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Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987
File 023
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Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 023. 1987-04-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11355.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-04-17). Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 023. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11355

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 023, 1987-04-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11355.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date April 17, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 023
Transcript 22 MONTROSE VOICE/APRIL 17, 1987 New Clue to Why AIDS Develops in Some People By Gayle Young UPI Science Writer NEW YORK—Repeated bouts with colds, flu and other common infections may trigger the development of AIDS in people who have already been infected with the HIV virus, researchers reported Wednesday. Scientists at the Whitehead Institute in Cambridge, Mass., said their studies may prove a widely held theory that the HIV virus that causes AIDS spreads whenever the body's immune system is activated by common, usually trivial, viral and bacterial infections. Eventually, the spread of the virus leads to full-blown AIDS and the destruction of the immune system, the researchers said. "We don't want to leave the impression you get a cold and then get a rampant disease," Dr. Gary Nabel, a researcher at the institute said. "This is a case of chipping away at something over time." The AIDS virus, or HIV for human immunodeficiency virus, can cause no symptoms for five to seven years after infection, although the incubation period is shorter in many cases. During this lag time, the HIV virus probably reproduces each time the body's immune system is activated, Nabel and researcher David Baltimore reported in the British science Journal Nature. They said their laboratory studies indicate the HIV virus lodges in the immune system's T-cells, where they reproduce whenever the cells respond to other viruses and bacteria that enter the body. The researchers were even able to pinpoint the specific protein, identified as NF-KappaB, that is released by the T- cells and which binds to the HIV virus and causes it to reproduce, probably kil- 'My Salary Was So High... I Quit' NEW YORK (UPI)—Workers give all kinds of excuses for quitting their jobs, ranging from a desire to "write poetry on the beach" to embarrassment at being paid too much. A survey released Monday said that 100 ofthe nation's 1,000 largest corporations responded to the poll conducted by Accountemps, a temporary personnel service. It quoted some reasons given by employees who quit their jobs, including: —"I'm going to be much happier as a dog trainer than I am as a management consultant." —"They said I couldn't take short nap breaks twice a day." —"I want to write poetry on the beach." —"My salary was so high, it made me uncomfortable. So I quit." —"They wouldn't let me keep my talking mynah bird in a cage in my own office." —"The job was fine, but it was no place to meet men. Too many of them were bald, with bow ties, suspenders and white socks." —"Now that I won't have any money coming in, I can stop paying alimony." "The results make it eminently clear that the decision to leave a job is not always based on logic and self- interest," a spokesman for Accountemps said. ling the T-cell in the process. Over time, the amount of HIV virus increases while the number of T-cells decrease, Nabel said. "Generally you can tolerate the loss of some cells," he said. "We don't know when someone reaches that critical point where you can say they definitely have AIDS, when they have too few T- cells to ward off major infections." People with AIDS have crippled immune systems that allow opportunistic infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis to invade their bodies. Doctors estimate 30 percent of people who are exposed to the AIDS virus actu ally develop the disease, although they say the percentage may prove much higher. The researchers said they did not know why some people who have been exposed to the AIDS virus eventually get the disease and others do not. But they said the viruses and bacteria that may trigger the HIV virus to reproduce are extremely common. "Our bodies' immune systems are always battling something," Nabel said. Nabel said about one in every 1,000 to 10,000 T-cells is activated when bacteria or viruses enter the body. He said other research has indicated the HIV virus reproduces at the same rate. "There was evidence that HIV replication was linked to T-cell activation, we wanted to find the mechanism," he said. The protein that causes HIV to reproduce is found in all T-cells, he said. "It suggests a steady progression toward AIDS," Baltimore said. "It doesn't suggest any (cure) right away... it helps us understand better what is going on." Nabel said the researchers isolated T- cells in the laboratory and infected them with HIV virus. He said the cells were then prodded into action with a laboratory-made stimulant, but said natural bacteria and viruses would cause an identical reaction. By studying the reaction, researchers were able to identify the T-cell protein that caused the virus to reproduce. High Race Final Line Naturally Starts Venture-N aprx. 2:00pm Finishes at Mary's Bonnet Judging at Chutes 6:00pm Heels requested & Bonnets requested Prizes!! Trophies!! & Blisters!! 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 j^yr G w5 Morning: 7am-Noon Monday-Saturday i_f_S Afternoon; Evening: 11 30pm-l2 30arr Can Beer Si 25 Draft Dorr 75c Well Dr;nks Si 7:: Snois St 25 Lary Thompson, D.J. Home of Eagle Leathers
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