Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 326-A, January 20, 1987
File 005
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 326-A, January 20, 1987 - File 005. 1987-01-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/117/show/112.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-01-20). Montrose Voice, No. 326-A, January 20, 1987 - File 005. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/117/show/112

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 326-A, January 20, 1987 - File 005, 1987-01-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/117/show/112.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 326-A, January 20, 1987
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 20, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript 4 MONTROSE VOICE/JANUARY 20, 1987 Federal Panel Recommends Licensing AIDS Drug By Celia Hooper United Press International WASHINGTON-A federal panel has recommended a new AIDS-fighting drug be approved for some patients with the fatal disease, but the chairman says it may amount to "a genie" let out ofthe bottle too soon. The Food and Drug Administration panel voted 10-1 Friday, Jan 16, to recommend approval of the drug for limited prescription sale to AIDS patients who have a certain type of pneumonia and to patients with an advanced AIDS-like condition. The recommendation was made after the panel reviewed the results of limited testing of the drug azidothymidine by its manufacturer, Burroughs-Wellcome Co. The recommendation now goes to FDA Commissioner Frank Young for preliminary approval. The panel chairman. Dr. Itzhak Brook, professor of pediatrics and surgery at the Uniformed Service University of Health Sciences, cast the lone dissenting vote, saying it was too early to recommend approval. "AZT may be a genie that we're letting out of the bottle after too little data," he said. But the committee concluded, "The controlled clinical trial sponsored by Burroughs-Wellcome demonstrates AZT's ability to prolong the short-term survival of AIDS patients with recently diagnosed Pneumocystis carnii pneumonia and certain advanced patients with AIDS-related complex." In its test, the company gave 145 patients the drug and 137 received a dummy drug. One AZT patient died, as opposed to 19 on the placebo. In addition to lowering the death rates of the study's patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, AZT reduced infections and improved nerve and brain functioning in some patients. When the study ended, the government allowed the company to expand experimental use of AZT. More than 3000 of the 13,000 Americans who have AIDS are currently receiving the drug free of charge. Despite the results, the panel said it had a number of reservations about AZT. The drug has serious side effects, including anemia and supression of bone marrow production of some types of cells. Members of the panel said researchers had not studied the side effects sufficiently and said they lacked information on the long-term toxicity of the drug, the best dosage, the interactions of AZT and other drugs prescribed to AIDS patients, how long the drug is effective and exactly which AIDS patients will benefit from taking the drug. Panel members said they were concerned that increased availability ofthe drug would lead doctors to prescribe AZT for AIDS patients for whom the drug had risks but no known benefits. Brook said approval ofthe drug would deter researchers from collecting new information. "If we approve AZT today, it may limit collection of new data. If we wait, there will be more data and we can be more sure that we're prescribing it for the right patients." Dr. David Barry, Burroughs- Wellcome's vice president for research, said the company was committed to continued research and tightly controlled distribution of the drug. Barry said experimental prescription of the drug is "a tremendous burden to the FDA, physicians and patients. The paperwork is staggering and the delays significant," adding the company has spent $80 million producing and testing AZT. The panel's recommendation does not guarantee AZT will go on the market. STRIVING FOR POSITIVE CHANGE... is a process of growth Dea! with persona* problems withm a c-snng DR NICHOLAS EDO, PsyD. Psychologist Btalock Professional Bldg. 8320 Weslview. Suite* 445-5QS5- Houtfon 77055 Enhance personal growth with professional support 2HMUG Zip Please make check or money order payable to CHRISTMAS CRITTERS 1318 Nance Street Houslon, Texas 77002 Surgeon Gen.: AIDS Research Not Hurt by Budget Cuts By Elaine S. Povich United Press International WASHINGTON (UPI)-The nation's two top doctors are insisting to skeptical senators that proposed federal budget cuts in scientific research and delays in hundreds of research grants will not hurt the war on AIDS. In his fiscal 1988 budget, President Reagan recommended increasing funds by 28 percent for AIDS research and education, but called for a one-year postponement of 700 basic medical research grants at the National Institutes of Health to save $325 million. "It's not going to affect AIDS," Surgeon General C. Everett Koop told reporters following a hearing Thursday, Jan. 15, by the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee on acquired immune deficiency syndrome. "The cutbacks we will be asking Congress for this spring are postponing decisions on 700 new grants," said Robert Windom, head of the public health service. "All the present research will continue." But Committee Chairman Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., said the tactic of cutting back on basic medical research while increasing funding for AIDS is "robbing Peter to pay Paul." Sen. Lowell Weicker, R-Conn.. noting that one treatment for genital herpes came out of dental research, said, "We don't know where the breakthroughs are going to come from. We can't abandon basic research. Especially with something as flaky as AIDS." Koop's report on AIDS, released in the fall, predicted there will have been 270,000 cases ofthe incurable disease in the Untied States by 1991 and that 179,000 victims will have died. Koop said Thursday the risk for infection is increasing dramatically and the public, especially teenagers, needs more information on how to protect itself. AIDS is spread by sexual contact and can affect anyone, he said. He recommended limited sexual partners, using condoms and avoiding sex with intravenous drug users. The hearing set the stage for what is expected to be an effort by the new Democratic-led Congress to add money to federal programs on AIDS research and other scientific programs. Kennedy has already said AIDS is among his top five issues for the year. Sen. Paul Simon, D-Ill., said he hoped that the administration's plan to increase funds for AIDS research would not mean a "pull-back on cystic fibrosis, cancer, and arthritis" research. Koop stressed his reports show AIDS cannot be contracted by casual nonsexual contact. You don't get it from using the same towels, by sharing the same bed, by using the same telephone or even the same toothbrush," he said, adding that there is still a lot of misunderstanding about the disease. &Sfc
File Name uhlib_22329406_n326a_004.jpg