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Montrose Voice, No. 284, April 4, 1986
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Montrose Voice, No. 284, April 4, 1986 - File 001. 1986-04-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1163/show/1138.

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(1986-04-04). Montrose Voice, No. 284, April 4, 1986 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1163/show/1138

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 284, April 4, 1986 - File 001, 1986-04-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1163/show/1138.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 284, April 4, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date April 4, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Are You 'Clothes Conscious'? ~~:~e Dozens Sought the Blessing of the Gay Group This Time mnfllrose GPC Endorses Many, and Varied, Candidates VOICE By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Some 25 candidates for state and local posi­tions received the endorsement of the Hous­ton Gay Political Caucus at a meeting held Wednesday, April 2. continued inside 'The ~ewspaper of Mon~rosi:" _ Fr~ay._April 4, 1986 Issue 284 (713) 529-8490 Atlanta's Pharr Library captured last weekend's Lone Star Classic in Houston. Photo feature, inside Politicans, Bar Owners and a bunny rabbit were on hand at last week's First Annual GPC Pet-a-Rama and Bonnet Contest. Photos inside. String of Nightclub Robberies Continue in Montrose By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter As the Houston Police Department continues the search for the murderer of Marion Pantzer, owner of"Just" Marion and Lynn's, several other local clubs have been robbed under circumstances similiar to those at Pantzer's club. During the past weekend two clubs were entered. At one, a robbery occurred and, in a separate incident, a security guard's gun was taken. Police believe it could be the same men who have robbed other clubs including the attempted robbery at "Just" Mar­ion and Lynn's. Sgt. R.L. Maxey said the robberies have much in common. "It seems to be the same fellows althou~h the suspects are no longer wearing ski masks as they did, ' he said. "There are just too many coincidences," he added. He also pointed out that witnesses in several cases have seen a red four-door foreign automobile used by the suspects to flee the scene. continued inside Nearly $2,000 Raised Donations Needed for Pantzer Reward Fund By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Since it was formed on March 18, members of the Marion Pantzer R-eward Fund Committee of the Houston Organiza­tion of Bar Owners (HOBO) have collected $1,950 from local businesses and individuals. However, the amount falls short of the $5,000 needed to post the reward. continued inside 2 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 4. 1986 611 Softball Hamburgers Come and Meet the 61 l's Softball Team with Hamburgers Starting at 3PM SUNDAY! 13 CONTINUOUS HAPPY HOURS DAILY 7 AM-8PM STIFF DRINKS ICE COLD BEER HOT MEN ALWAYS: 50¢ DRAFT BEER 13. Adams~ Ltd. Customer Appreciation Mondays 19 Hours Hapliy Hour Al Day All Night Bloody Marys & Screwdrivers 75¢ 7am-2pm Mon.-Fri. 611 Hyde Park 528-9079 The ffiontrose Uoice announces a new Public Affairs Column 'i\sk Citl) Hall'' 'Bl) Houston CitlJ Councilman Qeorqe Qreanias Ever had a problem with Citq Hal]? Anq citq service? Perhaps qou"re just curious about some aspect of ourc1tq government or the services it is required to perform for its citizens (streets. police garbage. health, utilitq regulation. or even the zoo) Councilman Greanias will answer qour questions. address qour concerns, or help qou get around Citq Hall ·red tape·· Write "Ask Cilq Hall," c/ o ffiontrose Voice , 408 Avondale, Houston, TX '17006 (ljour question will be answered in the ffiontrose Voice. Confidenlialilq can be maintained if desired. On personal issues, Councilman qreanias will provide a personal answer.) Starting in march in the Ilewspap~r of rn·ontrose APRIL 4, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 3 Nearly $2,000 Raised Donations Needed for Pantzer Reward Fund By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Since it was formed on March 18, members of the Marion Pantzer Reward Fund Com­mittee of the Houston Organization of Bar Owners (HOBO) have collected $1,950 from local businesses and individuals. However, the amount falls short of the $5,000 needed to post the reward. Legally, the fundmustdeposittheentire $5,000 in a bank account before the reward can be offered, according to HOBO presi­dent Alan Pierce. The reward will be offered for informa­tion leading to the arrest and conviction of the person who murdered Pantzer at her club, "Just" Marion and Lynn's, on Tues· day, March 11about12:50 am., during an apparent. robbery attempl Pantzer, who was sitting at the bar when the ski-masked suspect entered, was shot with a .38 caliber handgun after she pulled her own gun and fired once, accord ing to the police report. At the HOBO meeting the following day, Pierce expressed "outrage" over the murder and the attempted robbery. "Sev· eral of you have been robbed recently," he told the group. "And now we have a death. Something has got to be done before we have more trouble of this type," he added. The committee formed to establish the Marion Pantzer Reward Fund was appointed at that meeting. To raise the montrose VOICE AJ\10 TEXAS•'-'TAA MONTROSE. TEXAS PoP\jllhO<l fest 1965) 32.000 Cen1u1tracta10101. -401 02 40201 102 02. I~ 02 '°3 and •Oot 01 Z•P codes (roughly) 77006. 77019 (por110n), 77098 Bounded troughlyl Shepherd Or /we.ti Allen P1rkwly inotlh) Mam SI fNSO US 59 {IOU1h) ll!•lude !Montrose Blvd II WMlhe1mer Rd I 29' 4'' 13 N 1-ong•tude 15" 22'50'W Attotl.lde 10' ELECTED OFFICIALS FOA MONTROSE 090fQe G••nln. Howton Crtv Council ldl$t Cl 9()1 Bagby 111J! '2169J:l El Franco l• Haml County Commt.i<>Nr 1pc:1 1) 1001Pr•don.11'3/211 .,,, W1119r Ran•ln. Con11aoie rpct t) JOI S.,, J«lllla. (113! 121 S?OO Jolbra Oanburg_ ,.., .... ~ ot Rap...,-,tab•ff fd•SI 137• IO!IS.W F .. y 1113)'10-IOOI Cr-.g Wnh1"01on Ta•n Senate 10..1 13' nr.IC..rotll'M. (113! eff.4J.13 M•tkiry 1-lle'ld US Ho~ of Repr-111••• (dill 11) Ulr8 Snilfh a8'Q 1113! 13SH3~ The Newspaper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 284th ISSUE. APRIL 4. 1986 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-6490 Contents copyright 1986 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClur9-P11bli4hfH·ed1tor Linda Wych&m•nagmp editor Connie WoodS'news Pete Diamond news David Roumfort.f)'Oducl1on Seen Cutsinger. 8111 O'Rourk&r""1t> .. , Steve Warren 1111/ollM co,,Nf>Ol'td.,.,I ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Hous1on (713) 529-8490 Elsewhere T ekas (800) 222-1537 EXT 995220 Elsewhere US (800) 22S-.0227 EXT 995220 Jerry Mulholland.ctv1r11s"'fl d"ector Karen Myrow 1ceoun11111eu11 ... 1 FoundintJ MemtHlrt Greater Montrose Bull~ Guild.· G1y and Lesbian Presa A11oc·1at1on Nf!w Service Pac•l1c N..-ws Ser.o•ce POSTMASTER Send 1ddr•• correct1on1 to I08 A ... ond•••. HOvtton. TX 77oo&-3028 SubscrJp/1on r1111 in US !II :SHled 1nve1ape $19 per yur (52 ;ui.tff) $29per1111;mon1t11(261uunJ.orS125perweek{leu """ 26 ••uf'S) Back IUU9I S2 00 Mctl Nattonal tKIVltl<llnfl r1pru1nl1/NI Jot1 015.at>lllO. R1votfH1 .. I M,.rkelu'OQ '566 61h Avmiu .. Ntow YOftl. 10011 (212) 211-tie63 ~d"'l,.mg ~lilll Wtldnelday 5 30pm. lor lnue releHed f•lday~;ng Notice to 1Uv1rl1Mfl 1.ocaJ1dv1rtlsing rmte w:fledule Ei(IM A w b9 lll61Cl•v1 Apr 11 1986 RNpon11bil1ry Th9 Montroe.e Voice doel not IUU-rfff>On• .. b'l ly for 1'1Vethlmg Cla•mt Aeedert ahoukl ad>oo•se lhe ,,..... .. Paper to any ~·~e 111:tvert•1111g $5,000 reward, Pierce suggested that busi· nesses in the area contribute $100 each or as much as they could afford. Members of the committee including Pierce, Charles Armstrong, Ted Lenze, Ron Sioux and Terry Flood, have been contacting area businesses and clubs for contributions. Individuals may also con­tribute to the fund. "The Marion Pantzer Reward is not just for the arrest and conviction of Marion's murderer," Flood, manager of The 611, said. "It is more than that. It's for all the businesses and individuals who have been robbed, mugged or buglarized in the Mont­rose area," he added. "It seems that the same people are 'hit· ting' each of the bars, and it is time to find those guys," he continued referring to the recent robberies in the area including the one Saturday night, March 29, at Outlaws at 1419 Richmond Avenue. "Basically, we are trying to clean up the neighborhood. We want people to go out and enjoy themselves without worrying about problems or violence," he added. Flood went on to say that it is important for people who have been mugged or robbed to contact the Houston Police Department when the incident occurs. 04People must report it to the police so that they are aware of how much violence there is in the Montrose area," he explained. "The police at the neighborhood center have really been nice and helpful, but they need to know what is happening in our neighborhood," he continued. "The police have been most cooperative during the recent events, but individuals must con­tact them when anything happens." Flood pointed out that the reward fund is a meaningful step toward ending the robberies and violence in Montrose. Flood and 611 owner Steve Shimer are among the list of robbery victims during recent months. Other clubs which have been robbed include the Outlaws, Venture-N, Briar Patch, and Lola's. Contributors to the reward fund thus far include: Union Jack, Exile, This Week in Texas, Westheimer Cafe, Chutes, Brazos -·lSUT lo+l ~ 'M. $ If 'M.'~ &ltlG INF\Llw..TB> '5'f \Aion\E fm'\.f.? T STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AIDS.KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON FRI 8.30AM 5 PM SAME DAY APPOINTMENT River Bottom, We Deliver Videos, The Barn, Cousins, Heaven, Appearances, and Bear's, all contributing $100 each. Mary's donated $500 to the fund with The 611 giving $250, Walter Strickler, $50, and Tom Beck, $10. "We don't care how much anyone donates," Flood said. "We appreciate any amount donated. Donations are tax deductible," he added. He also pointed out that the local bartenders have been con­tacted. "We want to thank all the bartend­ers who have contributed and hope that others will also contribute," he added. Anyone interested in donating to the reward fund can do so by contacting Flood at the 611, 528·9079; Alan Pierce at the Brazos River Bottom, 528-9192; Charles Armstrong at Heaven, 521-0107; This Week in Texas, 527-9111; or the Montrose Voice, 529-8490. "It's important that we act quickly to get this reward established,'' Pierce said. "We need it now so that we can offer the reward and find the suspects involved in this murder and the robberies." JEAN-MICHEL JARRE RENDE VOUS Saturday. April 5. 8pm MON:°, WED • FRiTVENINGS AND SATURDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY Twelve Oaks Tower 4126 Southwest Frwy #1000 Houston, TX 77027 621·7771 w = :E ENJOY HOUSTON FESTIVAL-86 1901 Taft (at Webster) 524-8601 4 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 4. 1986 Dozens Sought the Blessing of the Gay Group This Time GPC Endorses Many, and Varied, Candidates By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Some 25 candidates for state and local positions received the endorsement of the Houston Gay Political Caucus at a meet­ing held Wednesday, April 2 .. I have been screening candidates for nine years," Ray Hill, chairman of the screening committee said. "I have even screened candidates like Mickey Leland in the car on the way to the airport. "But this has been one of the most intense and thorough screenings we have ever had." Hill went on to say The candidates who spoke to the GPC agreed. Several candidates referred to the screening as the most "'intelligent," "com­prehensive." and "worthwhile" screening they had encountered during their candid­acies. GPC President Annise Parker acknowl edged the screening committee and members who participated. "We had an excellent group of screeners this year,'' she said. Hill added that one of the reasons he felt the screenmg was so successful was that many of the screeners were new to the process. As each candidate seeking an endorse­ment spoke their allotted time, Parker said, "I hope the candidates don't feel this is a cattle call. It's an opportunity for members to put faces with the names of the candidates." Candidates who were not only endorsed, but received the vote of special support, were Doug Warne. candidate for 309th Family Court Judge; Sheila Jackson Lee, Probate Court No. 4 judge; and John Pou· land. state railroad commissioner. These candidates will have GPC volunteers working for them individually. Hanna Chow was endorsed and received the special supJX>rt for County General Court No. 5. However, Ctiow was the only candidate who was not recom­mended by the screening committee. In a vote of) I to two, the committee recom· mended Sam Alfano for the position , The general caucus overruled the committee, thus endorsing Chow. Following the vote involving Alfano and Chow, one angry GPC board member left the meeting but later returned. The caucus did not endorse any candi dates for governor, state treasurer, state senator, state Supreme Court No. 4, 308th Civil Court, County Criminal Court No. 3. County Clerk, and County Surveyor. How· ever, Parker said that some of these state­wide candidates will be endorsed at the next regular GPC meeting. Receiving GPC endorsements at the state level were Gary Mauro, land commis­sioner; Jim Hightower, agriculture com­missioner; John Pouland, railroad commissioner; Rusty Duncan, Court of Criminal Appeals No. I; Gaston Leland, state representative for District 142, and Larry Evans, state representative for Dis· trict 147. Judicial candidates endorsed included Jay Burnett, 183rd Criminal Court; Reu­ben Guerrero, 180th Criminal Court; Leo-nard Roth, 184th Criminal Court; Lupe Salinas, !&5th Criminal Court; Rank 0. White, 295th Civil Court; Doug Warne, 309th Family Court; Juanita Jeyes, 314th Family District Court; Eugene Goldgar, County Court of Law No. 2; and Carolyn Day Hobson, County Court of Law No. 3: . County criminal 'court judicial candi dates endorsed were Hanna Chow, court No. 5; Bob Musslewhite, court No. 6; Al Leal, court.No. 9; Dennis Craggs, court No. 'I. and Angel Grega, court No. 14. Sheila Jackson Lee was endorsed for Probate Court No. 4 and Nikki Van Hight· ower for County Treasurer. Larry Wayne received the endorsementforJusticeofthe Peace No. 1 and Larry Vasselka for Harris County Democratic Party chairperson. Parker reminded the members that the regular GPC meetings would be held at Holiday Inn, South Main at Blodgett. She also invited the members to visit the new GPC office at 900 Lovett. The regular busi ness meeting will be held Wednesday, April 16 at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz How Clothes Conscious Are You? By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. Nru•a America Syndicate $ptt1al to the Montrose Voice Do you recall the la8t time you felt really good over a compliment about your clothes? Clothing does influence our behavior, and the importance we attach to what we wear varies with each of us. Associate Professor of Marketing Michael Solomon of New York University, an expert on the subject, says that what we wear not only influences our self-attitudes, but also how others perceive us. studies that male job applicants in infor· ma) dress (slacks, polo shorts, etc.) did not have as high an opinion of themselves as those more fonnally attired. The latter group (who wore suits, ties, etc.) ca11_1e ~:rnt ahead on a number of character1sttcs. They were noticeably more assertive, con· !idently drew closer to the interviewer, used more assertive speech and asked for higher salaries than their informally clad peers. Conclusion; practical utility of "dress for sucef>As'' was achieved. Associate Professor of Marketing Michael Solomon of New York University, an expert on the subject, says that what we wear not only influences our self· attitudes, but also how others perceive us. His studies show that clothes have a Ian · guage all their own and they are a cue to proper role behavior Some obvious example8 he in occupa· tions which give us a script for our ~ havior-a policeman's blue cap, a clergyman's rollar, an executive's three­piece suit, a nul1'e's white jacket-each article of apparel is associated with a par· ticular person who's expected to act in a certain way. To find out how clothes conscious you are. i.e., how much emphasis you place on clothes for succesi; m the things you do, answer the items on a scale of 1 to 3. 1- Disagree; 2-Agree: 3-Agree strongly. They are adapted from tests developed by Or. Solomon involving thousands of sub­jects. 1 What you wear sets your mood for the day . 2. Your decision about what to wear is influenced by who you expect to encounter during the day . 3. You experience a psychological lift when you buy clothes 4. You would fef'I self.conscious if you were dressed inappropriately for some occasion 5. You deliberately change your clothes in order to boost your morale. 6. It's import.ant to be dressed in the latest styles. 7. You believe that what you wear strongly influences others' impressions of you THE BEST Ll'ITLE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASO;\ABLE NIGHTIY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVATE BATIIS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 i 118 URSULINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 8. You would feel uncomfortable if you met someone at a party who wore the same outfit as you o Explanation Clothes are a powerful source of informa­tion for self-definition. A judge wraps him· self in his robes. He realizes that he is exp('('ted to exhibit very proper behavior A soldier's crisply·pressed, standard uni­form reminds him that he is a member of a well-disciplined fighting team, etc. This ••apparel dialect" also permits others to clasi;ify our personality and anticipate our behavior. Thus, Dr. Solomon believes in dress codes at work, play, school, etc., because they define rules of conduct and behavior. Literally clothes make (or break) a man or woman. Solomon found in one of his Jn this vein, sociologist G.P. Stone sue· cinctly put it: "As the self is dressed, it is simultaneously addresed." o Score Total your points. Prl3 points-You are oblivious to your clothes and the impact they might have on you or those you meet. 14·19 points-You are average. You pay enough attention to your appearance as is necessary to be acceptable to others. 20·24 points-You have high clothes corlsciousness. You rely on your wardrobe to enhance your image before others. No matter what your score, the wisdom of Solomon advises: "Be aware of the Golden Rule of Dress: Look as you want to be treated." Losing out on the Battle of the Bug? Call RE5ULT5 Pest Control & Sanitation and Win the War 223-4000 Lorena Mclaughlin-owner/operator TXPCL #6155 ~11 ~£nwrhnn WILLIAM THOMPSON William Kenneth Thompson, 28, died March 27. 1986. Preceded 1n death by father, Wil­liam Dunlop Thompson and brother, Dion Kevin Thompson. Beloved son of Eileen and Jackson Waller of Spring; grandmoth­ers. Nellie Gibbons and Maisie Thompson, both of Brooklyn, N.Y.; numerous aunts, uncles and cousins. Mass of Christ ian Bur­ial was held Monday, March 31, 1986, at Christ The Good Shepherd Catholic Church. In heu of usual remembrances, those desiring may contnbute to the KS AIDS Foundation, 3317 Montrose, Box 1155, Houston, Texas 77006 OuA POU CY The Moritrose '"v°'~ :ii commemorate ;t;; pau.ng ot MQntroae r99•dents •nd Houston gay community nwmbers with #I announoement Frl&ndl or, ... ,,_ ol the dec•slld may proYtcle us w•th facts about the penon·s It!•. "-"- ol the cloaftl Wt"ll•'iOfS. and bur,.I 1rr1ng......,ts Proee or ¥9'H can be included Ptctur• are apprec:,.led •nd w•H be retur"'9d AUTO REPAIR & BODY SHOP FREE ESTIMATES FRAME STRAIGHTENING INSURANCE CLAIMS ALL MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL REPAIRS 2001 HAROLD HOUSTON, TX 77098 NICK FACTORY TRAINED BRITISH LEYLAND MECHANIC 522-5255 KEN 20 YEARS BODYWORK EXPERIENCE 526 -1 9~ 0 Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily HAIR LOSS? Disappointed in Minoxidil and New Generation? :/ Let us Introduce you to a new herbal shampoo and conditioner called DERMAFOLEX'" This European product contains safe herbal ingredients which stop hair loss and helps promote hair growth We further guarantee your satisfac­tion or Refund Your Money1 This 11 • Limited Offering ORDER TODAY Texas 1-800-442-4799 EXT 875 USA 1-8=00-752-70 01 EXT 875 :a:: "Kiss of the Spider woman" has arrived early and Is In the store!! SPECIAL **SPECIAL **SPECIAL **SPECIAL With every movie rented from April 4 through April 12, show your receipt and receive a 10% discount on any item In Mad Elegance (You know that neat card/gift shop next door to Mad Video). This special lasts only from Friday, April 4, through saturday, April 12 SO, If you've been lust­ing over something at Mad Elegance, rent a movie at Mad Video and receive 10%off that desired-fer item at Mad Ele­gance. Offer is only good for one Item per movie rented and does not include merchandise already on sale. PLUS: • Free popcorn with movie rental • Every Mcmday two-for-one movies • Plenty of free parking along with other unique shops to browse In • Keep your receipts and received 1 free movie rental after every 5th paid movie rental APRIL 4, 1986 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 IR1®wow®0 IR1®wow®0 IR1®wow®0 !R1®wow®0 Revival Evangelist: Rev. Samuel Kader & Robert Shisler MCC, Dayton, Ohio Every Night Beginning: Sunday April 6, 1986 6:30 P.M. Weeknights: 7:30 P.M. Community Gospel Church The Pentecostal Family of Montrose 3207 Montrose Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 521-0511 Ronnie Pigg, Pastor Sunday Morning Worship: 11:00 A.M. Sunday Evening Praise Service: 6:30 P.M. Thursday Evening Service: 7:30 P.M. God Loves You Just As You Are IR1 )~ 1~ r IR11 ,~~ut©JO IR1®\V/U\Vlfi.11 IR1®\V/0\Vl®0 6 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 4. 1986 Neighborhood String of Nightclub Robberies Continue In Montrose By Connie Woods Montrou Voice Staff Reporter AB the Houston Po1ice Department con­tinues the search for the murderer of Mar­ion Pantzer, owner of "Just" Marion and Lynn's. several other local clubs have been robbed under circumstances similiar to those at Pantzer's club. During the past weekend two dubs were entered. At one, a robbery occurred and. in a separate incident, a security guard's gun was taken. Police believe it could be the same men who have robbed other dubs incJuding the attempted robbery at "Just" Marion and Lynn's. Sgt. R.L Maxey said the robberies have much in common. "It seems to be the same fellows although the suspects are no longer wearing ski masks as they did," he said. "There are just too many coinciden· eet1," he added. He also pointed out that witnes&es in several cases have seen a red four-door foreign automobile used by the suspects to flee the scene. According to Outlaws owner Bill Was­sow. two black males entered his club on Richmond Avenue Saturday night between 11:30 p.m. and 12:00 midnight. Demanding that the customers lie on the floor. oneofthesuspectsdemanded money from the bartender while the other guarded the two. Witneesea have said that two other SUH· pect.s waited in the car parked in the park· ing lot during the robbery. Was80w was sitting in his office when he heard a gun shot. He said he imme­diately dialed the 911 emergency number to summon the police. He had to make three calls before the police finally arrived . ''The dispatcher I talked with the second time wanted a description of the sus­pects," he said. "I told her I wasn't going to walk out during a robbery to get a des­cription." Police records do show the three phone calls and the first stated "a robbery in progre!l.s." Wa!l.SOW Raid it was approximately 30 minutes before the police arrived. "The suspects had already left, but we feel the police got good descriptions from our cus­tomers who saw them." he added. The police detectives went to the club Tuesday to remove a bullet fired at the ceiling during the robbery. However, Sgt. Maxey said the bullet fragmented and they were unable to match the bullet with the one found in Pantzer's lxxiy. The robbery was the fiah for the Out­laws. Wassow, who also owns The Hole on Tuam, has been at his present location for six years. During his 18 years in the club business he said he had never been in a situation such as the current one. "I have had robberies before," he said, "but never like this." In recent months. ROme 25 to 30 robber· ief! or attempted robberiet> have occurred in the Montrose area. Steve Shimer.owner of the 611 Club, told of his recent robbery. "Terry !Flood) and I were in the office when a black male walked up the stairs with a gun pointed at us," he explained "He was there before Terry could even close the door,•• Shimer also pointed out that it was a Sunday night between 8:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. after a big weekend. "The suspect knew the layout of the club and where we were," he added. Each of the club owners who have been "hit" said that the suspects knew the layout of each club. "They know exactly where the cash registers are located and where the money is kept," Wassow explained. Earlier Saturday night before the robbery at the Outlaws, a black male entered the Briar Patch on Holcombe Blvd. where he held the security guard at gunpoint with a shotgun while he demanded the guard's gun. Diane Stal· lings, a bartender at the Briar Patch, said the guard was then thrown behind the bar. No money was taken. Immediately following the robbery at the Outlaws, "Just" Marion and Lynn's received a call to alert them to what had occurred. Pat Hall, co-owner of the club, said they were on the street immediately with a security guard. "You just nevrr know if they (the robbery suspects) will double back on Richmond. ~he pointed out the need for the club owners to notify each other after an inci dent. "The bar owners need to stay in close contact. They must stick together and call immediately if something happens," she explained. ''These guys are crazy," Wassow said. .. They walked into the bar on a Saturday night with a big crowd of customers in there. The pattRrn in the past has been to 'hit' a bar Monday, Tuesday or Wednes· day night around I :00 a.m. or just before 2:00 a.m. ," he explained. "My concern is toward my customers," he said. "I owe this type of consideration to my customers-we must take action against this violence. I surely don't want any of my customers getting hurt. If we don't do something people are going to revert to the privacy of their homes and stop going to clubs. We certainly don't want that to happen," he continued. In addition to the robbery at the Out­laws, other clubs have been victims of rob­beries or robbery attempts. They include E/ J's on Richmond, the Briar Patch, Lola'• on Grant, the 611 Club on Hyde Park, and the Venture-N on Main St. Wessow has made a direct written appeal to Mayor Kathy Whitmire and City Councilman George Greanias asking for additional police supp<>rt in the area. He pointed out in the letter the need for better police protection and a shortened response time. Although a witness wrote down a license plate number on the car used in the Outlaws robbery, police detectives said the number could not be traced. Sgt. Maxey said the person may have copied the number incorrectly . Several of the club owners also pointed out that before a robbery occurs they have noticed a customer almoHt always asks for change or will pay for a drink with a large bill, especially $100 or $.50. "We want these guys caught. The rob­beries must stop, and we certainly don't want any more murders," Alan Pierce, president of Houston Organization of Bar Ownrrs, said. "We are going to do what· evrr it takes to get these guys." Westheimer Property Owners Consider New Ideas By Pete Diamond Montroae Voice Staff Reporh!r There was a time when much of Westhei· mer Road was clean, tree-hned and bor· dered with hou8f's. There was also a time, in the not too distant past, when many of these same houses became "modeling stu­dios," when protititution flourished and crime was rampant. Two years ago, however. a group of con· cemed individuals from five local civic organizations met to discuss what could be done to reetore or rehabilitate WeRthei· mer and improve its image and reputa­tion. They began by working to ehminate the 1'modehng studios," moved on to sug­gesting traffic control measures and then supporting an area police substation. But the efforts of the Coalition ofMont­roee Organizations. made up of two repre­een tati ves from the Avondale Aasoriation, the Greater Montrotte Busi­neu Guild. the Neartown Association, the Neartown Bu!'tlneSB Alliance and the Wes· theimer Colony Association, have not atopped here. On March 20, more than 40 people, including Coalition representa­tives, Westheimer property owners and Councilman George Greanias, met to dis­cuss ways of revitalizing the street end ehAre ideas on how this might bet,t be accomplished. 'The purpose of the Coa1ition is to act as a catalyst to create a more favorable envir· onment for the revitalization of the 100 to 1000 blocks of Lower Westheimer," says Bob Bagot, a representative of the Greater Montrose Busine88 Guild. "This meeting waa designed to present the findings in capsule form of two years activity of the Coalition to the people who own properties along Lower W estheimer." One of the ways it was suggested that new hu•inessea could be attracted to the area are under a rental incentive program. Under euch a plan, landlords agree to The Coalition of Montrose Organizations U'orka to find u·ays to eliminate ne1ghborlwod tyeaores such as this building m the 200 block of We.!!itheimer f Pete Diamond photo) charge busin68es which rent retail space from them a reduced rental rate for a cer tain amount of time. until the new busi nesa is financially sound. While beneficial to new business owners, attracting busi­nesses to the area under this program also helps landlords by reducing or offsetting the amount of money they must pay to insure their vacant buildings. Another plan to aid new businesses sets property taxes for a certain area at a con· stant rate for a period of five years. Under this tax deferral program, new businesses can gain a solid financial foothold and profit from being in a favorable sales loca· tion without facing rising tax rates every year. However. after five years, the area is reassesed and business owners then resume annual tax payments. A number of other subjects focusing on ways of improving the appearance of Wes· theimer and attracting new businesses to the area were discussed at the meeting. including various forms of landscaping, " antique'' street lighting fixtures and building consultants, who can advise property owners how to improve or restore exisiting buildings If a building is structurally sound, this would eliminate the need to tear down many buildings along Westheimer that have the potential to be utilized for busi ne88es. However, those buildings that are structurally unsound and potentially dan · gerous can be reported to the Houston Pub lie Works office. Buildings reported to tht> office will be inspected and. if determined to l>f' dangerous and the owner does not take action to repair it, the building may be torn down. Also discussed was parking along Wes­theimer, or in some cases, the lack of avail· able parking spaces. An innovative, but expensive, way of creating additional parking that is currently being studied is to move existing buildings to the bark of their rettpecl.ive Jots and utilize the space in front of the building for parking. A lees costly option is for businei;ses to provide parking behind their stores and in alleys. Because of the potential for crime in alleys, this has bet>n viewed as a less desirable way of creating additional park· ing. It was al Ro mentionrd that since prop­erty owners are rettponsible for the maintenance of alleys, several options are available to th£>m, such as blocking off the alley and buying the land which is adja· cent to their property. CounMlman Greania~ complimented the efforts of the Coalition and said that while Lower Westheimer presents some of the toughest prohlemM to change, it also showli some of the greate;t gains. Calling the Lower WeRtheimer Police Substation "a trut> community effort," Greanias said it is "the attention to details that makes rhnngr in a rommunity and in Lower We"'· theimer. It's not enough to clean up a neighborhood. you've got to attract peo­ple. We are becoming n deRirable develop­ment community (with) a firm base to make significant Mtrides in the coming years." To place an AD in the Montrose Voice just phone us ! 529-8-190 l~m 5 : • • el d.a ·~- Ads can be charged over the phone to a ma1or credit card OR we can bill yo later 1732 Westhelmer 523-2213 Leather • Levi • Western Chutes Proudly Presents The Country Express Band Sunday, April 6 (on the Patio) 4pm til 8pm Texas Riders Guest Bartending at the Brig Also Serving Bar-b-que $2 Donation 25C Draft 3pm til Watch for the Colt 45's Slave Auction Coming Soon Mr. Mike Scott, DJ (Main Bar) Home of Eagle Leather Fa the Mon that Knows what He Wonts APRIL 4, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 Ob God, she's back again! S~s illj~H-11 Tttl\#·1""1tr,.4Fl1SIJClhr«lor The outrageously bilanous. sca/bingljfunnJ lesson of a lifetime' SISTER MARY IGNATIUS EXPIAINS IT ALL FOR YOU b.v Christopher Durang Late \ lght Performances Frida) & Saturd.2~. I lpm Sunda~. 8pm AU performances - SS Ot.argt bcktt.., IO \b... ;u·r<:.ard. \ 1. · \ or \mt'dcan bpre." liROl P R\TE.\ \\\JL\BU Ttckrl' also :l\21lablt- a1 Sbo\\ti\, m Trmquili~ ft-Mk eo.-pmn1et1" ah §AME DAY TYPEP §ETTER§ A NJ<:W DIYI 8 ION ()~' 1r1n: l\IONTR08E VOJC'E We'll typeset your Flyers, Menus, Business Cards, Letterheads, Resumes, Brochures, Forms, Ads­and hundreds of other items­the Same Day (Sometimes You Just Want It Right Now!) Get it to us by Noon (or call for a pickup by 11am) and we'll have it ready by Spm (size of the job permitting) SAME DAY RATE - $60 per Hour OVERNIGHT RA TE - S40 per Hour 3 DAY RA TE - $20 per Hour NO MINIMUM TIME LIMIT' If your typesetting really only takes 10 minutes. you'll only be charged for 10 minutes) 81 TYPESTYI ... ES TO CHOOSE FROM Pick Up and Delivery Available ($5 charge) 408 AVONDALE - 529-8490 8 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 4 1986 Recovering from Alcoholism Editor's Note: This is a the second msta/. lment of a five part series presented by representatives of the MORE Program of the Montrose Counseling Center on alcoh· olism and drUIJ dependency in the gay and lesbian community. By Robert H. Hodge Director, MORE Program Montrose Counseling Center Recovery from the disease of alcoholism has some of the basic characteristics as recovery from any disease. The primary element must be that the person wants to recover Second, and almost as important, the per80n must believe that recovery is possible. Many gay/ lesbian alcohol abus­ers do not believe that recovery is possible for them . There seems to be a belief that somehow one cannot be gay and not drink alcohol. That belief is simply not true. For many of us, our socializing takes place in the gay bar. The bar has served as a meeting place for gay people for many years. In the days prior to Christopher Street, the bars were well-hidden and one had to know where to go to find one. They were the meeting places, the community Researchers Say Most Fellatio Not Real Risky By P ete Diamond Montrosr Voicr Staff Reporter According to "play safe" information dis­tributed by the KS 'AIDS Foundation. oral sex or fellatio where there is no exchange of semen, is considered a moder ately safe, but nevertheless risky sexual practice. However, Canadian researchers recently published their findings from a study which they say shows oral sex is not a feasible means of transmitting the AIDS virus. Results of the study, which began in mid·l982 and focused on more than 700 gay men, were first reported in January in the Journal of the Canadian Medlcal Association. The r~earchers found the majority of a group of men who said they limited their sexual practices to fellatio, did not test positive for the AIDS virus Although Tom Audette, director of the Montroee Clinic, agrees that there are no documented cases of a per!-lon contracting AIDS from oral sex. he adds that it is quite difficult to find a group of people who have limited their sexual practices strictly to oral sex. While the Canadian researchers believe that acids in the stomach would kill the AIDS virus before it could enter or ~ absorbed into the bloodstream, the poss1· bility of contracting AIDS by ingesting virus·infected semen or presemmal fluid still exists. Any sores. cuta or lesions within a person's mouth provide an open­ing for the virus to enter the bloodstream , Audette says The "portal of entry" for t he virus can be as small as a microscopic cut in the mouth or as large as a cold sore on the lip, he says. Jn fact, an accidental cut to the gums while brushing or flossing teeth also will provide a means of entry for the virus Audette adds that because of this, other forms of oral sex such as rimming remain risky. Oral sex offers the increased possibility of not only being exposed to the AIDS virus. but other infections and viruses as well, such as hepatitis B. CMV (cytome­glovirus) or even parasites. According to Audette. a hepatitis B infection, for exam pie, may compromise or suppress a per· son's immune system, and this may play a role as a e&factor in developing AIDS Audette adds that for these health rea eons and because it is questionable whether or not AIDS can be transmitted through oral sex , the Montrose Clinic sug· geata avoiding unprotected oral sex . It is also possible to be in a bar and not order alcohol. They do serve other beverages and for the most part no one knows or cares what you are drinking anyway. centers and a safe haven to be oneself in a world that discriminated agai nst us at every turn. The gay bar has become a social institution, and to this day, plays a vital role in the life of our community. We meet each other and socialize over a cocktail. Alcohol becomes the great leveler of persons. We relax and the inhibitions we may have walked in with we drop with a couple of "cold ones." There is nothing unusual about this and certainly nothing wrong with the bars or socializing in them. The tragedy comes when alcohol use becomes alcohol abuse. The gay prob­lem drinker is trapped. How will I meet people? All of my friends drink. They won't wa n t to be around me if I stop. How can I be in a bar and not drink alcohol? What if l do want to recover, I can't go into a hospital for three weeks. The straights would never accept or understand me. I cannot be that open about my gayness in a straight atmos­phere. I may lose my job. All real fears and all legitimate questions. For the record, you can have just as much fun sober as you did drinking. Any­thing you did drinking you can do not drinking. The only thing that stands in your way is believing that this is possible and then doing it. It is also possible to be in a bar and not order alcohol. They do serve other bever ages and for the most part no one knows or cares what you are drinking anyway Your friends will probably be happy that you a re doing something aboutyourdr in k· ing. Those that deny that you have a drinking problem probably drink very much the way you do and have not accepted that they too have a problem with alcohol. There are treatment programs that are predominately gay. The Lambda Center, in Montrose, is a gay/ lesbian AA meeting facility. The Montrose Counseling Center has an outpatient treatment program designed specifically for gay/ lesbian alcoholics. The program is called MORE. A commitment to try is needed. It is pos· sible to learn how to be in a bar and not drink. It is possible to meet people and to socialize and have friends and not drink It is not easy but it can be done. You learned how to use alcohol and now it is just as possible to learn how to live with· out it but in its presence The alcoholic is stronger than most peo­ple think he/ she is. They go to work, when they work, feeling worse than anyone but another alcoholic can imagine. They "screw their courage to the sticking place," as Mr. Shakespeare said, and shake their way through situations that would leave most immobilized. It is my belief that the alcoholic can use these strengths and regain a life that is more full than when recovery started. By placing alcohol in a neutral position, an entire world of freedom opens. You can socialize where you please and how you please. If you are looking for a mate or just ..- --=-- [\I Spruce Up 1Jour /l\ Home for Spring } ~ with ... 11 I I l.i~ HSK CONTRACTING A Full Service Contractor • Roofing (All Types) • Tile/ Masonry • Remodeling • Carpet • Sheetrock/ Painting • Cabinets • Plumbing/ Electrical • Decks/ Hot Tubs • Foundations • Room Additions Repaired • Concrete • Tree & Trash • Fully Insured Removal • References • Insulation Available • Water Proofing • Chimney Sweeping & Repairs No Job Too Big or Too Small 520-9064 OR Emergency Digital Pager 891-4053 Member of Greater Montrose Buslnes someone to "play safely" with you for thl' night you will find that your chances are better sober. The MORE Program at the Montrose Counseling Center offers a way for gay, lesbian alcoholics to recover and reclaim their lives. Meeting in a gay environment, the problem drinker can learn how to live without drinking and how to enjoy life. Since the MORE Program is, in part, funded by a grant from the Texas Com­mission on Alcoholism, a portion of the cost can be absorbed by way of a scholar­ship. If you or someone you care about has a problem with alcohol, please call 526- MORE. Someone will be glad to help. Werner R. Voigt, Jr. Attorney at Law Criminal Defense DWI. Drugs. etc. (713) 527-8033 By appointment 3212 Smith. Suite 102. Houston No1c•11 in• ~••rt~ by TXBectdOl1.•91115pec;t&hUllon q;;~ FINEST 24 HOUR RESTAURANT l>AILG]( E>EeIAL ~ - ~ · ~ · ~ · ~ ·~· ~ · ~ · ~ 1102 WESTHEIMER , HOUSTON GAY OPERATED 522-3332 BETTER LAWns & qARDEns Total lawn maintenance includinq mowinq. edqmq tnmmmq , pruninq Je rhhzmq , spra4mq Commercial-Res1denhcll ~d ffi ulchinq .~. A'Zdlea fecdinq fr':. Oebns Removal ... ~?, Comple te Tree Service .. ~~:h\ Stumps Remoocd "• ,.......,,. Tot.i.1 f encmq Sero1ces (Cedar notched Picke l. Tre.iled . Cl4 l Complete Sprinkler S1.1stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN APRIL 4, 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 9 New Worry About American Ghettoes Linked to South African Turmoil By Franz Schurmann Pacific News Service Special to the Montrose Voice As the spate of recent media coverage of the bleakness of ghetto life indicates, establishments are again worried about the place of blacks in American society. An unspoken conclusion from that cover­age is that, except for a successful black middle class, there may be no place for them. Such was the tacit message from a recent book·length series in the Chicago Tribune on life in largely black North Lawndale on Chicago's west side. Page after page detailed crime, despair, babies born to children, no jobs, degraded stand· ards of living. Readers got the sense of people just vegetating as if in some film about the world after nuclear war. Even more reminiscent of such films is the fact that young people predominate, reflecting the rising proportion of black teenagers and young adults in most ghet· toes in recent decades. To someone old enough to remember, the current establishment worry is differ­ent from earlier decades. Jn the 1950s, peo· pie of power and influence felt that blacks were just too valuable a manpower resource to waste. Jn the 1960s, the New Frontier zealots wanted to show the newly emerging Third World abroad that the U.S., contrary to Communism's claims, could become a racially integrated society. Then there was an optimistic tenor to the new race policies. This time, however, the establishment mood is as bleak as ghetto landscapes. It is a fair guess that what got the estab­lishments into this new mood of worry had something to do with South Africa. Last year, night after night, American. televi· sion viewers could see anger exploding out of black townships. Those who read the papers carefully learned that the explo­sive energy came largely from youngsters, some of whom were barely past grade school. And it did not take much imagina· tion to realize that exactly the toame kind of youth tinder lies strewn about the ght>t· toeR of U.S. inner cities. In South Africa, the townships have no economies, only people who stream out everyday to work elsewhere in the white man's economy. North Lawndale once had Sears' world headquarters, the famed Hawthorne plant of Western Electric, International Harvester, Ryerson Steel. All are gone now. But unlike South Africa, North Lawn· dale's people have little to stream out to. To the west they are hemmed in by trucu· • Unique Selectfon • Free Membenhlp • No Deposit For Memben • 2 tlor 1 on Tues & Wed. I except adult movies) and ••• One day Free Rental tlor any one 11), no,..adult movie. FREE Rental Valod Mond¥·Tl'ur>d¥ Exp1r~ /\pril 10, 1986 Llmtt 1 ~ Houst'hok1 Current M~ Not Ehgble lent white suburbs, and to the east by downtown Chicago's booming yuppie economy for whites, upwardly mobile minorities, and, increasingly, Latino menial workers. In previous decades, the establishments believed it was time for the mighty machinery of government to get moving and do something about racism and pov· erty. Now the mood is that even lots of money-which is not available anyway­would not make much ofa difference. The problem, they now believe, goes deeper to differing "values" between the under classes and the mainstream. The media which have long been sym· pathetic to government's efforts to improve the social scene have recently found kind things about the new "conser vative" mood among blacks. "Blacks must save themselves," goes the new mood. The papers feature people like Ber­tha Gilkey who transformed herrun·down St. Louis public housing project and is AMNTION NIGHTCLUB ENTERTAINERS Singers, Piano Acts, Impersonators Please make sure the Montrose Voice hos a good quality (prefE!fobly in block and. white) publicity photo of you in our files fa use when ouradv€1f­tisers are engaging your seNices. It wouldn't even hurt for us to hove seve­ral photos of your sm1'tng face 'honk you The Montrose Voice lf" NEWSPAPER Of MONlllO' 408 AVONDALE 529-8490 preaching her self-help gospel throughout the nation. Yet, as the Tribune's series indicates. the challenge is monumental, and if South Africa be an omen, time could be running out. And the longer run prospects for a benign outcome to the American racial dilemma could be even bleaker than South Africa's. There, blacks are needed throughout the economy. Jn the American economy, they have become dispropor­tionately redundant. In the early 1970s, former Black Panther Party leader Huey Newton argued that blacks had becomeunemploy· able and therefore should tum their ghet· toes into "liberated zones" within America itself. Louis Farrakhan preacheti the fundamental incompatibility of black and white America to a growing black fol· lowing. Talk from white establishments about differing values will only enhance such secessionist sentiment. Whites often ask why if other ethnic groups fought theirwayoutofpoverty and in the process created bustling neighbor­hoods, blacks could not do likewise. North Lawndale was once such a neighborhood populated. by East European immigrants. When busine~ses left and whites fleet. the ghetto came into being. The answer may be that blacks will simply do it in a differ­ent way. South Africa reminds us that de facto apartheid exists in the United States as well. In South Africa young people who style therm•elves ··comrades" have begun to-organize the amorphous townships and lead the fight agaim;t whites. What really worries American e:.tablishments is that in America's inner city ghettoes similar young people could start moving in the same direction. Stein & Toklas DETECTIVES Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth t,ltrough the French countryside. investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward. author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real­life friend of Stein and Toklas. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6. 95 in bookstores. or use th1S coupon to order by mail. He;:; is $7.50 for Murder is Murder is Murder, by Sa.;uel Steward. name ~ _ addres. __________ _ city state ..zip--=------- Alyson Publications. Dept, P-5, 40 Plympton St Boston, MA 02118 10 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 4. 1986 Sports Voice Calendar & Standings Anole~tte l• n<"l3C usw• Jblt 111 AIM/,... "'!• 9•)" >mmur v IJ4' ~,oat1~ Al qh n.nMh ,,.,. a• 1' y pa ,:,.m•P'•rj ''' tte Ulbnlf lbs Hou-Tex Tennis Club Challenge Ladder mat< through Mar 23 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim Kitch 6 Pat Power 2 Randall Dickerson 3 Eugene B 4 Donny Ke!Jey 5 Da•"'d Garza 7 Ste ... e Bearden 8 Thomas Cortez 9 Eddie Chavez 10 Tlny Tim BLADDER 1 S8be Vetez 2 Lou Garza 3 Joel 6 Mark Deardorff 7 Randy ~Mier 8Mr 8111 4 Ronn Rodd 5 Larry Jarvis 9 Rick Massey 10 0111 Santa1h C LADDER 1 RO Knapp 2 Gabe Heroin 6 Rudy Garcia 3 Henry Eckharcn 4 Rici( Martinez 7 David Moskowitz 8 Randy J1erscheck 9 Steve Chesney 5 Oa1w1d Hendrickson DOUBLES LADDER l Steve Bearden & 8111 Santa1fl 2 Ronn Rodd & Richard Pregeant 3 Er"... ,..~ vez & Henry Eckhardt Houston Tennis Club Challenge Ladder '"at hes tnrough Mar 31 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Andrew Moms 6 Rick Hadnot 2 Robert Holmes 7 Ed FarJey 3 J C Barrera 8 Rich Corder ' Arm1 Alblnza 9 Oscar Martinez 5 Ron Bel •o Edward 1e Leon 8 LADDER 1 Ron Mi.;Cautey 2 Billy Green 6 Randy Lunsford 7 Da1w•d HendnCk$00 3 Randy Miller 'Steve Bryanl 5 Roy Mendiola 8 Oscar Ysass1 9 Rudy Garcia 10 Travis Willis C LADDER 1 JV Klinger 2 Joe D 3 Howard Brown DOUBLES LADDER 1 Billy Green & Paul Brown 2 Randy L.unslord & Rich Corder 3 Travis W11l1s & Randy Lunsford ' Pai Br •wn & A1 :h c~ >rdf>' MSA Pool League Team Standings. Winter League. Week 16 TEAM Recent W~k Tota• Matches. Total games DIV S ION A 1 Bacchus I 11-4 12-3 143-082 2 Four611 ... 12-3 137-088 3 Ranch Hands 11-4 11-4 130-095 ' Mary• Naturally 15-0 10-5 137-(188 5Too611 4-11 S-7 122-103 6 Manon & Lynn's 10-5 8-7 119-106 7 StreetGat.s 4-1' 6-9 117-108 8 Bacchus II 15-0 6-9 109-116 9 BRB Shooters 0-15 6-9 075-150 10 Outlaws 8-10 8-10 122-103 01VISION B 1 TheS..m 10-S 13-2 140-085 2 Ltpshc:k 10-5 10-5 135-090 3 611111 13-2 10-5 130-095 'The Galleon 5-10 10-5 127-098 5 Kindred Spirits I 9-6 8-7 11~107 6 Kindred Sp1r•ts II 2-13 HJ 125-100 7 JR'S S-7 6-9 104-121 8 The 611 6-9 6-9 102·123 9 Hooters II 8-10 ~11 073-130 10 Lone Stars 7-8 ~12 081-143 11 Hooters ... 2-13 080-14') Regular Weekly Events SUNDAY; Frontrunners, Memorial Park Ten­nis Center Houston Tennis Club lOam-lpm. Homer Ford Tennis Center Hou-Tex Tennis Club 10:30am-1·3Qpm, Homer Ford Tennis Center Women·s Bowlmg League Spm. Stadium Bow1 WW 8 Bowhng League 7 30pm. Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: MSA Men's Bowling 9pm, Stadium Bowl TUESDAY; Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nis Center MSA ·Fun Volleyball League,. 7pm WEDNESDAY; MSA Pool League plays 8pm. various tocat1ons THURSDAY; Frontrunners. Memorial Park Tenrw; Center Houston Tennis Club 7:30pm Homer Ford Tennis Center "Whatever Happened to Baby Jane· MSA Mixed Bowling League 8 45pm. Stadium Bowl Special Events Apr_ 5 81llards vs Bowlers Pool Tourney Apr 6 Texas Gay Rodeo Assn meets 2pm Kindred Spirits. 4902 Richmond May 24-26 6th annual "U.S. Gay Open' National Tennis Tournament. San Francisco June· Oak Lawn Tennis Assoc hosts Texas Cup Challenge, Dallas June 21 Gay Pride Week Sports Day (date tentat1vet July 25-Aug 3 US Olympic Festival Houston Labor Day Weekend Women·s Softball ·86 Wortd Series. New Haven. Conn Women's Softball Classic Set for May 31 The Houston Women's Softball League will host the Fourth Annual Houston Women's Classic Slowpitch Tournament on Saturday and Sunday, May 31 and June I, al Memorial Park. The double elimination tournament, sanctioned by the American Softball A~twciation, will feature 24 teams. Accord­ing to Kathie Pearson, tournament direc­tor, invitations have been sent to other major cities including Dallas, Ft. Worth and Atlanta notifying their teams of the upcoming tournament. "We would like to get a good response from teams out-of-town as well as our local teams for this tournament," Pearson said. "We have had some really good tourna­ments during the past and would like this one to be an even stronger tournament," she added. Trophies will be presented for the first four places with individual trophies for the first place team. The first place winner will also receive free hotel rooms, donated by Holiday Inn, for the 1987 tournament. Individual trophies and jackets will be presented for AU-Tournament team members. In addition, troph_ies will go to the Most Valuable Player, the Golden Glove award winner. and to the winner of the special sportsmanship award The entry fee for each team is $85 and must be received no later than May 27. For entry information, contact Kathie Pear­son al 864·4394. All players must be at least 18 years of age. The tournament also requires team jerseys with numbers on the back. The awards presentation will be held Sunday afternoon, at the completion of play. in the Holiday Inn's State Room. Holiday Inn. 1·10 and Silber. will serve as host hotel for the tournament. Bacchus Moves to First Place in Pool Play Bacchus I moved in'to first place in Div· ision A with a winoverToo61 l in theMSA Billiards League as of March 26. Four61 l, Division A leader for the majority of the seaBOn, was scheduled to meet Bacchus I in their final position round with the div­ision title at .-take. The Ranch Hands and Mary's Naturally will play at the Ranch in a battle for third in Division A The Barn, winner of Division B, showed 'heir muscle by downing second place The ~alleon. The Barn will ~quare off against Lipstick ma must win match for Lipstick . The Galleon and 611 Ill were scheduled lo play for third place honors in the last week of winter billiards on April 2. Sports Voice Newcomer Places in Tennis Easter Match The Houston Tennis Club held its annual Easter Party at MacGregor Park on Sun­day, March 30. Newcomer Steve Hoff fin­ished second in the Doubles Swap Meet. Rich ~der took first and Randy Luns· ford, third. Hoff won the Raw Egg Toss with visitor Cedric Woods The Be.;t Decorated Egg honors also went to Hoff. Hoff threw his egg 75 feel before it broke. In new team doubles action, Travis Wil­lis teamed with Lunsford to defeat Paul Brown and Rich Corder 6-3, 3-6, 6-2 to lake the No. 3 spot on the chal1enge ladder. Billy Green came back to win the decisive third set in a challenge for No. 2 on the B ladder by Lunsford. They were split 6-4, 4--6 when Green buckled down for a 6-I win to take the match. The next club rvent will be voting on the March Most Valuable Player. The vote will take place at a small party after this Sunday's tennis. Interested players may calljl.ich Corder, 524·2151, for more in for· matioi:_-i. In Montrose, Neady Everyone Reads the Voi'e ~ .:.;..···•see the stars •••• .. MEMBERS OMLYtt Rent One at Regular Price and Get 2nd for "Does Not Apply to Adult Films 2016 MONTROSE Houston, Texas 77006 529-5544 HAIR LOSS­NEWMEDICAL TREATMENT Male pattern baldness occurs when the hormone DHT acts on hair folli­cles. Proxidil 8. is an advanced 001.lbination of topical DHT-block­ing agents ~ith .the ha1r growth­stimulator Mmox1d11. It c~mmonly arrests and reverses balding when Minoxidil alone does not. Call today for a consultation. Peter H. Proctor, MD,PhD MPB Clinic Suite ID, 5401 Dashwood, Bellaire 661-2321 The Quest For One on One April 6th 6-10pm 715 Fairview 521-2792 APRIL 4, 19861 MONTROSE VOICE 11 Atlanta's Pharr Library Takes Lone Star Classic By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Close and exciting are probably two good words to sum up this year's Lone Star Classk But close only counts in horse shoes, and since softball was the name of this game, Atlanta's Pharr Library clinched the tournament with a final score of 8-7 over Houston's Rich's. The double-elimination tournament began last Friday, March 28, with 20 teams from Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, Atlanta, Boston. Norfolk, Va., Dal· las and Houston. After defeating Patrick's of Dallas Friday morning, Pharr Library continued undefeated until Saturday afternoon when Rich's overcame them with a score of 9-6. With one loss apiece, Rich's and Pharr Library took to the field again. Pharr Library gained an early lead in the first inning, scoring five runs to Rich's one. By the end of the third inning, Pharr Library was leading with a score of 7·2. The next o Scenes from the Lone Star Classic Perfect weather prevailed last weekend as 20 softball teams competed in the Lone Star Classic. At the end of tournament play, the teams gathered for an awards banquet at Rich's. inning brought some surprises, however; Rich's scored five runs, tying the score at 7-7. The next two innings were scoreless, but finally, in the seventh inning, Pharr Library ran another point in, winning the championship game, S.7. Following a banquet 1ater that evening at Rich's disco, a short awards ceremony was held. The first place trophy was pret>­ented to Pharr Library, second place was awarded to Rich's, third place went to Dirty Sally's of Houston and the fourth pince trophy was given to Houston's 611. Team players from Pharr Library and Rich's each received individual awards. A new a;,_,ard was presented this year in honor of Wayne Romero, a charter member of the Montrose Softball League, who died from AIDS related complica· tions last year. The first annual Wayne Romero Team Spirit Award was given to the Outlaws from Norfolk, Va. Bob Schwartz, manager of Pharr Library from Atlanta, and Mike Morrison, manager of Houston's Rich's, are shown with their respective awards (Voice photographers David Roumfort and Pete Diamond captured a few of the many highlights of the exciting tournament) 12 MONTROSE VOICE APRIL 4. 1986 'Lucas' a Surprise 'Feel Good' Movie Films By Scott Cutoinger Monlros~ Voice Film Critic o Lucas Sometimes a small film will turn out to be a "sleeper," a little movie that has the potential to be a big or minor hit. Lucas fits easily into this category, something along the lines of My Bodyguard or even Rocky. It's a "feel good" movie that's sim· pie, yet reaches out with compassion, wit, and good teen insight. Writer ' director David Seltzer (writer of the Omen and The Other Side of the Moun· tain} stems to be following in the steps of John Hughes, the man who makes decent teen nicks like The Breakfast Club and Pretty in Pink. The emphasis in Lucas centers on adolescent feelings. relation­ships, and yearnings that go far beyond just basic sex and love. The main charac· ters are flesh and blood people who care about each other and in turn the audience cares for them Charlie Sheen rRed DawnJ is hand· somely charming as the team captain who surprisingly has a big heart (unlike the rest of the team). He and Kerri Green fSummer Rental) have a very touching scene in the school laundry" that subtly suggests the romance that is beginning to bloom. Together with Lucas, the three form a friendship triangle where each per­son contributes and helps in their own manner Highly recommended for all ages. Lucas is a good, entertaining motion picture that wiJI raise your spirits. Make an effort to support this .. little movie," and you'll feel better for it o April Fool's Day The scene is a familiar one. The deserted island with a ferry that won't return for days. The invitations for people to gather at a large mansion. Scarey muisic and the flash of a knife. It's (don't scream yet} "Fnday the Thirteenth Part 6." No. I'm Corey Haim lforegroundJ i.t Lucas Blye, a teenager u·1th a slant on life that is aU hill own. Charhe Sheen tbackgroundJ is hu fr1end and protector. football captain Cappie Roew. and Kerri Green is Maggie, the gul they both love in "Lucas·· Lucas is an odd 14-year-old who has excelled to h<>ing a high ochool freshman He likeo to study and collect in•ecto (but never kills them), listens to cla1'sical muaic. and ha.a suddenly met the girl of his dreams. The new girl. Maggie, becomes his bosom buddy, and he is in heaven ash(> 11harH time with this 16-year-old dream Summer wishes are soon just a memory when school start& and Maggie ~omes a cheerleader To make matters worse. she falls madly 1n love with Cappie Roew. the football team captain and Lucas' school protector. Lucas is devastated, unable to cope with the lou of a friend that he really wants to love in a romantic way, So, just to prove himself, the little guy trieo out for the football team (which he used to call "superficial"). It's a valient effort as he despeorately tries to prove that he can be different and still belong and fit in. His aspirations bring him a victory. but not in the manner you might expect. I liked Luca.s because it has a big heart. Cory Heim is so instantly appealing as the bespectacled brain. we immediately embrace him. Heim t},furph)''s Romance. Silver Bullet} plays Lucas just a touch nerdy. but we can clearly see that he is blouoming into a bright adole8cent who will learn from hia experiences. sorry. It's something similar called April Fool's Day. Well, it's easy to get confused since it was directed in the same macabre style (and basically uRing the same script) as the Fr1day the Thirteenth movies. Pro­ducer Frank Mancuso Jr. did all of the "Friday .. moviel' , and all he's done here is change the title. Stupid kids wandering through the woods drunk or looking for things in places where they shouldn't be. Thir> being April Fool's Day, there are plenty of potential deadly tricks to be played The big downfall of A.FD is not bemg very exciting_ There is almost no blood (maybe a dismembered head or two), but very little actually happens. Lots of mean· ingless conversations and idle walking around becomes old because it leads nowhere. Not that we want a brutal murder to happen, but in a movie of this type .. something'' needs to be happening. Obvioualy, the writers of this movie had a great ending with nothing to hang it on . Without giving it away, I will just say that the last 15 minute8 were quite enjoyable and a complete surprise after the dullness that preceded them. However. I don't think that the movie can be recomm(>nded JU8t.oo the baaia of the laat part of the film. Ken Olandt and Amy Steel desperately seek to escape from an isolated island estate when a ruthless killer strikes m "April Fool's Day" A terrible film with a neat twist ending, Apf"f't Fool's Day contains a few new_faces that you might recognize like Amy Steel. Deborah Goodrich ("All My Children") and Griffin O'Neal (Ryan's son). How· ever, like in all of these types of ~carey movies, thl" actors are just part of a silly "potential victimR" awaiting their tragic fate. We can only hope that there won't he a part two. What's next-probably a St. Patrick's Day killer in a leprechaun suit. o Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters Probably you've never hrard of Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters. a film about one of Japan's most prolific and important writers about post-war Japan·Yukio Miohima. Directed by Paul Schrader (Cat People. American Gigolo) and backed by George Lucas and Frances Ford Coppola, the film is considered by many to be a daring artistic failure. The 1985 oddity was not widely seen in this country, mainly because it is a bizarre and philosophical look at a man through his life and books. The film is divided into thoughtful effort, the use of the stories is often confuAing and at times seems unne­Cf.' si-iary. A straightforward story of a man's unu1rnal life is matenal for several film&. The problem was Mishima's widow and family. They wantt>d Schrader to exclude rer· tain parts of Mishima's life, especially thosp dealing with his homoAexual life­style. The result is a film that barely touches upon his lovert-1, hir> ob8ession with the male body, nnd hi A friendshipM with authors like Truman Capote and Tenness(• WilliamH. BookA like Confes· sions of Mask thatrev(>alC'd his homosexu­ally in un autobiographical manner are not m(•ntioned. In the end, when Mishima commits sui­cide, his lover is supposed to cut his head off with a sword and kill himself. The fact that the young cadet is Mishima's lover is never mentioned or hinted in the movie. This is important to the final moment, and detracto from the final effect. Visually, Mishima is stunning with fab­ulous set direction by Kyoji Saski and designer Eiko Ishioka. The soundtrack, by Krn Ogata stars as Yukio Mishima, the most internationally famous and controversial Japanese u.Jriter of the post-war era in ''Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters" four themes or sections: Beauty, Art, Action. and Harmony of the Pen. All were themett that Mishima used in his writings and novels. In each section, there are scenes re­enacted from novels such as Temple of the Golden Pavilion , Kyoko's House, and Runaway Horses. These segments are interepen1ed with black and white clips 11howing the real-life correlation betwf>en his life and his work. In th(> end we are supposed to get an idea of how this man lived, worked. and finally killed himself. While- M;.h,,,1a is quitf' a hf'autiful and Phi hp Glass is also out.standing, although some aequencee would work better with less muNic. It's an interesting film to see and hear, but somehow thf> whole idea never gels together In the f'nd, we know very little about the person Mishima really was, only how the dire<:tor has interpreted his writings to mtrror his life, and philoAophies. It's a good try. but for the most part the effect is an alienation of the audience. Mish1ma will show at the River Oaks Theat€'r, Wednesdayllalurdny (April 9-12). APRIL 4, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 WEARE OPEN and we want your FILM! Q*U*A*L*l*T*Y 1 HOUR PROCESSING l!Y_MONTROSE ... and at fair prices OPEN DAILY * OPEN SATURDAY * OPEN SUNDAY This Week's Special, HELD OVER ... JUMBO PRINTS . . . ---------------- -- -. with every order, at small print prices OUR PROMISE ... * We'll give you the best quality possible * Chemicals always fresh * Equipment always adjusted to YOUR film characteristics * Friendly, knowledgable personnel * Confidential processing for sensitive subjects HENRY'S 1 PHOTO * Fair prices (even lower if you choose 1-day service) . . . . . . . . . . . . -. We'll Process Your Film in 1 Hour 4281/2 WESTHEIMER ON WHITNEY 529-0869. 520-0206 A message from Henry and Bear: "We can't empha­size QUALITY strongly enough. Your prints will be big, bright and beautiful .. . as crystal clear as pos­sible from your negative." Henry McClurg owner Bill "BEAR" Ross manager One hour (machine time) service available on all C-41 type film (most of the color film used today) . COMING SOON: 2 Hour Black and White Processing OPEN DAILY* OPEN SATURDAY* OPEN SUNDAY 9am-6pm Weekdays, 10am-6pm Saturday, Noon-5pm Sunday 14 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 4. 1986 The Far Side by Gary Larson M6 ~IVERSAl HIE 'S 't'NC A TE Rock Shop 101 "Oh, lovely- just the hundredth tome you've monoged to cut everyone's heod off." Cartoon feeiH:Jge<s "Hold of right there, Doreen! ... Leave It you must-but the dog stays!" ----. Interplanetary luggage mix-ups Fortunes Capricorn Solves the Puzzle By Mark Orion For Friday, Apfll 4 through Thursday. Apfll 10, 1986 ARIES This os a great week tor travel whether it be business or pleasure. Plan your intinerary carefully to make the best use ol tome. Take along a friend 1f possi­ble If not, be prepared to meet new and exciting people TAURUS You are called upon for some unexpected entertaining. Don't panic. You'll be able to answer the call with your usual grace and etiquette. New acquaintances notice your poise and charm GEMINI-This weekend finds you choosing between two very interesting social events. At this time in your year you can't go wrong with either one. Keep your eyes and ears open because both events offer great opportunities for the future. CANCER The first week of the month finds you in a slight financial bind. You have the creative ability to find ways to have fun and yet save money. Think sim­ple and you'll soon lessen the strain. LEO -Close friends and relatives look to you for guidance. Don't feel guilty of you don't have all the answers. Just help out as best you can. Those in need will benefit from your advice VIRGO -Your sharp eye for detail helps you fond an error at work. Although a minor mistake, correcting 1t lessens tension on the job as well as on the home front. A little scrutiny of work systems helps avoid future problems LIBRA -Instead of contemplating a1ob change, ask superiors for new, more challenging. assignments. You are quite capable of handling the increased work­load. The excitement of a new project cures your on·the-1ob blahs SCORPIO -You subtly communicate a problem you are having with a friend Your knack for diplomacy allows you to express yourself, yet save the relat1on­sh1p. Those same skills will be in demand in another situation later in the week SAGITTARIUS - You find yourself having to make a decision on a romantic matter. It's been a while and you don·t quite trust your judgement in this area Let 1ntu1tion be your guide. This will be one of the few times that you decide 'if 1t feels good. do ot" CAPRICORN -You put together the pieces of a nagging puzzle. Now that you've solved the mystery, prepare for a new game that will really tax your analyti· cal abilities AQUARIUS You ' re constantly changing your living patterns and, cur­rently. you're excited about your new routine The change helps you break a bad habit You should be proud of your­self PISCES -Spend time on yourself. You've been overextended by the needs of those around you. As a result. you've placed a strain on your physical and emo­tional health. Use this week to pamper and treat No. 1 •1Q86 THE MO"'TROSE VOICE In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voice APRIL 4. 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 And that means a person's thoughts are turning to love, romance and (yes) sex. To celebrate the arrival of the season of love, the MONTROSE VOICE expands its PERSONALS section. And, we make it easy to place a Personals. Just phone us. (We'll bill you later.) 27 Reasons for Placing a MONTROSE VOICE PERSONAL AD ••• •Making New Friends (33,000 readers each issue) • Looking for Romance • Sending a Special Greeting • Safer than Writing on Bathroom Walls • A Chance to See Your Name in Print • Alternative to Bar Cruising •Anything Beats "The Quest" •It's Inexpensive • Confidentiality Can be Assured • Saves Gas • They're Easy to Place • Getting Back in Touch with Old, Lost Friends• Finding Missing Persons• Because Your Lover Ran One Last Week • Because Your Lover Asked You To• Forming a New Organization• Mother's Pressuring You to Settle Down• You Need a Man• You Need a Woman • You Need a Ride Across State Lines (Quick) • Seek Safe Sex Partners • It's a Chance to Make Yourself Seem Perfect • Send a Sweet Love Note to Someone Dear • Invite an Erotic Adventure • Send a Proposition to Someone (when you make it public, they can't ignore it) • State Your Kinky Desires (and aee who answers) • Good, Clean Fun FREE THIS WEEK 1st 40 NEW 'PERSONALS' A Ticket for 2 to the Comedy Workshop To place your "Personal" in the Montrose Voice, phone 529-8490 OUR RATES ARE REASONABLE: Just 40¢ a word. (Bold centered headlines are $1 each word, minimum 3 words. CONFIDENTIAL BLIND BOX NUMBERS are $3.) 16 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 4, 1986 VILLBYOP TBBPIBSIDB Out of the wild comes VALLEY OF THE FAR SIDE, Gary Larson's newest best-selling cartoon collection. Featuring the usual assortment of insects and animals, cowboys and cavemen - all engaged in a variety of warped situation comedies - VALLEY OF THE FAR SIDE will bring new peaks of pleasure to every fan of THE FAR SIDE. -------------... .-.-···-= Order a copy for your favorite fan of The Far Side today! Please send me - copies of VALLEY OF THE FAR SIDE at $5.95 each _copies of BRIDE OF THE FAR SIDE at $5.95 each - copies of IN SEARCH OF THE FAR SIDE at $5.95 each - copies of BEYOND THE FAR SIDE at $5 95 each _ copies of THE FAR SIDE at $5.95 each Send to Valley of the Far Side clo Montrose Voice 4400 Johnson Drive Fairway, KS 66205 Please include $1 for postage and handling per book or­dered. Total amount enclosed - --- 0 Check D Money Order D Visa D MasterCard Address ------------------ City ________ State ___ Zip ___ _ Credit Card# -------- -------- Signature as on credit card Expir. Date (If check, make payable to Andrews, McMeel & Parker) Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. APRIL 4, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 17 Chronic Hepatitis, Smoking, Suntanning A weekly health information column sponaored by The Montrose Clinic What is chronic hepatitis? T he re are two basic types of chronic h epatitis. Persi8tent chronic hepatitis is when the liver has healed but blood test.8 still show evidence of an abnormal condition. A person with chronic hepatitis will probably feel fine, and he/ she is not likely to spread the disease to others. With active chronic hepatitis, the liver and blood tests are abnormal over a long period of time. Symptoms may worsen over time, and the patient usually feels tired and weak. There is also what is known as a chronic car­rier state that is detected by a blood test. The carrier shows no signs of illness, but he/ she can spread the disease to others over an extended period of time. My father has smoked two packs of cigarettes a day for 30 years. I am trying to get him to quit. Do you think it would be easier for him to quit cold turkey, or to cut down slowly and then stop completely? There are two separate issues involved in smoking: the habit itself (the actual cigarette smoking), and the chemical dependency on nicotine. Some people are able to stop the habit and overcome the dependency at the same time. Others are able to stop smoking cigarettes but use a nicotine gum so that they don't go through withdrawal. After kicking tf\e habit, they then try to kick the dependency. With either method, some people are able to stop at once, and others succeed if they cut down gradually. Keep in mind that medical experts report that nicotine withdrawal ; symptoms start when a person cuts down and usually last until after he or she has quit completely. So cutting down doesn't wean the body from smoking. The symptoms may be just as intense over an extended period of cutting down as they are when the smoker quits cold turkey. A new approach can help break a cycle of failure. If your father has tried to quit in the past, urge him to try a different method this time. Try to help him develop a new, good habit to replace smoking. A walking pro­gram is free, easy, and very effective. And so that he doesn't substitute candy bars for cigarettes, suggest that he keep low-cal snacks such as fruit and raw vegetables around for the first few weeks. I am 24 years old and have a lover. I have no problem getting or keeping an erection. When I reach a climax though, little or nothing comes out. What causes this, or better yet, is there any drug or something to take to increase the amount? I have never known anyone with this problem. Any advice would be great! Ejaculate (semen) is composed of seminal fluid, most of which is pro­duced by the prostate gland, and sperm. Seminal fluid forms most of the ejaculate. The amount of semen ejaculated can vary drastically from man to man and from one ejaculation to another. Some men simply produce less sperm and/ or less semen than others. This is in no way a reflection on their virility or sexuality. It is important to remember that separate body mechanisms produce orgasms and ejaculations. As you know, it is possible to experience a climax without ejaculating, and it is also possible to ejaculate without having an orgasm. If you have always had this condi­tion but are able to climax, it is not likely that you have a medical prob­lem. However, there are certain things, such as diseases or medica­tions. that lead to decreased amounts ADVERTISING SALES If you make a good impression on people and ore conscientious about your job. then consider this: The Montrose Voice is seeking an additional advertising representative 1986 is going to be our year. and we need to add to our sales staff. One-on-one sales experience preferred For an appointment. call Henry McClurg. 529-8490. MERIDIEN LEASING INC. llS SlS. 735i '86 BMW lO'J/mo 195/mo 569/mo '86 MERCEDES BENZ '86 HONDA 190E lOOE S&OSL 149/mo Acconl 498/mo Preludt n51mo 159/mo 17'/mo '86 CADILLAC '86 PO RSCHE '86 JAGUAR RX-7 626 329/mo 944 3911/mo 4911/mo '86 MAZDA 209/mo 178/mo 944 Turbo __'86 TQYOTA Camry Crliu 1n/mo 185/mo CALL LEE BO RBA (7 13) 975-1872 XJ6 569/mo '86 BUICK 17'/mo 27'9/mo - i!f/11&. NO DOWN PA,MENl • lO\\lR MONTlll'r PA.,.MlNT •CASH FOR .,.OUR TRAOl The Medicine Chest Presented by the Montr08e Clinic of ejaculate. Just to rule out the possi­bility of a problem, you should see a urologist.. (A urologist is a physician who specializes in urinary/ male genital problems.) If you are medically healthy, there is probably nothing that you can do to increase the amount of ejaculate. You may simply have to concentrate on the pleasurable releBBe of tension you feel when you climax, as opposed to ejaculation itself. Again, every individual is different, so check with a physician about your particular case. I am fair·skinned and love to sunbathe. I only bum sometimes, usually at the begin­ning of summer. Should I use a suntan oil or suntan lotion? Everyone should use some kind of sunscreen as protection against skin cancer (and leathery, wrinkled skin). The particular type of product you use is unimportant as long as it contains the correct Sun Protectiove Factor (SPF) for your skin type. The higher the SPF number, the greater the amount of protection from harmful rays. If you are fair and burn easily, you should use at least SPF 13 or higher. If you burn sometimes but not always, use a product with an 8 or 9 SPF. If you tan easily and burn only rarely, try a 6. And if you have dark skin and tan easily without burning, use a product with SPF2 or 3. Safe sun rules include: Always wearing some type of sun­screen, Avoiding burns by gradually work­ing up a tan, Always using a lip protection pro­duct, Always wearing sunglasses that screen out ultraviolet rays. What is the relationship between poppers and AIDS? One of the first theories abou tAIDS suggested that nitrite inhalants (poppers) disturbed the immune sys­tems of users. Researchers have ruled out poppers as a direct cause of AIDS. But keep in mind that poppers are not recommended by health offi­cials, and they certainly do not have a positive effect on your immune sys­tem and your health in general. For more details, see Montrose Voice issue No. 283 (March 28, 1986). Readers are muited to send theirquestwns on health matters to: The Medicine Chest, cl o Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale, Hous­ton, Texas 77006. Letters should be suf>. mitted anonymously. Announces their Weekly Customer Appreciation Award II This Week's Customer of the Week is: Ben Clark ~ ttGBG> D.J. Lary Thompson HOME OF EAGLE LEATHER 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 18 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 4. 1986 Houston Festival Goes Into Full Swing Stages Presents Realistic Drama with 'Traveler' By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Theater Critic Marsha Norman's Traveler in the Dark (Stages) is not quite a classica] tragedy. The ending is too happy for that. Never the less. it provides a very real catharsis. There is a hero we can identify with-in this case, a very talented surgeon. He has a single, tragic flaw in his personality which makes it impossible for him to make thing"' go right for himself. His frustra­tions grow. His troubles deepen and become more complicated. His. and our emotionl'i, attached as they are to the pro­peller of his attempts going around and around and never reaching proper frui· lion, twist and knot up like a rubber band. Finally, he recognizes his flaw and moves to correct it. He lets go of the prope11er to fix the rudder. Suddenly all of our tensions flow out of us so fast they they take with them many, if not all, of the tensions we brought into the theater from our own pri­vate propellers. That is cathartic relief. Classically it happens too late for our hero. For him, all is lost, but he can face it properly becamie now he understands it. In this play-well, not all is Jost, and we're made aware of the need for mystery , Although the hero is an athei.st, that is not hU. tragic flaw . He's guilty of hubris­excessive pride. Having, from his point of view. seen through an irrational god. he -~et.s him.self up as a rational one. The rule of pure reason in his life has cut him off from many human emotions that he des-gelical preacher. These are deeply felt, well-reasoned arguments on both sides They become neither preachy nor sacha­rine, nor do they lead to any pat conclu­sions. Neither my friend John, an atheist, nor I felt in any way shocked or insulted. We left the theater inspired to our own spirited discussions. These verbal fireworks are blessed with a sen.sational cast. James Black, Charlie Trotter, Sally Edmundson, and young Trent Te1lepsen all contribute pheno­menal , bravura performances. Yet they are always true, I felt, to Norman's poetic imagery. Director Ted Swindley's true metier is realistic drama. This success deserves to be placed beside Bent and Pacific Oi·er· lures as one of his all-time best. o Houston Festival The Houston Festival goes into full swing this weekend. Already, we've been able to see the Allen Parkway sculptures. I think the one with white forms and hedges is quite pretty. I~n't that the first time living plants have been incorporated into one of the works? A major part of the festival this year is r\ew Music America, 1986. This is an annual event ~tarted in 1979. Houston is the first third coast city to host it. The festival ha& always been dedicated to the innovative, particularly to provid­ing an arena for new names in experimen· tal music. This year a panel headed by (uft to right) Sally Edmundson, Trent Tellepsen and Jam•• Black star m "Traveler in the Dark" playing through April 27 at Stages perately needs. Even whimsy is beyond his gnlSp His atheism does lead to some engross­ing arguments with his father, an evan internationally acclaimed. Houston·born composer Pauline Oliveros chose more than 150 compasers and musicians from a field of 700 applicants to perform The motif of NMA '86 is new and widely acclaimed as a designer of stage invented instrumentation. They certainly sets. This year, he will be the only U.S. run the gamut. Next Saturday at the representative at the prestigious Venice Children's Museum, the audience will Biennale. (Left to right) Dr. Petr C. Marzio, director of The Museum of Fine Arts, and sculptor lsamu Noguchi, creator of The Lillie and Hugh Roy Cullen Sculpture Garden, site the placement of selected sculpture in the Cullen Garden, to be dedicated on April 5 make music by playing miniature golf with balls wired for sound. This Wednes­day morning, inside the Astrodome, a composer will use a blimp to manipulate sound. Of course, it's a salute to the Sesquicen· tennial. There will also be an electronic piece about Halley's Comet (performed at the Burke Baker Planetarium this Tues­< lay). The highlight is tomorrow evening. Jean·Michel Jarre will make his first appearance before an American audience. He will be performing in front of a 45-foot tall reproduction of the downtown skyline which will be in front of the Meridien Hotel. From there, he will conduct computer-controlled laser effects, syn­chronized pyrotechnics (fireworks) and mega-projection systems which will turn the real skyline into a huge, magnificent work of art. As Jarre puts it, "The city is the show. The show is the city!" Rendez·vous Houston: A City in Concert will be simulcast on KKBQ so that you can view it from any place in the western half of the city that has an unobstructed view of downtown. It will also be the first commemorative tribute to the 25th anniversary of NASA's Johnson Space Center o Notes Too many things happening! I'll have to delay my quarterly calendar for two or three weeks . . After nearly a decade of planning and at a cost of approximately $3.2 million, the Mue;eum of Fine Arts will open the Lillie and Hugh Roy Cullen Sculpture Garden tomorrow When full, the garden will hold around 30 statues. as well as 99 trees (all native to Texas). On opening day, there will only be 12·15 works from the MFA's permanent cotlection on display. An Ellsworth Kelly sculpture has already been commissioned e1o1pecially for the garden. Plans are also afoot for hosting traveling shows. Tht> garden is only the second one Isa mu Noguchi has ever designed to show off other sculptor's works. The other is the Billy Rose Sculpture Garden in Jerusalem (coni;;tructed in 1960). As well as being a sculptor and designer of outdoor public spaces, Noguchi is "I hope," sSid Mr. Nogucn1, Lmn. when people walk through the garden they will hear a conversation going on, a very quiet conversation between walls and spaces, people and sculptures." The opening is being saluted by a world premif"rc of a work by John Cage. It should fit beautifully because the piece was com· posed with performance in a Japanese. style garden in mind ... Miller Theater isn't opening in April this year. Renovation, including replace­ment of the roof and the stage floor, has postponed the season there bl late May. PR People Shuffle-Kate Grady from Houston Ballet to AT&T and Francis Car· ter from Houston Grand Opera to Houston Ballet. Do-si·do! Auditions: Kemah Shakespeare Reper tory at Stages. Two monologues (one Sha kespeare, one modern). 4 15. 52-STAGE. Also: America, the Musical (Summer production). Risky Buisness. Three songs (one belt, one ballad, one comedy). 416&7 528-3611 !!! Celebrate! Celebrate! Dance to the New music. 4 18114, the American Psychiatric Asso­ciation dropped homosexuality from its list of mental disorders. B'days: 4-Maya Angelou, John Cameron Swayze (Where'd you put the watch this time, John?); 5-Gregory Peck, Spencer Tracy, Bette Davis (But y'are Blanche, y'are!); 6-playwright Susan (Confessions of a Female Disorder) Miller, Billy Dee Williams, 7-James Garner, Billy Holliday, Henry Hay (founder of Mattachine Society); 8-Julian Lennon, JacquE'R Brei, Buddha; 9-Paul Robeson, Tom Lehrer. Baudelaire; 10-0mar Sharif, Harry Morgan. 4/ 7/ 81 , Nancy Reagan, in an interview 1n Th<' Globr, railed homosexuals "immoral, perverted and disgusting." Run rampant! o Openings NMA means New Music America. All NMA's are One Night Only! unless other wis<• noted . That Sad Jar of Atoms (Onwaugh Gallery, 4. 6:00)-0riginal one-act by Max Pearson . Mary Shelly contemplates Byron's casket. Colorful Kite Ta les (Children's Museum, 4)-traveling exhibit from the Smithsonian. New and lmprov(ed) (Denny, HSPVA, 7)-NMA. Houston Symphony Chamber Orches- Montrose Live Freebies. Electric Sky (Burke Baker Planetarium, 8, 2:00)-Tape music works. NMA. Flute Fling (O'Kane, 8, 5:00)- NMA. From Lubbock to Berlin (Dudley Hall, U.ofll., UP, 8)-German compositions. NMA Wdedkind (Goethe Institute)-scenes and songs from the father of the Theater of the Absurd. ONO! John Williams (Jones, 8)-the classical guitarist. ONO! Don't Even Think About Moving (Republic Bank Lobby, 9, ~)-John Rose's IO-hour improvisation on the vi<r lin. NMA. Freebies. Astrosounds (Astrodome, 9, 9:00)­Sonic experiments. NMA Leroy Jenkins (Cullen Center, 9, 11 :30- 1 :30)-Jazz violinist, NMA Freebies. Lunch for $1. Pipes and Strings (Christ Church Cathedral, 9, 5:00). NMA Betrayal (Rice, 9)-Pinter's reverse­time- line look at the eternal triangle. Lone Stars (Heinen, 9)-NMA Electorange (The Orange Show, 10, 5:00)-Barbecue and music. NMA Is It Real? (Lawndale, 10)­Performance art. NMA The Pony Ring (Chocolate Bayou, 10)­Quiet drama of two ex-stuntmen. one's daughter and a drifter Portrait Photography (MFA. !Ol-from the IMO. to the present. Jean· Michel Jar re brings his light and music show to Houston tomorrow night Shrine Circus (Astroarena, 10)­featunng the Flying Gaonas and the Cor­tez Family performing double-wide on the flying trapeze! The Dining Room (Company Onstage, 4)-a panorama of lost WASP gentility. Kinetic Zone (Firehouse Gallery, 4)­NMA, ongoing. Michaela Martin, violinist (Jones, 4)­HSO with Comissiona. Nrw Music Parade (Montrose Blvd., 5, 10;:10)-NMA, Freebies. Ryoanji (Cullen Sculpture Garden, 5, Noon)-World premiere. For Four, or More, or Less(Brown, MFA, 2:00)-performed by The Cambiata Solo­ists and Tam hour. NMA Ella ,Jenkins (Fantasy Stage, 5, 2 & 3:30)-as ~een on Sesame St. and Mr. Rodgers. HouFest. Meditations (Rothko Chapel, 5, 5:00)­NMA L. MiC'helle Brown (Heinen, 5)­Soprano. FreebieR. ONO! Ri<'hard Johnson (Watson Gallery, 5)­AC'ryliC's. Noises Off(Tower, 5)-When I first read this script, I could hardly 8('(' the pages for the third act. I was laughing so hard my eyE>S wrre wat('ring. People were looking at me funny, hut I C'ouldn't stop. The inept cast of an English sex farce takes us through the fin1t of the play-within-a-play three times. Simple Minds (Southern Star, 5)- 0pening of the amphitheater for the sea­son. "Don't You" forget that your ticket is also good for free admission to Astroworld the day of the concert. ONO! Nancy Dreu• and the Swami's Song (Main Street, 6, 2:00). Scribing Sound II (Diverse Works, 6, 5:00)-Exhibit of new music notation. NMA, ongoing. Freebies. Space Citv Blues (City Hall Stage, 6, 7:00)-by Lanny Steele. NMA. Freebies. Hildegard Behrens (Jones, 6)-German dramatic soprano. ONO! Third Annual Houston Cantorial Con­cert (Congregation Beth Israel, 6). ONO! Dreamsounds (Holiday Inn-Houston Downtown, 6, 10:00 p.m.)-Hayman's event for sleeping audience. NMA Ship of Fools (Diverse Works, 7, 2:00)­Jntermedia work by the New Culture Quartet of Sweden NMA Fianoporte (O'Kane, U. of H. Down· town, 7, 5:00)-NMA Noel Harrison stars and Patricia Kilgariff is featured m "Noises Off," which opens at _the Tower Theater on April 5 for 12 performances tra (Heinen, 7)-Paul Kirby conducting, Spnng Au,akenrng (Alley 10)- oboist Phil Alrxandcr soloist. ONO! Teenagers dit-1cover sex and suicide in a Olu Dara and the Okra Orchestra (First repressive C'ullure. City Tower South Plaza, 8, noon)-NMA APRIL 4, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 19 Midtown Video 2043 S.W. Freev.tay at Shepherd 522-2805 Your24 Hour Video Store Vldeo.XXX Movies Super Selection of Gay Flicks Wide Selection Regular XXXX Good Selection of General MOllles We Rent-Self-Trade-Buy No Membership- No Hassle T~AFT~ ~~ v- Al'TOl\IOTIVE Ill 1-1-11 'f'.u~r, :>:!:!-:!190 * Oil Change $2495 * A/C Check & Charge $2695 * Check Cooling System $2795 1><>~ 'T ~ •;ca.•x-r 1n;TsY GENERAL REPAIR AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION ELECTRONIC lUNEUP AIR CONDITIONING ROCK "N I HORSE Newest Women's Bar (Men Welcome Also) Dancing Nightly Country Band Saturday DRAFT BEER 75¢ Happy Hour, $1''° Regular Well Drinks $150 Happy Hour Happy Hour 4-7pm Hours: Tues .-Thurs. 4pm-2am Fri.-Sun. lpm-2am n .os•:n MONDAYS Narene Ktt-ou•ner Kelly-mgr. 5731 Kirby, 520-9910 20 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 4. 1986 Montrose Classified Love!! Lost Love!! Money!! Vegas!! CONFIDENTIAL PHOTO FINISHING Don't take those pictures ol your boy­lnend to the drug store Bring them to Henry·s l-Hour Ptloto. 428 Westhetmer. tor conhdenhal photo de'f'elop1ng and A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frederick Brandt can show you how to have act1ve tun or play passive games with the personal ads In thar book "ClasS1hed Alta1rs. they'll tell you how to write an ad that really stands out. what to expect when you place or ANNOUNCEMENTS respond to an ad. and even what all those SAFE SEX & J/O CLUB H lthy. active. tult1111ng sex, 1-10-1. 3'~~p~o~a~~~~~~108d17ov~.'1 it 33233 LEGAL NOTICES_ __ The Montrose Voice. a general c1rcu1at1on rieW5paper having pubhshed continu­ously for 1 year or longer. is qualified to accept 1egal notices affecting the news­paper's c1rculat1on area of Montrose CARS & BIKES MERIOIEN LEASING Lee Borba. 975-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE Non-smoking male to share Heights home. w1d. privacy. $235 uti 1es 863- 1510 MONTROSE DUPLEX large 1 bf. fireplace. hardwood floors track lighting, cethng fans. m1mb1tnds washer/dryer $35G'mo 529-9910 or 529- 7121 Montrose. furnished. ut111tifl paid nice tbr duple• renovated 1 or 2 mature gen­tlemen preferred $350 523-5147 aftemooris GM s dependable persott to share 2 bdrm apt Weslayan-59 area $200 plus u!lhhes ti60-7956 Sma11 quiel MontrO.e Complex New paint. new double door ice boxes $100 deposit 1 bdrm $285 ptus eiec 529-8178 I NEED HELP! Unemployed In exchange lor lodging. I win do hOusework. yard work. and other domestic chores Call Tom 688-1921 T.red ol paying high rint 1n Montrose? Mo'<le to the ooter-Loop Rents from $210 Payment plans a'<la1lab1e Call Firefox Club Apts 432-0398 Small complex. 1-2 bf available. applian­ces, carpeting. drapes. beautiful garden and pool Easy access to all freeways bus. downtown. Medical Center lbr­$ 280. 2br·S350 plus deposit and uti 1t1es 523-8849 or 862-8037 1920 WEST ALABAMA APTS. 1920 W Alabama. 529-6798 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GREENWAY PLACE APTS. 3333 Cummins lane. 623-2034 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Smais quiet Montrose complex New paint. new double door ice boxes $100 deposit 1 bdrm$285pluse•ec AJsoa'<lalf­able 2 bdrm 529-8178 VOICE: ADVERTISING WORKS Rent thal hOuse or apartment throogh a Montrose Voice Classified Call 529-&490 And charge +I on your Amencan Express Diner's Club. Carte Blanche. MasterCard or Visa EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED AIR CLERICAL Hughts area. $1100lmo Cai. 62~3n ~:~'i(rE~/~~ between lpm and 5pm. WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE AN ACTOR OR ACTRESS No expenence necessary We train Top pay Call Personal Product10ns 954- 1451 see fiersot181S-s100-d8Jy LEADING ART GALLERY Searching for arltst. sculptors. and ceramicists. for 1985-86 calendar Call 529-4648 lor appointment sarb...-cki~artend"erSwanted !or Hous­ton location 649-2177 lea"e message I return cans Frlendshlp!I All ot these things can be yours Use your own personal winners c1rc1e·s numbers 11.000 year old science is now a tool for you Send exact data B11th Name. B1rthdate AM or PM Makes perfect gilt $7 each (7 page chart) II using Visa or Mastercard. send 1nlo from raised print Your check is wel­come The Winners Circle (200M) P 0 Box 111638 Houston. Texas 77293 21 YA. OLD BLACK MALE Maintenance and make-ready man wanted tor luxury condos 1n Montrose area Salary and rental discount for quah- _ tied person Contact Mark Oatsyall tor apphcahOn 523-4403 Slim. attract1'<le. clean cut. is looking to meet single females. or mamed couples Provocat1..,e. soph1st1cated. 1nlelhgen1 passionate. sincere. 5.6 ... 130. clean and sale Just a dnnk. a dance and con..,ersa­t1on or. secret meeting place lor a hot extra spicy. sexual encounter I can han­dle 1tt Heavy. age. race. saze. is no prob­lem. Photo and phone or generous suggestion would be n1cel But not neces­sary Wtll replyw!phototl requested P.S No single males Reply Bhnd Box 284 K Clo Voice - - PERFORMING ARTS Ticket ott1ce personnel sought lulVpart time Exceflent '<le<ba/ slulls requ11ed Base plus comm1:1s10n Car• Ms Knipp after 11am 526-S323 (MISC.) FOR SALE FOR YARD SALES See 9ds undM ··vard sa191· at the end ol the Montrose ClasS6l1ed &~~~~Pu1 ~~nt~rom,:ecl:~·a~;1~~!P~~~ your ongrnal negah'<le allows Top mirl 34. 5·5--;;- seeks M wh011kea t-o do tits Wnte PO 701041 Houston. TX 77270 DOUBT YOUR LOVER? Electronic bugs. hstenmg dtNICe& Kits plans. Catalog $2. Whisper Electron.cs, P 0 Box 270204. Houston 77277 LOVE ADRIENNE RICH? GWF, 22. S's·· 180: educated. loves cats. books. cats_ dancing. mov11•. cats. cook 1ng. seeks one good woman. 20-40 I'm ~~e~;-!16:=.1~11~'~!t ~~~~e,~l~1:1n~~~~ 283-C clo Voice PHONE SEX Our servtce connects Horney Guys 24 hrs a day Do1tnowfor/MsthanS3SOan hour f41S) 346--8747 OuR PC:>ucv on sex-ualiy-ExphcitAd'<ler· t1smg The Montrose Voice do81 not believe that humans engaging 1n consent· 1ng sexual acts with one anothflt' •S immoral. Our readers are encooraged to advertise here to seek relationth1ps encounters. ad..,entures. etc AU adverttS· mg should, however. not contain Ian· ~eu~_:that would offend an unsuspecting ~6~.~~~:?~~b~~i:.~~~~0~~~~a~u~~'b~~~ P-5. 40 Plympton. St , Boston. MA 02118.(Also included wlll be a coupon tor $Soll on your next Personals tnyourcho- ~~~~:! 9v8Jig~flications. mcludmg the PLAY SAFE Sale sex 1s tun. erotic Play safe. tor your sake. tor your partner's sake YARD & GARAGE SALES Garage Sale. 1627 Colquitt. Sat-Sun Noon-ltl HAYING A YARD SALE? Announce 11 here then stand back tor the crowd Call 529-849Qor v1s1t the Voice at 408 A'<londale to place your yard sale announcement MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fn Sat SELECTED EVENTS APR APR IN FUTURE WEEKS 5 Therapeutic Relaxing Healthy Loving Mark-Master of Massage 713-527-9753 TOP TO BOTTOM Relax1ng and soothing deep mutcle mas­sage by bodybuilder 568-2544 - - TAXES GOT YOU WORRIED SICK? Massage !or comfort and health Fitness Exchange 524-9932 RELAX AND ENJOY! The Body Works Massage is back For appointment. call B1 S26-2470 BODY MASSAGE Full body mas.sage Hot 01l-1n or oul Bruce 622-0370 THE CADILLAC OF MASSEURS D ~i.~o1;1~tl 1~k~Jxi PERSONALS GWM, STABLE, 31 A shm and horny bottom seeks non­smoking top lhru 40"s. who·s thick. hung and horny tor deep and sat1sly1ng sale ::ply :~db~xl~~~~er;0 ~~:~onsh1p GWM. rancher. 45. ·s·6.-·: 1-s()lbs. -brown­tbrown who likes country hv1ng. dancing. qu14" times at home. Seells someone who has s1m1lar interests. Must be neat and sincere Reply Blind Box 284-W c/o Voice ~~=~ :;e:Jr:;~~;;~s100 d•Uy part Slender male. 25. COiiege educated wtlh high morals and values Seeking mono- ~~d~e~~11~~sh1p Reply to Bhnd Box PHONE SEX Our service connecls guys 24 hrs a day No models or scnpts Hot hve ad1on Call now (415) 34&8747 4 APR APR APR APR APR 6 7 8 9 10 for ad(lr··•'>l1a1 •flf0ttn11l•on or oho.,.,, ,.,...,~~ lot ..... ," stfld t. ,.N OOk. IOf the 1poNot1ng organinl•,>n under ·orgaruza d Mc it•DM Ctas11l1 Typestyles indicate events· location: Events in Houston, Events of Local Interest Elsewhere. Events of Aleo lnt•est SELECTED EVENTS llTUESDA Y Frnnlrunn"' nm 7pm THROUGH 7 DAYS ;;;;~~m,.'.';~~;.'~;:~~:1~:,"b~;, •FRIDAY .. Breakthrough" League" plays, 7pm le.bian-feminiat program, KPPT. •Apr.8: Lutherans Concerned mttta FM-90. 8:15-IO:JOam TUESDAY, GraC4' Lutheran Church. •FRIDAY: Montroee Country 2'">15 Waugh Cloggers med 7pm, MCCR. 1919 Decatur •FRIDAY: Poela Workshop. Spm Apr.4. A Place in the Sun. 704 Fairview .SATURDAY· KS/ AIDS Foundation meets 3400 Montr~. no. 501, llam &5ATURDAY: Houston Gay Health Advocata med 7:'JOpm Apr. 5 &SUNDAY Houaton Tf'nnill Club annual Eaater picnic &SUNDAY: Montroae Tf'nnis Club plays 10:30am-1 ;tOpm. MacGrt(Jor PMk .SUNOA Y Frmtrunnen run lOam frc:.n Memorial Park Tennia ~nter .SUNDAY Women's bowhn1 league plays, 3pm, Stadium Bowl -SUNDAY WW B Bowbng Lea¥Ue. 6:15. Post Oak Lanes .SUNDAY· Overf'atf'n Anonymous mttt 8pm Montrow Couna.eling Center, 900 Lovett •MONDAY; Frontrunn«• run 6:Xtpm. frc:.n Golf <Anter. HPrmann Park •IN 1 WEEK: MonlrOM Art Allianrf' meets Apr.14 •MONDAY MSA Bowhng. 9pm at Stadium Bowl. 8~ Brae.main fiUESDAY· Lesbian I Gay Rr9ourCf' 8f'rvitt, Univ of Hou11tc•n. mttt11 2;J()pm Apr.fl. Spandlf't<lp Room. Umv Cf'nter. Univ Park lrl'UESDAY· Monlrf.llle Symphonic Band meets Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm Mpr 8: Integrity meeta TUESDAY, Autry Hou8f', 6265 Main lrl'UESDAY: Citiuna for Human Equality mttta 7:30pm Apr.8. 3217 Fannin, 2nd floor rrrtJESDA Y: Houston Data Profeesionals meet.a 7::t0pm Apr. 8 94 Nf'artown Businesa AllianCf' mttta 7pm Apr_ 9. Liberty Bank. 1001 Wmtheimf'r •WEDNESDAY MSA Pool ~ague competition •WEDNF.sDAY: Overeater• Anonymous mef't flpm Bering Church. 1440 Harold lrl'HURSDAY· Fronlrunnen run 7pm from Memorial Park Tennis Center 9TH URSDAY: ''Wilde ·n Stein" gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPl''1' Radio. FM90 9THURSDAY: Avondalf' ANociation meet# 7::)0pm Apr 10. ('hri1ttian Women'• Center. 310 Pacific STH URSDAY· MSA Mixed Bowling Lf'ague bowla. 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 BraeRmain &faK ll(NAAt-X:> OUT INTO THE PIX.LUTING COR'inRTl(lo.J Of 1AAT W,-CfQ'\PINU GRIND oor TIER£, I BREl\f\ll DE£PL '< AND fill l'N SOUL WITH '<0JR NURTURING PURITY •IN 1 WU~K: Nf'artown A111m. 4th annual MontrOKe Homf' Tour Apr lJ.14 • IN I WEEK Mnntr08f' Softball 11al(ue IM'aMJn Ol)f'ns Apr. 13. Lf'vy Field •IN 1 WEEK: Hou8ton North Professionals mt'f'ta 7::J()pm. Apr. 12 •IN t WU:K: MontrORe Symphonic Band spring concert 7:30pm April l:l. Lani£>r School •IN J WEJo;K: MSA Women'• Softball 1-A'ague open• Apr. 14 •IN I WEt-:K. Gay Asians & Frif'nds meet :tpm Apr. 13 •Apr. 16: Gay Political Caucus meet11 ;,217 Fannin, 7:30pm IN I WEEK •IN 2 'NEEKS- Spring Wesfhelmef Cok>ny Alt F•Ovol Apr. 20-21, Houston ~): ChoiCf'IJ mttla lpm Apr. 20. Ma11terMon YWCA, 3615 Willia • 5: Parenta FLAG meet.a 2pm. Apr 20, Pr"'byterian Cf'nter, 41 Oakdalf' ~: Hou8lon Area Gay & labian Engineer• & Scientl8ta mf'et 7pm Apr22 ~: Montrc.e Civic Club (Neartownl meet.a 7pm Apr 22. 1413 Weetheimer • 9: Grf'a~ Montre»<e Businee11 Guild mttU 7pm Apr. 23. Brennan"• Restaurant.~ Smith • Houston Gay Pride Week Committee meet.a 2::J0pm Apr. 24 . Kindr('(f Spirits. 490'.l Richmmd Ave 91N 3 'NEEKS Son Joclnto Doy, April 29 To place an AD in the Montr'ose Voice .. Just phone us! QUICK REFERENCE (THr Out & Post by Phone) A1m-1-to>t1 5~J211 AMBULANCE, 911 C.iy Hau. ni-J011 DOC1or. Ne 1cil of 529-3211 FIRE, 111 Gay POl.11c11 Citucu1. 521· lOCX) Gay & L•b~nSwitchboard--:-529:3211 KS/AIDS F-oundlhon 52• 2•37 ~IWyttr lff adl OI' 529-J2tt lttHly.235-1313 ~onlre&e C1tn1c. Si'".-5~1 Monlr~• cOu,..ehng Ctr_ 529-0037 MONTROSE VOICE r.2i-a.i90- POLICE, 911 Clowlf' W•the~ Pohce Sia 5~3100} ia>1\ 654 4040or236-ii11 T1me ••mp -at11• M•11n Votltl' r99111rat1on. 224-11119 .. 1 JtO Montrose Voice Classified Advertising r~Ot CJ,Y "i ~~v:r~'''~'~,,':.1"o.;;.;:':'.:/';jg";:~ F r~ l•rd l•y dv THE HEADLINES: Headhne words 1n bold type, centered. are $1 each word (minimum $3 per line). (Centered bold headlines can also appear within the text or at the end of the ad. and are also $1 per word. with a minimum of S3per line.) THE TEXT: Each word in regular type is 40¢. (Additional regular words in 'ALL CAPS" or Bold Words not in all caps are 55¢ each_ Additional BOLD WORDS in all caps are 70¢ each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each additional word like this 40¢ THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each add1t1onal word like this 40¢ THESE THREE LINES A LL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLO, $9.00 Then each add1t1onat word l1keth1s is 40¢ ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WOADS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE 55, EACH Addttlon• I bold words !Ike this In text .re SSC H eh ADDITIONAL BOLO, All CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C: EACH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer. make no copy changes during the run. pay for the full run in advance, ~nd deduct 15% Aun the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same condtuons and deduct 25% BLIND AD NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number We'll f~~~~e;!~8~1Jr tgfr;ca:dR~1~:~:f ~r;re:a'g~~~~~~~~ ~g~u~s~~i~~~~~~ecsa~i~1 g~ forwarded indefinitely. however, for as long as they come in.) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mail your ad in or phone it in. You can pay by check, money order. Mastercard, Visa, American Express. Diner's Club or Carte Blanche. Or we'll bill you DEADLINE: Classified ads received by 3pm Wednesday will be placed in that week's newspaper Ads received later wtll be placed in the following week's newspaper ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Btind Ad number, clo Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006-3028. It will be for­warded. unopened. to the advertiser Enclose no money ADDITIONAL NOTES: A ··word" is considered anything separated by ··spa· ces. •except hyphenated words are considered 2 words when each segment 1s a recognized word 1f 1t stood on its own. A complete phone number, including area code. 1s 1 word City, state and zip 1s 3 words bold line bold line text words bold line Use sddit1onsl paper if necessary CATEGORIES 0 Announcements D Accomodat1ons (lod~ing for Houston visitors) o Cars & Bikes ~ ~~~~~~:~, f~~~~ ~~~~~n~s,~~~~~;s~r: D Models. Escorts. Masseurs D Personals O Pets O Aides o Travel D Yard & Garage Sales PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTED AD UNDER _ _ _ • _ IN THE •-GREATER MONTROS6~~~~ifUAi~OPPI NG DIRECTORY, _ bold headline words al $1 each (minimum $3 per line)· regular words in text at 40¢ each ALL CAPS regular words in text at 55¢ each· Bold words In text at 55¢ each. BOLD ALL CAPS in text at 70¢ each Blind ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my ad in 1t mailed to me. $1.25? _ TOTAL FDR 1 WEEK: Times weeks: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S): O Also. I wish to receive The Voice home dehvered each week I have enclosed (or will be billed or charged, as indicated below) an add1t1onal O $29 for 6 months or O $49 for 1 year TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged~ METHOD OF PAYMENT· D Check enclosed D Money order enclosed O Cash O VISA charge D MasterCard charge D Diners Club charge O Carte Blanche charge D Amerc1an Express charge o Bill me If charging, card expiration date Credit card number Signature Name Address Phone(s) for venf1ce1ton of ad. 1f necessary MAIL OR BRING TO Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006-3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 10am-5 30pm APRIL 4, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 MONTROSE RESOURCES ... ~Ti NATORGANIZATION~ Bar Owner. Aun ol T• cBOAT' 720 Brazos~ Aust•n. (512J •72-3J33 AIDS Action Counci~Fedlr1.on OI AIDS Re .. llld Org1n<11t,ons 1115· lnd1p1nd..,c:e Av SE WIShongton 0C 20003. {2121 ~7-3101 G1y & lfllb..., Pren Aun, Poe A. Old Ch•lsNSIA. New YM NY 10011. 121:<') 988-6622 Gl'f A•ghll N.i lobby POB 1892, W11hlngton DC 20013.!202)~6-1801 Hu1T11n Rights CamPl•Qn Fund. POB 1396. WHh •ngton. DC 20013. 12021 ~6-2025 Intl G1y Assn. RFSl Bo• 350. S-10125 SIOCllhQlm Sweden. phone ••6-8 s..i 80 50 l.,.,bdll l'egll Del1t1M. 132 W Ord. New Yor• NY 10039. 12121 &44-9488 lwl).an1G1y R1gn11 AdvOClllS. POB sn AUll•n 78767 N1t Ann ol Bu1•nen Counclts. Bo• 15"5 $a'1 FrW'IC•te0.CA!M115. r•15189$-6Jlll Nat "5sn ol Gly & l1Sb111n DemoC1ub1. 11•2M1u Av SE Wuh1ngton. DC 20003 (2021 ~7-310. Nit G•r Hmlttl Educ Foundlt1on. PCB 1s..i Nf>w YM. NY 100315. (212~ ~IJ or Or G• ... befg 17131523-S2()1 NII Gly A.gt.ts Adwoc:llle&, ~ C.tro, S.., Fran· eseoo.CA9-t11' (•15)tl83<Wl2• Nit Gly Task force fNGTF• 80 Hri Av. New Yo.-11; NY10011.1212l 7'1-5800 NGTF"1 Cr•.n,.. (800> 221-7°'4 1ou1 .. o. ,..._ York Stl!el Rura1 eo.1o1ion_ Clo Wali.F·Zanghl. Boll 611. Blum, TX 76827 Tx Gly'lesblln Thi\ fOtCI. P08 AK. 0..ton 76201.(81713157-8216 USTr1t1~rt""T'"°MllU1JCor>taetSve. lOH·B E Ptk1. S..t .. 91122. (2051 624-82M Hairy menlH81rlarlS adl~st -Into $"2"0o­Ha1r, 59 West 10th, NYC 10011 ATTENTION ORGANIZATIONS Check your tist1ng. We hst here each week name of organization. address. phone. regular meeting dates and times. and ~~~~r~~.~~.~~0~:~1 ~n:~r~ro1~s:~nf~! Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006 THE MONTROSE YOICE-INYOLYEO IN THE COMMUNITY Aid for AIDS. POB6641•---n266~2&-6Q; AnA c.·i);iiaChOf1.111 Ch, =~ )!Christ POB 6673'. 77266, 52B-18~ A Place ,;;-,"• Sui\52"2-7885 ACLU.1236-W Gr1y_$24:5925 AIDS HOf..ne "&'2li=32il (Q&lSw1tchbo1rOI Arnt.-.canG1yAth&C1a.-POe------e6111 77266. ~27· 9255 ..:.1ro-Ra;~wsoc.ety T0t the ·oe.i. s20-0132 (TTYI A~ondeie Assn -Poe-6eos.4 -772«) meets 1 30pm 2nd Thurs. Women 1 Chrlst1•n Ct• 310 Pec•loc :et~~Orrryn·1 M4lgaz_1ne. 6u0 SW FWy •Jli BayOtJ S·1u Singers~ Reibert Moon. d-tr 269$1";;1 ford. 868-308' BermgMit~f,aTUfi,1edMe1hoo111Ch:'rcil. 1440 =~~1~!:re!Zfa~~1S:m"'.3~~Ju~·~to:: Pride Weelo: pel show •Pm Jun 28 Cho.Ce. UfiJ;""m,ied 529:)211 (G&i.Sw1tcht>O.tt;) Ch--;;st;an Chutcti'Oi tti&GOod5hePtlerd:1107 Montrose 1vc lpm Sun. Bible slu<ty 7 30pm Thurs 1MOn£rQ6;) Chuich Offiri11- 1700 Montroi"e 528-1852 Church01Ctm11.-;; -fl11tl18...0-wft1he1m;. 529-1005 sva 10 •51im Sun, Btb111tvcty 7 30p.,.j Wed. Ah Ch"s A Rice, pntor Church Olihe-ROCk~ 5ao-e•56 l~CISun1010.m C111iens -ior-----.:k..,...n Eciuamy CHEI. Poe 30-45 77253.680-3346.937-3516 meet2ndTu•.2414 Gr•mercy Ci9.1 -lesbian Mothers Group. San• •73=3708 ~~:~:;u~-~"''-'C"-"--- C011: i"5-:S-oifre11 &t19r prft. meets et Brazos Rover Bottom. 2'()0 BrHOI. 52&-9192 co-r,.;r;:;-o11Hlofpul)i;'C-H.11th Awarerlets. PCB 3045 77253. 528--6333. 522-508-4 'fiharorig Group for the Worried Wetr meet Fri. 7-apm MonlrOH Cour.ehng Ctr COinmUii-~y -POi,£,C.1-ACt'°" COmm•ttff (C.. PAC). POB 2005. 77252. 236-8666 ~~~~~:~ ~:t~SJo~~~h~f;iro.e. 52°l- COnQre'181~AY1iChiVim~28~1iCe3a-899T meets 2nd & •th Fri. Holiday Inn. 0.1111 Room Main & BIOOgell coup.es GaVf>mie Week p91 lhoW4PmJu"28 Bem1g Church Cr1111 Ho111n9.228:1sos - - ~ni.11M010Pc..526-&834- - 6hW~rO...p-:--4oi"·A;Otld~524-95S4 0.1n1 Foond1i•on. 2700 M.Soii-524:5791 ();gf;'o1)'/HOu fQ'iyCl.thOiicsl. 3217 F1nn1n.52e"7 0111, 523--7644 rnMI & 1oc1el 7 30pm S.I ESOPS -pr,.,ate Prohtui0na1-Soc1et Club. -1'161· 9876 fed...-el'°" ·01 Chir1t•e. United l0t Soc,.TSefv,. ~=•l~~~~~kl:~b~ui;::,:;:,~~~mM~~1?!; Chrnc Montrose Cou1isehng Ctr ls1tJ"n.18r1.1nChurefi.521ofinr.tn-:S26-1571 svc 11 lS.m Sun Fron1runn;n Joe 6204019 or Seivadoi- 529~ 1288 run1 Sun. Tues & Thurs M1mor1el P•rk i::t~'u';'; 1 Gay Pride Week •por11 day l!etill ~--~~~h1rffig E-.perierice (GA5E).S2a: G•Y& l9sbllo Arch1Yes01fli &11111i.1e0111H-1M. G.Y & L96b.an -Mormons_ 1"f1T-WMth9om.r 116CMO. 770Q8, 568-1'13 G1Y&l8sb1.ln Stu0en1Assn11 UolH. Bo-_-3i4 '!,~ Calhoull. 529--3211 !G&l Sw11chbo1rd) G•r & lesb..flSw.1~hboard.-PoB·&M91.7726e ~~!:bs ·~~~i,:'t•on, COUOMhl'lg. relerr111 Gay .Asians & -Friends. 785-3833 or Gil Sw•!Chboerd Gsy F11'*-1 3217Faot'lln 529--0111 G&l.-H•sputot•Unidol.-POB9009;>1, 77260, 521 ~~=·~J':nd21Mon. Dignity Ctr Gsy G.Y Nu,_·;.11 .. nc• 880-94&6 Ga}t -PeoPie '" Chrisl•an Sc•eoce fk.x 6 Bt l••re 77401. 665-26'2 GayPo1.te:a1 C.ucuS !GPCI.~ 77266. 521-1000 meets 3217 F1nl'lln lit&. 3rd Wed. pnm• •Y •ctoon May 3. Gi'y Prooe WMk comm1,11111y 1wards dinner Jun 27. Gay Pncle Week Spoils ParkR1UyJun28 1HouJG1y p;;~;-m;ue._roe~ 77266. St1n ford 523--76« 0t C.thy len11han 868-6256 pul:lliC meetings NJr 27. Jun 1 4pm O.gnoty Clr. G1y Pnctre Weell: Jun 1~29. oom· memorat1on of fl•d on Mary·s (lent1t1vef Jun 20 Sports 01y1Donner1tentat1vel Jun 21. Walk lor UMy (tentat•ve) Jun 22. OJ Sp1notl oent•t•ve) Jun 22. Montro.eAr1Alh1ncee•h1b117 30--11pm Jun 23. 'The Group" lrve theater prnent111on Jun 24. Day ol Rememberance ftent1t•vel Jun 26. Gay & lesbian H1span1ca Un•dol evenl Jun 27. GPC COfT'JmuMy 1wards din1'191' Jun 27. 8ef- 1ng Church ~ncake brea1<.f11t 11am-3pm 1nd pet show 4pm Jun 28. Gre1ter Mol'llrose Bull· 0.1 Guild busi"81s bu•ld'"g woo.shop & trade fair (letitll,.,eJ 9 30l.m·3 30pm Allen Perk Inn Jun 28. Mon1rOMSymphon1cBandconcer1~1en­t• hve) Jun 28. Lower Westhetmer-W1o.1gh Or ~fide 5 J()pm Jun 29. GPC SP<J(ll Park Ralty Jun 29 GrU18r Montrose Bus..neu Guild, Phyll<S fr;. r;: I~~- t!~~;:1 b.~~~~ ~i~r: ph81'd. bolrd~t·ng2ndor3rdTN.lr$_bu1.,,...s bullchng workshop & 1raoe leor ttetitll•ve) g JOam-3 30pm Allen Perk Inn Jun 28 'The Group" theller workshop. Joe wa111522 2204 mee11 7pm Thurs. 01gn1ty Ctr. 3217 F1n­n1n. Gl'y Pnde Week preaen!ltoon Jun 24 H.lttiw•tch ProduchOns. Poe 66242. 77298 I•· b11n concerts. even!I free rn111mg hst .o.m. oph•le ln19rla.1hA1Tilnce. 129 Minor 523= =1~;f~'i3:~~::~-~~~~~~·u:.OB Hou.Bar Ow~sn !HOBO). C.io-BraiOSR;;. Bollom. 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 meets 2pm 2nd Wed HOUCommuno1y ciow-ni:" 862..:S31• Hou COimci1CiiCi~bs. 52&-8054 Hou 081iPml~Sn:6Q22 964-6-i~ meets 7 10pm 2nd Tues Hou Fi.g i Onll c;Orps, 01v1d Wa10.1r pres 152· 2716after6pn'i HOO G.IYH .. 11h A~OC&td.Si~. Burton. 190- 9.ua meecs 7 30pm 111 S11 t-1ou G.:Y S1....o;;,ts Ann, 747-3098 Hou ""ltil9r-~lh -Aiiianc"; contKI through lntegrotyl'Hou Hou "M;;fOl'C:Ycl8"CM>. c10 Ma(y a. 10i2wnll'I.,.. mer. 528-N!i 1 Hou NOrth Prot;i;.-Ona-1i Pee 38..0: Humble 773"7,8•11 •1821·7126 rne9t 73()pm ?rod Sat Hou '"Ch.id~ Gr(:;;p (HOG!. 521·~ or J,rJI 681).314' HOU1iOnl ;;"n;s Cltsb_-R.ch52i~215-1 i)iay-iOiim- 1 pm Sun & 7 30-9pm Thurs. Ho"* Ford Tenf'llS c" ~cf~-r~-1 ~~ s~~~~~;·~or9d~~11 !1~Y tMLrTU_AL_TENNiSevenilslh 1nr1Ua1 ::-U SGliy Open N1t1onel Tenn•s Tourn11ment May 24-26, S.n Fr1nc.isco. 0.y Pr•O. Wee•• sports day (len­tat• vel Jun 211 i/HiriC. POe 160oll.~ff222_ 694-1732"529-1014 •lf~•lled grOUPI Ire Interact e·zzamOI A Ptac;e ., the Sun. Montroee Art Alnanee. G&L Arcti•v• ol Tx. G&l Switchboard_ Mo111rose Symptionic Band. board /Tifft 7 J()pm 1st Thurs (v1ried!OC> honl). ech.lc•tt0n111 forum 7 30pm 3'd Thurs in9&fso11 Spe•ers· &°rell.I. Poe 391 -Beiia;Te 11"n.~4064 ntegrity ttOu(EP,M;()c).111n), P08 -e&ooe. 77266. 524· 1•89 m..is 7 30pm 2nd & "h Mon Autry Houle. 8265 Ma•n n1efict 1ow9f 40 group\.-POB 16041 77222. 89'· 1732 KPFT R•dto. F~-i0.--4-19 Lovell 8ivd 5~ BrHkthrougr( leebclon-fenunlll pgm ft1 8 15· 111m. ··w,lde ·n Stein· gay P9'" Thurs 730- 900pm K5'Alos Founc11t•On. 3311MQn11o.e·-ao.11s.s. 77000. S24-2437 Jerry K•uuma,ricaOC.rfuncS. 17&-.t106 Kr-.We of Hycir.1."811G~Cetlnd:·e;11 Merc1er726- 1032 Liin:lbdaCir Gay A:ieohohca i A1anon. 12iiJo Annie, 521·9772 lesb11in1Gay Resource Svc. Un•ver1;t-y OtHou, 4800Celhoun. boJC 309. 77()0.4 1.i~1253 meet• 2 30pm •rt•n11te Tues. Sp•ndlelop Room. 2nd flOor. un ... ers11yC1r Le1"U. En1erUnn You wnk-.nd. Pr~ Of Hou Council ofClubll. 526-«154 The l•Ule Church 212 F._..go. 522-7695 1¥C1 2 30pm Sun l.v;;;QWii. ..~ c.~.- , "'~,~,-,_...-•12 1s-10pm1 svca 6ptn Sun. ~ l.,n Maon & BlodgMI R..,. JeW!rit leogetl Lone si.r N~ll Group. POB 740572 77'274 lc1wer-weitt1--;;:;:;-.,~i.uOn.802-WeS­theomer_ S29-3100 l'Uth9-•ns CoflCerNid--mtMt1S-i1 Gt.iCiluttlhn Churctl. 2515 Waugh 9-31--06'8 ll1fft 3rd Tues evenings McA~~Cio-k~AiOsFouooet•on "311 MontroM BOJC 1155. 524-2·07 ~.~:~~~ ~~r,1~&1.lw?tc~~~~ meeis b•-,,..eekty ~:~:°t~~c~~;1i~~~~h8~~~~4:e;~- 1uck d•nner 7 )Opm 111 S•t monU'lly SYC:S 10 •sam & 7 1Spm Sun & 7 15prn Wed m9mber· :~..:'~:i!1 ~:•. :. .3 0pm Mon educ•t•on MelropQi;li"n-Pe.ii8ooa111 Church. -686-0290 IYCI 2pm Sun Benog Act•Y•I•• Bldg Mulberry at H1w1horne 1HoUi M11rciPoi1uinW1n0 E~ .. 5~18\0 "'"'' St Slephens EpJSCOP'f Ch\HCh 7 .JO Wed Mon1:roM"A"n-All1.1-1'c8.694-1il1----w:9J14 8* 533Z ett11ta1111H Inc- meet12nd Mon a.y-Pnde Week exhibit 7 30-1 lpm Jun 23 MontrOM Bus ""1eSIGU;W,t see G .. e1er Mi>niroM eu. Gurld MontroM Cm C-:;t; aft Nt..i-toWn Ann MOOl'OMC •n 803HllwlhOrM 52&-5$31 Opell Mon Tue. Thurs 6-9prn Mo,. 9 .~t• If)') ~ •56--8861 me-t 7- )'Tl F M< "R Ct 1919 Oeocatur MonlrOMCounuhog C. r 900Lovetl •2tl:! 529- 0037 AIDS vTci•rn •upport greup 6 30pm Mon WOm91'11 Suppon G•oup 7pm .Tues Mon1rose Singers gay men·s chorus. M•~e526- 3810 Montrose 'SOftb.11-Le&gue:-?0"~77227 524-314' G1y Prode Weell sports oay (tentat1ve) Jun" Morrtrou Sports Aun 1M-5AJ ~espec1l1csub-­~~': f1 Gay Pnc>e- Week sports day (lentat1ve1 Montrose SymphOnlC 6.nd.PoB 66613 772i£ 527-9'54 meet 7 30pm TIMS. D<gmty Clr. 3217 F•nmn 1Hoh11tei.-H Jnc G1y Pr1oe Week concert 1tentahve) Jun 28 MoRE526.MORE 529--0031 •k:ohOhsmootp.1- t•ent 1reetmenl pgm. Pl'orec:t Morttn:•e Counsel· 1ngC1r ~SA M<>iiN;gilt-8cW111;r;Q p1IV .. Stad1vm l•n•. fl200 BrMSm..•l'l Steve 692'"'597 Gl'f Prooe W9" soons ctr,- ('-ntatrvel Jun 2 1 MSA-ThuiSN•ghl•M·xid"LeaPleow1irn;1 Mike w .. t111 e1 913-1351 p1~ 9Qm Stadium l•nes fl200 BtMSrn.•ft Gi'y Pnde WMk Spor11 day 1tentat-1Jun21 ~SA ~S.1iin:tilLeague 0.bb.eSCOri91i. 1358 or Oenn11 Lord 660-6752 Gay Pride Week 1pens dr,- rtentat!V9) Jun 21 MsA:·VO..:..b•ll. Mark-522'.1'69 g1mes "7Pm Tue&, GreQOl')'-l•ncoln school 1101 Tift Gay Pride WHll IPOl'lS day llttf'la!•~e) Jun 21 Mont•Ole W.11cto subgroup Neartowm Assn ,N,1.1.• 0.'\11G..-Heattn EduCi1"°ii-FOUnoe1,0n:, 523- =~~h~~::~1~To;~o=~~~l4~ea- NortoW"1t Ann 1~0rllfO..C rv;c-Cl~b)1413 WeathellTler mee1 7pm 4111 Tues N9W!c-w., ·eut;r;s, All!.0C8--S29-7010 l'Tlft'll 7pm 2nd Wed. liberty Bink 1001 Westhe<mef Nf.~Hoom Christ...., C~urc~ e29Yi.19 86.: 8377 SVCS 1o.m Sun OverN!er1 Anonymous c.o Montrose C°"~ 1ng Ctr 90tl Lo ... n Peggoy II 52frl(l15 meel• 8PmSun. MottrOMeou.....ngCl:r &8pmWed Ber1rig Ctwf'Ch. i•40 Herold P•rent• & Friendl of LnboW & G•iS rPirents FLAG) C64-G663: metllll 2pm 3rd Sun f>Tnbr· 1.-.. ltCtf •10.kd.l+I Perk Peooie C. Neartow-., COmm~nrty -i,.., houle. 741-1524 Pai y Laf,IC,on PoB 600063 i1250------a62= 1476 Prribyt ..... ns "•Orleab••fl Gay Concer• Prnb'(_...,, Ctr 41 Ollt;c:t&1e S26-2584 meet• 7:30pm 2nd Ti* ::':9r~~ ~~presidents GPC1 Pae Recr .. tft -Lindf\lndCCmfTllllee. Aeneg1des i:i:~ Rerwg11des ,;;'Hts•' tie earn-ilo P.c.tic.528- 9427 Club night Thurs R.Ce Ut\•Y Ga;- Letb1aflSuppot1GroUP. 529--3211 !G&L Sw1tchboard1 ROtriko Chapel i.09 Sul ROss.524="9839 - Sh1ntJ Otr; counselo.,g for M.:thfe1ten•n; unes ... 522-508' SOi;ty-tor 2fld Se" (T~n7"<fu1l Coes1 Transv•lrte Chapter. Poe 90335 77090 ~.;iy -.or the P..omatron Ot-Amazc;.;-51i-ci(; Macchts.m !SPASM I Poe 70996. 77270 G&L 5,..,tc~rd529-32", 5Urioaf1Ce C.tue'Co 10011 d~ 'ZO ~Birn 710 Pec"1c 521-!MZ7 h Gly RadeO_ Aiin _ fTGRA)ti()u crwp• 0n ..... 11i' P08 66973. 77006 526--5001 meet 2P'I" Aor 8 K1nored Splr1t1 •902 R1ctwnonct Gi'y PnO. W• speirts c:s.r CtentativeJ Jun 21 ,f,.. ,H..u,".".' riR.;N.:Foun0•1oon ~tt •206 r.-R,Oers ·c:10Ai~--:-7iif&...;..;52,_27"112 Wwe Bow-hr'V Mvr1 ffi.1455 t>ciw~ 7 30pm Sun. Post Olk Bow mg U.nes Gly PrOCS. WMk apcr1:1c:s.retet11ative)Jun21 Wilk for Un 'y GaY"Pn(t;: Wee1t comm;nee a.y PrlCle Wee~ walk '19rltalr~) __ ~ 22 Weslay1n f.CN<st'llp 8£4-8899 W•H1euner Coklny Arts AUn~WMitle1rner n6l 521-0133 Sprmg Art Fest•v•l Apr 19-20 1001 W•l"9tmet Wti".i E .... H1Wenea to -~-J1ne M1•ed ~:111nl 4~f9rw:'.1 ~,::,~~a~~; ~.:e Week 1ports dey lle(llll•vel Jun 21 wo,;;.n·1 & ... l'tigleaoue. ·oe~ 973-1~ Spm Sun St•dlum l•flel. 8200 BrHsrn1m Gey Prtdl W ... sp0r11 d•y (tentaittve) Jun 21 wQ;;.n·1 LObbY AIL .. ~4----c;;eiMi52l-0439 Wom8n~IScfib.ii1 l••P. 5431 p,,,.""de 77008, C.thy or C.roty" 868-6256 Gay ProOe W&ek 1Port1 or,- flentltMI Jun 21. Wom.ns World Setiel l•bof Day w..._end, New Haven Conn WQmYn ~Cl 203.1 No~ i&M;slO ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular ctass1f1ed rates of paying "by the word.· you can purchase space here "by the mch." When buying by the inch. you can include special art, logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1' $29 2'" $39 3·- $49 4 WEEK RATE 1' $24 2' $34 3· $44 13 WEEK RATE 1' $19 2 $29 3· $39 22 MONTROSE VOICE I APRIL 4, 1986 Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory To oO.-Mise 10 this page. con 529·8490 during bu:i.lf"le'>S hours ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep 11 usted here in the Montrose Voice where literally thousands turn each week VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Adver11se your professional serv1cE through a Vo1cec1ass1hed Call 529-8490 Pay by check or charge 11 on your American Express. Diners Club MasterCard_ V1sa or Carte Blanche AIR CONDITIONING Aelr1geration. electrical 5-26~461-7 Sen1cm9 ttu· area su1 years AUTO SAL~S . LEASING FAMILY MOTORS 5210 Buff lo Speedway 667-6804 SEE OUR OISPLAYAO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MERIOIEN LEASING Lee Borba 975-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Also e "Car & Bikes" on Montrose Classified· page AUTO REPAIR All PAINT I BODY SHOP 1510 Leeland. 659-3131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed 2716 Taft 52~3723 Carburetor Specialist EJectncal Repairs All Broke Work WEST GRAY AUTO (TEX STATE INSPECTION) 238 W Gray !528-2886 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSI' VOICE TAFT AUTOMOTIVE ,41 Taft. 522-2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE NEAATOWN KAAZ ,901 Taft. 524-8601 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE AUTO REPAIR I BODY SHOP ~001 Har· Id 5?2-5~· •2t ·1940 BARBER SHOPS . HAIP. SALONS ,-o~7s 8;t,; S"i;, 1 I 302 W 11th at Yale I I (Heights) 863-1520 I Halfcuts $6 & up I Facial Face Lift $750 I L ~:, 1~~ :!":!"!'.:._I Tommy·s B.trb8f Shep Hair cuts S 10 Di: House cailJs $1500 & up Hank; W18fzba ,, now h8fe ••so For ,,,fo 528-8216 ~e:7:_:rb.r Sty11ng 940 Heights Bfvd BODY BUILDING ELITE PHYSIQUE One on one flt,,ess instruction ~aliz1ng 1n body bu1ld1ng (713) 661· BOOKKEEPING See also Tax Preparation·· category CONSTRUCTION I CONTRACTING Midtown A.Jr 521'-9009 HSK CONTRACTING 520-9064 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE COSTUMES All types ol exoi1ccostumes and cioihmg Personally made 726-0412 DATING SERVICE Midtown CrHtlon1 Unique Gins and S9n'lc" 521· 9009 DENTISTS Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhe1mer Hou!o1rin. TX 77rlJ6 Monday thru Saturday Hour5 by Appointment (713) 524-0538 DRAPERIES Jerry K8rr C~stom Designs. draper.es. bedspreads. ballon & Roman shades. m1m·bllnds and verttcals Discount prices 526-7279 ELECTRDL YSIS GEORGINA'S ELECTROLYSIS CLINK: 5959 Westheimer. 266-2698 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE EYEGLASSES TEXAS STATE OPTICAL ~;~; ~·1~e~~rn. 1~~~:Je s2&-t589 & SEF OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 Welch. 528-385t SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GIFTS. PARTY GOODS Midtown CrHtk>n• Unique Gift• and Servlcff 521-tOOI TIS THE SEASON 1966 w Gray tA1over Olk;S) 5~57 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GDURl'l!ET SHOPS SAY CHEESE '3626 Westhetnler I Highland Village) 621- 1825 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GYMS OLYMPIA FITNESS I RACKETBALL CLUB 8313 SW Fwy_ 9aa..8787 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAIR LOSS SERVICES MPB CLINIC 5401 Dashwood #10. 661-2321 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HOME AIR CONDITIONING Midtown Air 5:_ 1, WV'll TIME FOA AIC REPAIR? $25 plu1 l)9rt1. CALL 143-0311 LANDSCAPING D&A Landscaping Commercial· Res1dent1al Home Owner.., Special 988-3418 LATCHKEY LATCH'°KEY SERVICES 524-5295 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE LAWN CARE BETTER LAWNS I GARDENS 523-LAWN SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MrnlCAL CARE STEVE 0 . MARTINEZ, M.D. 2801 Ella Blvd suite G 868-4535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PROCTOLOGY CLINIC OF SOUTH TEXAS 210 West Greens Rd 872-7676 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE IMMUNO-THERAPY CLINIC 704 Medical Towers. 79S.. )98 PROCTOLOGY CLINIC OF SOUTH TEXAS DR. C.E. FONTAN I ER Diseases of the Colon & Rectum * Colonoscopy * Hemorrhoids * Const1pat1on * Rectal Bleeding Medical & Surgical management 872-7676 Answered 24 hours 210 West Greens Rd Houston, TX 77067 MOVING PEST CONTROL RESULTS PEST CONTROL I SANITATION 223-4000 PETS TOM'S PRETTY FISH 224 Weslheimer. 520-6443 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PHOTO FINISHING 1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO WE DO IT ALL' PnnMg and developing enlargements. 1umbo prints. him. Kodak paper 2615 Waugh Dr 520--1010. - HENRY'S 1-HOUR PHOTO 428''1 Westheimer. 529-0869 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PLUMBING CERTIFIED PLUMBING 523-8400 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PRINTING RINN'S SPEEDY PRINTING 1617 W. Alabmna, 527-0027 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SPEEDY PRINTING 5400 Bellaire Blvd. 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SPAS. POOLS SPA-TO-GO 5816 SW Freeway. 772-8646 TAX PREPARATION INCOME TAX RETURNS We Can Savi you tax dollars- and a lot of frustratt0n Tax Consultants ol Houston 46&-6199 TIRES ••• -~" 529-1414 ~ TME11tlE rLAH ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview 3 Blks Wesl ol Montrose TRAVEL TRAVEL CONSULTANTS Complete travelarrangments. 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