block of Stanford two men at the Asylum-all on charges' of indecent exposure, public lewdness or prostitution. Six persons were arrested at the Barn, a gay bar, involving public intoxicati?n, with the bartenders being charged with serving thoNe persons drinks. . Similar charges were made against thl' bartenders and patrons of the Exile. a downtown gay bar The Exile's OJ was "roughed up'" so badly after he was taken outside the bar he required "quilt• a fl'w stitches"' at Ben Taub Hospital before he could be taken to jail, according to an employee. There were also eight arrests at Mr. Peepers bookstore for public lewdness and indecent exp06ure on Wednesday night. Information on these raids wao taken from the vice activity sheets. The vice officers involved were Sergeants Truman PoAse, Lain, Kivela, Magee, Bumgardner: Evans, Arocha, Castillo, Clendemun and Wong. The arrestR made on the North Freeway were made by the "B Team." Regarding the Exile incident, one eye­witness who asked not to be identified said, "We were just Rtanding there having a drink. I looked around and there's this guy-and they're (police) just weigh laying the shit out of him-and I go, 'What the hell's happening?' The vice contact sheets list vice squad officers Bumgardner and Evans in charge of this operation. "I don't know if this guy said something or what, but it was like two or three of'em had him down and under restrainl They were handcuffing him. "And they dragged him out. It happened immediately-like it was just that quick (snapping the fingers) and they were An Eyewitness Account to Unprofessional Conduct and Degradation at HPD Jail Page 3 there. "Doug (Exile owner) gets on the mike and says, 'Everyone just calm down; there is no problem, they are here to protect you. Everyone stand still. No one say nothing. No one do nothing. And there will be no problem.' "They were there (about) 30 minute,;."' the witnes11 said. "There wM this one that just kept walking around, and he'd go 'you,' and they'd carry (the customer) out," the witness stated. The eyewitne~s stated that apprxi· mately 20 people were arrested by this method in the raid which took place around 11 :00 p.m., although the arrest sheet stated only 10. Eight plain clothei; officers were reported to have been in the bar at the time the raid was happening. The bartenders were the first to be arrested, but the rest, according to another person who was in the bar, "were picked at random. He would walk around very cai;u­ally and say 'you go up and stand by the stage.' He had all the people that were around the stage go up and stand by the bar and walked around the bar, I don't know how many times, and then said, 'We're finished.'" None of the persons taken were discer· nably drunk, according to persons who watched the incident. "Obviously eve­ryone was having a good time, but as far as being high, I wouldn't be able to say." As the witne~s reported, no one was fa). ling off the bar stools. No one resisted the police. "When they pointed their finger, the person would just get up and walk out. Nobody said a word to them. I kept wondering if they were going to come to us." The police never stated what they were i;pecifically doing, according to the v.it· ness, nor their mission in entering the bar. "They didn't say, <Thi is a bui;t.' They didn't say anything. They just came in. The show was going on. The music stopped, but they didn'tidentifywhat they were doing."' A drag show by Exile employee,; was in progress, and the police told all of the par· ticipants to return to the dressing room,; and put on men's clothing. "Doug took the microphone and said, 'Be quiet, they arc here for your protection-there -..ill be no trouble They're gonna do their job. Let them do their job. Everyone ~tand 8till. Be calm and please be quiet."' The eye,.itness said there was no baH1s for the police to be harassing the bar patrons, "because they werl'n 't doing any· thing. They were just drinking their drinks. You know it if there"s something obHcene going on, or vile and crazy .... But it was not. Thingll were really quiet." Yet the police records show that some were arre6ted for public lewdness. The other witness i;aid that if a person had come to see the show, he would not have had time to become "visibly intoxi· cated," because the show had just started when the polke came in. "There's got to be a reason for these three recent raid~,'' said the witnei;s, refer­ring to previous arrests made at JR's and the Barn. "Just tell me what it is, 'cause I don't know." Apparently neither doeb Montrose's City Councilman George Greanias. Kent Spear, Greaniae' aide, i;aid Thurs­day, "We don't understand it and are just as frustroted as you are. Several people are confused about why the bars are being hit and not the modeling studio~. they thought the knock down would be more of a sting operation." 2 MONTROSE VOICE I JAN. 20, 1984 Community Upset Over Rash of Vice Raids from page I In an effort to soothe the community's ruffled f.eathers, Greanias' office was attempting Thursday to contact every bar manager and owner for a meeting with Police Chief Lee Brown, which has been tentatively scheduled for Monday after­noon. Spear also stated that the meeting is open to all interested persons. Representatives of GPC, CPAC, CHE. the Montrose BuRiness Guild and other organizations will be especially invited. "We are very concerned about selective enforcement," Spear said. "We are Work­ing it through the system." GPC President Larry Bagneris, in an attempt to cool the rising tempers in the community in order to give community representatives a chance to find out the facts, said, "These arrests do not mirror the entire Houston Police Department, but officers who are very paranoid about homo11exuality." All officers involved, incidentally, are members of the HPD's vice squad. Another meeting with Chief Brown has been set for this Friday (Jan. 20), which will include members of the GPC, attor­neys representing the hara and some of tho11e arrested, as well two men who were arrested who plan to report to the Chief the treatment they received at the hands of the HPD. GPC member and gay activist Ray Hill, who ha.s been invited to the meeting, said, "My priority concerns the 46 people who have been arrested. In the past, these peo­ple have been left to the mercy of the police and courts and nobody knows what happens to them." Another person reported to the VOICE that the police raids may represent a power struggle between the Mayor and the police department. "The police department wants to show the Mayor that they are running Houston and not her. So they say, 'Let's go arrest a few fags,' and then that's what they do. It's just to harass, and it's just to stir up trouble." Bagneris said that he is concerned for the busine11ses that may be affected. "Some people are genuinely afraid," he said. NEW! SATURDAY AFTERNOONS AT RASCALS NEW! 2 to 6pm: Happy Hour cocktails 2 to 4pm: Hors d'Oeurves featuring Sliced Roast Round of Beef <SC: to benefit cay Political caucus> 4pm: Saturday Matinee with Montgomery, Plant & Stritch MONTGOMERY, PLANT & STRITCH appearing thru January 28 ii i 1 ii~tL1 ... ii1 I ii Tilt ii ~ !' i' il 8 !! ttJCJ:"' JL 1llL '1 lL. 1L-.,, I ~~. Dtnner Motl· ThU"S 6-11 2702 Kirby-524-6272 F11 & Sot 0-12 reservouoos requested •• . 1 n1a.1 11,.i. ,.1.•. 11 ~i11i..i.~,f, '1i1i 1 ~ ~ ..l J91t.. •U W•l A •t Shows 9:30, 11, 12:30 :-:·:.·:.·:.·:.·:.·:.·:.·:.·:.·:.·:.·:.··.-.·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..· :·:·:·:·:<-:·:·:·:·:··-·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.·.· .· VOICE Employee Arrested; Reveals Degradation by HPD By Robert Hyde The Houston Police Department's vice squad hit the MONTROSE VOICE close to home this week when one of its employeeH, ~rt L!lnd: was arrested for alledged public mtox1cabon at the Barn, 710 Pacific, Hhortly after midnight Wednesday Jan 18. ' . Land's arrest coincided with the seizure of 4ri other men in the Montrose commun­ity, including five others at the Barn and nil within a week's time. ' Land went out for a beer late Tuesday evening. After drinking two at the Rip­cord, he walked the short half blocks to the Barn where he ordered another, one he was not allowed to finish. At 12:10 a.m. Wednesday morning a~cording to the vice squad contact sheets: vice squad officers A.J. Dorr (Badge No. 61096), C.J, Clark (Badge No. 38019) and D. A. Atchetee (Badge No. 39244) entered the Barn. After removing from the wall and examining the bar's liquor license, the officers began selecting individuals "at random," Land said, and confiscated their !D's. Land said that he was not intoxicated. "I feel that I was picked because I was alone," he said. "There were two people together in the bar who seemed to be loaded, and the vice didn't bother them." Land was told by one of the officers to "go sit on the bench" in the front of the Barn where two other people were waiting to be taken to police headquarters. Land said one of the men was an off-duty bar· tender of the Barn who was not intoxi· cated and another a customer who appeared to be 11ober. Land did state that one of the two other men who joined him at the front of the bar •eemed to be intoxicated. Lund and two other men were then frisked, handcuffed and forced to enter a squad car. I.and rPportocl that one man nskl'd an officer, "What am I being charged with?" "You'll find out when you get down· town," Land reported the officer as say- Montrose Voice The Now' pap f Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 V~~'mYNCo MontrOM Voce. 1 t 000 coplel '*eett'y Canu Gay Newt 8.000 copies weekly Aus!m/San An!Onio 6 1.,, 4 000 COptn b1wtteltty Iota! Te•IS ., .. 19.000 cop• w•kly, avg trtduced ctrcu41t1on in J1nu1ryl Contents copyright c 1984 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry MCCiurg rptJbtiaher Robert Hyde/man•o1ng •d1tor Hollis Hood1n•*' «Mor Chuck Meredith "'°"' «1ito, 811he Duncan, Peter Derksen •nt•rtainmenr ... ,,,.,, Jon Cheetwood. Joo L Watts'contobut1ng ""''u9,1 Acef Clark •rt d"~'°' Jeff Bray g•aphu;a Sonny Davis .ccountmg Mark Drago Jeff Franke, Jerry ldoux. Steven Lacobe ~.,, 1,no Founding M•mbor Gre1tcr Montrose Business Gulld Gey Pr•1 ASIOCl8tl0n N•111i Serv1ce1 1'1temahonlll Gay News Agency Pedhc Ne.,,..1 Serva. Larry Bu1h 1Wa5hlngton, DC) S yttd1r;;•ted FHtu1• Serv•c•• & Wmer1 (San FrenciJCO) ChtOniclft Fe11u1", United fe11ureSynd1c1te. Jeftrey Wilson Randy Allred. Stonew111 Features Synd1r;;ete Bne~ MtNeught. Jo. 8ek;er POS1t.tASTER Bend address correcl1on1 to 3317 Montrose •306. Hou11on. TX 77008 Sub1C11pt1on ,.,. 111 US 1111NI~ •n~~ $49 per year (S2 ~I. $20per11« months 126 tsSUff),orSt 25perweek (less "'"" 2e ilsuH) Baek issues $2 00 each N•fsOMI ~vtrtis1ng rtpt•t•ntat1"• Joe OlSat>.to. A•Yenaen Marllel1ng 861611'1 A"enue, New York 10011. (2121242'-&863 AtJv•rtitlltQ tHMJllfl• Tuesd•y. 5 3CJpm. tor '5sue rittused Fr._ C1a:y 9¥")nlng NOtJ" to actvert;ura Locel ectvertlSlnQ rite schedule S••·A wa:s enec:tiwt Juty l 1$83 ~bH1tr Monlr'OU VotCe• dOff oot assome '"POnll· bt!tfY ior adwettt.ino cte1ms Reade!'$ sfKJUtd alert ~ontrl)ho VOjCi/" to any ~tve •dftft!t1ng ing. After reaching pohre headquarters Land said an officer asked each of the~ their names, occupations, addresses, Social Security numbers and driver's license numbers, and made note of what each was wearing. After they left the car, I.and said, he and the two other men were frisked again, taken inside the building on Reisner Street, and, after being told to stand against a wall, were frisked again. Two of the men were then asked by an HPD officer how much they had had to drink, and if they were homosexual, Land said. One of the men, the more outspoken of the three, was taken away, Land reported. According to Land, he and the remain­ing man were thl'n taken to a cell where five minutes later they were frisked again. "Are you going to give us any trouble?" an officer asked the two men, according to Land. Land then asked if he could make a phone call, and was told by an officer that he could within 45 minutes, yet it was over three hours before he was permitted to use the phone. After a short wait, the men were taken back to a squad car for transport to another building, Land said, where four other men from the Barn were waiting including two bartenders. one of who~ was on duty at the time of the arrests. ~fter being told by officers to put every­thing that was metal on their persons into a bag, a photograph of the group was taken. "It was like it was going to be in a year­book," Land said. Land and one other man were then ta ken back to police headquarters on Rei•ner Street, friRked again and returned to a cell, after which Land was subjected to treatment he considers degrading. "Are you homosexual?" an officer asked him, Land said He was then told to stand up. "Take off your boots," an officer told him. "Take off your ~ocks. Take off your pantH. Take off your underwear. Take off your jacket. Take off your sweater. Take off your shirt." Land said that he was allowed to keep on his T-shirt. Standing in the cell practically nude, JAN 20, 1984 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 IA'lnd reported the officer asking. "Are you wearing a cock ring?" When Land said that he was not the officer said, "Put your underwear ' and pants back on." Land was then told by an officer, "Fol­low me," was photographed and then taken to the fifth floor of the building where he was told by another officer, "It will cost you $110 to get out of here. Do you have that much on you?" Not until then was Land told that he had been arrested for public intoxication. He was then allowed to use the tele­phone, although an officer talked to him constantly, Land said, rushing him while he was calling for help. After the phone call, Land reported that he was returned to a cell. Ten minutes later, another man arrested at the Barn joined him. "We could hear them out in the han; · You're Reading the MONTROSE VOICE One of Amenca·s Ma1or Gay Community Newspapers Land said of the officers. "talking about queers and faggots." Just prior to Land's release and on his way from the cell to the elevator, Land said several officers were seated, some reading newspapers. As he w81S passing, Land said, one of the officers called out in a nasty tone, "Your mama, Kathy Whit· mire, the Mayor, was touring all the fag­got queer bars in a double-decker bus." Land was then taken down by the elev a· tor, he said, photographed again, then released. "It was uncalled for," Land said of his experience. "I felt degraded. I wasn't drunk, and they wouldn't allow me to take a breath test. 'You don't get to take a breath test for this,' I was told." Walter Strickler, owner of the Barn, was contacted regarding the incident and wked if he had any comment. "No." he said. "I'm just going to •weat it out." The Family is Society's Most Violent Institution A 20-year study of Amencan families has concluded that violence is just as much a part of domestic life as love, reportlS the Los Ang('/e.s Times. ~n facl: >'RY~ University of New Hamp­~ h1rn soc10logist Murray Straus, the fam· 1ly is the moi;t violent institution in our society, with the ";ctims most often being women and children. Straus s~ys a woman runs a greater risk of assault m her own home that outside it Physics! abuse of children, he found, i~ almo•t um versa!. He says the reason may be that we are trained to be violent from mf~mcy. A parent who olaps a child for eatmg off the floo; may be expressing con· cern, he says, but 1tteachcs the child a link between love and violence. GPC Starts Nomination Process for its New Officers from page I Former GPC President abd National Gay DemocraL• member Lee Harrington announced the formation of an official Democratic caucuR within the GPC acknowledging Marion Coleman"s Repub'. lican GPC caucus. Several members volunteered to revise the screenini: questionnaire to meet the diverse demand~ of thiR vear'i; elections which will include inte~iewing candi­dates for ~tate representatives and sena· tors, the Harris County Commissioner's Court, Justicc'll of the Peace, constables and judges. Hill .•tated that this vear's candidates must not. only addrC1Ss the interests of gays and lesbians, but also those of minorities &R well as econ omics. ' It was announced that onlv 34 tickeL• remain for GPC's night at the ·Alley Thea­tre for a special performance of Cloud 9. Houston's Gay Pride Week committee will meet Sunday, Jan. 30. at Kindred Spirits. and on each succeeding last Sun­day of each month through April. Bagneris stressed that the Gav Pride Week committee ts a totallv separate entity from the GPC. · 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JAN 20. 1984 Montrose Mouth By Amanda B. Recondwith Steaming over Police Abuses Amanda is steaming this week. There is enough pent-up emotion an this Issue of the VOICE over the police actions to fill twelve issues of the Times. and for those of you who read with skepticism over the seriousness of what is going on here in Montrose. there may be a rude awakening II would be just awful to be standing in a favorite bar, having a drink with friends. thank­ing you are secure, then suddenly be dragged out and stuffed into a patrol car and booked on some trumped up charge. Really now! Perhaps the party 1s over Maybe our darlings at City Hall should take more notice Mayor Whitmire, Mr. GraanlH, Mr. Hal~ Mr. L•lor, and Ms. Tins­ley would be hard pressed in the next election should one of their largest voting blocks sud­denly disappear; and by the looks of it. we may all be sitting m fall by the next election. That would make us very angry Perhaps we would find other more compassionate city officials to elect Amanda would love to be humorous on this sub1ect and come up with lots of clever little ditties about the advantages of being gay and having a sense of humor in the face of adver­sity. but when our freedoms are violated so blatantly one can too easily envision the Stal­Ins. the Hitlers the McC•rthya and all the none-too hilarious memories they bring back to mind Personally. Amanda never thought Hogan'• Heroes was funny. and should you be standing In a bar with friends and suddenly be carted off and given a police record. you won't think thats funny, either! Well. 11 1s a busy week, despite what's going on, so let's get at ii. -c- Thank you, David G. for sanding Amanda the fine letter about hie In the suburbs It was very illum1nat1ng to see that people out there really do care about their environment. You are cer­tainly correct In stating that gay oriented organizations should be set up in outlying areas There is a whole market out there that has not yet been approached, and the VOICE will no doubt appear somewhere in your area soon -c- Thank you Betay S out on Memorial for your much appreciated advice on the validity of liv­ing outside the Loop. Amanda had no idea 11 would be such an 1ssoe; however, you pointed out that there are thousands of dedicated peo­ple living out there who really do contribute to the hie and well-being of Houston. Even more flattering ls the fact that the VOICE ls being read by the people out there Now our demo­graphics are all screwed up• -c- Thank you Arthur Jonea for the beautiful let­ter. thanking Montrose for the success of your fabulous show at tho Ripcord We are happy to help anyone with potential and talent in this community That's what friends are for• - C-SL Stephen'• Episcopal Church, 1805 W. Ala· bama at Woodhead. is hosting an Evensong Service at 7pm Sunday. Jan. 22, in the sanctu­ary of St Stephen's. The service, which Is in observance of the week of prayer for Christian Unity will be shared by St. Stephen's, Grace Lutheran, Bering Memorial Methodist, St. Anne's Roman Catholic. First Cumberland Preaby1erlen, and COYenant Baptist churches; and Annunlcl•tlon Greek Orthodox Cathedr•I Sounds llke a real community event that should be attended by e' 1 - c - Last week's photos in the VOICE of the Robert Schwab memorial at Rothko Chapel were taken by Jamea Famea on assignment for HousTown. ::i - The University of Houston (UofH) is having an exhibition of 95 paintings of romantic lands· cape art by Herm•n Lungkwltz Jan. 15 through Feb 19 in Blatter Gallery Many of you are saying, 'So what," but Amanda has been d0tng her homework, and finding that 19th century Romantic and Victorian realism are enjoying a great come-back. This week's Time Magazine has a wonderful article on the sub­Ject. saying that these paintings are now being re-evaluated by the public. Perhaps the public is tired of getting headaches trying to figure out whether a painting looks better upside down or right side up. -c- Get on those sequins and paint those eyelids because Douglas Holl, chairman of the board for the Marllyn Monroe Foundation for Child­ren. and Ken Bales, general manager of Beja'• and Numbers, say they are producing "Holly­wood Daze," a cabareVMardi Gras type benefit show to help foster children. National celebs have been invited for the event at Numbers Ill. and rumor has it that Ma. Liu herself has been invited to headline the event• Watch for more details in the VOICE. -c- Havo you ever wondered what the Big Wigs in Austin think about Montrose. or whether they even think about Montrose? The Neartown Civic Aaaoelatlon Is presenting State Rep. Debra Dan burg at 7pm Jan.24, in Bering Mem­orlat Church She is going to talk about the state government and their relationship with our community. Sounds like a good opportun­ity to become informed, and maybe even get Involved with the Neartown Association. While we are on the subject. Jerry Blum is the new president of the Neartown Assoc1at1on, and George Pierce 1s now vice president. The group's Open Space/Beautification Commit­tee has planted bluebonnets in the 2700 block of the Montrose esplanade to compliment the purslano and crepe myrtle already there. Mont­rose Blvd. used to be the showcase street in Houston, you know It's nice to know that there is an organization caring enough to make ii beautiful once again. -c- Choice•. Houston's women's alternative. will have New Member Orientation at 7pm Friday, Jan. 27 The group aspires to provide an oppor­tunity for lesbians to network socially, profes· sionally and personally, and to involve women in projects within the gay community at large Amanda Is confident, however, that their orien· talion isn't like the summer camp orientation she remembers. There will be no wetting of faces and blowing Into bowls of flour, so there IS no excuse not to 101n• For information, call ~, The Moving Right Along Garage 1s st ill moving right along (they told me to say that'). They will be conducting Claaaea in Maehanlcs through the winter season. Amanda should have taken that class long before her transmission dropped out on the Katy Freeway. For informa­tion, call 663· 7329 -c- Dlgnlty/Houaton, an organization offering spiritual direction and social interaction to gay Catholics and others interested in their wel· fare, is sponsoring the First Annual Greater Montroae Pub Crawl, Sunday, Jan 22 at 4pm. Stan Ford. Dignity president, says the primary purpose of the Pub Crawl is to get their new "Mass Appeal" posters into places visible to the gay community. He also says that it's a great way for 100 or more members to go out and have a good time. Participants will meet at the Brl•r Patch. Sounds like lots of fun' - c- Wouldn ·1 1t just be amazing 1f the police raided a bar full of people on a religious outmg? -c-lncidentally Amanda would like to know 'ale \(')sik\ chiefly Scot var of SUCH 2aie or aiek \'sik\ vt aicced or aleked \'sikt\; aic-cing or aiekelng [alter. of seek] 1 : CHASE. Arr ACK - usu. used as an imperative esp. to a dog(,_ 'em) 2: to incite or urge to an attackt pursuitt or harassment: SET 'ale \ 'sikt 'sc"K\ adv [L, sot thus - more at so] : intentionally so written - used after a printed word or passage to indicate that it is intended exactly as printed or to indicate that it exactly reproduces an original (said he seed [~] it all) alek \'sik\ adj ~E sek, sik, fr. OE seoc; akin to OHO sioh sickt Mir socht depression] 1 a (1) : affected with disease or ill health : AILING (2) : of, relating to, or intended for use in sickness ( ,_ pay) (a,_ ward) b: QUEASY, NAUSEATED(,_ to one's stomach) (was ,..,., in the car) c : undergoing menstruation 2 : spiritually or morally unsound or corrupt 3 a : sickened by strong emotion (as shame or fear) (,_ with fear) (worried ,_) b : having a strong distaste from surfeit : SATIATED (,_ of Oattery) c : filled with disgust or chagrin (gossip that makes one,_) d: depressed and longing for something ( ,_ for one's home) 4 a : mentally or emotionally unsound or disordered : MORBID ( ,_ thoughts) b : MACABRE. SADlmC <,_jokes) & : lacking vigor: SICKLY: as a : badly outclassed (looked ,_ in the contest) b : declining or inactive after a period of speculative activity (grain futures were,_) c : incapable of yielding a profitable crop esp. because of buildup of disease organisms (clover-sick soils) aiek and tireet adi : thoroughly fatigued or bored VENTURE-N, 2923 MAIN ST. HOUSTON 2nd Only Bi-Annual (SICJ Party, Sunday, Jan. 22nd, from 4pm Coming Up: Evita Bus Trip, Monday, Feb. 6th, Bpm Aquarius Party Sunday. Feb. 12th, from 5pm Yea! Party!! whether you, Le Pub/1que. are really interested in a Cooking Column Our illustrious editor has heard rumblings from several factions, wondering why we don't have one. Please write me and let me know. - o- Drop by the Art Institute of Houston's main gallery from now until Feb 3 to see the work of Ruben Salin•• Medina, Sr., a portrait artist. Call Deanne Mraz, 523-2564, for information. ·o- Congrats to Roger, the fabulously gorgeous hunk who was awarded the new Mr. Exile, 1984 last Wednesday night, Jan. 11 Competition included western wear, leather wear, and the famous sw1msu11 competition. Rumor has it that because of goose-bumps caused by the cold weather. it was difficult to tell one lump from another' - o- Well, that's all the space I can give this week, folks. Remember that even though the police are arresting friends for nothing and throwing them 1n jail, and our president seems bent on getting us involved in armed conflict. and the greenhouse effect 1s melting the polar ice caps. things could be worse. They could can­cel Dynaatyl Gay Prostitutes Say They Lied About Mississippi Governor Three homosexual prostitutes who said they had sex with successful gubernator­ial candidate Bill Allain of Mississippi stated earlier this week that the allege· tions were not true and that they had been paid to make them. The accusers gave the story to the Jack­son, Miss., Clarion-Ledger on the gover­nor's inauguration day to "set the record straight." The men, Grady Arrington, David Holli­day and Donald Johnson, all recanted the story they had told and gave sworn state­ments to that effect to Allain's attorney. Bill Spell, the Jackson attorney who supervised an investigation of Allain'e private life for his Republican opponent, said the move was expected and that the three had been offered "large sums of money" in a "combination of threat and reward" to change their stories. Spell said Arrington had mentioned an offer of $5000, which Allain's attorney, Crymes Pittman, denied. Holliday, one of the prostitutes, said a rE"prE'sentative of a private detectivE' agency that worked for Allain's oppo­nents gave him money to make the state­ments. All three were allegedly placed on the payroll at $62 per day, with promises of more money on election day by Allain's opponents. Allain, 55, denied the statements that he had homosexual relationships and took a lie detector test to prove his innocence. He was elected with 56 percent of the vote on Nov 8. General Ousted on Suspicion of being Gay BONN, W Germany OGNA)-West Ger· man General Guenter Kiessling, a deputy NATO commander·in-chief who denies being gay and is unmarried, ha, been dis­misHod because his suspec~ed homosexu­ality made him a possible •ecurity risk. Sources said that West German intelli­gence had closely observed the general's lifestyle and conclude<! that it made him vulnerable to blackmail. The Defense Ministry said earlier that the 58-year-old Kiessling had retired early but refused to give any reaso_ns. . . A military spokesma~ said K1esshng had applied for early discharge, to take effect in April, and defense Minister Manfred Woerner had agreed to it. Kiessling, one of only three four·star generals in West Germany, wa~ one of two deputies to U.S. General Rl'rna~d Roger~. Kiessing hnd held the post since .Apnl 191\2 nnd normally would hnve continued in it until 1985 THE SONGS OF DIETRICH GARLAND & PIAF , JAN. 20, 1984 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 RUTH HASTINGS FEATURING BA Y LLO & CRAIG JESSUP Saturday January 28th One Show Only All Tickets $12.00 TOWER THEATRE 120 I W estheimer Secured Parking Available Presented in Association with the Montrose Voice 6 M ONTROSE VOICE I JAN. 20, 1984 Virginia Apuzzo: NGTF's Outspoken Executive Director By Kathy Tepee Via Gay Pre.a Auociation Wire Service "Before there was gay pride, brothers and sisters, there was gay and lesbian rage. We now have an opportunity, and damn good reason, to be in touch with that rage again for the SECOND STONEWALL," said Virginia Apuzzo, executive directorof the lljational Gay Task Force, at a recent gay pride rally in New York City which addressed the AIDS issue. "And just like our brothers and sisters who took to the street because they were fightmg for their lives," she continued, "we came to the street today for no less purpose. We are fighting for our lives, and the government better get the message that we intend to win. ''The fact of the matter is, brothers and sisters, that we stand at a critical moment in our history. We can look at thi8 moment and decide in our guts, and decide at this Second Stonewall, what our principle will be; Intolerance is intolerable. "Our wealth is not affluence, nor acqui· sition; it is the opportunity to put our 'What we ought to do for the time being in this Presidential race is fall in love with an issue and forget about failing in love with the candidate.' Virginia Apuzzo, executive director of the National Gay Ta;;k Fore!! ideals to work-to put them to work for the purpose of makin1i the history that we can be proud of-a history that does not have as it'a objective 'to survive,' but 'to thrive."' At this time when so many people in our community are fearful of AIDS. Apuzzo delivered a very up message to fight back. Notable activists Robin Tyler and Stonewaller, himself, Ed Murphy called Apuzzo "Our Leader." Apuzzo recently met with White House representatives in the offices of the Health and Hum an Services. Concerning the out· come of the meeting, Apuzzo said, "There is no evidence that there is a commitment about AIDS. I don't believe that the Rea· gan administration knows what the number one health care priority is. "At the meeting, we were told that we are making a political issue, whereas AIDS is a medical problem. My answer to them was, 'If your bos8 in the form of the Reagan administration saya that you must live within your budget, and in the constraints of your budget you find that know it-has made a commitment to sign a gay rights bill. ''Thoee of us who are working nation· ally are in the process of putting together a statement that we will ask all ofthecandi· datee, and then we will report to the com· munity what their responsee were. Of course, some of the candidates may have a disastrous record in other areas, and we have to look at that. '.\<'bat we ought to do for the time being in this Preeidential race is fall in love with an iesue and for1iet about falling in love with the candidate." 'Be yourself! Reach inside yourself and dare to be the best you can be. ' all you can commit ia only $12 million, and However, Apuzzo would like to see the if you are telling me that your answer i1 a Board of Directors at NGTF get more scientific llllllwer, then I'm telling you that involved and begin to take their roles more your answer ill political-that all you are •eriously: to perform, to be accountable to allowed to say is that there is only so much the community and to know when it's time money. You are not utilizing science as the to go. variable; you are using political con· "Members of the Board of Directors straint as a variable, and I'm reacting to need to recognize that they are policy mak· what I think is a political conclusion."' ere. If the or1ianization isn't going in the Apuzzo added, "When the New York rightdirection,don'tjustblametheexecu· Times said that the Reagan administra- tive director or the staff. Ask yourself why tion i.a yawning concerning AIDS. we in are you on the board, what do you have to the lesbian and 1iaycommunity know that contribute, who is your constituency, and they are sound asleep. what resource!! do you bring to the organi· "We have to let the Reagan administra· zation?" tion know that we see that politics is based In apparent reference and contrast to on homophobia. and that AIDS is an her predeces1<0r, Lucia Valeska, and her example of what government does when turbulent resignation, Apuzzo said, "If any group gets disenfranchised-be it members had the sense that it was time for women,thepoor,poopleofcolor,theunem· me to move over, they wouldn't have to ployed, the underemployed, the aging and write tyrant articles in the newspaper. the lesbians and gays." They should simply send me a dozen roses Switching to the upcoming Presidential to say, 'You served us for whatever period, race, Apuzzo said, "Alan Cranston has now your time is up, and thank you very historically always been supportive. Wal· much.' It'• a smart pert1on who knows ter Mondale did the Human Righta Cam· when w go." paign Fund benefit dinner, and he also ln .concl~n. Apuzze> said, "I l1>vc this sent out a gay rjgbts strutment !Or Gay community. l tlrink the moveml!nt saved Pride W!e'k. EmmHollinJrs-few people - ·my life; 'l'here WU"'a' time when I never thought it was possible for me to ever say that I was a homosexual out loud, even in a room by myself. The movement helped me and I owe a Jot. "I'm 42-year&-old and I see myself work· ing on behalf of the movement for several more years. "Congre88 is something that is a dream to me. but if the dream doesn't come true, well, I have to live my life." Tackling another political iesue, Apuzzo talked about a recent case where a closeted politician approached the lesbian and gay community and requested our help and support in a political campaign. Apuzzo commented, "More and more people within the community are going to have lees and less patience with people who take all of the benefits of all of the people who take the risks and who are not willing to take a risk themselves. Basically, you've got to care enough about yourself to be who you are." And many women wish to be like Apuzzo. When I suggested to her that she was a role model, she responded with, "Be yourself1 Reach inside yourself and dareto be the best you can be. Dare to be yourself. Young women today have to remember what so many women had to strug1ile and fight for. You must make it better; you must go on. Never give up! "I just love Holly Near's line: 'If you got all your freedom this afternoon, tonight you'd have to have your first meeting to 'The finest thing you can hope to have is the support from your peers.' make eure that they didn't take it away."' Apuzzo has had a varied career from nun to teacher to politician to leading one of the major gay rights organizations in the country. "I'm a ten<' her firllt,a lesbian feminist, a polrtician, and I'm Italian. I'm very cultu· rally identified, and that is good. I like that-to put aside where I came from and what I'm about. "I learned my politics in the two most political environments-as an ex-nun, there is nothing more political than the Church; and as a teacher, there is nothing more political than academia. "In the convent, the Church is the politi· cal beast, and academia is perhaps the most cut-throat environment." Apuzzo went on to explain how she learned politics on the street in the Bronx. Then she briefly entered a convent when she was 26-years-old, already having a 'I love this community. I think the movement saved my life.' B.A. degree. She went on to study theology and philosophy, although, "The Church paid very little to have me work for them for years," she said. One of her proudest accomplishments was introducing Black Studies in the Archdiocese in New York. Apuzzo held two positions in New York City administration. She was the former Assistant Commiesioner of Health and supervised the largest ambulatory system in the world at that time and provided the first patient liU>ratureon ammebiasis. Her second position was a term as executive director of Administration Trials and Hearings, the internal court system of the city. Apuzzo no longer supports her one-time boss, Mayor Koch, nor is she in agreement with Herb Rickman, who was appointed liaison to the lesbian and gay community. "I think that Koch has to seriously con· sider not only whether Herb Rickman serve& our need, but also whether Herb Rickman, in fact, serves Koch's need in terms of dealing with our community." Also, Apuzzo had vigorously, alon1i with the majority from the community, supported Governor Cuomo, who recently approved $.5.25 million towarde AIDS. Apuzzo takes great pride in her excellent reputation within the community: "The fi nest thing you can hope to have ie the support from your peers. It matters a great deal to me. People have been very suppor· tive to me. My staff has been extraordi· nary. We are a team, and I feel real good about that." Money Can't Buy Altruism Money can't buy Jove, and it <'an't buy good deeds, either, reports the San Jose Mercury. Psychologist Ziva Kunda says the only way w keep people engaged in altruistic behavior is to keep them internally moti· vated In fact, the doctor saya tangible rewards can weaken a sense of moral obligation. Offering to pay people to read to blind stu· dents, for example, actually lowered their willingness to help. You're Worth Your Wait in Gold Re.member that old story about your body bemg worth only $1 98? Don't believe it, reports American HPalth. It's more like hundreds of millions. And that' a not just due to inflation-it's the booming market in rare biochemicals. For example. our bodies are loaded with collagen, and that' a going for nearly $200 an ounce. A muscle protein called myo· globin fetches $2/)()() a gram. Even cholesterol haa its price. Doctors say the averaga person ia walking around with about $.500 worth. JAN. 20, 1984 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 Whitmire Denounced for 'Barhopping through Community' By Robert Hyde Fifteen angry Houstonian's appeared before City Council Wednesday, Jan. 18, to denounce Mayor Kathy Whitmire and Councilmen George Greanias, Anthony Hall and Rodney Ellis for touring the gay bars Jan. 8 to thank the gay community for its support. College student Carrie Schultz, who plans to become a Houston teacher, told Council that the mayor was setting a very bad example for young people by "bar hop· ping through the homo,;exual commun· ity." Jewell Davis U>mons screamed, "God is after you!" Geneva Kirk Brooks, long known in the Houston community as a champion of fun· damentalist causes, i;aid that when the mayor went behind a bar to a microphone to thank her constituents, that she had done eo, "slipping and slithering over semen soaked floors to become a bar maid." Jerry Vann, Community Political Action Committt>e member and co-owner of Miss Charlotte's, said the censoring group, employing the usual rhetoric, "preached" to the Mayor and her Council· men of Biblical violations and of the deg· radation of Houston's gay bars. "It was incredible," Vann said. "But it was really quite sad to watch them and listen to them talk." Vann added that Councilman Jim Greenwood's opinion was that of watch· ing a fire and "just letting it burn it.qelf out." GPC board member and gay activist Ray Hill, who asked to be put on the agenda as "relief' follo ... ing the speakers, said that three or four years ago their com· l~Ul'IBEPS 300 lJESTHEll'lER 525-s 3 38 NE~I HOLU~S: Sunday & Wednesday, 8 rn-1arn, $2 cove,r F~EE BAR DRINK with admission 8-9prn S4 cover dav 8prn-1arn, fR~E BAR DRINK with dmission 8-9pm · aF riday & Sat ur dr-.n.. ' 8prn-sunnse, 7, $5 cover . . . 8-9prn Half Price Adm1ss1on DEL UXE FIR ESH PIZZR ... . & . our upstairs NoW available in downstairs bars. ·ng in March New Lounge corn1 Join us for our RTu .::>ND Rl'll~lv'ERSRR':I PR' :1 L. 22 Sunday, Jan. agne Every Hour Free Champ menta might have contained some ele­ment of general concern, adding that the group just did not realize "how completely absurd their whole program was." Greanias was at a landfill hearing in Fort Bend County, but neither Whitmire nor Hall or Ellis showed any reaction to the group's remarks. Hill said that "every member of the Council was involved in a serious struggle not to burst out laughing." Hill also invited Brooks and her group to accompany him on a tour of the gay bars Ro they could actually see what a gay bar was like, since he felt that none of them had ever been in one. But their tour would be faster, Hill said, to enable them to catch a late night showing of the Rocky Horror Picture Show, so that they could appre­ciate Frank's comment: "It isn't easy hav· ing a good time." Hill stated that Brooks declined his invi­tation Wedne:>day for fear of catching AIDS, but told him Thursday she would go on a tour if other members of the group would join her. Whitmire was asked after the meeting if she would make another gay bar tour. "I probably will," she said. Friar Tuck Look Now Available Are you ready for the Friar Tuck look? Bob Shelley of Memphib hopes so. ording to the Boston Phoenir, he's mar· keting what he calls the ultimate in designer loungewear: a cla.;sic has.,ock, complete with rope belt and hood. The monk's costume is available in any color )OU want, as long as it's brown. Dining Room Hours LUnch 11:30 to 3 Mon.·Fri. Dinner 7to11 sun.· Thurs. and 7 to midnight Fri. & Sat. Sunday Brunch noon to 3 Visit Baja's for Lunch ••• open Daily with New soups and Sandwiches on the Menu Plus Old Favorites. Don't Forget ... Sunday Brunch & Evening Dining we Also Have Facilities for Private Parties & Luncheons Live Entertainment in the Cabaret on Saturdays and Sundays· ... Starring Luisa Amaral-Smith and Featuring Craig on the Keyboard. Saturday Shows At 8:30, 10:00 & 12:00 Sunday Shows At 7:00, 8:45 & 11:00 (Next Saturday & Sunday Michele Larin in the Cabaret) 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JAN. 20. 1984 Phil Donahue Show Examines SMU's Gay Rights Issue and MCC's Rejection by National Council of Churches By Doug Weatherford The nationally syndicated Phil Donahue program focused on the struggle for recog· nition of the Gay and Lesbian Student Support Organization (GLSSO) at South· em Methodist University in Dallas in a program taped Dec. 13. It is being aired in Texas at different times on different sta· tions in January Representing GLSSO was Leslie C-00per, former e<r<:hairperson for tlte group, who, along with Robert Rios, helped found the support organization and fight for formal school recognition during the spnng and fall semesters of 1983. Speaking for the other side was former SMU student senator Ted Brabham, who has continued to lead the opposition to GLSSO's efforts for senate recognition, despite his failure to win a position as a student body officer. Also included on the hour-long discu,;­sion program were the Rev. Troy Perry, whose Metropolitan Community Church organization has been attempting to win recognition and admittance into the National Council of Churches, and the Rev. Dr. Oscar McCloud. the head of the Council's Constitutent Membership Com· mittee. The Council spent 18 months deliberat­mg the issue of MCC admittance, only to put the application on indefinite hold, pending the ability to form a better con· sensus among Council member churches. Donahue began the program by point· ing out that many major colleges have already accepted the effort.' of gay stu· dents to have support organizations. But he stated that it was not possible to over­state the controversy which had been raised among students, faculty, adminis· tration and alumni ofSMU over the appli· cation for recognition of GLSSO. He stated that it had split the campus and split the governing board which is put in the middle of trying to balance the rights of students against the needs of a minority student body. Donahue said that he sensed the fear among many at SMU wru; perhaps that the school's image had been tarnished by the media by the suggestion that if you're Texan, you are a redneck and a reaction· ary, are afraid of people of different opin­ions or lifestyle,s, and adamantly against having any "queers or steers" on campus. It was pointed out by Cooper that a cam· pus poll showed most ~MU students, if allowed to vote yea or nay on the i,-;sue of recognition, would vote it down by a mar· gin of 59 to 41 percent (with a six percen tnge point margin of error). She also stated that many members oftheSMU gay com· munity were afraid to come out of the closet or attend GLSSO meetings for fear of being ostracized by the rest of the stu­dent body. Donahue opined that SMU seemed, through its administration and alumni. to be proud of the label "conservative," but that it was sensitive to Brabham·s appear· ance on the program, not wanting him to be perceived as speaking for SMU in any official or school-sanctioned capacity. Student Body President Homer Rey­nolds was quoted on the program as say­ing many at SMU were frustrated at Brabham appearing on the program, and that there was "sheer disgust" that he would appear to be representing SMU on national television. Brabham countered that Reynolds had an "unfortunate personality," and that he had previously tried to label Brabham a "media hound!' Brabham averred that most Texans were not rednecks and did not hate gays. He said that persons who held a like opinion to his simply did not want to have a school-funded support group for gays on campus. Donahue then asked why this was not a denial of civil rights of gays, to which Brabham replied that it waa not a quee-­tion of civil ri8hta, but of achoo! privileaes (an argument which was used this past fall during the debate before the senate for recognition). He 11aid he perceived a differ· ence between allowing a black student organization and a similarly constituted gay group. Cooper pointed out that both times GLSSO had sought recognition. it had received a unanimous recommendation from the senate Organizations Commit· tee, and that the group has the support of the leaders of the Perkins School o£Theol· ogy. Yet the fact that the Roman Catholic Georgetown University had also recently denied recogmtion to a gay support group was brought forth, as well as the fact that this decision of the university, when chal· lenged in federal court, was upheld as the right of a private institution to formulate its own policies in dealing with such issues. In discussing the failure to take action by the National Council of Churches on the application for membership of MCC, Donahue asked if it might not be true that many churches would leave the National Council if the MCC were allowed in, the implication being that at SMU, al8o, some students would either leave the school or would not apply in the first place if a iiay group were officially recognized on ram· pus. In agreeing, Rev. McCloud stated that this was also why the Council had never been able to take a unified stand on the subject of abortion for reasons of wanting to •peak with unity on policy is11ue8. Donahue said he saw this attitude as merely wanting to ensure against boat· rocking, rather than v.rrestling with decid· ing what a truly Christian stand would entail. He asked if it were not reasonable to ask the Council to speak honestly and effectively to the needs of a membership of Christians who are of a certain sexual orientation, whirh is not really a Chris­tian moral question, and which is really not anybody else's buNiness. Rev. McCloud stated that MCC met all the criteria for the white majority. Rev. Perry then pointed out the inconsis· tency of allowing non·Christian groups >fficial recognition at SMU, when often the argument against recognizing GLSSO has been that it represents a lifestyle anti· thetical to Christian precepts. Unfortu· nately, admitted Brabham, there was such a contradiction, but he offered neither an explantion nor a justification for it. An audience member felt that perhaps the major problem with the topic was a fear of dealing with gays by the heterosex· ual majority because of a lack of under· standing on their part. But Brabham said he felt no fear, only that he didn't want something which he felt went against Christian tl'aching to be officially recog· nized at his school. Rev. McCloud said he was of the opinion that the mere existence of the Metropoli· tan Community Churrh was the fault of the mainline churches, since gay people are seldom accepted into the congrega­tions of most churches once their sexual orientation is out in the open. These gay churchgoers then become isolated and must find somewhere else to turn for their spiritual fulfillment. In another comment from the audience, someone wanted to know just how many student. at SMU were involved. saying that the size of the minority being served Willi an important factor in determining whether the support group wa11 really needed. Cooper stated that there were 28 stu· dents at the fil'llt meeting last spring, and that the meetings have grown each time since then. She then lamented the exam· pies of harassment which followed some of GLSSO members coming out publicly in support of the group, and said these were examples of invaaions of people'• integ· rity. • Brabham then aa.erted that neither he nor the majority of students wanted such harassment to take place. But Donahue then asked how it was that such bigotry and intolerance were to be fought unless this anti-social behavior can be counte­rarted by such an educational atmosphere as should exist allowing for diversity, a diversity which would include groups like GI...'>SO. However. Brabham said he believed that the high visibility of the group on campus would lend to increa$ed, not decreased, harassment and resent· ment. Another audience member said the school was within its rights not to give a "stamp of approval" to such a group, while another said a prerequbite to beinii a Christian was accepting that God did not like sin, and that homosexuality was a ~in in His eyes. Rev. Perry then statM that human sexu· ality is morally neutral, that people who exist in loving relationships were not sin· ful in God's eyes, and that "Jesus died for my self, not my sexuality." A letter was read by Quincy Adams, president-elect of the SMU Mustang Club, wherein he was quoted as inviting those gay students who are unhappy \l.ith con di· lions at SMU to leave and find another school to attend. He said he wanted to send a "message to the world. If you are a professor or a student and have this lifes· tyle, then don't come here (to SMU)." Brabham disagreed, saying he did not want gay students thrown off the ram pus. A caller pleaded with Cooper and her supporters not to give up, though, sinc-e the caller said he had graduated from a small church-oriented school, was gay, and that ''none of us (gays) knew who one another were." Rev Perry reiterated that once people got to know homosexuals, they changed their attitudes and forgot the stereotypes they assumed were the norm among gay people. An audience member asked why gays were so intent on fighting hard to prove they were different from anybody else. But Donahue said that "sounds real nice on the Hallmark card, but the problem is that Jews and gays and Irish have had moments of societal presimre and negative pressure directed at them," and that at times measures needed to be taken to coun· teract the negative pre. ~ure. By the end of the program. when Donahue took an informal pool of the mostly blue-haired Indies who were in attendance, the applause was about evenly divided among those who thought the group should be formally recognized and those who did not. Cooper ended by stating that, if recog­nized, funding is then voted on separately, that thr gorup was funded by members and . upporters and was running short of money, and that any money received from the SMU student activity fund wold be used for educational purposes such as ads, literature and speakers for programs. In discussing how her appearance on the program came about, Cooper said GI.SSO's executive board voted to send her as the spokesperson. She said the audient-e did not know what ,;ubject was to be discussed in advance of their coming to see the taping, and that their response was surprisingly positive. considering the makeup of those in attendance who were pnmarily older women unused to thinking about the issues brought up. Cooper said the Donahue staff had researched the subject very well and wert> on top of the points which were brought up tn the disc:ussion. She said she took the pressure of the appearance on national tel­evision in stride, and had gotten a lot of help from her teachers, who allowed her to rearrange her exam schedule in order to be on the program. She said she was sorry that the hour w&R not really enough time to c:over all the important asprcts of the issue, but claimed to be pleased at the results and at the moral support she had gotten from her friends, fellow students and even the p<.'Ople involved in producing the Donahue program, inrluding Donahul' himself. "They treated me like a queen," she laughed. Though no longer a co-chairperson of GLSSO (Cooper and Rios turned over the reigns a frw months back to Paul Palmer and Miriam Blake), Cooper is still active in hl'r fight to gain recognition forGLSSO and promised that the is~ue would be brought before the studl'nt senate yet again this corning spring. With the close 16 to 15 vote in the fall , she claimed to be more optimistic about the chanc-es for suc· cell& thia time around. thou11h 8MU Preei· dent L. Donald Shields has said that, barring his receipt of information which he does not have at this time, he would probably be compelled to overturn the vote for recognition if 1t passed. At this point, Cooper agreed, only time will tell. Reynolds and Field are Tops with Teens Whic-h movie stars rank first in the hearts of America's teenagers? The Gallup Poll says the winners are 47-year·old Burt Rey· nolds and 37-year-0ld Sally Field, reports the Philadelphia Inquirer. The younger generation isn't entirely forgotten, with Brooke ShieldR number two on the women's list and Eddy Murphy the runner-up among men. But the rest of the list is loaded with old folks like Clint Eastwood, Roger Moore and Jane Fonda. o• utrh FeI NISH Ate you tn1n1ung alX>ut tearing out your C111ppe<1 or stained IS sink or tile? Wetl aon t ... Because you can now Redecorate your old batllroom w1tnout tile cost or mess of removing Be . ·1nn1· n . and replaang your Old plumbing and fixtures. This can be accomphsned by resurfacing Of Your New your present :~~r:~e~;I~~== synthetic porcelain. We can even resurface Bathroom I tile waifs Every Decorator ColOr to choose from and • they re all Guaranteed. Why not call now for Y'?ur tree estimate? "We Meire NEW out al Old" GULF COAST PERMA CERAll • 863·7072 JAN. 20. 1984 / MONTROSE VOICE 9 ULTRA-SOUND PEST CONTRO~M ·~Aff t f~~CTl~f t ClfAN t f CONOMICAl Ultra-Sound is Effective: ·~·rw WA~~ANTI 95% Lab Proven ELIMINATION against Roaches, Rats, Mice, Moths 90% or M ore Field Trial Proven ELIMINATION against Fleas, Flies, Mosquiotos, Ticks, Spiders. Carpenter Ants, Raccoons, Squirrels ULTRA-SOUND OF HOUSTON 3200 Kirby Dr., Suite 120 Phone 520-1976 45-Day Money-Back Guarantee AID Now ... Ride in Wide body Comfort to Los Angeles ... EASTERN'S L· 1011 Wisperliner Departs Daily at 5:35 P.M. - 0- Now ... New Widebody Service to New Orleans, Miami and Las Vegas. Check our Affordable Fares! Call your professional travel agent EASTERN, Houston's oldest and largest major carrier serving you since 1936 . ..... - ••r-el•--"" ·-·-·~.,_.._,..,,,.,_,,. _ __ ,,,, •l••••l•••• .. ••- •11,_.,, ,,_,,._ _ _. __ ,,, __ 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JAN. 20, 1984 ~ 0 ~... (") i ~ ~ We Serve The respected, community involved Montrose newspaper. Every Week, we inform and entertain thousands in Montrose. Look for the MONTROSE VOICE each Friday at your favorite club, shop or store. ~ lSTEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. Internal Medicine Infectious Diseases Sexually Transmitted Diseases Northwest Medical Arts Building 2801 Ella Blvd., Suite G Houston, TX 77008 (713) 868-4535 Same Day Appointment ; * Winterize Cooling ;;D § S2695 ~ g * Transmission ~ ~ Service s249s § :z * Oil Change and ~ ':? Lube s199s ~ ~ * Tune Up s399s ~ ~ (most US Cars) ~ ;;D 8 ~ 1411 TAFT-522-2190 ! • ELECTRONIC TUNHJP • AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION BC Club Houston 2205 Fannin 659-4998 MEMBER CLUB BATH CHAIN "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale Houston Texas 77006 (713) 520-9767 Have a V.D. Problem? Worrie.d about A.I.D.S.? OUR community has a great Sexually Transmitted Disease clime which does S.TD screenings. and has an AIDS program at an affordable price Most of our services are reimbursable through your medical insurance plan. STD screening (including most medicine) Tests of cure P.A CE. (Program for AIDS Counseling & Evaluation) S.TD & PACE Screening together Hepatitis "B" Prescreemng ... Hepatitis B" vaccine and follow-up testing $ 15.00 FREE $ 25.00 $ 3000 . $ 30 00 $150.00 Clinic Hours Monday 6-9 30pm. [·U·l Tuesday 6-9 30pm, Thursday 6-9 30pm. • • • Sunday 1-4 30pm 104 Westheimer al Bagby-528-5531 MIC and Visa Accepted Member lhe Texas Hospital Association Member the Greater Montrose BusoneS3 Guild THE VIDEO TRANSFER TRANSFER MEMORIES TO VIDEOCASSETIE Low Introductory Prices to Transfer *MOVIES * SLIDES OR PICTURES * VIDEO TAPES COPIED SATISFACTION GUARANTEED-PRIVACY RESPECTED For info cau 529-3684 or write 1504 Southmore, Houston 77004 10%0 Bartenders Charged with Serving Alcohol to Publicly Intoxicated Persons By Robert Hyde Danny Lee Miller, 21, and RonaldRickow 30, both of Montrose and bartenders at JR's, 808 Pacific, were arraigned in County Criminal Court at Law No. 1 '.fhuraday, Jan. 19, and charged with serv­mg alcohol to publically intoxicated per­sona at the bar early Thursday morning, Jan. 12. Charges were brought by vice squad officers A.J. Dorr (Badge No. 61096), C.J. Clark (Badire No. 38019) and D. A. Atche­tee (Badge No. 39244) who said that Miller and Rickow were observed serving drinks to two customers of the bar Roth Miller and Rickow pleaded non· guilty in Judge Billy Hagan's court. Judge Ragan, in a nontrial setting moved the case to February 27. ' The defendant11' attorney, Jim Wells said, "I am very confident that Judg~ Ragan will ensure the defendants a fair and impartial trial on the facts of the case." Wells also mentioned that he is in the process of obtaining sworn affidavits from witnesses which "should be of inter­est to concerned citizens regarding the vice squad's behavior." Channel 8 to Focus on Gay Politics University of Houston"s Channel 8 will focus on "Gays in the Houston Political Life" next Wednesday. Jan. 25, at 7:30 p.m., reported former GPC President Lee Harrington, who has been asked to speak for Houston's gay community. Another individual will present an opposing view on the "Houston Weekly'" show. hut Channel 8's Hill Watts said that that guest had yet to be scheduled . "Programs such as this one provide crit· ically needed educati<>nal opportunites for the Houston non-gay community," Har· rinirton stated. "I disairrce, for example, with a statement Mayor Whitmire made in Nene Foxhall's political column in the Ho1U1ton Chronicle on Jan. 15. The Mayor, in response to publicity she did not want concerning a recent gay bar tour she made to thank voters for electing her again, said, 'I don't think it serves individuals in the (gay) community well to receive a lot of media attention.' "If it had not been for continual, head· line media attention to the major anti-gay issue in the Eleanor Tinsley-Frank Mann City Council race in 1979, we would not be where we are today," Harrington noted. "If anythmg, the gay issue needs more exposure. and more public support by elected officials. Hiding is not the answer. Education, in this case by exposure to the people and the issue, is the key to eliminat· ing prejudice," he said. How About Legalizing Drugs? Formt-r Suprem1· Court Justice Potter Ste­wart says the idea of legalizing some recreational drugs "has a certain appeal to me," report11 American HeritaRe. St!'wart, who was appointed by Presi· dent Eis!'nhower in 1958 and retired two years ago, says the sall' and use of drugs is a serious social problem, and so long as it's a criminal offense, he says, the business will be in the hands of niminals. Stewart also refust><l to blame judicial leniency for the increasing crime rate. He beli1>ves it's due to the fact that so few people are brought to trial in the first plac·e. Only one suspect in eight is caught. he e11ys, 11dding that he'e not surpri~ed. given the ease of transportation in this country. Human Rights Campaign Fund Sets Goal of $1 Million The Human Rights Campaign Fund, a national pro-gay civil rights political action committee, wound up its 1983 fun­draising with events in Key West during the last week of December. The fund, now in its fourth year, has set ll minimum $1 million war chest goal for the 1984 elections. The 1981-82 cycle raised more than $609,000, and one 1983 activity, a dinner in New York at which Jesse Jackson was keynote speaker, netted some $30,000. Vic Basile, executive director, announced appointment of Shelia Kuehl and Jack Newby as co-chairs for the Los Angeles City Committee that began to reach its goal with a $1,000 plate dinner on Jan. 17. A re<·eption in San Francisco is planned for later in the month, as well as fund rais­ers in Dallas and Houston. o GRNL to Tackle Anti-Gay Exclusion at Immigration Hearings The Gay Rights National Lobby (GRNL) announced that congre11sional hearings on immigration law reform are to be held in early 19114, and lively debate is expected in an effort to repeal the anti-gay exclu­sion in the 1952 law barring any alien who is "afflicted with a psychopathic personal­ity, sexual deviation or mental defect" from entering the country. GRNL Immigration Task Force Coordi· nator Craig Howell, Legislative Aide Mike Walsh and Executive Director Steve Endean have worked closely with Rep. Barney Frank (!).-Ma.) to insure the hear· ing will take place, fulfilling a public promise by Hep. Romano Mazzoli (D.·Ky.), chair of the House Judiciary Subcommit· tPe on Immigration. Admitting that the current system of excluded cntegorie11 embedded in the 1952 Immigration and Nationality Act is indeed "outdated," Mazzoli pledged to hearings on modernizing that section. "Gay Rights National Lohby will con­tinue working r.loAely with Rep. R. Frank and other congressional friends to help organize favorable testimony for repeal of the anti·gay exclusion during the upcom· mg hearings," 11tated GRNL Deputy Director, Jerry WPllcr. o Gay Vote '84: Sexual Orientation Not An Issue in Democratic Delegate Selection For the first time in history, each state's plan for electing delegates to the 1984 Democratic National Convention must include specific language prohibiting dis· crimination b8fled on sexual orientation, said Tom Chorlton, executive director of the National AsAociation of Gay and Les­bian Democratic Clubs. This is a direct result of several impor­tant developments during the past four vears the leader of the 110 gay political associations said. In 1980 the Le.sbian and Gay Caucus at the New' York Democratic Convention included 77 openly gay delegates, alter· nates and committee members from 17 states. The Caucus was as large or larger than the delegations from 25 states. As a result, the gay rights were added to the Democratic Platform and to the Demo­cratic Charter. St'nator KennPdy, members of his stuff and key officials in the Carter White House met with the Caucus and courted its support. More than 400 .dele~ates signed .a petition plncing in nomination a ~ymbohc openly gay vice-presidential candidate .. In 19114, the rules are tougher, said Chorlton, tht> candidates far more numer· ous and thl' 1•lection proces~ shorter. "It will take morn determination and hard work than ever before in order to match or rxceed the tremendous success of four years ago," he said. Now is the time to get directly involved, said Chorlton. Not surprisingly, presiden· tial candidates and party leaders support those who have earned that support through hard work and visibility. "Don't expect to win a delegate seat if you simply show up at the election," he warned. Above all, gay men and lesbians should demand their rights. Articles 1 and IO of the Democratic Charter guarantee gay men and women "fully, timely and equal opportunities to participate in decisions concerning the selection of candidates, the formulation of policy, and the conduct of other party affairs .. ," it reads. "If you encounter any discrimination from your state or local party or from a presidential campaign, plea11e notify the National As11ociation immediately," he said. "Many of the party leaders and state executive directors are very supportive. Start now and build a long·term, working relationship with them." All participants should be aware of sev­eral basic requirements and guarantees included in each state's plan for delegate selection. No state may charge a fee to participate in this proce11s or to run as a delegatP. l':ach state must ah;o help low and moderate income individuals to defray expenses related to attending the National Convention if they are elected as delegates or alternates. At the same time, participation in the procet;s is restricted to those who declare their Democratic party preference (either through prior registra­tion, where applicable, or through a state­ment of support at the start of the process), and those who havf' not taken part in the election of delegates for any other party in 1984. ln addition to delegates and alternates, ench stat<> will also select mt>mbers for each of th1• three convention committees: Rules. Platform and Credentials. "The11e committeeR are especially impor· tant to the lesbian and gay community," said Chorlton, "since the 1984 platform and important change~ in the Democratic Party Charter will be largely decided prior to the convention in smaller groups. "Active participation, careful planni~g and hard work are the keys to success m 1984. This is the year to demonstrate co~­clu11ively that the gay rights movement 1s indeed nationwide. "When the Democratic National Con· vention opens in San Francisco next July," he continued, "the Les~ian and Gay Caucus at that convention mu~t reflect both our diversity and our determ1· nation to participate fully in the American political process. The door is open. Now it's up to us." For additional information, contact the national association at 1742 Massachu· 11etts Avenue SE. Washington, D.C. 20003. Junk Queen of Peking Enjoys Trash They call her "the Junk Queen of Peking," reports the Washington Post. She's 43· year-old Sun You·Zhi, whose motto is "It's glorious work to collect junk for social· iem." Every month she brings in 60 tons of garbage-anything from used bottle caps to raggedy sneakers-for recycling. Cast· off meat boneR from restaurants are turned into glue. Human hai,· from barber shops becomes medicine, and empty tooth· paste tubes are transformed into sheets of steel. Her only problem i11 sorting out old newspapers. The Peking Daily is no prob­lem: it can be sold to department stores as wrapping paper. But the government says foreign newspapers are too sen8itive for re-use. They have to be sent to a pulp mill for reprocessing. JAN. 20, 1984 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 What do you mean I need to be 19 to be served a drink at The Hole? Hours Mon-Sat 10-2 Sunday 12-2 Happy Hour Mon-Sat 10-7 1/2 OFF 1/2 OFF DOWNBEAT RECORDS CLEARANCE SALE!!! ALL RARE LP's & 12" & DJ COLLECTIONS 1/2 OFF MARKED PRICE ONE WEEK ONLY Friday, Jan. 20, to Friday, Jan. 27 Also Sale on Current & Catalog Selected Titles of LP's and Casettes from $3.49 & UP JAN. 21st, SATURDAY ONLY $1.00 OFF ANY IMPORT 12" OR LP IMPORT ONLY IMPORT ONLY IMPORT ONLY Check out our Used & DJ Selection of 12"s and LP's FROM 99C ON UP NOTE: We have added hundreds of new & standard titles for this sale. so come early for best pickings. OPEN 10am-8pm Mon-Sat 2111 Richmond 523-8348 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JAN. 20, 1984 Plan Now to Attend the Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference ,----- - 1 . --n- -·. - -~ . l -·.~~--- -.i I ..___ ~ - ~ ___J r;.AY PRESS ASSOCIATION January 27-29 Hotel Savoy Houston Workshops, Speeches, Entertainment If you ore working in the gay media or are a gay person working in the non-gay media (either journalism. advertising or administrative). plan to join your colleagues 1n Houston. Also. tor officials of gay organizations ......no are NOT In the grrf media but who would like to learn how to better Influence the gay media local and national. we'll have a special WOl1<shop. To Henry McClurg Vlee presiaent Gay Press Association. 3317 Montrose #306. Houston. TX 77006 Enclosed IS my $25 registtation fee (for GPA members) or S30 registration fee (l"IOn-GPA members) for the Southern Regional Conference. (Include $10 additional if postmarl<ed after Jan. 13) I am 1n the gay media. I work for the non-gay media [ I do not work in the mecft0 but would like to attend the WOl1<shop on 1nfluenc1ng the gay media and other events of the conf0fence. Name Acttess ~-------~ Phone(s) I am a member of the Gay Press Association '"'1 am NOT a member of the Gay Press Association (II crrM-l(J in Houston l:rf piOne. Iran OI bus. lei us lcnowYOll tfmealarlllolondwewll pock you up CJI IM arpotl or depot ) 'Nhen we recerve your form. we'll send you a conference schedule and a brochure on the ScNay Hotel so you can make reservations. (You do not have to stay at The ScNay to attend the conference ) The ScNay is within walking distance of several gay clubs Additionally, busses will be available for tours of Montrose nightspots. Your registraton fee will include tickets for tree and d1SCOUnted admissions to several clubs. 0 Regular Subscription $30 D Trial Subscription $15 D Send me more information, please. Name ~---------------~ Add~v.,..._ ________________ _ C1ty. _________ State __ Z1p ___ _ TypeofComputer_ _ _____ • ------ Clip and Mail to: GNIC NETWORK c/o Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306; Houston, TX 77006 i' .. --..-·--·-- - .. I .--···-·-·----~--,...,-.. ,,,..,_, ~--.,.-.. ~~••I.JS••- ,,,, j Ii' ~WIJ IJ:!>ILA'lfUli <Gi TIMES SQUARE STRIP &-'JI -r-.E II><>L TRAVEL CONSULTANTS rnA~lL ~~~Jl it~~ ~~ <Q Jr&~~ 111R\~~[L ~~~~IJ~!flJ~ ~~S)!lJJCT1Jfa,\~:IJ~ MARDI GRAS Various Statewide Group Departures For prices and info call Houston (713) 529-8464 or Texas Toll-Free 1-800-392-5193 ~ Deli open Sunday with Beer and Wine SPECIALIZING IN IMPORTED BEER, WINE, LIQUOR­and FOODS 913 WESTHEIMER at Montrose 526-6932 Open Monday thru Saturday 10am-9pm I 1 I * I t /I• ti Why the Ruckus at City Council? From Steue Cuniberti I was surprised to find that the Mayor's moi;t recent tour of the gay bars in her constituency caused such a ruckus. After all of the previous electioneering, why would there even be a raised eyebrow? But, as I saw on the tPlevision news this even· ing (Jan. 19), there were not only raised eyebrows, but also raised voices. Although ignoring the heightened police activities at gay bar!' subsequent to the mayoral tour, the newscast took a broad view oft he hoopla. giving equal cov­erage to someone's energetic- denunciation of a council that Jet their mayor become a "barmaid," and to Ray Hill, Gay Acti· vist's unbclieveable assertion that the mavor·s bar tour was not motivated by her interest in gay votes. The next itPm in the newsca~t concerned the poNsihle civil right11 violations inher­ent in a Houston area singles apartment complex management's decision to pro­hibit clothing at their now-declared-nude swimming facilities. I do not pretend to know what Mayor Whitmire told Ray Hill, Gay Activist, but what hhe told me and everyone else who greeted her warmly at the Brazos River Bottom was that she was there to thank us for helping her and the councilmembers that she brought with her win a hard· fought campaign. To me that SJ>('lls VOTES. The newscast mentioned that the Mayor did not intend to let the current outcry deter her from future bar tours if she felt that they would be useful, and for that I am glad. Why shouldn't a politician go to a church function to secure the black baptist vote? And why not to bars to get the gay vote? That is where the gay voters are. Musicians Miss Playing in the Band From former members of the Montrose Symphonic Band (G. Micharl Blizzard, Boyce Erwin a l kl a BerniC'e Bone, Bobby Heeney, Bill Huff alkla Beulah Bone, Datm Keith, G. Dauid Vogelaar al k/ a BPtty Lou Bone, and others who u·ish to rl'main nameless.) We would appreciate the opportunity to express our views concerning an organize· tion which has, in its hiRtory, lw·en a source of pride to our community and a great example o0f a successful gay com· munity organization. ,Just over three years ago, the Montrose Symphonic Band was ... "an ad hoc a~al· gam of prrson11liti.es and past musical exp!'rience." Drawing on the energetic support of a core .group of members and director Andy Mills, the group almost built itself into what we felt was the finest gay instrumental group in t~ec?untry ... . The community responded in kind, rally· ing with support both emotior:ial and financial, which fueled our creative fires even further .. With thiA new-found prestige and re.pu· tation however, came a corresponding incre~e in the responRibility of the band to its community and to itself. We disco· vered that in order to consistently improve and do "more" for our audience8, w~ ha~ to do muC'h more in the way o! orgamzatto!1 and preparation, both musical and adm1· nistrative .... Financial accountability, program development, fundraising, promo~ion.-all were areas in great need of attention 1f the band was to fulfill the dreams some of us had of touring the country with our music and our energy, and we were a.ware ~hat no one individual could accomphsh this task. As much as we hoped, though, that this one organization could avoid the pitfalls that so often plague successful groups of thie type, the MontroAe.Sy~phor:iic Band, for the first time since its inception three yeara ago, began to. see power struggle&, idea camps and factionalism. The delega· tion of the increuing work load waa not Letters viewed as a necessary and desirable out· growth of success, but as a threat to the eixsting power structure. Many members did not go easily, but over the last year (and especially since the last Gay Pride Parade), the band has lost many of its founding members and fine musicians-one way of expressing this loss is as a combined playing experience of hundreds of yearA .... (W)e miss the friendship and cornered· erie which was the biggest aRset of the Montrose Symphonic Band. We mifis the pride of maintaining a truly community organization-even in the face of reports from across the nation that a group of this kind could not function without a political hoard. We mies playing. Reader Dissatisfied with Gay Leaders Supporting Police From SteL·e Keller Twice in two months the Houston police have moved on Wei;theimer to victimize gay youth and men engaged in street trade, as u•ell as continuing arrests in the bookstores. As inexcusable as it is for the police to attack us for choosing to exercise our gay sexuality, it is predictable oppre~· sion. What is unforgiveable, however, is the up front sanction, support and appro­val of the leaders of the gay and Montrose area communitiefi: Ray Hill, George Grea niafi and I..arrv Bagneris. Shame, sha.me on all of you 'for your dastardly complicity with our enemies! Have you all taken leave of your senReb and gay sensibility? Or have you so sold out lo a conservative political eBtablish­ment that you hunger to be accepted by that it has caused you to abandon the needs and concerns of certain parts of the gay <'<Immunity you diolike? Where is Ray Hill and the GPC's pro­gram to help homeless gay throwaway youth who come to Montrose? His answer is the HPD. This is clearly a class issue, for their support of anti·gay police repression on W e11theimer is at the cost of the powerless-street boys and customers. Its benefit is for the powerful-the GPC and the Montrose money-changers associa· tions and thl'ir needs for straight­identified respectability and conformity at our expense. In fact, the latter pre~sure for "straight"·iacket conformity and straight-identified sexual attitudes seems to be the meaning of the GPC's constant h11rping on "unity" being forced upon us. In the pages of the MONTROSE VOICE over the months, it has been revealed and reiterated that unity means a suppreBsion of critic-ism in the face of GPC errors. It is at the point now of this disgraceful and absurd display of GPC leaders, instead of religious fundamentalists, taking the van· guard of those trying to sic the vice oops on us. Frankly, I feel bereft of any sen"e of protection against the ~lice by t~e lea~ ere of the gay community. I write thlb today impelled by the need to break this conspiracy of complicity and silence ~nd driven by the anger of my confrontation with the news last night (Sunday) about midnight of the entrapment and arre,;t of men in a gay bookstore on Alabama. Who will defend them? If I have to do this alone, I, for one, protest thi11 police aggression directed at gay men and condemn it and demand th~t the police get the hell out of Montrose 1f they cannot leave us alone. I further name Messrs. Hill, Greanias and Bagneris for their guilt in this crime against us and demand they desist. I believe the gay community is far more progressive and deserving of better leader· ship and a better organization than we have in Houston, For all of our effort.>, we de11erve more than a bar tour and police entrapment. which seems to be the sub­stance of Mayor Whitmire's pitiful pro­gram of pro-gay accomplishments for the year. LOLA PR..ESE'NTS NU MUSIC By J.D. Arnold Special Guest Bartender Monday, obe 0 6 '(1 Jan. 23, RED of Mary's TUESDAY 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer 9pm-2am WEDNESDAY 2-for-I Well Drinks 9pm-midnight THURSDAY NIGHT Tequilla Specials 75¢ (Chips & Salsa imported from Tila's) Daily 50¢ Specials 12-6 KRAZEE HOUR NITELY 9-IlPM LOL~S 2327 Grant-528-8342 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JAN. 20, 1984 Montrose People ... and Others By Billie Duncan Sometimes you sit and wonder, "Whatever happened to so-and-so." And the next thing you know, that person pops up where you least expect him. Anyway, that's what happened this past week to me. I was wondering where in heaven (or elsewhere) that Peaches, who used to do the wonderful shows at Just Marion & Lynn's, had gotton himselfoff to. I made a phone call to find out more about some little bar over at 50 Waugh Drive that I had not been to and what to my wondering ears should appear, but Peaches! It seems that he is preparing to open the bar for real, probably next week. It has the dubious title right now of"the Memorial Park Motel Bar," but Peaches says that that will change. Soon the bar will be properly titled as the Sha­dey Tree Club. Peaches says that they will be doing shows as soon as they can. Right now, there is a restaurant open and anyone can drop by the bar with hU: own bottle and visit Peaches. It's only a matter of time before the place is in full swing. In half·swing last week wru; the MSA benefit show at the Copa. It's not that the show was lousy, but that the crowd was sparse. People just do not seem to be get· ting out for the benefits anymore-or per­haps people just didn't know it was taking place. Because the crowd was small, at least one of the entertainers seemed to feel that his time was being wasted. Now, I know that entertainers in this neighborhood (and every neighborhood) are constantly called upon to donate their talents for these shows. Sponsors will spend money on any number of things and never expect to get them for free but will automatically 886Ume that perlormers will give away their time and energy at the drop of a aequin. '.fhis attitude can be a bit galling, but, still and all, once a person who is sup­posedly a professional has committed himself to do a show, he should have the grace to do it with all his heart. And he would not keep aaying over the micro­phone, "Come on. let's get this show over. I want to go home." To the credit of most of the Copa per· formers, the show was basically a charm· ing and well-done effort. One very touching moment came during a number by K lchelle Michaels when the two men in white face on either side of the stage (Ken Lambdin and Pat Vachon) came together and exchanged balloons. Naomi Sims was super, as usual, W1th terrific back-up dancing by Mark Leighton, Wayne Romano (who put the whole show together), Bill Sanders and David Bennett. Mark stepped in at the last minute to replace Frank McP eters, who, for some unknown reason, did not show up. Also last week at the Copa. Pamala Stanley did what was described as a "high-energy show" on Friday. People came to see that one. This coming Sunday, Jimmy James will do his last show. I haven't gotten to see him yet, but everyone that I've talked to who has seen him says that the show is great. You know what's great besides shows? Love. And love is what was celebrated at Al's on Wednesday night. George Nuse­kabel and David Lyons had their twelfth anniversry party there. It was a hoot and a half. The tone was set by the huge banner over the bar that proclaimed, "Congratulations to the (K)ween Mother and her great (K)night." The flavor of Al's was somewhat trans· formed by the presence of pink fru-fru bows attached to the camouflage netting that adorns the ceiling. David and George were both sporting red rose corsages, and David further compromised his leather garb by attaching a wonderful lace wed­ding veil (I suppose) to his motorcycle cap. They met in Ohio while doing sit-ups in a health apa. "Just a normal health club for normal people," said George. They've been going up and down ever since. Don Bye, who bartends at the Venture-N, gave them a bouquet made up of 12 one-foot rulers. Well, you know what 12times12 is, don'tyou?That's 144. which is a gross. I guess you could say that he gave the happy couple a gross bouquet. Either that, or he was wishing them many more inches to come. Since Miss Charlotte's is right next door, I stopped over there only to receive some bad news. Jimmy Peters of the Juke Box Band was killed in a car crash while returning from a gig in Killeen. Now that other members of the band who were injured are out of the hospital, they have decided to keep op going. They've hired Jerry Nail as a singer, and Jerry Vann says that he will book the band as soon as he has an opening. Coming up next month at Charlotte's is a thing called PriuateLiues for Public Peo­ple, which v.ill be a performance of Diver­sity Theatre's hit show, Prfrate Liues. lt will be done as a fundraiser for Anne Wheeler. That will be on Feb. 23. Bottoms up 84 keeps drawing the Mont· rose crowd out to the Windmill Dinner Theatre, but a lot of the cast keeps com· ing to Montrose to party. That11eemslikea fair exchange. 1..ast week I neglected to mention one of the numbers thatl really love in the show It is the Breck Wall/David Harris bit in which they mime to recordR while holding up props that give the songs entirely new meanings. For example, miming "We Can Work It Out" while holding up a box of Ex-Lax. Very funny. AIRo not in Montrose but worth a see is Dal'id Harris of Bottom.11 Up feeds beer to a duck Abbey S11non u:ill be featured in UofH Internati-Onal Music Festival Rut:. Hasting,. to apjNar at Tou'l'r Breck Wall of Bottom» Up smiles for camera .Vaomr Simm/I displays talent at MSA slWw at Copa • Montrose Live the show at Catch One Disco on Satur­day, Jan. 21. called I Ain't Been Licked. The talent roster for the show is too exten­sive to list, but it contains some of the top impressionists in the country, including the Copa regulars. We're talking hot show. On Sunday, the 22nd, the Ale House will have the Inanimate Objects once again. If punk is not your bag, the University of Houston will be presenting its Inter­! lational Piano Festival starting today m the Dudley Recital Hall in the Fine Aris Building on the University Park cam­pus. The festival will last for three days and will feature the talents of Claude Frank, Eugene lstomin and Abbey Simon. For more information, call 749· 1116. For high-brow music fans who like foot· ball, the Houston Symphony ha~ planned a really incredible event for Super Sunday. There are wonderful activities and entertainments planned. Montrosean Carolyn Franklin's kids from the Houston International Theatre School (rC'member them from their knock· down performance at Kathy's inagura· tion?) will sing and dance, the Houston Sumphony will do three 20-rninute con· certs of light music, and there will be five international dining areafi featuring food from Italy, China, Mexico and other pla· ces. Of course, at 3:30 the big screen TV will be turned on for The Game. In addition, they have planned door prizes. clowns, jugglers and balloons. And. get this, it is free. It will be at the Hyatt Regency West starting at 5:00 p.m. If you wantto journey out of the Montrose for what sounds like a great time, call 224-6623 for reservations. By the way, thanks to the owners of Joey and Bu-Bu P ig lett on Stanford for the use of their plumbing. o Eastern Major Underwriter for Alley's Arthur Miller Award Evening; 'All My Sons' Scheduled' Eastern Airlines, which hllJI served Hous· ton longer than any other carrier, has reef· firmed its commitment to the city's C<Jntinuing industrial and cultural growth as a major contributor of the Alley Award Evening Honoring Arthur Miller, reports the Alley Theatre. As part of the tribute, Alley Theatre has scheduled a major revival of Arthur Miller's award-winning drama All My Sons. The production will play on the Alley's Large Stage from January 26 through February 26 under the direction of Pat Brown. The actual Award, a rock crystal obelisk on a malachite and gold base, was created by the internationally renowned sculptor, George Stangl. The Award was commissi­oned for the Alley by Jack and Gretchen Josey. On Sunday, September 29, 1984, digni· taries, luminaries of stage and screen and membt.'Ts of the national press will gather in Houston to pay homage to the literary genius of esteemed playwright Arthur Miller. Eastern Airlines is to be commended for their generous support of this celebration of excellence in the arts. VOICE to Present Ruth Hastings at Tower The MONTROSE VOIO~ will present Ruth Hastings ae "Three Legends" at the Tower Theatre on Saturday, Jan. 28, at 9:00 p.m. Montroeeans already familiar with the Jntemational song stylist will have the ~pportunity to experience Hasting's iu depth tributes to legendary female per­formen Marlene Detrich, Judy Garland and Edith Piaf. Hastings will perform over 30 tunes, accompanied by piano, band and chorus. Internationally recognized for her per­formance in the off.Broadway musical Jacques Brei is A/hoe and Well and Liuing in Paris, Hastings has distinguished her­self in a variety of mui;ical styles, includ­ing Gershwin, Porter, Sondheim, Kander and Ebb with her five octave, dynamic voic<• and precist• delivery. Tickets at $10 and $12 are now on Releat all Ticketma11ter and Ticketron locations and by phone at 526-1709. Liqueurs Becoming Popular Alcohol to Swallow Many New Year's Eve tipplers will be wel­coming 1984 with a new beverage-the cordial. reports USA Today. The market for liqueurs has never been sweeter, with Americans imbibing drinks tasting like everything from melons to hazelnuts. The cause: a generation raised on milkshakes and soft drinks. Says one distiller; "People don't really like the taste of alcohol, just the effect. And liqueurs go down easy." America's Dogs are Barking Why Settle for Less!!! Do your feet hurt? If not, you're lucky: 808 LOVETT thn-e out of four Americans say theirs do, and most think it's normal, reports Lon­don's Dai/)' Mail. .. _____ serving Breakfast, Lunch, _____ 1111 ..------~Dinner, Orders to Go • ...,. ____ The f~t experts say that's wrung; 11111 accrptinir the pain causes people to neg· lert their feet. 521-1015 But a sore foot isn't necessarily an ugly foot: RO Pf'TCt"nt of the women and 90 per· cent of the men surveyed think their pedal extremities are beautiful. .._ _______ OpWene eWkeenedksd atiy/ sM 7iadmni·g1h1tp m .. •••••••••Sat. & Sun. Breakfast at 9am • Sun"day Supper ti/ 10pm ••••••••llt UNION ~ACK SPORTSWEAR/HAIRCUTTING 1212 WESTHEIMER 528-9600 Haircutting THE , Ft )l ' :'\lAI:'\~ t )F \Vt X )D[:\ KE A Wide Selection of Sportswear to Fit Your Active Lifestyle liiilililliililiiillliii...,......, Try Our New Professional Tanning Facilities $5 per 30-Minute Session $20 for Five 30-Minute Sessions 16 MONTROSE VOICE/ JAN 20, 1984 Films Anne Bancroft is actress Anna Bro118ki and Tim Matheson is Lt. Andre Sob1118ki, wlw mfatuatwn for each other is auerted by the German invasion of Poland m 1939 m Mel Brooks' "To Be or Not to Be" Mel Brooks' New Comedy is Masterpiece of Restraint By Steve Warren Via Gay Presa AallOCiation Wire Service Compared to Mel Brooks' last exercise, History of the World-Part One, his new To Be or Not to Be is a masterpiece of . restraint. Brooks has wisely not tried to do everything himself this time. He's hired debuting director Alan Johnson to direct and allowed two screenwriters to adapt the 1942 Ernst Lubitsch comedy which starred Jack Benny and Carole Lombard, to fit the talents of Mr. & Mrs. Brooks­Mel and (Anne Bancroft). Mr. Brooks plays Frederick Bronski, the egotistical star ("He's world famous-in Poland") and director of a Polish theatre company. Their material, onstage and off, is old and obvious enough to make Sugar Babies look fresh and subtle. Mra. Brooke playa Anna. his wife and co-star. They fight, but they love each other-although she is tempted by hand· some young airman Tim Matheson, who makes an excellent straight man (you should pardon the exprei;sion ). Did I mention that Hitler has just invaded Poland? The Bronskis say they don't care about politics, but they're really good Poles at heart; besides; a city in rub­ble and a decimated population are bad for business . So of course the troupe gets pulled in the fray, with Frederick imper~onating a number of noted Nazis; and suspense min· glee with laughs all the way to the Sound of Music ending. Frederick creates an instant clich6 when he says, "Without Jews, fags and gypsies there ia no theatre." To Be or Not to Be is light on gypsies but has a major fag in James Haake as Sasha, Anna'• dresser. This flaming stereotype is pre­sumably justified when he's made to wear a pink triangle ("I hate it-it clashes with everything!"). 'Thus he becomes sympa· thetic, as well as consciousness raising, while he's still funny ("I've got a late date-with another pink triangle."). I could have done without him and his audition for the road company of La Cage aux Foiles, but otherwise I enjoyed To Be or Not to BP. 1983's Best(and Worst) Movies By Steve Warren The year started dismally, but by late spring a combination of summer fun spec­taculars and "art films" had brought back the joy of moviegoing. Since then there·~ been a fairly steady stream of decent entertainment; and if the year-end releases failed to live up to their own hype, most of them exceeded my limited expecta· tions. The best picture of the year was made by an Australian working in America for the first time, who seemed to know more about thiR country and its people than those of us who have livf'd here all our !iv~. (Note that two of the top three were filmed in Texas, which may indicate a healthy trend toward coming here to make good movies.) Ten Be!lt 1. Tender Mercies 2. Daniel 3. Terms of Endearment 4. Under Fire 5. ThP Grey Fox 6. The Draught man's Contract 7. The Right Stuff 8. The Big Chill 9. Yentl 10. Carmen Second Ten (Alphabetical) Abuse; Bad Boys; Betrayal; Blue Thunder; A Christmas Story; Heat and Dust; Return of Martin Guerre; Return of the Jedi, WarGames; Zelig. If any of these haven't played in your area, get on somebody's case about it. Best Director Bruce Beresford, Tender Mercies. Runner-up: .James L Brooks, Terms of Endearment. Best Actor Robert Duvall, Tender Mercies Runner-up: Eric Roberts, Star 80 Best Actress Shirley MacLaine, Terms of Endear· ment Runner-up: Debra Winger, Terms of Endearment Best Supporting Actor Michael Wright, Streamers Runner-up: Jack NicholRon, Terms of Endearment Beat Supporting Actress (Tie) Cher, Silkwood, and Linda Hunt, The Year of /,iving Danf(erously Best Direction of Worst Script Francis Ford Coppola, Rumble Fish Runner-up: Michael Mann, The Keep Wo rst Ten (Alphabetical) Amityville 3-D; Beyond the Umit; By Des1f(n; Danton; Jaws 3·D; Krull; Liquid Sky; The Moon in the Gutter; Querelle; The Survivors. Special Commendation To Rainer Werner Fassbinder·s Berlin Alexanderplatz, even though I only had the endurance to watch the first three epi· sodes; and To the old movies that were some of this year's best: George Cukor's A Star is Born with Judy Garland; and the Hitchcock revival , especially VertiRO. DESIGNS CONSTRUCTION ASSOCIATES • Designers • Contractors • Residential • Commercial • Renovations fl Additions Since1976 References Furnished 529·8659 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat JAN. JAN. 20 21 JAN. JAN JAN. JAN. JAN. 22 23 24 25 26 For 1dd1tion.111 1dor,-,.i\t1rw or phone number1 fOf events listed below look tor the sponsoring 1>rt;11"•lal1uri u '1ler 'Orgemzallont" in the MontroM Class1hed Selected Events through 7 Days mFRIDA Y: NOW's Lesbian Rights Conference, Jan. 20-22, Milwaukee •FRIDAY: Baytown Lambda Group meets 7:30pm Jan 20 91<"'/UDA Y: Committee for Pub­lic Health AwareneSB's "Sher· ing Group for the Worried Well," 7-8pm, Montrose Coun­seling Center, 900 Lovett -SATURDAY: Choice's Le•· bian Mothers' Group meets 6:30pm Jan.21, 210 Fairview, apt. 1 •SUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays !0:30am-1:30pm, MacGregor Park -SUNDAY: Dignity's !st Annual Greater Montrose Pub Crawl. 4pm Jan 22, starting Briar Patch, 2294 W Holcombe -SUNDAY: Overeate?'!l Ano­nymous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold rutONDA Y: AIDS victim sup­port group meets 6:30pm, Mont­rose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 UIONDA Y: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braeamain • TUESDAY: Montrose Sym­phonic Band meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30j>m • TUESDAY: Lutherans Con· cerned meets Jan. 24, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh • TUESDAY: Houston Area Gay & Lesbian Engineers & Scientists meet 7pm Jan. 24 • TUESDAY: Integrity meets Jan.24, Autry House, 6265 Main • TUESDAY: Montrose Civic Club (Neartown) meet.a 7pm ,Jan. 24, Bering Church, 1440 Harold • WEDNESDAY: Greater Montrose Business Guild meets 7:30pm Jan.25, Liberty Bank community room, 1001 Westhei· mer •WEDNESDA l-': Interact met•ting, Bering Church, 1440 Harold , 7:30pm Jan. 25 •WE'DNESDA Y: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold •TllVRSDA Y: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KP1''T Radio, FM-90 •TllURSDA Y: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks 9/N I WEEK: Gay 1:'rcss Asso­ciation Southern Regional Con· ference, ,Jan. 27-29. Houston •IN 1 WEEK: GPC's Nigh~.at th!' Alley Thl'atPr, ''Cloud 9, Jan.27 9/N 1 WEEK: J,pshian1Gay Resource Service, Univ. of Houston, meets 2:30P':'1Jan. 31· Spindletop Room, Umv. Center, Univ. Park • IN 1 WEEK: Gay Political Caucus meets 4600 Main #217, 7::J0pm Feb. 1 9/N 2 WEEKS: Lesbians & Gay People in Medicine meet 7:30pm Feb. 4 ANNOUNCEMENTS •BUS1Ne.SS'"i5WNE~S We ltst tree N~k In this directory Montroae community ~n1Za- =-~~9th~:Q~~OO-t~,C~ ""' 0u11on e 1nd1cates this hating b a MONTFtOSE VOICE d•strtbuUon point COMMERCIAL SPACE OFFICE SPACE 604 Westhe1mer above Cookies, Goodies & More. Private entrance with living quar· ter a poss1b1hty Call 467-2736. DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES BEAUTIFUL 3/212 HOME Very private. iust outside Loop 610 within 15 minutes from Monlr0$e Partlally fur­nished Ideal lor roommatM Special offer Call •67-2736 APT. FOR RENT ~~~ ;~~~11~vin.ph~:m~~~c:'':e.~j Main, 112 btock ott R<chmond Unfur­nished Has stove. refrigerator, ale & gaa heat8<9 Water paid Good nelghbon and new paint Call 524-9092 - DOWNTOWNU:iiURY HIGHR~ :.~t~~;;~ ~~~:Yb':;':~.J's~~ After 5pm, 78~e690 RIVER OAKS AREA __ _ 4-2'h house, 2800 sq ft. Spacious. hard· wood floor. 2218 Dunraven. 1~ 51111 or 7112-22511. LARO..E. . DUP°'iiiAPT. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, study. hardwood, cen­tral AC, remodeled $700/mo. 522·50&4 Montrose area ROOMMATE WANTED __ _ GWF w1shee to share 2 bedroom Ahef duplex with same. Cati Linda. 49~5353 after Spm - WESTMORWND PLACE~­Townhouse/ condo tor &ale. 2-1 * amatl complex 3616 Garrott $89.000. 926- 7171 GRAND CENTRAL PIPELINE- - tHouaton'a gay roommate service.) The best business deal you will make lh11 year 52~3223 .... HISTORIC HEIGHTS HOME National Register Home for sale Conve-­nrent to 145 and Loop 610'" the hean ot the Heights. • bedrooms. 2 baths. 3 at<>­rtes. 4.000 sq ft on 4 lots. Completely restored with charm beyond descnptlon1 $200's Call 861·9996 tor details. EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED .... VIECKER·ZAYNE INTERVIEWING Viecker-Zayne is Houston's moat presti­gious. discreet and exclusive escon ser­vice Candidates must have outstanding appearance and altitude Call lor •PPO•nt­ment, 2·7pm, M·F. 526-1389 AMBITIOUS SALES PEOPLE Apphcat1ons now berng accepted lor tcle­merket1n1; 3 pa11t1ons in our Greenway Plaza ott1ce Good opPOnunrty with our expanding firm Cati •39-0940 tor an appa1ntment IN A BIND Immediate opening tor carpen1er or car penter"a helper Hourty wage negotiable on qualif1cat1ons Transportation and tools helpful but not necessary Contact John Sanon, 524 0038, or Mark Hender· son. 52t-3394 ACTORS/STUDENTS Earn excellent money FutUpart-11me representing Alley Theatre. Call Mr Wade al 228·9341 NGTF MEDIA DIRECTOR tor Nahonal Gay Task Force. For media education camp111gn and press relations W•lh stra•ght mect1a and gay/lesbian press. F1m1llar1ty with mainstream press {eleclronlc and prrnl) and gay Ind lasblan community essential Gooct contacts a ptus. M101mum combined five years expe-. rlence In bOlh gay and atra1ght mectoa required GOod wnung andeclltlng skrlls a musl Located in Washington. O C or ~!~io;~;k Coty Equal Opportun.ty FOR SALE, MISC. VCRfVIDEOCASETTES For sale. ExceJlent cond1t1on. Reasonable (would consider renttng or trading). After 5pm. 713152&-9112. -- WILD BILL'S JEANS New and used-worn and torn! Coats. sweaters. slacks, shorts Lois ot parly/ drag gowns We also buy used ieans Call 'Wtld B11r or •·Sonny·. 880-8824 or 88(}- 8844 (Across the slreet from Salvation Army Thrift Store. 2201·2203 Washing· ton.) GAY BARS HOUSTON iA~2212 Con;.JM-"2·7361 • Bacehus· 623 Lovett 523-3396 i"B8Jai'1-I02 Lovett-°527·9865 d1mng i a.m-7'0 Pec1flc~52&--9427 country 9 Brazot R4ver Bottom :2.ao Br&z:oe-:..52&- 9192 country iarsa~-22'94 W HOICombe-665--9678 • Ca~1-4i6S"Mart1nl.u'ttt9r'"Ktng--::&4f.2s21 disco C°hiCken COop-535 Weathe1mer "626-2240 •~1 R1c'hm'"ond-..:S2e-2259 d•tcO, snows i O•rty sa11y·i=m-A;Q'ndal&-52i.7s2s - i o0Uble -A Siiioon-5731 1<1rby 521-1444 e E7.i'1.:.:1-213RiC~-S21'·8071 9 E••t.-1011 Betl-6$9--0453 i'Ganeon-2303 R1cnmond"':..522=1e-1s_ __ •Ho,._109 Tuam-S2M128 i"JR"1 -~Pac1hc-s2~1i i"Jusi-Mar;c,n & lvM-1:::&17 Fa1rvtew 52&- 9110c leSbtan e K1nd----;-ed $ptrtts-!24'5--fMt~way- 665-9756. loot>ian eC°'v J-1112.Tuom--628-9343 eLocker-1311 Westhe'im•-521·2306 9Loa.1 Depot-2327 Grmnf=.52M.34_2 __ _ e Mary'1-1022 Westhelmer~8161 ~' Pllrk ~t•IB9r-50-Wavgt1 Or-861· 1311 i"M;drilte &.111-53.c Weatrleimtr-52~15ti d1aco. •tiows iMu Chark>tte·a-911 W Orew-62&-8640 country -~ Mtn.nQ c.-aa1 Pec.flC-6»-7..a8 • Numbers i-300 Wntheimer-626-8338 d>OCO iOtt.C.-,""·,""c~1..u.b . -......,2"1""oo"°A""'rblny-S~ 96n9-on OO-.-tofflw-Gray-s2"5oo--­• Out1a..n-1• 18 Rte~~-528-8803 e P1n1t Elephanl-1218 Lt.,and-8S9~ lhows eRanc~h.. -..U 20..,.,.~~-,,Ma;n-521H~730:-:---- i RMca1a -2102 Klrby-Q~n-~ 9 T~ Weatneimer-520-02.U telb1an. d•l<O •Venturtt-N 2923 Main-522~ eweSi Playla~-3012 M•rtm-52M948 Al.EXAN0RtA- 9 S1ll~ S.tly'a-9.Z4 Jackson 4'8-9HM BEAUMONT-i eopa-3CM Orleanl-832-4206 d•ICO 41 Sundowner ""97 Crocket!· 833~989 GALVESTON e <ly -2101 0 -763-91142 eMa<y'sll 2swa .... 7~ • Robert's Latin• '213 Kempner-765-()896 iTram!TIPl-617 W'"rne 7f)3.1247 LAFAYETTE- ~;tm.k:8 C::'w:' a:w1nowoocs Shopptng LAKE C.HARLES • Pal'9gon 1501 Broad ... ,,J.9389 d ICO ORGANIZATIONS JAN. 20, 1984 /MONTROSE VOICE 17 Montrose Classified Teua Gay/leiabilin Tuk Force. POB AK Denton le:D1-f817) 317..az16 r c:aij;1!; Cho.u.-tuontroaeJ Chureh ot CIWtSt-777-9286 A Pa.ee 1n the Sun- -c/o Gracffynn Books. 1Q.t Fairv..-. 522-7695 aUbgroup of l/H Inc. con­cetts 7pm Tues ACLu..:.1236 w Gray-52~ A1-os HOti!ne::c;o Gay S• ~bOa,:C,~321 • Amer-an Gay Athei.st1..:...S1-:e66o- - - ~bo~~)520- ~(TTY) ::r~~~,~~38:'-Aobert Moon, dlf, 209 ier..;o-M;;onll U01ted -M9thochst Chur""Ch:- 1440 HarokS-5~1017 aervk:e 10 50a.m Sun 81aek&Whiie Me;;T"OOether (8WMT,-cto Gay Switehboard 529-321 • Chokes leSbtan g~Gay s';itChbOafd. 529-3211 meets 12 30prn 3rd Sun.: atso'" Les· bianMotf'letl et;.llhan Church o,-the Good Srwpherd-1707 Monlroae Mf'licestpmSun Bbl.,.1Udy730om Thurs (Montrose) Church Ot Cnnst-1700 MontroH­n1.. Q286: services ,,am Sun Cnurcti of ChriltW\Fattn-217 Fakvtew-529-- 8005 HMCet10•~Sun&715pmWe481ble atudy 7 t5pm Tues & Sun Choir praetlce Wed after HrvteeS Ctiuref'lotPentic'Os-:a1ufttty-.:__1211R~ 850-7288. 520-5699 S.r.1Cn 7 30pm Fri •tam Sun Citl.lens t'O(H~;;n EQU.hty (CHE>-POB 3045. 7725J-680.33.la bOa"' -., 2'1d Tues Ci1ppers-POB-e56·.-Rlelvnond n.169 Cott 45's-meets a1 Brazot R1~r BO'ttOm-2,iOO Brazot-52&-9192 Comm1nH fc);°Pub1tC H°eiiih A;-.Teness-POB 304!1, n253-52H333. 522·50IM "'Sharing Gtoup for the WOt"f'i9d weir "'"' Fr! 7..epm Montrose Counsehng Cent•' Community 0o..,;1 Centef17oo Montr0Se- 523-ll018 COnQAYuChiv1m-meet1 at CCF, ~17 Fa1rv"'*-68&-8997· MMce & .ac1al 8pm 2nd & •m F" Cnala Hot,..,._ 228- I 505 - - D.ai..a-oaY~Atr.erSt---..c-,s"1-=~=,_.,,_.,..,.._ A In.tits o.ana Found.abon-2700 Mnon-52~ ~c:v~~~~ ~7~ ~·~ =. 7 30pfn sm:. 11! Anni.a Greeter MonttOM Pub Craw1, •pm Jan 22. starting Briar Pa1dt. n94 W Holcomllo 111 Unitanan Churet1-5i10 Fa;\~ti71' Nt'Ytce 11 15am Sun Fromn.innei.~2i=.128e- Qay i Al1~Shenng Exper~ciASi)-63- 1311. 528-0891 G..iY. '"&i.bian-AI,..-chi""". ....,.. -of'"'T'""ox_u_,a"=if!Me of l/H G•r .-...an Clut>-2$15 w...,Qh •11• nooe­a. y H11911mc: Cauc:ua-866-5252 -­~ A11aa-~e-aao-.948e <ilv P<>1it<ea1 caucia ··1GF'C1-Pa8iii66r 77266-521·10CX'.t meec 4600 Main •217 7.30pm ~~~ ~~ ~cf~~•ay bonofRJan27 Ga). Pride Week ·93 ComnuuM--cJoM.; Coleman . ._ ot Coleman. 901 w ...,. __ 523-ml G;;Sw1tehb0.-rd-Pc5e 362•. n253-5&321 t antormatlOfl. counsehng referra!I TTY AIDS Holltne Great.r---U-ontrOM BUslneu - GUi"ld=contaci tnrougri Montrooo Voice meets 1 30pm "h weo. comrnUNty room liberty Bank 1001 wn­lh .. mer Gr~t'fM1e60 Aru f.r:.Away F~- 82• -l ~- lntef'farth"'Aui.V.ce-729 Manor- 5:r.Hl969 Ho.,~ Arn Gay & i.--r;;g.,,_. & Sciensists-524-7•98. 1-10pm meeu 7pm •th Tues eHou-s-lon-Q1y-. ..H. a-U--~18agby HOuston Community °CIO'lllrns~862--8314 HOUiton Dall PrOfeu.onala-mem in East Room, Holiday Inn Central, •640 S Matn- 523-- 8022 meet 7 30pm 2nO Tues Houston Motorcycle Club-cl---0-Mary 1. 1022 We1the1~ 5~1 Houston North Pror....,one11-POe 3&IO. Hum. ble 773'7-8Jlat821·7t2e meet7.:30pm2ndSat 1 H inc POB1i041~n2i2~-1732 529-- 70U affiliated groups are Interact. Grao.Jynn Gallery S A Place ~ the Sun MontrOM Art ~::,.a:~=$~;::~~~~,! rose Clogoers beard ""'"" 7:3Qpm 1st Thurs (warted IOcatrons llduea.tional forum 7 30pm 3rd Thura lngeraou Speakers· Buruu-POB 391 Benatre 7740., '669--•06C ~~ty...';:¥5~ ~~"l;~ ~ Houu 8255 Ma n Chap:., Eucnarlat 1 30pm ,,an 24 interact-POe 16041 77222-529-701' mee1 4111 Wed S..mg Church 1440 twola 7 30pm e l(Pfi Radio FU-90-t19 Lovett Btvcf. 52& 4000: Wilde n Stein· gay radt0 show Thurs, 730-900pm KStAIOS Foundatton. 1001 Westheimer •193-- 524-AIOS Lambda Blcyci"e Crub-0..vid 882..(M56. Carol S2lM97~ lambda Cenler Gay Atcoholrc:t & Alanon-t..Zl• Jo Annte--521-9772 ~~~R~nS:..~~~'J.;'. 1253 rneeta 2':30prn alternate Tuesday& Spm. dfe1oP Room. 1ncl floor. UnrvetSity c.nter Lnl>oans & Gay Pecpoe m ueo~ - 7:30prn '" s.. lnNn Mother& lllbgroup of ChOtces meets Isl - 3rd Sat. e 30pm, 210 Fame. ""'I tutnera,.. eoncem9d-mem a1 Grace Luthe­ran Church. 2515 Waugh~1..QM3. •~11•3. rneet 2'1d & 4th Tues~ Man -,t.gonii't -~PbOn Courtny Club- POB 15A187t 71254 • lriotetropolftan Community Church of the Resur .. ,..,._ IMCCRl-1919 Oecatur-861~1'9 po!· luC\ dinner 7'30pm 111 Sat monthty MtYtCeS 10:4Sam A 7 tSprn Sun & 7 15prn Wed. member· ::.:t='l ::: :,.. 30plri Men edueal~ MontroM Art AH1ance- S21·:i-te1 aff1 II.ti l/H Inc; rnNt 2'1d Thurs ~rote Cloggers aft tai• of I ti Inc:; meet F n ne Bering cnurch ActlVitiel B'dg. 3405 Mui-- ~ ---------- Montrose Cho< Club see Neartown AllOClatJOI'\ • J.4ont:r0teCS.nt0-1oiWestheuner 528-5531 _., -knoghts ll-lOpm Mo~eoUnS.ling C.nter-900 Lovett •203-529-0037 Al OS vid1m sop pert group m-S 30pm Mon Montrose s.,,g;;-C;f -L~ 77•-3591 a·tte-r 6p-m reheat'NI Mon eves. Bering Church Montrote Tennis Club--Rano9tl--ai £97·9553 ploy Sun t~.30afn.1 30pm MacGrego< Paro MSA Mon N.gtll ~ ng..:.piay Stad11.1-m &ov.1 8200 Branmain-526-4576 or "99-9036 MSA. Thurs Ngf'lt (M-.. ed le.gue) Bow!mg­play Stadium Bowl 8200 Braesmam-961·1$23 MSA/GtNter Houston (Mens) Sorma 523- 8802 day, 523-041 I eve MS.vorUt..- Houston (Men 11 Softba s«.es 8 Commun1cat1on Comm ttee-POB 22272 77221 ~rGayWorldSeria_.,in9tton­! ltlve) :tprn 4ug 26. -al Pa"' MSA/Womena SohbaU L""lllJ&-lln<1aa1 ~ 7193 - - MSA/Voti.yball gAmn 7 30pm Tues. Grogory­Llncotn 'IC-hOOI. 1101 Tatt M~mphOnie Band-meetl at Benng Church 1"40 Horoto-527·945' mH1 7 30pm Tum. aff1Uatt llH Inc Montrose Walch aubgrou; NMnOwn AssOC ijustanga-meets at tfle Barn 710 Pac hc-52&- 9'27 club n;grit Thurs NailonaJ Gay Health -Educa~ FoundallOn­Houston 523-5204 =~hc:r.=~:n~~~~~::a· iimiow-;:,~.;r, (M"Q;,~ Cr;u: C'iut.l­- 11 Benng Churcl\ 1"40 Horold~ 1000: meet 7pm 4th Tues Ne;F~~chnSt~~-=912 w 1~ 591-1~ - !Dam Sun. 7 30pm - o;er-.n Anonymous-c10 &.r~nQ Church. ~~~~ 526-.o'S ,,_, ~ p-....,.. & FrtOndSof L-..0. & Goya-Houlton ~Spring ~792 ~,-;::CJO NeartOwn Community F"irenouM-7' 1-252• ~~eeoiii3:-meo:~ llOl!l ;;;c;;.o.;;; ~c-m--=-~..;v ClubPfOIOCI fl.Cl Uotiv Gay/lnl><Orl $-rt Group-524· 0724 Shantt of T••• COU1'lll9bnV rot ltle--Ch~ bl--522-50114 f uu s..~ i .tN Ciar5-3J2-3131 rneet Thu.. -"'11 r.; .. Bay~ G0y Y""'11~~7 rneet ~ •eekfy __ T°e•U Gay ROdeO Auoc-clo Kindred Spfnt. S2•5 Bu!falo Spowy ~=:: ~~' FOunctat1on 1915 Texas RIO«l-c/O MaiY'a:1022 weaih..me,-:.. 528.aMI - ~-- --- --- Uf\QnatVUniYef'lattSt Gay Caucus-cto 1at u,...,.,.n cnurc11. 5210 Fannu>-520-97117 528- 5842 ..-t 3tlS Sun aftomoons WeS- F0.~-8899 - WHthetmtr Cotony Art& AllOdatiort-1001 Wntf'tetmer •187 wc;;;;e;;sl-.ol>tly Aii.O.U:-. Chelsea · -621 0439 BAYTOWN- .... Baytown lambda Group- -427 13711 rnNtmg 730pm Jan 20 CONROE- ~~':; =~7 Janat!"'9)75&-- Conro. Area Lesbtlnl Kathy at { 409) 756-9069 meet epm 2nd & '"' Fn ~K,;,;~~i:.. 216C Longvolle LA 70M2 MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS RELAXING SENSUAL RUBDOWN C~uck 521-:M96. TEXESCORT-524-9511 Models escorts & masseurs -We do care enough to send the very best · Ma1or credit cards honored Monthly med1ca1 cert1f1ca1e Have e real run ttme wrtf\ the right guy for you HAPPINESS IS •• a handsome healthy humorous. happy hunk as your escon or model lrom TeJ<EaCOrl 524-9511 Mlljor credit cards honored Security and discretion assured TAKE A LONG LUNCH Ty. 869-2298 F1Yem1nutes north of down­town Alwar- available 1Dam-2pm; usu· ally thereafter too - BE GOOD to yourself todayt Have a rubdown from an expert llc:ensed masseur Call Ran­dolph, tOem-tOpm. seven days a week 528-31•7. NYC STAR MODEL Who la a woodsy hunk from Mai,,. and 1n Houston for a bt?Uted period• Ask about Ryan. Te>Eacort 524-9511 CENTAUR ___ Escorts 52!>-448'1 M8$1ercarc1'Vosa. 18 MONTROSE VOICE/ JAN. 20, 1984 ~ II r . . " Thunderstick? .. . You actually said, 'Thun­derstick?' ... That, my friend, is a Winchester 30.06." ~ ~TfillDIVARIU5 /' ' I I 0 Confused by the loud drums, Roy is flushed into the net. The Far Side by Gary Larson ,,. ___... " Dibs." ~ /- " For the one-hundredth time in as many days! . • . I HAVEN'T GOT A QUARTER!" BODY MASSAGE In or oi:t. Bruco. 521-2009. RELAX & ENJOY T~o Bodyworks massage. For app01nt· ment, call Bill. 526-2470. HANDSOME VERSATILE ESCORT Buck. 520-6735. PERSONALS FRIENDSHIP OR FUN GWM. 6'2'" 175 lbs, seeks new fr c~ds. Cruck 521-3496 SERVICE Masculine, hairy, well-endowed, married man. b1·s. gays, novices under 30. Call 522-2204 HISPANIC OR ORIENTAL ~:1~e ~~1~~.;-x1~~J~~p~~~~n~~~~~~~~~ WELL·BUILT Blondelhazel seeks studs 20-30 for fun. Ph01o a must! Box 66483, Houston 77266 CAN WE TALK? GWM. 34, 5'9'", 145 lbs , moustache. Seeks same for relat1onsh1p. Letter. photo please Box 169·A c/o Voice - SINCERE, RESP-ONSIBLE, CARING lnd1v1dual wanted by professional GWM. 27. for friendship and maybe more. Box t 69B c/o Voice MEN 25-35 WANTED Professional, well-built 29. 159 lbs handsome. seeks same. Box 42825, Suite 323. Houston 77242. HAPPILY MARRIED SOUGHT GWM, happily mamed to female. well­preserved 45. slender. short and well·built Intellectual. professional, seeks relat1on­sh1p with GWM in similar circumstances Seek slender. attractive looking. in my age category, discreet, successful profes­sional for ft1endsh1p, intimate sharing at not always convenient hours Direct cor· resp0ndenco to Box 61647, Houston 77208-1647 I INCH Azaleas 1n 8 Inch pots, assorted colors at Second Level, 608 Pacific 526-4566. - - - DON'T READ THIS GWM, 34, seeks non-smoking, hirsute man over 30 for frlendsh•plPoSS1ble rcla- 11oesh1p David 522·4050. ALEXANDRIA. LA. Mark B contact Mark m Houston. Box 169Y c/o Voice GAY COUPLE GWM. 5'10", blonde, hazel eyes, musl­ache G1 MA. M. 5·5·, dark brown, brown eyes. mustache. Seek attractive muscular men for good time. Photo a must Sonny and Tony WARM THOUGHTS Thank you. Paul. for the memories of a great evening Stan SCOTTY ~:;'c•a~'C~:Ti:.0~~1~;~slie~~ ~~~~a~ 529-7014 STRAIGHT ACTING PISCES Stable, professional, attracHve, slightly ahy, l1v1ng at home Looking for 1ntelh-p, f~~d.'~~~g=td!~r::!{.9,~~~0u~;;f,:;;,~~~ ate, french active. I'm a very down-to­eanh type of nice guy 38, 6", brown hair 11nd eyes, 195, serious, romantic Inter­ests Include home life, tennis. bowling ~~~='· ~:k;~Bt':JJl~g~~ing Photo gets HELP! FULFILL FANTASY-B1g dark man to fill my needs All day Fridays. Very hot Box 168Z clo Voice - AFFECT IONATE HUGGY BEAR-­Attractive Latin, 31, looks younger 5'6'", slim. smooth. professional, seeks attracM t ive, taller, hairy, endowed GWM for lover. Enjoy home, friends, entertainment Not into bars Lots to share, so please write. Box 166B clo Voice YOUN-G GAYNUDIST Club forming Send photo. phon~ Occu­pant, Box 740572, Houston 77274 --- LUCKY PIERRE-­Wishes to complete a menage Couple ahoutd be 30-40 P1cture1phone to Box 71 -11. Houston 77248 SINCERE. SUCCESSFUL, ENTHUSIASTIC mucul ne, attractive. 6' 2", 165 brown/blue, professionally employed. 26, happy, outgoing. varied interests. straight appearing. Compahble? Let's meet. Photo please Box 166A c/o Voice. - AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHERS GM wants to meet other gays interested In photography Lefs share the Joys of pho­tography togother. Peter 668-9425 - MEDICAL CENTER EMPLOYEES Let'1 meet et noon. Please be discreet Thomas 792-5717 work, 630-0966 mes­sage - HISPANIC FRIEND(S)WANTED GWM, 25, 145 lbs 5'10'", professional. straight acting. not into drugs, been out for 1 year, wishes to meet sincere. stable. Hispanic friend Write with photo Box 166Z c/o Voice GWM WANTS GllM Masculine. quiet Leo seeks similar for tun, possible relationship Cati Mac. 526-3140 TEMPORARY PARTNERS NEEDED Lover away unul March GWM, 34, soeka GR! A cuddters trim, moustache. 2~0. nonsmoker. clean Ad 166-D. c/o Voice HAIRY LIFEMATE SOUGHT by 45-year-old man. No smoking, booz­ing, drugs Larry 481-2892 &-9pm. RUBDOWN NEEDED __ _ Masculine. GWM. 29. seeks massage from n<>111cea under 22 years 781-8280. GWM WANTS RELATfONSHW­lnteresled In meeling GWM. 3&-45. for possible permanenl relat1onsh1p Char11e 961-3763 'AiTE'NT~ - Tall. a11rac11ve. blonde. blue. Piaces seeks cule. GPIFA-P, 20-30, dark hair. Ted 961- 4323 PAULOR JOE I would Ilka lo hear from you. Lei's keep 1n touch with each other. Remember all lhe little yellow jackets? Sien - ---GWM TEDDIBEAR ~:=:~~P.· 2-;_~,b~~~ ;:,e~~ilesa;:;~. Photo. info Box 187-V c/o Voice HIRE A BARTENDER En)OY your party• Let cert1f1ed bartender serve guests Reasonable rates J T. 455- 2508 MOVEMASTERS ~~~~~ =g;uppllea too 1925Wes- --E~LECTAONIC SERVICES TV. VCR & stereo repair Call Doug, 526- 2356. after 7:30 NEED A LAWYER YOU CAN AFFORD? PRIVATE GAY CLUBS SERVICES, ETC. d)udill, C[)ouqOas ATTORNEY AT LAW 303 W Polk at Taft 520-1370 Proudly servtng the FASHiONoESiGNERT O THE STARS Montrose Community Jauger. Grace Jones, Sharon Redd Cus- Drunk Dnv1ng-Pubhc lnloxocallon Debi Rebel- Bankruptcy • Club Houston iaii\i=2~{1nmn--659-49ie iFr~OUirter Th .. ter-3201 Loo1si1na-- 52Ml782 l~:e pa~:;~r c~:: ~,~:1naa~!:~~~ Designs. 526-0444 ln1ury Claims-Job & Accidenl nefl-Shophlt1ng Possession-Drugs & ~pons Charges Lewd Conduct-Pros111u11on eM!Otowne Spa--3100 Fannin-~22-2379 i 2306 Club-2308 Geneuee--v;-•. 'i-Ytir. - - PATRICIA ANNE O'KANE- - Altorney al law. 52&-7911 RESTAURANTS - TREAT YOURSELF TO MUSIC Learn to read music or Increase your repertoire. Mus1c1ansh1p, technique Reasonable Fees & Terms Convenient Location & ~~~~~~F~!~~ho:r~'9j~~:2g;truct1on. Pr~ • Office Hours ie.11·a 402 Lovett--527-8866 eBou1ev1rd Cafe-808 Love1t='521·1'0iS icttapultapec· 813 Richmond· 522·7365 ---RITCHIE;. GUSS Attorneys-at-law, 3407 Montrose, 521· 9216: telephone answered 24 hrs. Gef'eral Practice of Law NI Cert by Tx Bd ol Lg Spec MONTROSE CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING RATES Placing a Classified other than a Personals? Read this: •ANNOUNCEMENTS • CARS & BIKES •DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES • EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED • FOR SALE, MISC. • MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS • SERVICES •TRAVEL RATE: Up to 3 words in bold, $2 each week. Additional regular words 30¢ each per week. Minimum charge $3 per week. DEADLINE: 5:30pm Tuesday for Friday's newspaper. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer, pay the full run In advance, and make no copy changes during the full run, and you can deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13weeksor longer under the same conditions and you can deduct 25%. CHARGE YOUR AD: All classifieds must be paid in advance OR you can charge your classified to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill-except through your credit card-for classifieds. PHONE IN YOUR AD; Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in classifieds to (713) 529-8490 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. Placing a • PERSONALS ? Read this: RATE: Up to 3 words in bold and up to 15 total words, FREE. (Additional words beyond 15 per week are 30¢ each.) FREE PERSONALS apply only to individuals. No commercial services or products for sale. HOW LONG? A Free Personal can be placed for one, two or three weeks at a time-but no longer without re-submitting the form. ___ _ BLIND BOX NUMBER: If you want secrecy, we'll assign you a Blind Box Number The answers to your ad will be sent to us and we will then confidentially forward the replies to you. Rate is $3 for each week the ad runs but replies will be forwarded as long as they come in. ANSWERING A BLIND BOX NUMBER: Address your reply to the Blind Box Number, c/o Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. Enclose no money. Your letter will be forwarded unopened and confidentially to the advertiser. CHARGE YOUR PERSONAL TO CREDIT CARD All charges beyond the 15-word limit or Blind Box charges must be paid in advance OR you can charge to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill­except through your credit card-for classifieds. PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in Classifieds to (713) 529-8490 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. The Free offer does not apply to Personals phoned in. You will be charged the same rate as other types of Classifieds. (up to 3 normal-size words In bold capitals) (free or 30¢/word) (free or 30¢/word) (30¢/word) ---­( 30¢/word) _ ~-­( 30¢/word) bold headline at $2 __ __ words at 30¢ each --~- Blind Box at $3 per issue--.--- Total ___ _ times ••••••.• weeks - -- (~d1tlonal paper if necessary) Name_ Address ----- ---------- Amount enclosed __ -- co check o money order, o cash .n person o VISA charge o MasterCard charge) If charging by credit card: # _exp date Mail or bring to Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #204, Ho~on, TX 77006 JAN. 20, 1984 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 DENTIST Ronald M Butler. D D.S.-David B Chambers, D D S General dent,sts accepting ins assignments Nltroux oxide available Monday thru Saturday afternoons 524-0538 427 Westhe1mer - --ESALEN MASSAGE FOii relaxation. Profes~onal masseur Non­sexual. Jamea Buechler, 52&-1649. 781- 8031. eFranctaco·1 Hair Oeaig~R~ 523-0<38 - iHOUitOnCfUMt Hoose k>dgJl\9--106 Awon-­daie- 52()..9757 e1cenh~~~27 w.;u:;;m;;= 52().7972 • Legend• Hair Oesign-906 Westhelmer-527 .. 01118 il~•1r O.~n-3220 YOU.um-526--«iM 9._..~~-2528-K;~ 0672 eMontroee Hh-().i.g-n-10CM C.Utorn'8---522- =0nlroM -Voce r.ewspaper.=3311 ~ •30&--5~90 - --- e Neanown G•rage---1901 Tatt-52>279' eRon1 Ha1r~C.--;;- 1310 ~ ~2;~~~.-1~2272190 8 TO"""Y't Barbe< Shop-i15' ~ ... fll&-1218 ~Anrtn.1 C.~ntneimer-521· 11277 SHOPS & STORES BUTLER PETS New hours Monday thru Thursday, ~11, Friday and Saturday. 9-6; Sunday, 11- 4pm 524-0530 425 WestM1mer i°AiJ..Sta°TAoun Nt-;..., 1.01 Ridtrnond-528" 8'05 e ArtttQue eomer.= i"e21 wei"tne1mer=sn-eoe1 i"4ppearances-133&--A Wntne1me;=.~ iAsytum Ackiit Boou"ttft-1201 Richmond •Ball Parli. Adutt80oi1fore-1830 W ~ma .-eoo~"it~ - •Bou!evard=Plua-HOiet. 5020 Montrose •Cactus Rec:orctt-W A+at>amaai ~d icOb;-eblktuon· 20le-Wntn:.1tnf'r::S2&= 2989 By Tycho •cnu.r..-626 Hewthome--53-8298 eCut F"'-91'9-6015 Mont~522-1n5 eou ... (1 Aoutt ~WM~~ 9950 e Do.:ib<ave-Jonoo. 11>o ~ t1o•lung-tll83 w G.ay-522-1088 iDownt;;t Recon:ts-2111 -RchmOnd-523+ e3'8 i DTamal>-ka g 111-322• •-um-5211-S-57 eGoogte a-100. Wtotnaa~.t-5.555 eGrac~n BooU-7()1 Fairview-522-7695 •Health Sefi.er1-w A19blrN at s Shepherd 9House ot cOttee BNnt-2520 Ra - ~HO.;" &-Garden:.2".ti6it<M~ eKroger=3JOO Mon1rOM iAM"~"i--3827 OUntavy • Oh Boyt i.Mtflet Goodl-912 Weathellner- 52 ... 7159 •Old Eng'ish°Fumitur• 1138 w Grar-52\.. 8145 -~12 Mofti;0..-S2'6-30IM e Record Aectl: tnUSIO- 3 109 S ~.:.524::- 3eo2 eSiiAIZ AOUi"t-Newt-1132 w Alabama •nc-602 w .... t>omo~'-seso --­• Trie Tire Ptace-•307 FauvteW-529--1.CU euruon Jae" clothW)(l-1212w~-~ 8600 i Up One Western/Leather-BAB 2400 erazoo-52 ... $737 iv1oii;& o-M 511op-2.cg, eoiso-­iw..; v., o;c;;;ilQuot-1'02 Welch iwaiheuner ftea Marilet-1733' wft~ iwesthe1mer lnte~We"'Sthe1mer- 52G-1357 'iwe'iih97mer Aecorda 202:t Wnthe1-;;;;;= 52().a&OO •w•tct e11r1 New - i -~ Ck>lh•~· -2201 Was"4ngton Av-880-8824 i'Wiaae& stetn bOOk 1tor.-ao2 w9sthefm1"'- 529-70,. TRAVEL TAAYELGROUP LEADERS Consull us first abOut your groups needS Various tares and rulea may permit you to lravel free Travel Consultants 5~8464 •Tr~ .. COnlultama-2029 $w-F~-~ Fortunes For Friday evenrng. Jan
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