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Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987
File 022
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Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 022. 1987-04-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11354.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-04-17). Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 022. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11354

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 022, 1987-04-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11354.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date April 17, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript Stages Grows with New 'Hair' Houston Live by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice As a whole, Stages production ofHairis, a very, very good show. It's a bit of a mixed bag, really, but any show that can give me the electric cold goose- bumps that this one did several times and winds up with me on a crying jag is a contender. It's its own animal. Director Ted Swindley has paid more attention to the Ardencie Hall sings "Let the sunshine in" in the tribal love rock musical "Hair," playing through May at Stages Repertory Theatre plot than did '67s Broadway director Tom O'Horgan and his assistant Harvey Milk. This may be more like the original off-Broadway production. There was a rumor at the time that it had stayed closer to the script. They beefed up the plot considerably for the movie. So don't expect this to be quite like that, either. Although all three are/ were celebrations, the Swindley version comes off the most critical of the tribe. Through subtle emphasis, he never quite lets us forget that women had not yet found equality—even to the extent they have today. Though relationships with blacks were fairly good, they were a distinct tribe within the tribe with a separate, important agenda which their white brothers do not seem to fully embrace. There is one gay brother, but he claims loudly that he isn't. You have to remember that this was two years before Stonewall. The central character and the real, star of this huge cast is Claude, played by Curtis C. Alfrey. In the O'Horgan staging he as pretty much an innocent who became a sacrificial lamb when he was drafted and then died in Viet Nam. In the movie, the plot's changed so much that he's an innocent bystander, not a member of the tribe at all, really. Then he's heroically saved. In this Swindley retelling, he's a sweet but cor- rupt little boy who finds his real roots, gets the guts to face the truth and dies bravely. In the O'Horgan, Claude's going to war was seen as something of a sell-out, cop-out, almost cowardly maneuver. Hair originally came out in '67. It can be seen partially as that generation trying to explain itself to the '47 generation. That's stated specifically in one of the songs. So it is perfect that we now have the '87 generation examining the work to see what it offers them. The vast majority of this cast is too young to personally remember the period. So we are guaranteed a fresh-eyed reappraisal. But that is not exactly what Swindley envisioned. "As a retrospective, it ... allow(s) us to ask ... how we've changed and how we've stayed the same," to quote his notes from the program. When we enter the theater, we do not realize that those playing the leading roles are sitting amongst us. Then the rest of the tribe pulls them up onto the stage and helps them to change into hippie garb. Chris Kinkaid is a handsome, athletic guy. (You may have seen him oh Channel 5.) So is Berger, the character he plays. But instead of letting them meet, Swindley has erected an extraneous wall between them. Now Kinkaid is a stud playing an older man remembering what it as like to be a stud. Why? Because of this interpretation, the show takes longer to get going strong than it should. Possibly also because of it, some of the songs are approached almost like songs instead of rock. They are examined with the head rather than felt with the pelvis. The singers are in control of the songs rather than vice versa. The rhythms are there but the wildness isn't. APRIL 17, 1987 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 baseball game in Houston, the Houston Stonewalls defeated the Galveston Robert Lees 35-2. Sunday April 19 is Easter. B'days: William Holden, Olivia Hus- sey, J.P. Morgan. 18—Clarence Darrow, Virginia O'Brien, Hayley Mills. 19— August Wilhelm Iffland, Elinor Donahue, Jayne Mansfield. 20—Jessica Lange, Harold Lloyd, Luther Vandross. 21—Elaine May, Iggy Pop, Anthony Quinn, Queen Elizabeth II. 22—Glen Campbell, Eddie Albert, Joseph Bottoms. 23—Lee Majors, William Shakespeare. "But this wasn't the whole story— that wouldn't be fair/ The memory of his beauty deserves better"—poet C.V. Cavafy (born April 17) Judy Tenuta brings her unique comedy show to the Comedy Workshop April 21 in a benefit for the AIDS Foundation There are 26 people in this show. Obviously, I am unable to mention all of them. But Michael Ballard has really grabbed my attention this season, in this and in Do, Lord. He is catching fire and somebody had better build a show around him, fast! It seems like every 20 years or so, something happens that kills scores of Lillian Evans as Myra and Robert G\ Ages" playing through April 26 on the But when these people do get down to rockin', they can tear the joint apart. There's one solo by Mary Hooper that will tear your heart apart. There are chorus numbers that will tear words out of your throat to sing along. (They encourage the audience to come in their old '60s garb.) I couldn't help but sing along on "Three-Five-Zero-Zero" which is about bringing the war back home. Like I said, these people often give men those cold, shivery electric tingles that start in your spine and don't let up 'til the whole body's vibrating and you've got to move something, tap your toe, whatever. And my body shook again, with convulsive tears, when Claude died— especially when they brought on the Viet Nam War Memorial to remind us he was only one of many. But they should have taken it off again. "Let the Sunshine In" was seen not so much as a plea for peace and freedom as it was a curtain call celebratory song. It was quite jarring in an unhelpful way in front of that set piece. ham as Charles in "The Middle Alley Theatre's Arena Stage Americans. The government either is in the forefront when it is a question of war or is lagging behind when it is a question of disease. It never seems to respond in a manner tht keeps its citizens happy. Perhaps, given time, The Normal Heart will be seen as this generation's Hair. □ Notes Don't forget! Judy Tenuta's opening night at the Comedy Workshop, April 21, isa benefit for the AIDS Foundation. Also, April 21, is the 10th anniversary of the opening of Annie. It's also the night they've planned to open the sequel, Annie II. I kid you not. The Park, that lovely mall downtown, is celebrating the Symphony with special decorations and events April 21-25. Chrysalis Reportory Dance Company is touring to Austin this week. □ Celebrate! April 21, 1887—In the first recorded □ Openings The Chi-Lites (Rockefellers, 17 & 18)— The silver anniversary tour Crimes of the Heart (Theater Suburbia, 17) One Enchanted Evening (Music Hall, 17 &18)~Newtown Wayland conducts the Hosuton Pops in music by Richard Rodgers. Kid City Waterways (Main Street Theater, 18, 2:00 p.m.) Marimba Magic (Zoo, 19, 2:30)— Freebies. ONO! Hal Tennyson's Big Band (Tranquility Park, 20, noon)—Freebies. ONO! Judy Tenuta (Comedy Workshop, 21)—top-notch punk female comedian Fantasy Island (Houston Center for Photography, 22)—slide lecture by painter and sculptor Fletcher Macky. ONO! Jacqueline Simone (UST Bookstore, 22)—reads from her short fiction. ONO! Texas Troubadors (Main Street Theater, 22)—different vocal singers each Wednesday Arnette Cobb Jazz Quintet (Jones Plaza, 23, noon)—Freebies. ONO! Asleep in the Deep (UST, 23)—world premiere of Pat Cook's newest murder mystery Donovan (Rockefellers, 23 & 24)— Season of the Witch Kind Sir (Actors Theater of Houston, 23)—A Broadway star falls in love with a rogue who is pretending to be married so he won't actually get caught. The Marriage of Figaro (Heinen, 23)— one of the funniest operas ever written Norma (Jones, 23)—Houston Grand Opera presents Ghena Dimitrova as a woman whose thirst for love threatens to destroy her and all she loves. Bellini's bel canto masterpiece. Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose Classic QBesigm of'Houston FLOWERS & GIFTS European and Tropical Cut Flowers, Plants, Fruit & Gourmet Baskets, Imported Chocolates, and Stuffed Toys Available. 1811 Indiana at Dunlavy 523-3791 Major Credit Cards Accepted
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