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Montrose Voice, No. 14, January 30, 1981
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Montrose Voice, No. 14, January 30, 1981 - File 001. 1981-01-30. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11724/show/11708.

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(1981-01-30). Montrose Voice, No. 14, January 30, 1981 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11724/show/11708

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 14, January 30, 1981 - File 001, 1981-01-30, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11724/show/11708.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 14, January 30, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 30, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript What's a neWspaper without comics? pages 13 & 15 What are our legislators doing in Austin? page 5 Montrose Voice Friday January 30, 1981 Good Evening Montroae weather toniaht: Cloudy and cooler with a 30'!1. chance of rain and a low of 50°. Sunrise: 7:11AM. Saturday: Cloudy with a chance of rain and a high of 64°. Sunset: 5:59PM. ISSUE #14, PUBLISHED WEEKLY photos by Ed Martinez The Montrose bowlers Quick now, what is the largest men's bowling league in Texas? If you guessed the Montrose Sports Association Bowling League, you got it. Every Monday night at 9:00PM, members of the MSA Bowling League gather for sports and fun. Richard Dauchy, president of the league, was very vocal in stressing that anyone who is interested is invited to come out to Stadium Bowl, one block south of Kirby on Main, for an evening of fun and bowling. "We're interested in participation, not competition," Dauchy stated. "We're also very .Proud of the fact th~t there is a gay bowhng league in Dallas w1th 134 members, and leagues in San Antonio and Austin are scheduled to begin soon." Dauchy also said that the league here in Houston, which has been around since May of 1979, has 270 members, making it a very large league indeed. Over the Memorial Day weekend, May 22- 24, Houston will host the First Annual International Gay Bowling Organization Tournament. And the Montrose Sports Association, and its bowling league, will be host to the event. This will be a match play on point system tournament with competition in single, doubles, and team events. The large turnout at Stadium Bowl and the friendly attitude of the members of the league indicate a bright future for this, the largest, men's bowling league in our state. PAGE 2 I MoNTR08B VOICE/ JANUARY 30, 118i .0------rm-a-!f-l--\---o---~-- ~- · == --=- - - -= -=.. - .=:- - -=.. -=- . --=- '-=:::' . &U.§Jf!! BOOB~ ---- -- -- ---- -- -- --· -- ---- --- - --- - - --- - - --- - ''Where the world meets Houston'' lo6 Avondtii4!/Rouston, Te-.s 77006/(7J:J) ;ZG-9767 We honor American Express, Carte Blanche, Diners Club, Visa and Mastercard. Montrose NeuJs Tinsley proposes tax break for historical buildings A city property tax break program that would encour­age owners of historical buildings in Montrose and elsewhere in Houston to restore or perserve them was proposed to the Houston City Council January 14 by Coun­cilwoman Eleanor Tinsley. "If we're going to preserve these buildings, we've got to move very fast. They're dis­appearing from the land­scape," Tinsley told City Council, the Houston Post reported. To qualify for the tax breaks, the owners of the structures, which includes both office buildings and res­idences, must seek historical landmark designations from the Texas Historical Com­mission and the National Registry of Historic Places. Southwest Center for Urban Research conducted a survey of 27 structures in Montrose and 224 structures elsewhere in Houston. These were structures which they thought might qualify now Demonstration staged outside Chinese consulate The Chinese consulate in Houston, located in Mon­trose at 3400 Montrose Blvd., was the scene Monday, Jan. 26, of a demonstration by members of the Revolution­ary Communist Party show­ing their support for Jiang Qing, widow of Mao Tse­Tung. The communists were con­fronted by noisy beckers. Jiang Qing had a day ear­lier received a suspended death sentence by a Chinese court for plotting to over­throw the government dur­ing China's Cultural Revolution. or in the near future, said Steven Fox of the research group. Among the commercial buildings here, he said, were the Tower Theater at 1201 Westheimer, the Alabama Theater at 2922 South Shep­herd and the Plaza Hotel at 5020 Montrose Blvd. Weingarten Realty, which owns the shopping center containing the Alabama Theater, has been reported to be considering tearing down the old 50's-style complex to make room for building a more-profitable modern high-rise. Such a move, though, was said to be only in an exploratory stage. Tinsley's program, autho­rized by the Texas Legisla­ture in 1977, would grant a 50 percent exemption for five years for buildings that are preserved and a 100 percent exemption for five years for other structures that are restored. In the sixth through tenth years, buldings that are pre­served would receive a fifty percent exemption and after ten years those structures would receive a 25 percent exemption. The exemption would not apply to Houston Independ­ent School District taxes. If a project were demol­ished after receiving the exemption, the city could "recapture" up to five years of taxes the owners had not been required to pay. The total of 251 structures include 77 public buildings already exempt from pro­perty taxes as well as 60 commerical structures and 114 residences. the research firm stated. If all of the structures were restored, about $750,000 in current tax collection would be lost, Tinsley said. A more reasonable maximum is probably about $200,000, she said. The MONTROSE VOICE is published weekly. Offices: 3520 Montrose, suite 227, Houston, TX 77006. Phone (713) 529- 8490. Contents copyright 1981. Office hours: noon-7pm. ADMJNJSTRA TIVE/EDITORJAL Henry McClurg, publisher/editor. Ed Martinez, associate editor. Subscribing members of San Francisco Chronicle Features and Surburban Features of Newspaper Enterprise Association. POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to 3520 Montrose, suite 227: Houston, TX 77006. Subscription. rate in US: $29 per year, 52 1ssues, or $19 for six months. 26 1ssues. ADVERTISING Randy Brown, advertising director. Advertising deadline: Tuesdays, 7:00 p.m. National advertising representative: Rivendell Marketing, Nt'w York. JANUARY 30, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 3 "Upfront" folds Upfront America, a bi­weekly tabloid newspaper published in Montrose and distributed throughout the neighborhood, has published its last issue, owner Gary von Ooteghem said Thurs­day, Jan. 29. "It's cost me $50,000 over the past three years. I've used up my whole settlement," he said, referring to a federal appeals court _ruling last October that ordered Harris County to pay him $56,000 in back wages because he was fired from his county accounting position in 1975 for reportedly politicing for gay rights on county time. The money has yet to be paid to Van Ooteghem, but he has borrowed using the court ruling as collateral. "I am busted, I am broke," Van Ooteghem said, talking about the closing of Upfront. The newpaper, about three years old [counting issues published under its original name of simply Upfront), was noted for its excellent graphics. However, the pub­lication had a rough time attracting the amount of advertising needed to cover all overhead. The term "human rights" could be used to sum up the general overall editorial direction of the newspaper. Several times during the paper's history, publisher Van Ooteghem obtained investors or loans to keep it alive and even once announced he had sold it out­right to photographer r. Hardy Williams. Williams published the heavily-in debt newspaper for several issues and then Van Ooteghem took back over. The publication was started as a non-profit news­paper with expenses covered by contributors. After a few months, it decided to become commer­cial. selling advertising space. With the folding of Upfront. Montrose is left with two weekly publica­tions: the MONTROSE VOICE, a newspaper started in 1980, and TWT magazine, an enter­tainment guide started about 1973. Van Ooteghem said his plans now were to open up a computer service operation, specializing in accounting services. News series to show gay report A brief story on homosex­uals in Houston is scheduled to be featured Friday, Febru­ary 8, on KHOU-TV, channel 11, during the 5:00PM newscast. The report is part of a series the station has been working on called "Hard Times in Boom Town." The series plans to broadcast reports on forty different subjects, at the rate of two each weekday in February. · The subjects range from traffic control to growing Intended raP.e victim wrestles knife in Montrose attack A 31-year-old man was charged with burglary and an attempted rape of a female Montrose neighbor Friday. Jan. 23, police reported. The intended victim was said to have wrestled her attacker's pocket knife from him and cut him in the face and shoulder, then called police. The accused attacker, Bill Albert Futral Jr. of 2011Yz Harold, was treated at JJen Taub Hospital and then arrested, police said. Officers said the man is charged with forcing his way into the woman's apartment about 8:00AM, Friday. Jan. 23, under the pretext of ask­ing for help. He then was said to have produced a knife and forced the 32-year-old woman in the apartment to accompany him to her bedroom. Once there, however, she was said to have succeeed in grabbing the knife and stab­bing him twice during a struggle. Futral was being held withput bond, police said. city service needs to gay rights-issues that have caught the public's attention as Houston matures and expands. The reports average about three minutes, although the one on gay people runs longer, said Ian Pearson, an executive news producer at the station. In his opinion, the gay rights segment is "excellent, one of the most powerful of the forty issues covered." The segment includes an interview with Lee Harring­ton, president of the Gay Political Caucus, the city's leading gay rights organiza­tion. The interview is con­ducted by Newscenter 11 reporter Sharon Adams. No exact time for airing of the segment on February 8 was released, only that it will be sometine during the hour­long newscast that starts at 5:00PM. The forty-part series was scheduled to run from Februry 2 through February 27. PAGE 4 I MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30, 1981 Thursday, Feb. 5, Party! All Day, All Night, At Mary's Beer Busts Sunday 4-9 and Tuesday 9-midnight --· -' ---- .. . - - - - _.. _- - - -- - -'- .. 1022 Westheimer .....,....... * Montrose NeuJs Will Houston follow Atlanta in closing of all 'adult' bookstores? While bookstores catering to erotic tastes currently flour­ish in Houston, especially in Montrose, almost all of Atlanta's "adult" bookstores and movie theaters have agreed to close in return for dismissal of charges against their employees. A prosecutor in Atlanta says the agreement is proof that "law enforcement now has the upper hand" against alleged pornography. "If you need a dirty book, you'll have to leave Atlanta to get it," Glenn Zell. an attor­ney for the bookstores, was quoted as saying. Zell said owners of at least sixteen "adult" bookstores agreed in mid-January to close their doors on condition that anti-pornography cru­sader Fulton County Solici­tor General Hinson Mc­Auliffe dismiss all charges pending against their employees. What's the chances of the scene being repeated in Houston? Not probable, most obser­vors agree, but certainly not impossible. One hitch, however, is a court test now pending before the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans over the constitutionality of the current Texas obscenity law. If the appeals court over­turns a local ruling and throws out the Texas law, as it has done with earlier Texas obscenity laws, it could be at least two years before the state would enact another, since the Legislature nor­mally only once every two years and is currently in session. The deadline has passed for the pre-filing of all bills in this session. If the appeals court upholds the lower the court decision and keeps Texas' obscenity law intact, the defending bookstore and theater owners, which includes Montrose Ventures (owners of Studz News, the Asylum and the Ballpark], could appeal to the Supreme Court, possibly keeping the law in limbo for about another year. The Houston vice squad, however, might take it on its own to conduct a large crack­down in that year. They cur­rently make a few random arrests of bookstore clerks for commercial obscenity and recently made several arrests of bookstore custo­mers for violation of section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code, the section that defines sodomy as illegal. A Houston attorney famil­iar with the arrests said most occur in the afternoon "when there's likely to be just straight-appearing business­men in the stores," theorizing that these usually plead guilty and pay their fines, trying to avoid any publicity. "The vice squad certainly doesn't want a jail full of screeming gay rights acti­vists (that a nighttime 'raid' might bring]," the attorney said. The closing of the doors of these establishments in Atlanta puts that city in the company of Jacksonville, Fla., as the only other major city in America to have effec­tively banned the sale of erotic material. In Houston on Janurary 14, a clerk for Downtown News, 900 Preston, was sentenced to three days in jail and fined $750 for selling a magazine showing three people simul­taneously engaged with each other in sexual activity. William Andrews, 56, was convicted on a charge of com­mercial obscenity, a misde­meanor. which had a maximum penalty of a year in jail and a $2000 fine. A Houston police vice offi­cer had purchased the $6.98 magazine last August. Montrose NeuJs: The Austin Report JANUARY 30, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 5 Integrity, eleven years old, gets tax-exempt status Integrity/Houston, the oldest gay organization in the city, will celebrate its eleventh anniversary Thursday, Feb. 19, with an open party, the organization announced. Just prior to the party, the group will hold elections for seven board positions, they said. The anniversary celebra­tion comes exactly one month after the group, tech­nically known as IIH Inc., received its notification of tax exempt status from the Internal Revenue Service, they said. Richard Burckhardt, a former officer in the organi­zation, said, " We are extremely happy with (the IRS] decision and hope that it will act as a catalyst to expand our community services." Integrity was technically a "service" organization for its first ten years but in 1980 was reorganized as an "edu­cational" corporation. Houston's gay publica­tions in 1970 listed Integrity/ Houston as the only gay organization in the city. Today, a decade and a year later, Integrity/Houston, which is not affiliated in a non-secular way with any religious group, is still listed, along with 24 other gay groups. Integrity's current major project is a community cof­feehouse Friday nights at Bering Church , 3405 Mulberry. Ashley Smith wins in District 83 election In a special election between two Republicans for state representative from District 83, which includes the River Oaks area bordering Mon­trose, moderate Ashley Smith won over conserva­tive, anti-gay candidate Steve Jones. Smith captured 55 percent of the small vote total on Saturday, Jan. 24. No Democrats had entered the race, which originally had a field of six Republicans and one Libertarian. Jones was remembered for "gay baiting" city controller Kathy Whitmire when he once ran against her in another election. During the campaigning for the state representaive position, Jones, when he addressing a gathering of the Texas Gulf Coast Conserva­tive Caucus Jan. 6, said he opposed "avowed homosex­uals" teaching in public schools Smith made no reported comments during the cam­paign in regard to gay people. The election was to fill the seat of Chase Untermeyer, who resigned to join the staff of Vice President Bush. Ogg would raise fees Common Cause complains AUSTIN-State Senator Jack Ogg, who represents Mon­trose, has introduced a bill in the Texas Legislature that would raise filing fees for judicial races in Harris County. The current filing fee is $700 but Ogg would have it raised to five percent of the judge's salary, to keep, as he put it, "the filing fee at some respectable level to insure the candidate is serious." Ogg maintains that many young lawyers run for judi­cial posts simply for the free publicity, and not seriously to win the position. Pro abortion group lists Danburg contribution AUSTIN-State Representa­tive Debra Danburg of Mon­trose received a small $200 contribution from pro abor­tion forces during her cam­paign against Republican Hap May. it was announced in January reluctantly by the pro-abortion forces, fearing retaliation by the conserva­tive Texas Legislature. "We don't want to emba­rass any legislator or cost him his job. But our job is to ensure that any person who wants to seek an abortion can get one," said Jan Friese of the Texas Abortion Rights Action League. At least seven other candi­dates received contributions from the pro-abortion forces, they announced. Several bills are now pend­ing concerning the abortion question. AUSTIN-State Representa­tive Debra Danburg of Mon­trose, a freshman Democrat, was named Tuesday, Jan. 27, in a complaint filed with the Texas Sercretary of State by Common Cause of Texas, reported the Houston Chro­nicle from its Austin bureau. Common Cause named the District 79 representative as one of seventeen candidates for the Texas House who had failed to comply with provi­sions of the state's Campaign Finance Reporting Laws, the newspaper said. The organization was reported to have asked Secretary of State George Strake to require the candi-dates to make a written explanation for failing to comply with the law. Donna Mobley, executive director of Common Cause, said Danburg had not met a Dec. 4 deadline for reporting her campaign expenditures in the Nov. 4 general election to the secretary of state's office, the newspaper said. Volunteers for Common Cause checked the records the week of Jan. 5-9, the newspaper said Ms. Mobley told them. Rene Rabb, an aide to Rep. Danburg, said the informa­tion required in the Dec. 4 report has since been filed with the Secretary of State's office. the newspaper said, adding that the campaign records were filed Jan. 15. "There appears to have been some confusion over what has happened. The information for the period in question was filed in a Jan. 15 report, which is our under­standing of what we were supposed to file as a final report. Our campaign records are on file, an.: we do very much support the idea of open and full disclosure. On all our previous reports, we itemized contributions that are far less than the amounts required by law," Ms. Rabb was quoted as saying. The Montrose Voice : Your Comunity Newspaper PAGE 6 I MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30, 1981 HAD IT WITH THE BARS? Here's an exciting way to meet new people! LAMBDA COMP A compatibility matchiri'g service owned and operated in Houston! WHAT IS LAMBDACOMP? Basically, LAMBDACOMP is a matching service with can locate those special people for whom you've been searching. HOW DOFS LAMBDACOMP WORK? If you decide to join the service, LAMBDACOMP will send you a confi­dential questionnaire in which you will state your own qualifications and those which you desire in another person. LAMBDACOMP CAN ... Help you locate those people who are honestly desiring meaningful relationships. LAMBDACOMP CANNOT ... Find you a date tonight. WE ARE NOT AN ESCORT SERVICE! MEMBERSHIP FEE just $15 for 3 months. LAMBDACOMP BUSINESS HOURS 5:00PM-lO:OOPM MONDAY-FRIDAY 9:00AM-1:00PM SATURDAYS CLOSED SUNDAY "LET LAMBDACOMP STRIKE A MATCH FOR YOU" (713) 721-5583 (1'~-nt!/ n pi cronies: a close friend, esp. of long standing) LeBar & Cafe You'll like our new after-hours menu featuring Cronies Breakfast Special 2 EGGS with HAM, BACON or SAUSAGE and your choice of beverage $295 Dine nightly 5:30-11:30 After-hours 11:30-dawn Sunday champagne brunch 12:00-5:00 1322 Westheimer 522-1521 The French Quarter Cinema presents WET SHORTS a Tora de Semmone film in its Houston premiere plus "Hot Trucking" Both rated X, in color, all-male 527-0782 3201 Louisiana • Houston A MAN'S EXPERIENCE OPEN 3PM-7 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK lli w. . trHim 2700 ALBANY HOUSTON TEXAS 520-1522 m rn BATHS SUNDAY: $1 OFF WHEN IN HARD-HAT MONDAY: $1 OFF WHEN IN WESTERN ATTIRE TUESDAY:$2 OFF WHEN IN UNIFORM WEDNESDAY: $20FF WHEN WEARING A T -SHIRT FROM ANY LOCAL GAY BUSINESS OR ORGANIZATION THURSDAY: $20FF WHEN IN LEATHER MEMBERS RECEIVE 1 FREE LOCKER PASS FOR EACH NEW MEMBER/GUEST HE BRINGS IN. FREE LOCKERS WITH ALL NEW MEMBERSHIPS. POOL CLOSED UNTIL SPRING Texas Gay News JANUARY 30, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 7 Religious affiliates plan gathering The Voice covers Montrose every week: ABILENE-Gay people affil­iated with a number of reli­gious organizations are planning to convene in this central Texas city Feb. 20 for a three-day "Input Abilene" convention. It's being billed as the first statewide assembly of gay people from religious groups. The main purpose, oganiz­ers say, is to "build a com­munication's network that will provide support, infor­mation and encouragement to both the old and the new forming relgious organiza­tions and churches in Texas." The meetings will take place at the Walnut Street Pub, a gay bar. It was announced that Houston gay activist Ray Hill, a Baptist, will deliver the keynote address and stal!e a workshop on the media. Hill is manager of KPFT radio in Houston. Other workshops an­nounced included one to cover communications between the organize tiona, oen for planning Gay Pride Week celebrations and one on developing resources. The group said it will also view the film "Gerty, Gerty, Gerty Stein is Back, Back, Back," which stars Pat Bond in a one-woman portrayal of the famous lesbian play­wright. The Church of Christ in Montrose has been actively soliciting Qther gay-related church groups in the city to join them in attending. R. Kent Naasz of the Church of Christ said costs was being "kept to a min­imum" and housing would be provided. Neighborhood News Report on the Legislature Texas Gay News National Gay News Dallas leads in killings by police ,.The Far Side and ,.Keeping Up" Montrose Directory Montrose Art Montrose Movies Newly-released figures show that Houston police killed nine people in 1980, which compares with six­teen in Dallas for the year, 22 in Chicago and 20 in Los Angeles. Dallas led the nation among major cities in per­capita killings by police officers. New York City did not immediatley have its 1980 figure available but its 1979 figure was fourteen. Dallas Police Chief Glen King says he plans to make no changes in the depart­ment's policy there on the use of firearms or the investigat­ing procedures that follow police shooting deaths, UP! reported. In each of the Dallas deaths, police in-house investigations exonerated all the officers involved. In fact, in Dallas, more than 130 killings by police have been reported since 1972 and in not a single one has a police officer been found by the department's own investigations to have . unjustifiably killed someone. Among the nine killings in Houston last year, one included gay activist Fred Paez. ' A grand jury investigation has resulted in officer Kevin McCoy being charged with a misdeamanor in Paez' killing but his arraignment was postponed in early January, this year. Comparitively speaking according to population, out of every 500,000 residents, Dallas lead the cities listed here with eight killings, Chi­cago and Los Angeles had four each, Houston had two, and New York is projected to have had just one in 1980. In January, The Civil Rights Commission, citing a "distressing increase in racially motivated violence" in 1980, urged Congress to make it easier to prosecute police who abuse authority. The commission urged that federal charges involing violent acts by police officers should be treated as felonies, not misdemeanors. Live Theater in Montrose Sizzling commentaries Special Notice: Friday ud Saturday eveaiaa. we will remaia opea later. Watch for timn next wnk In our ad. A Montrose Area Restaurant at 708 W. Alabama 528-8245 Country Style Breakfast begins at 7am Choose your best budget lunch from the Steam Table beginning at llam Relax for dinner 5pm to lOpm PAGE 8 I MONTROSE VOIGE I JANUARY 30, 1981 Saturday · Jan. 31 featurtng Randy Alan and the Double Eagle Band GRAND OPENING .. : '.' '.: ~. ·'~ .· :~::~;--:;·::;tf$~~::.:>~?::·. '.· . . . ·:" ...... -.... ·. -::·.•~.:~:.'~~-~; ·~ :'<~:~~:1::F1 . ' ~ .. ·, .. . . JANUARY 30, 1981 1 MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 9 Free Bar 7-9 Special Attraction featuring linda Petty and company After-Hours HOUSTON COUNTRY ~------------ 2700 Albany __ ..._ ______ ~--- 529-7848 --~~ Commentary PAGE 10 I MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30, 1981 Free Enterprise ByEdMutian Free enterprise, it seems, is good for everyone, the foun­dation of our capitalistic society, and the embodi­ment of the American way. That is, unless your ox is being gored by too much free enterprise. At that point, it becomes a threat to the American worker, our industrial foundations, and the profits of the particular industry in distress. Consider for a moment the automobile industry. For decades it flourished under the gospels of Alfred Sloan and Henry Ford, grinding out profits in the billions of dollars, fueled by the principle of planned obsolescence that made it almost patriotic for Ameri­can families to buy one, two or even three or more new automobiles at regular intervals. Detroit, particularly Gen­eral Motors, the largest of the Big Three by far and the leader of the industry, brainwashed us that new was good and that bigger was better, at least as far as automobiles were con­cerned. And, in the death­less words of Charlie Wilson, former chief execu­tive of GM and later Eisen­hower's Secretry of Defense, "What's good for General Motors is good for America." Those were indeed simplier times. But then the Arabs finally got smart and told the oil monopolists to take their $3.50 per barrel price for their crude and shove it. They enforced the oil embargo of 1973 to get the attention of the Big Oil boys, and cheap gasoline disappeared as fast as a businessman's morals at a convention. What the oil companies were doing to America's largest manufacturing industry with their obscene greed expressed through a quadrupling of gasoline prices was not immediately apparent. Soon, however, even the thickheaded dinosaurs at General Motors, Ford, Chrysler and American Motors woke up to a glaring fact of life: Americans wanted small , fuel­efficient, reliable automo­biles. They were unable to pay the extortion demanded at the gas pump. They expressed this wish by sendmg the percentage ot the automobiles sold in America by foreign manu­facturers up to an astound­ing 25 percent of the total. Detroit responded by spending billions of dollars doing what it should have been doing for at least the prior five years and pro­duced what the customers wanted. The reason Detroit delayed for so long was that they made more profit sell­ing large gas guzzlers. Unfortunately, however, when they did fiunally bring out the cars they had labored over for so long, there was an embarassingly inconvenient surge in Potomac Patterns: An Unwelcome but Necessary Word About the Hostages ByEdMutian In this first week of the hos­tages' freedom from their one year-plus of terror, tor­ture and illegal imprison­ment, it behooves us to reflect on the matter of our grief. As always, our grief should be proportionate to the gravity of the offense to the victims and the nation. On balance, it would seem, that America has indulged itself in a binge of melodramatic sentimen­. Ality anknown since per­haps the reaction to Charles Lindbergh's crossing of the Atlantic. First Jet us say that there is no disagreement with the basic idea of gratitude, relief and joy that is felt by every American over the release of the hostages. However, it is also true that we ehculd admit that the entire matter of the takeover of the American embassy in Tehran, Ameri­ca's response to the viola­tion of the most basic tenet of diplomacy and interna­tional Jaw, and her subse­quent handling of the impasse that resulted have been shameful and coward­ly. At the time of the return of the veterans of the war in Vietnam, America had at last acknowledged her com­plicity in a horror and a tragic crime against the peo­ple of Southeast Asia. There was no celebration in the streets, no yellow ribbons flying from buildings and trees all over the land. Our people had sent her finest young men to do shameful work, and the country had the decency to observe an ominous silence as her defeated warriors returned. please turn to page 14 interest rates. The fall of 1980 was inauspicious tim­ing for the cars that Detroit heralded as the answer to America's prayers. Further, the prices on the cars were unheard-of, average eight and nine thousand dollars. Result: Detroit is suffer­ing its worst sales slump in over twenty years. No less an authority than Paul Volcker, Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, in an appearance before a Senate committee, nailed the problem squarely, how­ever, when he stated that the real reason for the auto companies' sales difficul­ties was their pricing stra­tegy. Detroit, suffering from old and very bad habits, continued to try to wrest the last nickel of profit from their new buggies, and make up for the billions of dolars they had spent bring­ing them out, all in one model year! This was in spite of the fact that the American cars were noticeably inferior to foreign cars in quality and still higher in price than their foreign competitors. So now we hear cries from auto unions, auto manufacturers and auto parts suppliers calling for import quotas, subsidies for the auto industry, and every other boondoggle hogwash scheme that calls for the American government to reward the inefficient, the lazy and the greedy. It is noteworthy, though, that the foreign cars are not suffering a sales slump, and Chrysler, under the able direction of Lee lacocca, which has reduced auto prices, has recorded signifi­cant sales increases over 1980. General Motors and Ford, however, following their same old pattern, con­tinue to increase their prices in the face of drastic drops in their sales. Does this make any sense at all? When Chrysler lowers prices and sells more cars, and GM and Ford raise prices and sell less, doesn't that tell someone some­thing? And should poor old joe Schliemel taxpayer be required to bail GM and Ford, AMC and whoever else that insists on trying to maintain high profit price levels at the expense of sag­ging sales, out of their present dilemma? No, hell no, and ten times no. Let those who have drowned us with all this rhetoric about free enter­prise put their money where their loud mouths have been for so long. Let 's see whether free enterprise is really free or government subsidized. Montrose Art Women's Caucus for Art displays A group called Houston Women's Caucus for Art is currently staging an exhibi­tion in the gallery of the St. Thomas University art department, 3900 Yoakum in Montrose. The daily exhibition with free admission will last through Feb. 13, they said, at which time it would be shipped to Austin for an "exchange" exhibition. An Austin group, known by the name of "Women and Their Work" (which is also the title of their exhibition) will open at the St. Thomas' gallery Feb. 21, the univer­sity said. Art This Week in Montrose (Friday, Jan. 29, through Thursday, Feb. 5) Art Leape of Houaton-1853 Mootroae-523-8530 Three Dimensional World sculptures all day Friday, plus Saturday afternoon, and daily Monday-Thursday. Contemporary Aria Muaeum- 5218 Montroae Blvd.-528-3128 The New Photography in the Downstairs Gallery all day Fri­day and Saturday, plus Sunday afternoon and daily Tuesday­Thursday: Ansel Adams and the West photography exhibition in the Upstairs Gallery daily Tuesday-Thursday. Crooolo Gallery-2008 Peden- 528-2548 Vermont Landscapes {13 ways of Coping with Nature) and Ker­rville (an allegorical documen­try) by Suzanne Bloom & Ed Hill daily Friday, Saturday, Tues­day, Wednesday and Thursday. Floe Aria II Collectore Gallery-1"8 Mootroa-527- 8317 Connections: Works by Andreas Hadjialexiou daily Friday, Sat­urday, Tuesday, Wednesday snd Thursday. (Alfred C.) Gla .. ell School of Art-5101 MonlroH Student exhibition all day Fri­day plus Saturday morning and daily Monday-Thursday. Harrla Gallery-1100 Blaao­nett- 522-1118 Works by Tony Bass, daily except Monday. Uttle Esypt Eoterprlen-1t01 W. Gray-522-1505 Kathleen Packlick collages. Moody Gallery-2015-J W. Gray-528-1111 Asaorted artiits daily Friday, Saturday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Mueeum of Floe Arte-1001 Bl•aonoet-528-1381 Theoph!le-Alexandre Stein/en: Illustrator in the Library Gal­lery: Honore Daumier Prwts from the Collection in the Romansky Galleries: early Chi­nese art selections from the Asia House Rockefeller Collec­tion in the Lovett Oriental Gal­lery; and selections from the Beck collection in the Jones Gal­lery: open sll day Friday and Saturday, plus Sunday after­noon , and daily Tuesday­Thursday. R. T.'a Art Gallery-1811 Helshta Blvd.-888-0521 Poetic Reflections by Stephen Kibbe Hardin Friday and Saturday. Roblnaon Gallerlea-1200 Blaaonnet-521-8221 Show by 10 artists daily Friday, Saturday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Rotbko Cbapel-1408 Sui Roaa Mark Rothko paintings and Barnett Newman's Broken Obe­lisk sculpture. St. Thomas University Art Dept. Gallery-3900 Yoa­kum- 522-79U ext. 292 Houston Women's Caucus for Art exhibition. Wildcatter-3517 Waeh­ington- 889-5151 Oil industry-related works daily Friday, Saturday, Tues­day, Wednesday and Thursday. The Voice covers Montrose every week: Neighbor hood News Report ·on the Legislature Texas Gay News National Gay News "The Far Side" and "Keeping Up" Montrose Directory Montrose Art Montrose Movies Live Theater in Montrose Sizzling commentaries by Ed Martinez And more Montrose Theater JANUARY 30, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 11 'Jesus Christ, Superstar' Auditions Auditions for "jesus Christ, Superstar" Saturday Equinox Theater will hold auditions for Jesus Christ, Superstar in the activities building of Bering Church, 3405 Mulberry, Saturday, Jan. 31, the company announced. Equinox stages plays at its theater at 3617 VVashington but will be branching out with Jesus Christ, Superstar, doing productions at other locations. Musical director Shelly Berg will audition singers at 1:00PM and choreographer Patsy Swayze will conduct dance auditions at 3:00PM, they said. Singers should bring music for a prepared audi­tion piece (accompanist pro­vided) and dancers should bring a cassette tape for a prepared dance audition, they said. The phone number for more information is 868- 5829. The production is said to call for fifteen men and ten women, ages 18-50, singing and dancing in a broad range from classical to con­temporary. It scheduled to plav April9 through 11 at Miller Outdoor Theater. Live Theater This Week Near Montrose (Friday, Jan. 30, through Thursday, Feb. 5) (Nhla Vance) Alley Theater- 815 Tex81-228·8341 Thomas Babe's Fathers and Sons (drama] starring Alan Feinstein and Barbara Ander­son, Friday evening, Saturday afternoon and evening, Sunday afternoon and evening, and Tuesday through Thursday evenings. Chocolate Bayou Theater-1823 Lamar-758-8840 Keith MacGregor's Renovations [world premiere) Friday, Satur­day, Sunday and Thursday evenings. Comedy Workshop Cabaret aod the Comlx Aooex-1805 S. Shepherd-524-7333 Anything for o Lough Friday, Saturday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings. Culleo Audltorlum-Uol· verslty of Houaton, Calhouo St., Eotraoce 1-528·7888 Long Wharf Theater presents James Goldman's The Lion in Winter (comedy-drama) Friday evening and Noel Coward's Pri· vote Lives [comedy] Saturday afternoon and evening, Sunday afternoon and evenin&>o and Tuesday through Thursday evenings. Deooey Theater-3517 Aua­tlo- 522·7811, 529-0340 High School for the Performing and Visual Arts presents Hous­ton premiere of Jerome Kern's 1917 Leave It to Jane [musical) Friday and Saturday evenings and Sunday afternoon. Equloox Tbeatar-3817 W81h· loa--888-5828 Ronald Ribman's Cold Storage [drama) starring Michael Fletcher, joel Kenyon and Mary­belle Chaney, Friday, Saturday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings. Jooel Hall-815 Loulalaoa- 222·3415 Houston Grand Opera presents Bizet's Carmen starring Louie Otey and Marc Embree, Fri. eve­ning: The Wiz Tuesday and Wednesday. Malo Street Theater-8285 Malo-524·8708 W. Somerset Maugham's 1926 comedy The Constant Wife star­ring Shelia Mahew, Charles Tanner, Ted Luedemann and Polly Macintyre, Friday eve­ning and Saturday afternoon and evening. Staae~-708 Fraokllo-225· 8538 John van Druten's Voice of the Turtle (romantic comedy] Fri­day evening, Saturday after­noon and evening, and Sunday afternoon. Tower Theater-1201 Weal· helmer-522·2452 The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (musical comedy] Friday evening, Saturday afternoon and evening, Sunday afternoon and evening, and Tuesday through Thursday evenings. Vaudeville Thaater-301 Mllam-227-4477 Something Old Is New Again Friday, Saturday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings. Wortham Tbeatar-Uolverslty of Houatoo-749·3798 Claude Caux and the University of Houston Mime Troupe's Mime Time Toles Friday and Saturday evenings and Sunday afternoon. The Voice covers Montrose every week: Neighborhood News • Report on the Legislature • Texas Gay News • National Gay News • uThe Far Side" and uKeeping Up" • Montrose Directory • Montrose Art • Montrose Movies • Live Theater in Montrose • Sizzling commentaries by Ed Martinez • And more (CHAI'Ul1VIC 12) Getting away with a group, a friend or just by yourseU. THI HIIOHTS MIXICAN USTAuaANT Let us help. Serving the travel needs of Montrose. • • • Yoar Travel Elltpert. 52~-19~~ 3~05 Montrose Houston Oar Place 1419 Richmond/528-8905 Kaye O'Rear Harris Labowiu owner/ gen. mgr. ass't mgr . EVERY THURS., FRI. & SAT. UVE MUSIC '1USTINE" with Shannon McGuire, Susan Chessher Be Susan Hyatt. Special Guest: Kat Graham EVERY THURS., FREE BUFFET BY "HARRIS" This Thursday: Rice Be Beans served at 9pm. Band starts 8pm THE ONLY PUCE WHERE EVERYONE IS WELCOME" EVERY THURS., ALL BEER 8()( 8-12 (EXCEPT IMPORTS) To Serve You: Kaye, Julie, Shannon Be ---------­Karl Still only $2cover/ dancing, 25< pool, trapshoot, pinball, beer Be wine NIWHOUU la00am-10a30pm clally 3921 NOITH MAIN 169-1706 Breakfast-Lunch­Dinner Buy one, get one free Up to $4.50 v•lue, P'-­IMW thl1111i Columns PAGE 12 I MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30, 1981 Mr. Fix Telephone companies have emphasized tbe advan­tages of baYing phones all over tbe borne. But, wait a minute. Not everyone who calls does so by phone. Some peo­ple come to the door and ring the bell. Tbere is no way to mate tbe front door accessible to every area of the bouse. You can, however, install additional bells or cbunes so that tbey can be beard in even remote parts of tbe bouse or in tbe back­yard. It's a simple job. It's safe as well because you are working with low voltages. However, take the precau­tion of turning off tbe cur­rent while making connec­tions. Installing a new bell, buzzer or cbime involves eJ:tending wire from tbe old bell to the new. Tbe new wires are simply fastened to the terminals on tbe old bell without bothering with the original wiring. Removal of a cover plate will e:1pose tbe terminals. Use regular bell wire. Easier tban using two lengths of single conductor wire is to use a single length of wire with two conductors. Strip tbe insulation off the ends of tbe wires, bend the wires into slight books, loos­en the terminal screws, slip the wires under and tighten. EJ:tending the wires is a matter of concealment. If tbe additional bell is in the basement, run the wires down alongs•de the frame of a door or otber woodwork. Drlll a small hole in the floor and drop tbe wires throuib. If the bell is on tbe same floor, drop tbe wires down to tbe basement, bring them back up again in tbe area of tbe new bell. If the old bell is on a clos­et wall, you can conceal the wires by pulling them through tbat wall and then down to tbe basement. If the new bell is on the second floor, you will ba~·e to drill a bole in the ceiling. In this case, it is wise to run the wires along a baseboard until you reacb a closet, bring the wires through the closet wall and then Jake tbem up through tbe ceiling. If your borne has bell but­tons botb front and back witb a different sound or combination of sounds indi­cating whicb is being pushed, then you will find three terminals instead of two on the bell or chime. In this case you must run three wires instead of two to tbe new bell. And they must be connected in eJ:actly the same way. Tbe wire connectPd to the terminal marked "rear" on tbe original bell must be connected to tbe same ter­minal on the new bell. An extra bell will require more power than tbe old bell transformer can deliver. Tbe transformer steps down house current to a lower voltage required by bells and chimes. Tbe correct voltage is marked on the transformer. If in doubt, your dealer can recommend the proper size. Tbe transformer IS often located on the side of the fuseboJ: or very close to it. Two heavy wires enter it on one side. The bell w1res are fastened to the terminals on the other side. Before replacing the transformer. remove the fuse for that circuit or turn off all of the power If you are not sure wbat you are doing, call in an electncian to handle this part of the JOb (c) 198 1 Suburban Features You're Cooking One-dish meals come in many guises. One that takes advantage of the versatility of yams mcludes beef, pork, sausage links, chickpeas and onions. Anyone who com· plaiDS of bemg hungry after trying this dish is a candi­date for a p1e or spaghetll­eallng contest. Serve w1th a pineapple and cottage cheese gelatin mold LOUISIANA YAM AND BEEF DINNER 3 poullds leaa, boDeless beef cback, ~t ia 2-illcll cubes 3 tablespooas flour % tablespooas salad oil 1/ 2 potUid pork sausage liaks, nt iato 1-incb pieces Water I medi•m yams, peeled and f1Urtered I cu (28 ouces) cbickpeas, draiaed 4 carrots, peeled and quart­ered % medium onions, peeled and sliced I cup sliced celery Salt and freshly ground pep· per Place beef and flour m a bag and shake until meat IS coated Heat oil m Dutch oven or large sk•llet Add beef and brown well on all s1des Remove beef and set aside Add sausage and brown over low heat for about 12 to 15 mmutes. Return beef to Dutch oven Add water to cover S1mmer. covered for 45 mmutes Add yams and ch1ckpeas Cook 15 minutes longer. then add remaining vegetables Cook uncovered 12 to 15 mmutes longer or unt1l vegetables are tender. Season to taste with salt and pepper Turn mto servmg d1sh. Makes 6 to 8 servmgs rc·t 1981 8 \· Suburb.&n h·o~lur" Montrose Directory rb Want Ads BUSINESS OWNERS: (I( We liot lree each week (a) all business eateblith- :b~"~!w':r!~~. ib ~~~~~~'Jr," f:i~~v~~~ tisen. (cf aelect:l: other estatliahments end (d) telected special eventl. (2) We Utt free each week. in bold, larser type, infor­mation about all current dieplay adver­liaen (tboae purchaaina a minimum of 1/18th paae}. (3) Space in the directory it alto SOLD at the rate of 2~C per word f:tJoint regular type) or S8 perinch (var- 201 •:e~~!~clJ /S~o ;.~-:~~~ ~:r·~~~~ ?o~ thirteen or more conaecutive iatuea, paid In odvonce. (4) Coii529-MIIO, noon-7pm, *fo r more information. indintH MONTROSE VOICE distribu­tion point. CONCERTS ~~~~ :;:,l~~edart.!~~;.f:;;·:~~~~:l!b:; Ban" and "Nightclubs." Opera and ballet prnentationa are Hated eltewhere in thit i11ue under .. Live Theater Thl1 Week N .. r Montrose.* Jonet Hall-815 Louiliana-227-2787 Sergiu Comi11iona conduct• Houlton ~:C~~hH~~.r:~· G~::~n~:.r~u~~e~~::; Leontyne Price Sun. evening. Summit-Greenway Plaza-961-0003 Styx Thur1day evening. Voadovlllo Tloooltr-- MU .. -H7- M77 Local jazz arti1t1 Friday and Saturday night• after-houri. DATING SERVICES "A new way to meet friends." For balonutloa Mad SASE • l1to Alteraatlve Coaaec:tloaa Box 10 1713 Weethelmer Houetoa, TX 77081 CONFIDENTIAL Lambda Comp 721-$583 Let Lambdacomp strike a match for you. See our ad elsewhere in this issue. EROTICA *Adoni• Newl-1407 Richmond-523- 04114 *A•ylum Book•tore-1201 Richmond •a. II Park Book•tore-1830 W. Alabame *Diner'• Newl-240 Weltheimer-.528- 8950 *Froacb Qaartor Tboator-3211 Loalalaaa-527-e?IZ "Wet Shorts" A: "Hot Trucking" all-male double feature at the French Quarter. See our ad elsewhere this issue. ~:Te :~~i::.ciUiively, full length aii- •Studz Newl-1132 W. Alabema Gay men excluaively. M18CEU.ANIOUS EVENTS & PLACES Altrodomain-Kirby Dr at 1-810 Conexpo '81 daily Sunday-Thursdey Burke Baker Planetarium-5800 Caro· line-526-4273 -The Neor Fron11er f'ri afternoon 6 evemng, Sat. afternoon 6 evening. plua Sun. 6 Wed. afternoon• Ht,:~~!~~e'C1r~~t&~~~~~~u~::haor Joyce Brothen daily f'n a Set Summit-Greenway Plau- 961-8003 The Royal Ltplzzon Stolhona hone ahow Fnday eventnJ. Saturday after· noon and Saturday eventna EVENTS Otrr-QF-TOWN Auatin Texaa Leal•lature in 1e11ion. FLOWERS •Bloomero-3818 S. Shepherd-524· 2G37 *Friday'• Flori•t-1338 Westheimer- 524·8518 FOR SAU 8r medium double cainned eofa. Thorn, 523·11577. GAY BARS (A) Houlton Tavern Guild member indi­cation, placed in thl1 directory at their requeat. *Bebylon-300 Wettheimer-.526-6551 Gay men predominantly; di1co mu1ic by Rey Weaver; after-houn Fri. a Sat. evenlngt; T-dance a beer 1peclal Sun. w:d.1~~;.~!~:~d2~0!~1iy~r~~k~ th~~:~ evening; cover charge nightly. *Bojo'o-402 Lovett-527·9888 Ruth Ha1ting1 and Co. Fri., Sat., Tuet., Wed. a Thura. evening•. *ABarn-710 Pacific-528·9427 Gay men predominantly: buffet Sun. aft ernoon: color night a pool tourna· ment Mon. evening; margarita night Tun.; tchnappt night Wed.; ateak night Thun.: home of the Mu1tans•· *Black Boot-327 Wutheimer-.528- 7258 Gay men predominantly; leather night Tu11. *Brazoa River Bottom-2400 Brazot- 528-9192 ~:%d!"~~~~r~~~~nu~~~~~~~~. c;';.~t:l. eveninga; beer bu1t Mon. evening: pool tournament Thun. evenins: home Colt 45 Motorcycle Club. *Brier Patch-2294 W. Holcombe-665- 9878 Buffet Sun. afternoon a: Tuet. evenlns: M1dmght Bowlers SpecioJ Mon. eve· nina: pool tournament Wed. evenina. •Bunkhoult-1704 Weatheimer-520· 1818 *Chicken Ranch-53.5 Weatheimer- 522·8058 *Copa-2831 Richmond-528-2259 OiiCO nightly with Ric Harvey A David Schuller on 1ound a liahtl; 111 well drink or beer free Fri., Sat. a Sun. eve· r~n:e•;,_:~~~~~~o~h!!r~ilt ~~n~i~~;~ Ernetllne. Sabrtna Ro11 a Charhe Sun. ~~~-in:~e::~~ ~OOCI~~ b~0~n~:n6~·; with 75t well drinka: amateur imperao- ~~~1:a~i~~0=i~ue;s, ·--:~tt~r~~t~~d 2~ well drinh Wed. a Thun. evenina•: cover charae niahtly. Cove-2912 S. Shepherd-524-0170 *Different Drum-1732 Weltheimer- 528·8508 Gay men exclu1ively: dre11 code after 9pm: after·hour1 Frt. a: Sat. evening•: beer 1pecial1 Sat. a Sun. afternoon• a ~~~~;· :l~ebn~~:~Jtl~:d.~~~c~~ ~~~~i:ae~ Leathermen. UDirty Solly'o-220 Avondele-529· 7525 Beer 6 liquor bu111 Sat. 6 Sun. afternoon•. •Dogpatch 2-1213 Richmond-.528- 3838 *AExile-1011 Bell-859·0453 Country band Fri. a Sat. evening•: im£enonalion ahowa with "Little ~y~~:~:T:::.nwi~;e~:~or night Mon· •Calleon-2303 Richmond-522-7818 Gay men frredominantly;_ buffet Thura. c~~;~~,; .:::.;:~e~:!l~h·~::a1r~~e~~ Feb. 8 • Grant Street Stalion-911 Falrview- 528-8342 *Houoloa Coualry-2700 Alba­ay- 521-7148 Houston Country Grand Opening Saturday, Free Bar 7-9pm. See our ad this issue in the centerfold. ~uar~~~ a1t1!~~h:u~:r~:~ :-~~~ ~~~~t~ea- •Ju•t Manon a Lynn'l-817 Faltvlew­S28 ·il10 Cay women predomtn•ntly *Lampolt-2417 Tlmu. Blvd.-528- 8921 Gay women predominantly. *AMary'o-1022 W•tbelmer-521- 1151 Party all day, all night, Thursday, Feb. 5, at Macy's. See our ad paae elsewhere thlaluue. *AMidnlte Sun-534 Weatheimer-526- 7519 Jmpenonation 1howa Sun. A Wed. evenlnga. •Montroae Mining Co.-805 Pacific 529-7488 Gey men predominantly: beer bu1t Sun. afternoon. •Old Plantetlon-2020 Kipllna-522· 2353 ~!:,~.~~ha':ae:!'te:~!w~,:r::,e~~~d a llaht•: lmperaonation ahow Sun. eve­nine with Tiffany Jone•: Schnapp• ~!~n~~~~g,·~~:::=~e :J:!f ~oT~':rta::::: nina•: cover charge mo1t niahtl. -*O3u r Place-1411 Rlchmoad-521- Friendly, Friendly, Friendly. Our Place. See our ad eltewhere thl1 laaue. Ju•tine band f'rJ.. Set. a Thun. eve­ning; buffet Thun. evening. *Ranch-8620Y1 Main-528-8730 Country dance le11on1 Thura. evening. •Rat'• Hole-109 Tuam-528·8066 •Rocky'o-3418 W. Dallu-528·8922 Gay women exclu•lvely. •Pink Elephont-1218 Leeland-859· 0040 Gay men predominantly. •Saddle Club-911 W. o ... w-528· 9281 Live band Fri. evening; CaW dance lea­aona Tue1. evening. •Twlna-535 Weathelmer-522-6058 Gay women predominantly. *AVaatu,...N-2UJ Mala-122·1111 Gay men predominantly; Un· Porty Sun. evening; Bore Chest & Club Night Wed. Wildwood Saloon-1504 We•theimer GAY BATHS *Anaa-2700 Albaay-520-1522 The Arena: A Man's Experience. See ad paae elsewhere this Issue. Gay men excluaively, member1hip required: hard-hat niaht Sun.; weatern night Mon.; uniform niaht Tue1.: gay T-ahirt nlaht Wed.; leather night Thur1. •Club Houlton-2205 Fannin-859· 4998 Gay men exclu•ively. memberahip required. *Midtowne Spa-3100 Fannln-522- 2379 Cay men exclu1ively. *2301 Club-2301 Goao .... -521- 1235 Gay men exclualvely. memberahip required HAIR CARE Mid Town Barber Shop-602-A Fair­vlew- 529-8018 •Salondanlel- 1544 Wealheimer-520- 9327 HOMES & APARTMENTS fOR UNT • fOR SALE J. Rou Montrou ofhce- 528-5218 Far Side by Gary Larson And now, standing at my side, 1 give you the man who conquered Everest, the Ma tterhorn, Kilimanjaro ... Inside the Loop: Choice 1 A: 2 bedroom townhomes from the low 30s, covered parking, pool. CIA/H. Gary Sykes­Realtor- MLS 524-3434 KEY SHOPS IIHd'o Koy Sllops-1112 Wootbeba· w a 1121 Commoaw•ltb-123· H27 Reed's Key Shops in Montrose. LODGING *Houotoa G-t H-111 Avo•· clalo-520-1717 Houston Guest House: "Where the world meets Houston." See our ad page elsewhere this issue. MASSAGE Legitimate Professional Massaae (no sex calls, jilease) J.C., 529-7467 MOVING & HAULING SERVICES Moving, hauling, deliveries 520-7744 IN a NEAR MONTROSE STRAIGHT NIGHTCLUBS WITH UVE ENTERTAINMENT Anderson Fair-2207 Grant Folk1inger Nanci Griffith Fri. a Sat. evemng1. Birdwatcher't-907 Wutheimer-527· 0595 Scott Gertner Quartet Fri., Sat., Tuel., Wed. a Thurt. evenina•: Craia Smith Quartet with Terry Ma~on Sun. a Mon. evemnga. Cody't-3400 Montroae-522-974 7 Paul Eng lith Group Fri.. a Sat. even ina• plu1 Mon.· Thur1 evenmga. Jatmina-1512 W. Alabama Cy Brinton Fri., Sat. a Thur. evening•. L81 Britaa-814 W. Gray Saxophoni1t Tony Campi II Fri., Sat. a Tue~.-Thura. evening•: Drene Ivy a Clementine Sun. evening. Mum't-2018 Main-659-1004 Bob Hentchi!n weekday1fternoont: all­women'• jazz band Add lib with Donna Menthol Sun. evenins. Rockefeller'•-3820 Walhington-884· 8242 (lick••• 881-8925) Sam A Dave Fri., S.t. a Sun evening•: Arthur Prytock Thurt. evening ATTENTION ORGANIZATIONS The Voice il 11 cloae 11 your phone. Call ua with your organization'• new• and meet ­ana datu. 529-8490, noon-7pm ACLU-1238 W. Gray-524-5e25 ~~~n~a~:~~~~~s~:_t1h0o1~ilt Church­}~!~~~!~' a~~;:::f:~·rr?.~~:~:~~Ln~~~ Methodiet worthip tervice Sun. morn­ing; lntegrityJHoutton butineu meet­Ing Thun . evening. Black 6 White Men Toget her-529·5008. 774-3591 Church of Chrtat-520-K Wu thetmer 774·2388 Church of C hrutaan Fatth 4 13 Wu thelmer-529-8005 Won h1p servtcu Sun mornma. Sun evenmM and Wed. evenlntt: Btble 1tudy and non-dnnken meetl nJl Mon. t\if' ftlr.A JANUARY 30, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE·/ PAC 13 Su~•!,•n ~aL C~!•n!'er Sat ... ... ... 1 2 3 Selected Events through Seven Days Conexpo ' 81, a six-day exposition of construction equipment expected to attract over 100,000 people and bring $52 million to the Houston economy, bel!ins Sunday at the Astrodomain [Astrodome, Astrohall and Astro-Arena combined). Tryouts 7:00PM Monday and Tuesday evenings at Cockatoo for male singers and dancers for 28th Annual Diana Awards. Gay Political Caucus meeting Wednesday evening. t:ockatoo-3400 Travia 28th Annual Diana Awarda tryouta, Mon. 6 Tues evening1. Cona. Beth ChlamtGay Jewt-MCCR. 1919 Decatur-529·4878, 524-5180 Next aervice a 1ocial Feb. 13 Data Profeuional•-529-8631, 522-7809 Next meetlna Feb. 9 Diana Foundation 28th annual award• tryout• Mon. a Tue1. evening•. Cockatoo, 3400 Travi1. Oignlty-528-7644 Meetina Thuuday evenina. Catholic Student Center. Edgar'• Firtt Church of Sam-615 W. Drew-523-8881. 447-8499 Poetry readina• Wed. evening. Family 6 Frtend• of Gaya-MCCR. 1919 Decatur Next meeting Feb. 8. Finl Unitarian Church-5210 Fannin- 528-157t Lambda meeting Fri. evemng. Gay Joggen Atlociation-523-8788 bay Parenta-881·9149 Gay Political Caucul-4800 Main •217- 521-1000 ~i~~:~~~~-1~vening; city-wide "GPC Houaton Tavern Guild ~~~nS~~~t~e~~~~~~NExile. Mary·•· Mid-lnlelf'ilytHouaton a Community Coffeehouu-Berina Church, 3405 Mulberry-529--7014 Community Coffeehoute gathering Fri. evenmg: bu11nt11 meetma Thun. eve­nma; 11th anniver11ry party 6 board election• Feb. 19 *KPFT Rad•o- 419 Lovett Blvd.-528· 4000 W1Jde 'n Stem gay radao ahow Thurt evemng Lambda-tat Unitarian Church. 5210 Fannm MeeflnA f"n even m~r Metropolitan Community Church-1918 Oecatur- 881 ·8149 Protutant wonhip urvicet Sun. morning, Sun. even•na a Wed. evening; Mont roae Singen meeting Mon eve· nina; Span11h cla11 Thur•- evenina Montrote Civtc ClubtNeartown-BertnR Church, 1440 Ha wthorne-522·1000 Next meetinsr Feb. 24 Mont rote Counnhnw Center-iOO Lovel t 0209-529-0037 Montrou Patrol-3329 Richmond-528· 2273 JAN JAN .. .. 30 31 4 5 Selected Events Later Family and Friendo of Gays meet­ing Feb. 8. Data Profeu ionala meeting Feb. 9. Montrose Symphonic Band rehearsal at Cockatoo Feb. 10. Cong. Beth Chiam/Gay jews next service and social Feb. 13. Integrity/Houston 11th anniver­sary party and board elections Feb. 19. Gay Political Caucus city-wide "GPC Night" Feb. 21. Montrose Civic ClubtNeartown next meeting Feb. 24. Houston Livestock & Rodeo Show Feb. 27 through March 8 New Orleans' Mardi Gras March 3. San Antonio' a Fiesta climax April 25. Weatheimer Colony Arts Festival April 25-26 Mother Ruth's "Montrose Clinic on Wheels" will be at the Galleon, 2303 Richmond, next Friday, Feb. 6, to conduct free VD testa, compliments of the City of Houston Health Department. Montroae Sinaeu-MCCR, Hili Oecatur-527-1188 Meeting Mon. evenina. Montro11 Spor11 Auoctahon Bowling 865-1734, 5%2-3329 League aamet Mon. evenin •. Stadium Bowl: t1t annual lntemahonal Gay Bowlintt OrRanlutton Tournament Moy 23-25 Montro1e Sport• Allocialion Tennil- 529·2750 Meetina• Thurs. evenina. Monlrooe Symphony Band-MCCR. 1919 Decatur-527-968$11 Reheanal Feb. 10. Cockatoo. Natlonal A11oclation of Bu1ane11 Coan­cilt- 1911 Southwett fwy. •too-C Montrose Sym­phony Band Open Rehearsal Everyone welcome Feb. 10, 7:30pm, Cockatoo, 3400 Travis. Bring instruments It music stands. If you don't own an instrument, come anyway. For more iafo call Andy MiU., 527-1669 ~~a!~o~~~~~=tat--CPC. 4800 Texa1 Bay Area C.Jt-33%·3737 Meetana Thun . ........_ Texat Gay T11k F.-c:e-sz.t...JIJI Conference: V \~ .... - ~ ., Tex11 Humea . ,.... ~.:,::;. 9139 PAGE 14 I MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30, 1981 Weatbeimer Colony Arta Auociation- 808 Weatbeimer-521·0133 Weatheimer Colony Arta Feativa1 Apr. 2.5·26 PERSONALS ADVERTISING RATE in thlo oection: 25C per word per it~ue, payable in :;tvui!rce.u~n t!':nd"ro!r:/nc!~':i~U~~ ~X NUM&ERS: additional $1 for each week the ad it to run. Write out your ad on a plain piece of paper with name, addre11 end tlsnature, and MAIL TO Montroae Voice, 3520 Montrose, suite 227, Houl­ton, TX 77006. ~~~,~~~.~~ +t~: ~~:fud~:~:tg!~~ dllna {aalea tax alao included}. Box 128. 3317 Montroae, Houston, TX 71006. CWM, 30, VERSATILE. wantt to meet new people. 18-30. for aood time•. Send phone to Ad 111 c1o Montrote Voice. BWMT, BLACK • WHITE Men TOjetber. int:C~~\trnoc~~~ ~~~v:~~:!~rr::~-c!~t~ 174-3591. GWM. mid 40., well-built and endowed, G~ ::.2~Cf.~'::~~.!~: .:3~~·r::::~ drugs to abare tingle bedroom apt in Montrote. Free room to nght man. 522- 8355 7-8a.m or 16-Upm. SINCERE CHEF with tuxedo. Allow me to prepne and aerve your next important supper! Thorn. 523-6577. HOT MONTROSE MAN, 30. Gk active. Fr pauive. well built. equip&:, aeekt ~:~!~~ .. ~~~::.· ~~!:o;i~/7;~.3317 PRINTING Kwik-Kopy Printtng-3317 Montrose- 522·16116 PUBUCATIONS Inner-View-520 Wntheimer-522-9333 *MoalroM Voice--3528 Moatl'OM 1227-5211-MM The "Montrose Voice," the newspaper of Montrose. Deadline for next issue: Tues., Feb. 3, 7:00 pm. Call 529-8490 for advertising or subscriptions. Next issue to be released Fri. afternoon, Feb. 6. TWT-3223 Smith •t03-527-8tt1 ~fir:t"~ America-804~ Weatheimer- RESTAURANTS *Bar-B-Que Ranch-1525 Weatheimer- 5211-228a *Braaterie Reataurant-515 W Ala­bama- 528·6744 *Ch•palt•pec Mexlcea Ru· t•urut-IU Rlchaolld-522·2H5 Great Mexican Food in Montrose. *Croai-U22 Wntbelmer-522· 1$21 Cronies is open after the bars close. See our ad elsewhere in this issue. After-hours nightly; champagne brunch Sun. afternoons. *Gyros 1536 Weatheimer 528-4655 *House of Piea-3112 Kirby-528-3818 ~l:!. F~-==~.~~~:~~~·m ·~~ MeiD-181·1701 Great Mexican Food in the Heights. See our elsewhere this issue. *Spud-U-Like-418 Westheimer-520- 0554 *SINIDI8ble-708 W. Alebe1118 The Steamtable has a Free Coffee Bar. See our ad elsewhere this issue. *Steak ·n· Egg-4231 Montrose-528- 8135 OTHER SHOPS, STORES & SERVICES •All That Glinera laifta)-4325 Montroae-522-8976 *Bym•a'o laterloro (home faralohlaao)-tol Weotbelmer- 52 ...... 2 Hyman's Fine Furnishings, Custom Interiors. See our ad elsewhere this issue. *Deb's Ta (T-1h1rt imprinting)-520 \hatheimer-520..1304 *Downbeet Recorda-2117 Richmond- 523-11346 •Facets (gHta)-1412 Westhelmer-523· 1412 *l•z.zroom (recorda)-808 Lovett-529- 0926 *A Piece Ia TilDe (uoed clothlasl- 1401 Rich-lid Vintage Clothing. Quality Second­Hand Clothing. A Place in Time. See our ad elsewhere this issue. *Q-1 Luther (clothina a erolica)-408 Wutheimer-527·8044 *Record Rack-3108 S. Shepherd-524- 31102 •Sports Loehr (clothlng)-311 Weat­heimer- 520..8555 *Trea Chic (eyewur)-520 Westheim­er- 526-0878 *Treyman faifls)-407 Weathimer-523- 0226 *Wilde 'n' Ste1n Book Shop- 520 West­heamer- 529-7014 Excluaavely a•Y· Wallflowers C) 1981 Suburban Features SPORTS Hofheinz Pavillion-University of Houston-748-6935 Southwell Conference basketball tour­nament (women's teama) Fri. and· Sat with University of Houston and Rice; University of Houston vt. Southern Methodist (men's teams) college bas­ketball Tues. evening. Rice University Autrey Court-527-4068 Rice vs. Texas Christian colleae basket­ball (men'a teamal Sat. afternoon Stadium Bowl-8200 Braeamain-666- 2373 Montrose Sports Asaoctatlon team bowling Mon. evening Summit-Greenway Plna-961-9003 Harlem Globetrotters exhibition baa­ketbaiJ Sun. afternoon A eventng, Houston Rockets vs. Denver pro bas­ketball Tues. evenina: Rockets va Oal· las Wed. evenina. TAXI Ualtod Ceb-7511-1411 United Cab, in Montrose and throughout Houston, 24 hours. 759-1441. TRAVEL AGENCY Prestige Travel-3205 Montroae-522- 1922 TYPESETTING & GRAPHICS *Moatrooe Voice Typeoettlaa- 3520 Moatl'OM, oulte 227-521· ... 80 Fast, accurate, computerized typesetting-and printing. Small and large jobs. Potomac Patterns continued from page 10 But now this: The out­pouring of unchecked senti­mentality at the return of unjustly imprisoned per· sonnel at our embassy in Iran. They at least were innocent of any wrongdo­ing, and our country owes them its regrets, its apolo­gies for the incident, and reparation for the time spent in captivity. But all this? This orgy of celebration, this media hype that makes the television networks practically explode in coverage, analy­sis, specials, and God only knows what else? The rivers of type, including this small rivulet itself made necessary by the rest, that report, explain, weigh and gossip about the families of the victims? Is all this really proportionate to the actual matter itself? Is it not rather possible that this reaction to the long overdue release of the 52 victims is the expression of America's pent up desire to have something to cele­brate, to be glad about, to take pride in as a nation? The release of the hostages in itself is rather the ines­capable proof of America's ineptness and lack of cour­age. What a pity that this should be misconstrued and seized upon as a cause for national celebration. Amer· ica, the land of the free and the home of the brave, you've come a long way: Down. let's hope we can recover our balance and begin the long trek upward in national pride and sacri· fice that will once again make our national posture something deserving of celebration. Martinez is associote editor of the Montrose Voice. More Cooiing Comfort Less Cooling Cost I #tf! M fi freezes energy costs ,.. 1~45 a l .••.... AIR CONDITIONING 8c ~ HEATING 0 1ft Oo JUST A FEW OF OUR z ~ SATISIFIED MONTROSE -0 CUSTOMERS: 1ft VENTURE-N, MIDNITE SUN, ",., Oo oO RATS HOLE Advertise in the Montrose Voice's next week: Want Ads Personals, Help Roommates Wanted, Apartments for Items for Sale, Wanted, Rent, or name your own category. Call 529· 8490, noon-7pm, to place your ad over the phone. Or mail254 per word {or $8 per column· inch} to Montrose Voice 3520 Montrose #227, Houston, TX 77006 Montrose Movies JANUARY 30, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 15 Movies Near Montrose This Week (Friday, jan. 30, through Thursday, Feb. 5) Theater management, espe­cially the Shamrock, change films frequently. Readers are advised to call theater to con­firm showings and obtain times for films listed here. Alabama-2922 S. Shepherd- 522-5176 French Quarter-3201 Louisi­ana- 527-0782 Galleria-Loop 810 at West­heimer- 826-4011, 626-0140 Greenway-Greenway Plaza Underground-626-3339 Loew's Saks-S. Post Oak at San Felipe-827-9910 Museum of Fine Arts-1001 Bissonnet-528-1361 Rice Media Center-University Blvd. at Stockton, entrance 7, Rice University-527-4653 River Oaks-2009 W. Gray- 524-2175 Shamrock-7017 S. Main-797- 1446 Windsor-5078 Richmond- 622-2650 • Indicates movie is recom­mended by the MONTROSE VOICE. Coatlaulas, Sbowlas Dally Alligator (rated R]: around the city • La Cage aux Folies (comedy, in French with English subtitles, rated R] starring Ugo Tognazzi 8t Michel Serrault: Greenway Blood Beach (horror, rated R): Shamrock Delusion (1961 horror, rated R): Shamrock • David Lynch's Elephant Man (1980 drama, rated PG] starring john Hurt: Greenway Fear No Evil (1980 horror fan­tasy, rated R]: Shamrock Steve Shagan's The Formula (1980 drama, rated R) starring George C. Scott, Marlon Branda 8t Marthe Keller: Galleria Hanger 18 (science fiction, rated PG]: Shamrock Hot Trucking (gay erotica]: French Quarter The Incredible Shrinking Woman (comedy, rated PG] starring Lily Tomlin: Alabama Richard Donner's Inside Moves (1980, rated PG) starring john Savage, David Morse and Amy Wright: Galleria The Jazz Singer (1980 musical, rated PG] starring Neil Dia­mond, Lucy Arnez &; Laurence Olivier: Galleria Agatha Christie's Mirror Crack'd (1980 mystery, rated PG] starring Elizabeth and Kim Novak: Windsor • Nine to Five (1980 comedy. rated PG] starring Dolly Parton, Lily Tomlin &; jane Fonda: Loew's Saka • Robert Altman's Popeye (1980 musical, rated PG] starring Robin Williams &; Shelley Duvall: Shamrock • Martin Scorsese's Raging Bull (1980 drama, rated R) starring Robert De Niro: Shamrock &; Windsor Neil Simon's Seems Like Old Times (1980 comedy, rated PG) starring Chevy Chase"& Goldie Hawn: Galleria •Sidney Paitier's Stir Crazy (1980 comedy, rated R) starring Gene Wilder &; Richard Pryor: Loew's Saka Wet Shorts (gay erotica]: French Quarter The Wicker Man (rated R]: Greenway Windwalker [adventure, rated PG) starring Trevor Howard: Shamrock Friday oaly Altered States (1980, rated B.) starring William Hurt and Blair Brown: Galleria The Competition (1981, rated PG] starring Richard Dreyfuss, Amy Irving and Lee Remick: Galleria Nicholas Ray's The Lusty Men: 8:00, Museum of Fine Arts Keeping Up by William Hamilton l I \ ,_' \,,: l \\ Monda Cane: 7:30 &; 10:00, Rice Media Center • Airplane (1980, comedy]: 9:15, River Oaks Tunnelvision (comedy]: 7:30, River Oaks Saturday oaly Elliott Carter at Buffalo: 8:00 Museum of Fine Arts George Steven's Shane starring Alan Ladd &; jean Arthur: 7:30, Rice Media Center Hal Ashby's Harold and Maude (1971 comedy] starring Bud Cart and Ruth Gordon: 2:00 &; 7:00, River Oaks The Ruling Class (1972 satire] starring Peter O'Toole: 4:00 8t 9:00, River Oaks john Huston's Fat City starrring Stacy Keach &; jeff Bridges: 10:00, Rice Media Center Suaday oaly • Cecil B. DeMille The Ten Com­mandments (1958 adventure starring Charleton Heaton: 3:00 &; 7:00, River Oaks Moaday oaly Andy Warhol's Women in Revolt (1972):. 7:30, River Oaks • Andy Warh.ol's Flesh (1988) starring joe Dallesandro: 9:30, River Oaks Tunclay oaly Marjoe (1972): 7:30, River Oaks • Pumping Iron starring Arnold Schwarzenegger: 9:15, River Oaks Wedanday oaly Barbarella (1968) starring jane Fonda: 7:30, River Oaks Flesh Gordon (straight erotica]: 9:30. River Oaks Tbunday oaly Monthy Python's Jabberwocky [comedy): 7:30, River Oaks • Monty Python's Life ~f Brian (1979 comedy]: 9:30, River Oaks Robert Bresaan's Mouchette from France: 7:30, Rice Media Center -~ u Hey- bankers' faces, everybody- it's ten o'clock, the bank's open. Columns H you •-born thia week: The principles of justice and fair play are very Important to you. You like harmo­ny, too, and may have a knack for diplomacy and peacemaking. You enjoy the arts and all forms of beau­ty and are quite creative in your own field. You can get along well with almost anyone. ARIEl (:t-2114-1t): Play your cards close to your vest. Aries. Don"t tell aU you know to any­one who will listen. Avoid buy­Ing frivolous Items; save your loot lor Important goodies. Before last day. find Valentine for lots of hugs and kisses. TAURUI (4-2015-20): Week could get off to shllfy start with whispered conversations. Do keep a line open. Taurus. ·causa you're apt to h<lar from an old friend. Look lor financial news and days could c1osa with one who doesn"t know his own mind. GEMINI (5-2111-20): Those you have to deal with in authority may present a lew problems. Gem. Watch lor an erstwhile Jamb who might become a feeble-minded lion - Jots of bluster but not many brains. A special Valentine awaits by week"s end. Yippee! MOONCHILD (1-2117-22): Consolidate your position this week. Moonbaby. Send a few ideas back to your think-tank lor reappraisal. Put all the fin­Ishing touches on current proj­ects before you begin the new ones. Later. hearts and flowers. LEO (7-2311-22): Cupid has a !me. flirty week on store for you. Leo. Oh. yes. there os a bit of work. too. and you might look for someone to withdraw an offer he"s made you. Basocally. though, you·re flying high. wide. and handsome. sweet­heart! VIRGO (1-2311-22): You always get a lot of satisfaction and enjoyment from doong thongs for those you care for. And thet"o good. Virgo. because this week you"re asked to gove. and give again. Just don"t be taken advantage of. babe! Days end happily. UIIRA (1-23110.23): This week may involve a treasure hunt, Libby, as you disco-. some­times by accident, se-al super gems. Nostalgia plays a role, and you can expect a surprise along the way, too. P.S .. Venus sands all her love. SCORPIO (10-24111-22): Romance Is in th<l air for every­one this week. and lovers are in th<l spotlight. This os nothing unusual lor you. Scarp; love and romance are always at 11><1 top of your llstl Go frolic in the sugar ·n· spice, my -I SAGITTARIUS (11·23112·21): A certain amount of confusion is not only possible. Saj, but probable In week ahead. Think twice before you act. Expect game plans to change In midplay. especially home and family plans. Later. Cupid may be fickle. CAPRICORN (12·2211-1t): There's no Jaw that says you can"t change your mind, Cappy. And I doubt that any­one has chained you to your decision. Treat yourself to th<l joy of ttexlbilltyl Days Include a very spacial game of post office. AQUARIUS (1·2012-1t): Venus sits on your shoulder. Aquari. giftong you with an extra bou­quet of charm. Don"t waste It on just anybody. angel; save ot lor your lavorote lover. You JUS I can"t miss! By the way, better balance your checkbook. PISCES (2-201:t-20): Be firm, Pisces. and don 'I let yourself be budged before you"re ready. As Sam says. better not to act at all than to act prema­turety. Your week holds carts, an encore, and, of course, a lovers· rendezvous (c) 1981 Suburban Feetures Super Psychic BY DAVID HOY - My ESP continues to tell me that there will be a re-negotiation of the grain trade witll Russia and tbe Communist-block countries during late spriDg of lt81, and it will immensely bene­fit the American farmers. - I feel that soon hospi­tals will begin a ··money­back guarantee" policy on their services [including food). but excluding the doctors' services. - I predict that tbe fash­ion world will be dominated during tbe summer of Jt81 by pastel colors, with baby blue being predominant. - ESP tells me that legalized belling will be a commonplace. run-of-the­mill pastime w1th the Amer­Ican pubhc by the mld- 1980s. - I predict there will be monumental strides made in the field of medical discov­eries during the next three years; some discoveries will unravel keys to longtime mysteries, and the domino principle will result, bring­ing the answers to a myriad common ailments. I also sense that mny questions about cancer will be answer­ed within tbe next two years. Bemg able to correctly pred1ct usually functions best when th1s abihty IS ·put on the spot.· When you need help and you ask your m1nd to g1ve you the answer about some future happentng. some lost object. or where to find the best parking place. you will be amazed at the information that you will receive. Sometimes you w1ll ~-ons1der your mtuttive feel­ings to be irrelevant. but you must respect the first impresstons which come to your mind. In the long- run. you will learn that those first feelings are the most accurate ones Subsequent feelings many times are col­ored by your logical mind trying to tell your mtutllve sense that it"s all wrong. • Recently. I was called by a frantic fnend who had lost the diamond out of her rmg. She insisted that she had lost 1t while at work and was searchtng every nook and. cranny of the beauty shop My ESP sa1d that it deftmte­ly was back at ht'r home. wedged in a crevtce tn her bed, and that the bed would have to be d1smantled tn order to recover the large cluster She went home and took the bed apart partially, twice. with no success Then, she remembered I had said "dismantle,' so she took 11 completely apart. Out JUmped the beautiful diamonds. thanks to a strong ESP feeing whtch had come to me. The next tunE' you lose somethmg. use your ESP to pred1ct where rt will be found' lei 1981 SuburbWI Feetures PAGE 16 I MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30, 1981 REMEMBER THE LITTLE PIG WHO WENT TO MARKET? • .. Wee}}}}}, that's what our buyers were,. pigs. So when you see all the goodies they bought you 'II see why they went "Wheee, wheee, wheee!" all the way home. But, before you can 5e'! all those goodies, we've got to make room! That's why our sellers (they're the pigs that stayed home) have selected original oil paintings, lamps, end tables, cocktail tables, dining tables, dining chairs, upholstered chairs, sofas and noor samples for our Winter Clearance Sale. The sale begins Sunday, February I, Noon.{j and con­tinues Tuesday and Thursday nights, February 3 and 5, from 6 to 9. Don't be the little piggy who had none! fine furnishings for purely personal tastes. 10-6 Monday-Saturday (Plus Salt Hours ThJS Wttk) 608 Westheimer, Houston, Texas AMPLE FREE PARKING 529-8002
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