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Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987
File 017
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Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 017. 1987-04-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11349.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-04-17). Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 017. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11349

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987 - File 017, 1987-04-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/11362/show/11349.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 338, April 17, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date April 17, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript 16 MONTROSE VOICE/APRIL 17, 1987 'Campus Man' Goes Beneath the Flesh Todd (John Dye/ enlists the aid of some photogenic college athletes for his student calendar in "Campus Man" Houston Screens by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice "Preaching to be saved." How often have we heard that phrase? People with a message try to get it heard by winding up feeling that the only people listening to them agree already. The producers of Campus Man seem to have gone a long way to avoid that situation. From their advertising, I was led to, expect a cute, brainless little exploitation comedy featuring not a lot of plot but lots of hot male bodies. And for the first 20 minutes or so, we get just that. Our heroines, Kim Delaney and Kathleen Wilhoite, are sitting around the pool watching breathtaking men, especially Steve Lyon, do very aesthetically pleasing high dives (Though Lyon has a double do his actual dives, there is no way to tell it from the film.). Stretched out around them, for variety, are willowly blond boys. This gives Lyon's roommate, John Dye, ideas. He will produce an all-male pin-up calendar for the ladies—a salute to sports. With that, we get some very tasty shots of photo sessions with lots of flexing muscles. Then, after they've got us caught, the filmmakers pull the old switcheroo. We get to the meat of the movie, the real thought-provoking comedy that was hiding under that sheep's clothing. This is actually a show about the consequences of exploitation. So, you see, director Ron Casden and friends have enticed into the theater the very people they want to talk to. Not only that, they've given them an opening that will get them to forgive nearly anything. And if they ever feel they're starting to lose us, they can always have Lyon, who has been an Ail- American linebacker and a GQ cover model, take his shirt off. Or tease us with Miles O'Keefe. Remember Bo Derek's Tarzan? He's here as the older, slightly sinister bad man to spice up this steady diet of young innocents. But he never does take his shirt off. I guess that's to prove that Casden isn't giving us exactly the kind of entertainment he looks upon critically. Now, for those of you who don't like beefcake, this movie is good comedy- drama. Although this is an entirely fictitious story, it was inspired by Todd Headlee, an Arizona State University student who created the first male pin-up calendar. In honor of him, and because it's an interesting location, the movie was made at A.S.U. Headlee produced the calendar five years ago. It takes a willing suspension of disbelief to accept that, in the movie, this savvy marketing student has his independent brainstorm just last year. Then, to further stretch our credulity, although Dye is having a lot of trouble selling the calendars in Tempe, one of them just happens to show up on the desk at a magazine in New York. Morgan Fairchild, the editor, decides that she must have Lyon as her "Man of the '80s." It means a very lucrative yearlong contract. V'i;'£"_J. lf-fr Mark Hammon, in his first motion picture starring role, plays a gym coach pressured into taking charge of a remedial English class during summer session in "Summer School" Dye is very proud of what he's done for his friend, but Lyon doesn't want it. Years ago as kids Dye introduced him to diving. Now he's a top-notch college diver with a chance at the Olympics. How can Dye take back the dream he gave him? For this will jeopardize his amateur tanding. And their friendship, too. The women are there for the romance and to help instruct the men's consciences. By the way, keep an eye on Delaney. I got confused and wasn't always sure she was the same woman. This movie is really about friendship. It's also the closest we're likely to get to a sports movie about diving. There are some beautiful dives, lovingly photographed. □ Film Clips There will be a one-night festival ofthe works of explorer, filmmaker and underwater cinematographer Jack McKen- ney at the Adams Mark Hotel next Friday. He will take time out from shooting Jaws IVto fly up from the Bahamas and attend a 6:30 cocktail party before the screenings. Info & tickets: 661-6080. week and letting the Houston International Film Festival take its deserved spotlight stage center. Everything is going to be so fresh at the festival that as I prepared this column, they were not sure what's happening when. They will by this weekend. Calendars will be available at participating theaters like the Greenway III or the Museum of Fine Arts. On the commercial scene, the only thing I'm sure is coming out this week is Project X. It stars Matthew Broderick and concerns a chimpanzee who has learned how to speak in sign language. A few things are happening on the art Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello, their days as "The Big Kahuna" and "The Queen of the Sand" a fading memory, contemplate a return to the fun and sun in "Back to the Beach" Paramount Pictures is celebrating its 75th anniversary this summer with, among other things, reruns (Beverly Hills Cop II), retellings (The Untouchables) and returns. Yes, Annette Funicello and Frankie Avalon go Back to the Beach. There's a brand new Carl Reiner comedy starring Mark Hammon in his show circuit: Liquid Sky (River Oaks, 17 & 18) Menage (River Oaks, 22 & 23)— French black comedy Charulata (The Lonely Wife) (Rice Media Center, 23)—film by Indian director Satyajit Ray A Home for Ladies (Goethe Institute, 23)—Eberhard Fechner interviews 16 Jimmy Garrett (Mathew Broderick), a young Air Force pilot assigned to a top secret military training program, becomes involved in a suspenseful adventure with a highly intelligent chimpanzee named Virgil, who has been taught to communicate in sign language in "Project X" first starring role in a movie, Summer School. □ Curtain Up Everybody's sort of sitting back this retired Catholic noblewomen about the history of Germany since Kaiser. In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voice
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